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M A G A Z I N E 55 August | September 2013

HTML to InDesign

n The Case for QR Codes n How to Make Great-Looking Lists n Turn InDesign Into a Font Creation Tool!


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MAGAZINE

PUBLISHERS David Blatner, Anne-Marie Concepción EDITORIAL Editor in Chief Mike Rankin, mike@indesignmag.com Managing Editor Wendy Katz, wendy@indesignmag.com Senior Editor Sandee Cohen, sandee@indesignmag.com Contributing Writers Diane Burns, Nigel French, Scott Citron, Jeff Gamet DESIGN Rufus Deuchler rufus.deuchler.net PRODUCTION Matt Mayerchak www.mayerchak.com BUSINESS Contact Information www.indesignmag.com/contact.php Subscription Information www.indesignmag.com/purchase.php Published by InDesignSecrets.com, a division of Publishing Secrets, Inc. Copyright 2013 InDesignSecrets.com. All rights reserved. Reproduction and redistribution prohibited without approval. For more information, contact permissions@indesignmag.com. InDesign Magazine is not endorsed or sponsored by Adobe Systems Incorporated, publisher of InDesign. InDesign is a registered trademark of Adobe Systems Incorporated. All other products and services are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners and are hereby acknowledged. Photos on pages 19 and 31 courtesy of Fotolia.com

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From the Editor in Chief Greetings and welcome to issue 55 of InDesign Magazine! Back in issue 53, we had a great article by Michael Murphy on the best practices for exporting HTML out of InDesign. And in this issue, Michael’s back with the other side of the story, showing four strategies for bringing HTML content into InDesign. Speaking of strategies, if you’ve ever needed to apply different masters to your document pages, you know that can be a troublesome job. So David Blatner’s here to give you the best strategies and step-by-step instructions for how to swap master pages. The ability to create QR codes is one of the most intriguing new features in InDesign CC, and Sandee Cohen’s article The Case for QR Codes covers not just how to make them, but why you’d want to, and where QR codes are being used today (hint: nearly everywhere). I chipped in with an article that reveals some of the inner workings of InDesign’s Check Spelling features. After you read it,

you’ll never wonder again why it can seem like InDesign randomly bounces from page to page during a spell check. And you might be able to spell check faster than ever, thanks to a few undocumented keyboard shortcuts. Nowadays, it’s impossible to look at a newsstand without being bombarded with cover stories featuring lists. Fortunately, Nigel French has you covered in this issue’s InType, where he offers tips for making all kinds of numbered and bulleted lists that look great. Scott Citron reviews IndyFont, an incredible script that you can use to make custom fonts right inside InDesign. Diane Burns gives us an inside look at how Yoga Journal made the leap from print to iPad with the help of Adobe DPS. And as always, Jeff Gamet’s InBrief features the coolest new fonts, extensions, and other goodies for InDesign users. Enjoy!

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InSide: Table of Contents 7

From HTML to InDesign Michael Murphy shows you everything you need to know to efficiently bring HTML content into InDesign.

58 InDesigner: Yoga Journal Diane Burns looks at how one popular magazine has made the leap from print to digital with Adobe DPS.

20 The Case for QR Codes Sandee Cohen looks at the many uses for QR Codes, as well as how to create and edit them.

65 InBrief: New & Improved Products Jeff Gamet keeps you up to date on products that are new, improved, and interesting to InDesign users.

31 A Closer Look at Check Spelling Mike Rankin investigates the inner workings of InDesign’s Check Spelling feature and reveals why it sometimes takes you bouncing back and forth through a document.

69 InDex to All Past Issues Download the InDex and discover what’s in all the past issues of this magazine.

36 I nStep: Swapping Out Master Pages David Blatner demonstrates strategies for applying different masters to document pages. 45 I nType: Learning to Love the List Nigel French shows how to work with bulleted and numbered lists and make them look great. 52 InReview: IndyFont Scott Citron reviews an amazing scripted solution for creating custom fonts right in InDesign.

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“I co d u the amn tra ldn’t ha QR c mpo v ode code line e gotte s n a a s s trou I would nd the v semble that d wi ble w ideo have thou s i . b t h e W en in – Ad Mrs t i t h o obe Kitch ut th a wh S ener o on th enior o and le load se Prod e inc o the u iden kids f t tha ct Mana !” ge featu t inspi red t r Chris K re in he it InDe sign new QR chener CC code

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From HTML to InDesign Four paths that will help you bring HTML content into InDesign and preserve its formatting . . . somewhat.

by Michael Murphy INDESIGN MAGAZINE  55

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T

he future of publishing may rest upon HTML. Whether or not that’s true, only time will tell. But there’s no denying that a vast amount of content has been structured and formatted in HTML. Typically, our challenge as designers is getting content out of InDesign as HTML, a task which I covered in my article “InDesign to HTML” in the April/May 2013 issue of InDesign Magazine. But there may also be times when we’re called upon to do the opposite—to take HTML content and bring it into the realm of print or PDF through InDesign. Currently, there’s no method for directly importing HTML into InDesign, but there are a few “unofficial” paths for bringing HTML in and preserving much of its structure and formatting. Whether your preference for tackling this task is down and dirty, methodical and geeky, or somewhere in between, at least one of the approaches in this article should help you get your HTML into InDesign—and, with one exception, won’t require spending a dime, except for the cost of your own time. None of them are perfect, but they beat starting from scratch. Bear in mind, too, that my goal here is not to take a full web page layout and recreate it in InDesign. These methods bring in only the text content from the HTML. As a markup language, HTML identifies different types of content, like headings, paragraphs, and lists. The formatting of that content is described by code called a Cascading Style Sheet (CSS).

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The content and its formatting instructions are brought together and rendered by the web browser. Your challenge is to bridge the gap between the code and InDesign using one of the following four methods.

Method #1: Copy, Paste, and Hope for the Best Upside »» Free »» No prep up front »» Type formatting (somewhat) preserved Downside »» No styles generated for pasted content »» Bolds and italics are lost This option requires the least amount of up-front effort but comes with a huge “your mileage may vary” disclaimer. Open an HTML file or web page using your web browser, select all of the desired copy in the browser, and copy it to the clipboard. Browsers will differ in how much, if any, formatting they preserve. For example, Safari on the Mac will retain much of the formatting you’ve copied, while Chrome preserves nothing. On the Windows side, the current version of the much-maligned Internet Explorer does probably the best job of all.

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Figure 1: The Clipboard Handling area of the Preferences dialog box is where you tell InDesign whether or not you want formatting from the content of the clipboard to be preserved. In an HTML-to-InDesign workflow, you want All Information selected here.

Before pasting what you’ve copied into InDesign, however, be sure you’ve set your clipboard handling preference (Preferences > Clipboard Handling) for “When pasting text and tables from other applications” to “All information (Index Markers, Swatches, Styles, etc.)” (see (Figure 1). Otherwise, the content will come in as unformatted text. When you paste the copied text into InDesign, you’ll see some measure of the formatting preserved, depending on the browser you copied it from (Figure 2). In most cases, all text will come in

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Figure 2: Online article content selected in Safari on the Mac

with “No Paragraph Style” as its style, with all other formatting treated as overrides, and no character styles will be created (Figure 3, next page). However, Explorer for Windows manages to hang on to heading attributes (H1, H2, etc.) and hyperlinks well enough that corresponding Paragraph Styles for H1, H2, and so on will be created, along with a Hyperlink Character Style.

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Figure 4: Automatically generated (and very clinically named) paragraph and character styles in their respective panels after running the Auto Create Paragraph and Paragraph Styles script.

Method #2: By Way of Word Figure 3: The content from Figure 2 pasted into InDesign. Some formatting is lost (specifically, bolds and italics), but the fonts (Georgia and Verdana) are preserved, as are the sizes of the body text, headings, etc. No paragraph or character styles have been applied.

From this point on, building the styles you want is up to you, but you’ll have the formatted text as a visual reference. To speed things up, you could download and install Thomas Silkjaer’s Auto Create Paragraph and Character Styles script. The script examines the formatting in the document and then creates and applies paragraph and character styles to the text. It does quite a nice job of keeping the number of styles to a minimum, too. The styles are generically named—AutoStyle1, AutoStyle2, and so on (Figure 4)—but renaming styles is a lot less work than creating them manually.

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Upside »» Free (unless you don’t own Word) »» Translates most tags and classes into styles Downside »» Word can be very fussy about opening certain URLs You can use Microsoft Word to act as a bridge between HTML and InDesign by using Word’s Open URL feature (File > Open URL). Simply enter a URL into the field, and Word captures the content from the destination page. One thing to note is that Word doesn’t resolve the “friendly URL” scheme (i.e., /name-of-article-all-spelledout/) used by most sites today. It considers those URLs to be

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directory names, and Word needs a filename—preferably, one ending in “htm” or “html.” To get around this limitation, go to the web page and use your browser’s Save As command to save the content as “source”—meaning the actual HTML markup and content—and then open that saved “.html” file with Word. Don’t expect Word to get the formatting right, however—the page won’t look like it does on the web when its content arrives in a Word document (Figure 5). That said, Word does an excellent job translating most HTML tags—headings, lists, etc.—into paragraph styles (Figure 6, next page). In addition, paragraphs in the HTML with class attributes in the <p> tag result in Word paragraph styles named to match those classes. For example, text enclosed with a tag like <p class=”author_name”> will produce a Word style of “author_name.” Generic paragraphs get the basic “Normal” (or, sometimes, “Normal (Web)”) style applied. Bolds, italics, and hyperlinks automatically produce “Strong,” “Emphasis,” and “Hyperlink” character styles, respectively. However, this method might bring more of the web content into Word than you want. Site navigation options, sidebars, and page footers will be in the document if you’ve saved the entire web page. In that case, simply select and delete those elements from the Word file, and then choose File > Save As. Give the file a name, and save it in either Word format (.docx) or Rich Text Format (.rtf ) by choosing the appropriate option from the Format menu in Word’s Save dialog box.

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Figure 5: The same article from Figure 2 as it appears when opened in Microsoft Word. Fonts, type sizes, and colors are lost, but heading structure, bolds, and italics are intact.

When you import the Word or RTF file into InDesign, the styles will come along with it (Figure 7, next page). Be prepared, however, that you’ll find overrides in abundance, and you’ll need to spend time cleaning up and redefining your styles. Word does an okay job, but it will get a lot wrong, especially if the incoming HTML isn’t clean, logically-ordered, and standards-compliant. Also, don’t expect

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Method #3: Get Hard-core with Hard Code Upside »» Offers the most control; leverages existing markup Downside »» Might be too geeky for some users; requires multiple steps; tables get very tricky

Figures 6: Word’s Styles palette showing styles based on the HTML tags, including “Heading 2” (translated from the <h2> tag) and a style called “byline” generated from a class attribute (<p class=”byline”>)

Figure 7: InDesign’s Paragraph and Character Styles panels, showing those same styles after the Word file is imported

to get a perfect representation of HTML content in InDesign. The best you can expect to achieve is greatly reducing the amount of manual re-formatting required, along with maintaining the content hierarchy, most style designations, and your bolds and italics.

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The method that gives you the most control over your HTML-toInDesign conversion also requires a more hands-on approach to working with the source HTML. In this case, you’ll employ the power of GREP Find/Change to simultaneously use the HTML markup to apply styles and strip out that very same markup. The best thing you can leverage from HTML is its structure and consistency—unless you’re working from very sloppy HTML that doesn’t comply to web standards, which we’ll assume is not the case here. Anything consistent and structured can be dealt with very effectively with some relatively simple GREP Find/Change operations. First, you need to get to the source HTML. From most browsers, this is as simple as choosing File > Save As and choosing Page Source (or Source, or HTML, or other words to that effect). Once saved, the HTML file can be opened by any text editor (for example TextWrangler on the Mac, or Notepad on Windows). From there, you

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can select all of it (or just the portion you want), copy it to the clip<strong>(.+?)</strong> will find all text tagged to appear bold. board, and paste it into InDesign. These are just a few of several searches (Figure 8) you’ll need to run Before moving on, you’ll want to take a look at the HTML to look to find the different content and its tags. for how many different types of markup tags you’ll need to deal So what do you do with the text once you’ve found it? First, make with (and therefore styles you’ll need to create). For example, some sure your Find/Change dialog box is showing all of its options by markup is highly semantic, meaning that it’s simple and relatively clicking the More Options button (if you see a Fewer Options butfree of class attributes. Some HTML will rely quite a bit on classes. ton, you’re already seeing everything). Next, enter the appropriThat’s tricky, because you’ll need to create separate paragraph styles ate expression in the Find What field of the GREP area of the Find/ for each tag (H1, H2, P, LI, etc.), with and without classes, and a charChange dialog box. If you’re using expressions like the examples acter style to correspond with each <strong> and <em> tag, plus any above, the (.+?) portion of the expression refers to the text you <span> tags. Initially, those styles don’t even need to be defined with want to keep. Literally, it means “any one or more characters, but the anything other than a name. Attributes can be added later, but the shortest match.” styles themselves need to be present in the document before you In the Change To field, just type $1, which will put back the text can start practicing your GREP magic. found within the HTML tags, but will discard the tags themselves. Once you’ve created the necessary Find What Change To Change Format style to apply styles, you can open the Find/Change dia<h1>(.+?)</h1> $1 Your level 1 heading style log box, choose the GREP tab, and start <p>(.+?)</p> $1 Your main body copy style searching for specific tags and the text <p class=”class_name”>(.+?)</p> $1 Your corresponding paragraph style <strong>(.+?)</strong> $1 Your Bold character style that appears within them. For example, <em>(.+?)<em> $1 Your Italic character style the regular expression <h1>(.+?)</h1> <span $1 Your corresponding character style will find the level 1 heading, including <li>(.+?)</li> $1 Your bulleted or numbered list style its tags, and <p>(.+?)</p> will find all Figure 8: Examples of the most common GREP Find/Change operations you’ll need to run on HTML pasted into InDesign. of the text in any single paragraph along Depending on the complexity of your HTML, there may be many more, but most will be some variation of these relatively with its surrounding tags. A search for simple expressions.

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(Technically, it “puts back” the part that was inside the parentheses.) Then, click the small icon to the right of the Change Format area at the bottom of the Find/Change dialog box and, in the resulting window, select the paragraph style you want to apply to the found text. For example, if you’re searching for text within the <h1> and </h1> tags, you’d choose your level 1 heading style—whatever you’ve named it. When you click Find, then Change (and I strongly suggest testing this by changing one or two before committing to Change All), InDesign will put back the text within the opening and closing tags, apply the style you’ve specified, and delete the tags, leaving you with styled text without any surrounding tags. Dealing with hyperlinks In this method of processing pasted HTML, removing the markup for hyperlinks while preserving the link information requires a three-part process. First, choose Convert URLs to Hyperlinks from the Hyperlinks panel menu (or choose Type > Hyperlinks & Crossreferences > Convert URLs to Hyperlinks), and then click Convert All in the resulting dialog box. InDesign will add all of the links it detects as Shared Hyperlink Destinations and will automatically apply them to the URLs within the link anchor tag. However, the text between the markup (the tags) won’t have the newly-created links applied. That task falls on you.

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The fastest way to find all the text within the anchor tags is to run a GREP-based Find/Change for any text preceded by a closing angle bracket and followed by a closing anchor tag. That expression— (?<=>).+?(?=</a>)—will select the content of the link tag but not the tags around it. For each search result selected, choose the desired hyperlink from the pull-down menu in the Hyperlinks panel, and then click Find Next in the Find/Change dialog box to continue on to the next result. Repeat this step until you’ve processed all the links. Finally, once all the desired text has hyperlinks applied, you’ll want to remove the original markup. Here again, it’s easily done using GREP. In the Find/Change dialog box, on the GREP tab, enter the expression </?a.*?> in the Find What field, leave the Change To field empty, and then click Change All. That removes every opening and closing anchor tag, leaving you with working InDesign hyperlinks on the remaining text.

Method #4: Seek Professional Help Upside »» More automated than any of the other methods Downside »» Out-of-pocket expense (but relatively low); results can be unpredictable with complex content

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Sometimes the best solution is one someone else came up with. No one can know or do everything themselves, and there are a lot of very smart people out there creating solutions that fill in the gaps of InDesign’s feature set. One such solution, Rorohiko’s FramedWeb plug-in for InDesign ($39.00), tackles this very problem.

Sometimes the best solution is one someone else came up with.

paragraph styles in the process. The more complex the page, the less successful the plug-in tends to be. On the other hand, it does extremely well in parsing source HTML (the actual markup) you paste into InDesign, especially if you grab only the desired content (for example, the body of an article without all of the surrounding web page elements) and run the plug-in on that (Figure 9 and Figure 10, next page). FramedWeb creates paragraph and character styles from the imported HTML in a way that is very web-like. The “cascading” part of CSS refers to the method of controlling the most text at the root level of a style definition and then describing only variations to that root style where needed. All of the paragraph and character styles FramedWeb generates are based on a top-level style called HTML, and styles are arranged hierarchically using style groups to

FramedWeb contains both an HTML parser and a CSS parser, and it allows you to create styled InDesign content from a URL, a local HTML file, or HTML copied and pasted into InDesign. Of the three methods, the first is the least reliable, which isn’t surprising considering that it’s the most ambitious. FramedWeb allows you to type a URL into an InDesign text frame and then choose Convert Web Content from the API menu (which is where Rorohiko plug-ins usually live). The plug-in goes to that URL, parses and gathers its content, and brings it Figure 9: Once installed, FramedWeb adds an API menu and FramedWeb submenu to InDesign. When placed HTML or a URL is selected, the Convert Web Content option runs its HTML and CSS parser to convert the destination page or pasted into InDesign, generating character and HTML to styled text and remove all extraneous markup.

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Turning Grayscale to Color in Photoshop | CreativePro.com

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Turning Grayscale to Color in Photoshop

Written by David Blatner on July 12, 2013 Rating:  Select ratingGive it 1/5Give it 2/5Give it 3/5Give it 4/5Give it 5/5 Body:  When it comes to creating multitone images, it’s common to think of using the Duotone mode. But just because you want a multitone doesn’t mean that you need to use the Duotone mode to get it. In fact, you can often get just as good results by manipulating a grayscale image in either the Multichannel mode or the CMYK mode. There are, however, pros and cons to each technique. File size. An image in Duotone mode, whatever the number of inks, is saved as an 8-bit grayscale image along with curves. CMYK images, then, are four times the size, because each pixel is described with 32 bits of information, even if you’re using only two channels. Similarly, a two-channel multichannel file is twice as large as a duotone. Single-color areas. In Duotone mode, there’s almost no way to create a single area in which only one color is present. For example, it’s a pain to make a 20 percent blue square in the middle of an image, without black also printing in it. However, this is easy to do in any other mode. Blends. There’s also no way to create a gradient blend between two spot colors while in Duotone mode. In CMYK mode, it’s easy. Outputting images. When you output a multitone image, the mode it’s in may have an impact on your output process. For instance, you probably cannot transfer an image in Duotone mode to a high-end imaging system. Also, because duotone images must be saved in an EPS or PSD format (see “Saving and Output,” later in this chapter), you cannot take advantage of any tricks your page-layout software may be able to do with TIFF imag-

es. Adjusting tone. In Duotone mode, you can always change the duotone curves without affecting the underlying grayscale image data. That means you can quickly repurpose the image to a number of different output devices. Or, if your art director decides to print with green instead of yellow ink, you can quickly change the tonal curve to adjust for the difference in ink density. On the other hand, if you’re creating multitones in CMYK mode, you may be changing the image data in each channel, so you want to minimize the number of adjustments you make to avoid image degradation (or use adjustment layers). Working in CMYK mode, however, gives you the chance to actually see (interactively) how your curves are affecting the image data. And you can use features like the white-and-black-point clipping display in Levels to make decisions about your curves. This can be very helpful, especially when making small tweaks to the curves (see Figure 1). Figure 1: Grayscale reproduction with the four process inks Screen representation. Photoshop knows how to represent most spot colors reasonably well on screen when you’re in Duotone mode. However, if you’re creating spot-color multitones rather than process-color multitones in CMYK mode, you may have to ignore the colors you see on the screen (which are RGB representations of CMYK colors).

Converting Grayscale Images to Color

Because a multitone image typically represents a grayscale image using color, you generally begin with a grayscale image. In this article we’re discussing using CMYK to create duotones, so you’ll want to switch your image from Grayscale mode to CMYK mode. You can use two methods— simple conversion or copying into a new file. Simple conversion. You can simply switch your image from grayscale to CMYK using the Mode menu. However, many people seem to think that this simply adds three new channels (cyan, magenta, and yellow), and leaves all the grayscale information in the black channel. Not so. Photoshop uses the color settings preferences to convert neutral grays into colors. The amount of black generation (based on the profile or Custom CMYK setting you’ve selected in Color Settings for CMYK) determines what appears in the Black channel. You can use Custom CMYK as an equivalent to creating a quadtone using the Duotone dialog. We rarely use this method; it’s clunky and just about impossible to make adjustments to each plate after the conversion. Plus, Photoshop separation curves are not designed to expand the tonal range of a grayscale image, so you’re losing the opportunity to enhance your image. Nonetheless, if you do use this method, we strongly suggest you set Black Generation to Heavy in the Custom CMYK dialog first (see Figure 2). That way, the black channel contains more information, and small anomalies on press won’t result in large color shifts.

Figure 2: Heavy Black Generation in the Custom CMYK dialog box The multichannel step. A second, more reasonable, way to convert your grayscale image into CMYK form is to convert the file to a Multichannel document first. 1. Duplicate your image (select Image > Duplicate). 2. Select Image > Mode > Multichannel. Notice that the Grayscale channel in the Channels palette has changed to “Black.” 3. Duplicate the Black channel three times by dragging it on top of the New Channel button in the Channels palette. You should end up with four identical channels. 4. Finally, select Image > Mode > CMYK. Photoshop assigns each channel to one of the colors (the first channel becomes cyan, the second channel is magenta, and so on). Now it’s time to start adjusting curves for each of the channels. This is a tricky proposition because, you typically don’t want to make tonal adjustments to a channel more than once or twice. You can work around this by using a Curves adjustment layer to tune the curves, and then flattening the image when the curves are the way you want them (see Figure 3).

Figure 3: Creating a tritone with an adjustment layer

Excerpted from Real World Adobe Photoshop by David Blatner, Conrad Chavez and Bruce Fraser. Used with permission of Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.

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Figure 10: The original web page selected for conversion (left) and six pages from the result of FramedWeb’s conversion in InDesign. Note that some images are successfully translated, but some are not, and that the layout of the web page is not preserved.

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help make the dependencies more apparent. It’s logical from an engineering point of view, but most InDesign users will probably want to rework those styles to fit their preferred organizational schemes. Another caveat is that tables are not currently converted by FramedWeb. To bring in HTML tables as InDesign tables, you’ll have more success with methods 1 or 2. FramedWeb does not claim to recreate a web layout or preserve its appearance. In fact, its documentation quite explicitly acknowledges that it doesn’t. There’s nothing out there that will, but FramedWeb is currently the most automated method of handling this kind of conversion. Rorohiko makes the fully functioning plug-in available free for a 30-day trial, giving you ample time to try it out on the kinds of content you may need to deal with and evaluate how well it matches your needs.

All Words and No Pictures? Getting HTML content into InDesign with its hierarchy and as much formatting as possible preserved is a lot trickier than getting images from a web page, and only Method #4 in this article allows for bringing in both at the same time. The problem with web images is that they are optimized for the screen, typically at a resolution and size that allows for fast downloading and browser rendering. That kind of image won’t cut it for print, however. If you

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intend to repurpose your HTML content for print, you’re going to need the original images from which those web-optimized versions were produced, wherever possible. But if you’re simply creating an InDesign layout that will never be produced with ink on paper—a PDF, for instance—then maybe those lower-resolution image will suffice. So how do you go about getting them? Nearly all web browsers share a common feature that lets you right-click any image, then choose an option (Save As, Save Image As, Save to Disk, etc.) for locally saving a copy of that image. That’s fine if you’ve only got a small handful of images to contend with, but if you have more than that, you’ll want to speed up that process. Some browsers have free extensions available that, once installed, will add multi-image saving capabilities. For Firefox, there’s Save Images, and for Chrome, there’s Image Downloader. Safari has no built-in method for saving all web images at once, but you can quickly cobble this functionality together using OSX’s Automator utility (Figure 11, next page). From Automator, simply drag three actions—Get Current Webpage from Safari, Get Image URLs from Webpage, and Download URLs (in that order)—from the Internet group of the Actions Library into the main workflow area of the application. You can set up actions to get the images on the page itself or that the page links to, and specify a folder where the images will be saved. Next, make sure the web page you want is in

17


the frontmost active window in Safari, and click the Run button in Automator. Once the Action is complete, you’ll find all of the saved images in the folder you specified.

Figure 11: You can build a simple workflow in Automator on the Mac to download images from a web page.

Choosing the Right Method for You None of the four methods described in this article is a clear “winner” for every HTML importing and conversion scenario, but one of them—or a combination of several of them—can be applied in a manner that makes the best use of its particular strengths. They’re all meant to simply get you closer to your objective. Every project is different, no one’s work habits are the same, and not all HTML is created equal. The “right” choice is the one that gets you the desired result for a given task at a given time. The key is to remember that the information you need to repurpose—from HTML content into InDesign content—is already there in the markup. The tags identify the type of content and its place in the hierarchy, classes specify unique formatting changes, and your most direct path to success is to leverage that information to save yourself time and preserve the essential structure and formatting of your content.

n Michael Murphy is an award-winning designer, InDesign expert, author of Adobe InDesign Styles, and co-author of Adobe Creative Suite Design Premium CS5 How-Tos: 100 Essential Techniques. He is also the author of the lynda.com courses Learning Grep with InDesign, InDesign Styles in Depth, and InDesign for Web Design. You can view his work at vinestreetdesign.com.

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By Sandee Cohen

The Case for QR Codes

How did a set of instructions for assembling a trampoline inspire one of the new features in InDesign CC? One of the new features in InDesign CC is the ability to generate QR (quick response) codes within an InDesign document. QR codes are a special kind of barcode in the form of a square mosaic pattern—you’ve probably seen them increasingly appearing on posters, advertising, and packaging. But what made the InDesign team decide to add them to the latest release? Believe it or not, the development of this feature started with the Senior Product Manager, Chris Kitchener, working in his backyard, putting together a trampoline for his kids. Somewhere in the middle of the project, Chris realized he was totally lost. Fortunately, there was a QR code in the printed instructions. Chris used

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his smartphone to scan the code, which opened a video that demonstrated all the steps necessary to finish the job. This personal experience showed Chris the importance of QR codes on printed material and how adding them to InDesign CC could benefit users.

Where QR codes came from and why they’re so ugly QR codes didn’t start out as a means for watching trampoline videos on a smartphone. They were created in 1994 by Denso Wave, a subsidiary of Toyota. The information in the codes was used to help track the thousands of parts necessary to assemble cars.

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The Case for QR Codes

QR codes were an improvement from the standard barcodes that are applied to packaging and books. Those codes are considered one-dimensional, as their information is read only across the code. But bar codes require quite a bit of space to be read correctly and are limited to providing only 20 digits of information. Denso Wave needed a way to put more information into a smaller area. Their solution was to create a twodimensional mosaic pattern that is read both horizontally and vertically. This allows the QR code to represent up to 7,089 numbers or 4,296 alphanumeric characters—way more than a plain barcode—in less space (Figure 1). But coming from a manufacturing background, QR codes were never supposed to look pretty. In order to be scanned correctly, there needs to be a clear area between the mosaic pattern and any other text or lines. There also needs to be a high contrast between the code pattern and its

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Give Your Codes Some Reading Room Figure 1: A barcode is read in only one dimension. But QR codes can store more data encoded in two dimensions.

background. However, that doesn’t mean that the codes have to be black on a white background. You can choose any combination of high-contrast colors—blue on pink, brown on yellow, red on gray. You can even put the QR code pattern on an image, as long as there’s enough difference between the pattern and the background. Even with that degree of flexibility, it’s unlikely that many designers are initially thrilled with the thought of incorporating QR codes into their work. But once you understand the benefits of QR codes for your readers, you may feel better about making room for them in your layouts.

In order to create codes that can be successfully scanned, you need to allot adequate space in your design. Don’t just shrink a QR code to micro­ scopic size or tuck it in between text and graphics. If the code doesn’t have some breathing space around the pat­ tern, the scanner won’t be able to read the code well. Test to find the smallest possible code that can still be read by a scanner.

Types of QR code data There are nine different types of data that QR codes can contain (Figure 2, next page). However, currently InDesign CC can only create five of them.

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The Case for QR Codes

Figure 2: Types of QR Code Data

Type of Code

Description

Contact Information

Contains the typical information that you’d find in an electronic contact application. When you create the code, you enter the information in various fields such as First Name, Last Name, Organization, Address, City, State, Zip, and so on. When the code is scanned, the information comes up as a vCard. This allows you to quickly add the contact information to a device.

Yes

Email

Lets you fill in the fields for the destination email, subject, and message. When the code is scanned on the device, it automatically opens the mail application and you’re ready to send the email. This is a very easy way for readers to request more information about a product.

Yes

SMS Message

Instead of sending an email, this type of code allows you to direct your readers to send a phone SMS (short message service).

Yes

Plain Text

Lets you define a field of text that can be scanned into the device. This allows you to send any type of information that you don’t want your readers to have to type in manually.

Yes

URL Hyperlink

This is the code with the most potential uses. You can easily direct readers to your company’s website or a video such as the instructional videos that helped Chris Kitchener assemble his trampoline. Any type of information that you can put on a web page can be accessed by this type of QR code.

Yes

Calendar Event

Makes it easy to add information about a special event to a calendar application. The code can contain a name for the event, times, time zone, location, and description of the event. Think about how easy it would be to publicize a community theater show with one of these on the poster.

No

Phone Number

Automatically creates a phone number for the reader to call. More immediate than using email.

No

Geo Location

Lets you create a link to a Google Maps location.

No

WiFi Network

Contains the WEP password for a WiFi network. When scanned, the code automatically configures the phone to access the WiFi network—especially useful for long WEP passwords. Imagine having a QR code on your home router. Your guests wouldn’t have to copy complicated passwords.

No

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Created by InDesign

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The Case for QR Codes

How much are they used?

have used them) and South Korea (38%), with the US running a close third at 24%. They are also popular in Turkey, India, and Brazil (Figure 3). These numbers indicate that there is a use for QR code marketing in all sorts of media.

According to a recent article by Marketing Charts (marketingcharts.com), while not yet a mainstream activity, the use of QR codes is growing. They are especially popular in China (30% of smart phone users 40 35

38

QR code usage among smartphone users

38

30 30

30

25 24

20

22 18

15 10

14

14

Unfortunately, the use of QR codes in marketing depends on educating the user base on their availability. Given the explosion of QR codes in advertising, magazines, and packaging, it’s hard to find anyone who hasn’t seen a QR code. People may not know what they’re called, but they definitely know what they look like. According to the 2013 BrandSpark/Better Homes and Gardens American Shopper Study, 83% of North American consumers are aware of QR codes, and 47% of those have used their mobile device to scan one at least once. Among those that have scanned a code, almost half did so from a magazine (49.8%), in-store sign (49.3%), or packaging while shopping (49.2%). The numbers are lower for news­ papers (17.7%) and transit ads (8.7%).

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The possibilities of QR codes

5 0 Australia

Brazil

China

India

Italy

Russia South Korea Turkey

Figure 3: The Percentage of smartphone users scanning QR codes

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UK

US

It doesn’t take much effort to see how QR codes can help any marketing plan. Many advertisers now include a code on their

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The Case for QR Codes

print ads and posters. Sadly, most of these codes only take the reader to the product’s website. But codes can do so much more! In 2011, Macy’s unveiled their “Backstage Pass” campaign, which uses QR codes located in the stores. Customers scan the codes to open videos from Macy’s celebrity partners

such as Tommy Hilfiger, Jennifer Lopez, P. Diddy, and Martha Stewart (Figure 4). In Austin, Texas, the bus stops for the MetroAirport bus have posted QR codes you can scan to receive up-to-date information about when the next bus will arrive as well as a route map.

Figure 4: As shown on their website, Macy’s spells out the entire QR code process in ads and web pages.

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Tesco’s Home Plus supermarket chain in South Korea uses QR codes in a unique way. They do not have as many actual stores as their major competitor. So Tesco places photographs of store shelves in bus stops and subway stations to create virtual stores. Shoppers can then scan the QR codes for products on those virtual shelves to fill a shopping cart in their smartphone (Figure 5). The items are delivered when the commuter gets home that evening.

Figure 5: Commuters in South Korea can shop for groceries while they wait for a bus or train by scanning QR codes.

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The Case for QR Codes

Restaurants are getting in on the act too. Several restaurants in Vancouver, BC are using QR codes to provide diners with information about the ingredients used in their meals. I visited a restaurant in Austin, Texas that has a QR code printed on their bar napkins. When I scanned it, my phone opened a web page with discounts at the various branches of the restaurant (Figure 6). I particularly liked the added message “My, you are tech savvy, aren’t you?”

QR codes have also found a home in books. My own InDesign CC Visual Quickstart Guide uses QR codes to add multimedia to print. In previous editions of the book, I used arrows in illustrations to indicate motion in the document. However, this edition has QR codes in the margins of the book next to those illustrations. Readers can simply scan the QR code, and a YouTube video opens explaining the technique (Figure 7). This has been

Figure 6a: A QR code is printed on bar napkins at Max’s Wine Dive in Austin, Texas.

Figure 6b: When the QR code on Max’s napkins is scanned, the customer is taken to a website with discounts.

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Figure 7: The static print images in a book can be augmented by QR codes that link to video demonstrations.

very helpful for showing how to use intricate features such as the Pen tool. It was particularly helpful that InDesign CC has a QR code creator within the application. With over 150 videos in the book, I could easily create the QR codes without leaving my InDesign layout. We also chose a cyan-colored code that matches the highlight colors in the book—much less clunky than black codes would have looked. Tech-savvy companies have found many uses for QR codes. Google employees have QR codes with their contact information on the back of their business cards. The

25


The Case for QR Codes

recipient gets to read the contact information and then scan it into their smartphone. Because all the data is encoded in the QR code itself, this works even without a web or WiFi connection. AARP magazine recently ran a cover story on Hoda Kotb and Kathie Lee Gifford. Readers could use a QR code in the magazine to view a video of the two women in their photo shoot. This is the type of information that a print-only publication couldn’t ordinarily provide. The Trada building in Boulder, Colorado has a large QR code on the outside. Scanning the code brings the viewer to the website of the company developing the building (Figure 8). Taco Bell and ESPN have used QR codes in an ad campaign for the Bowl Championship Series college football games. Customers scanned QR codes on the food containers. The code took the viewers to exclusive videos of ESPN analyst Mark May previewing upcoming games.

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Taco Bell has even created print ads with QR codes made from avocados and lemons. When scanned —and amazingly, they do scan correctly—they open web pages with the recipes that inspired new Taco Bell dishes (Figure 9, next page). QR codes don’t even have to be scanned from printed images. I recently went to an event where the presenter projected a QR code onto the screen in the room. Attendees could scan the code to then open an online survey that rated the content of the presentation.

Tell your viewers what to expect

Figure 8: A QR code on a downtown building in Boulder, Colorado provides a link to the website for the developer of the building.

Five years ago, it was necessary to put instructions next to QR codes explaining how to download the software that reads them and what to do with it on your smartphone. Two years ago, you might not have needed instructions for how to use them, but you might have wanted to suggest where your customers could download

26


The Case for QR Codes

for accessing the code information. Other uses are self-explanatory; you don’t need to explain the QR code on a business card.

Always Consider the Customer You should think about what type of web page a URL QR code will open. If your company has a site optimized for mobile devices, send them to that site. It doesn’t engender good will if they have to wait for a huge download that is hard to view on a mobile screen.

Figure 9: These two “fruity” Taco Bell ads contain actual QR codes that take readers to websites with special recipes.

the software. Today, most QR codes appear without any instructions at all. Still, you should probably tell your viewers what they can expect if they scan the QR code. For example, a QR code on a package of vegetables might have a label explaining

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that the code will provide recipes for using those vegetables. A QR code in an ad might explain that you can use it to send an email requesting more information about the product. Some companies also alert their viewers that there may be data charges

Creating and modifying QR codes It’s very simple to create a QR code in InDesign. Choose Object > Generate QR Code. The Generate QR Code dialog box appears. Use the Type menu to choose one of the five types of QR codes. Then fill in

27


The Case for QR Codes

the appropriate fields for that type of code (Figure 10). Click the Color tab to select a solid color swatch (sorry, no gradients) for the QR code, and then click OK. A loaded cursor appears. You can then drag to create the QR code at whatever size you want. As they are simple vector objects, you can scale the codes to any size without worrying about resolution issues. If you want to edit the information in the code, select it, and then choose Object > Edit QR code. The Edit QR Code dialog box appears where you can change the code. QR codes are pretty robust, with redundancy built into each pattern. This means that a slight scratch on one part of the code doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t destroy the integrity of the information. It also means it is possible to add a logo to the center or side of a QR code without losing the information in the code (Figure 11, next page). You can add a QR code to t-shirts, cups, or balloons, and it will work. Several companies are already

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Figure 10a: Use the Type menu to choose which kind of QR code you want to create.

Figure 10d: The fields for a text QR code

Figure 10b: The fields for a business card QR code

Figure 10e: The fields for an SMS text message

Figure 10c: The fields for an email QR code

Figure 10f: The fields for a website URL QR code

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The Case for QR Codes

Figure 11: Despite the manipulations, all these codes are valid when scanned.

creating temporary tattoos of QR codes. These make for fun activities at corporate events. They work—even applied to the bumps and wrinkles on skin. (I suppose you could get a tattoo artist to ink a permanent one if you really wanted to, but I’ll pass.)

Editing in Illustrator InDesign’s QR code objects are embedded PDF files, but they don’t appear in the Links panel. This means you can’t manipulate the objects directly in InDesign. But you can use Adobe Illustrator to modify the code in many ways. Double-click with the Selection tool, or use the Content Grabber to select the embedded PDF object within the frame.

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Copy and paste it into an Illustrator file. You now have native Illustrator objects that can be modified using Illustrator tools or pasted back into InDesign for manipulation. (See the sidebar for information about a product that does this for you within InDesign.)

But be sure to test codes that have been modified, and for best results, use them at a rather large size. Also note that you may get different results with different mobile devices. Devices with higher resolution cameras can scan more QR codes accurately.

Taking QR codes even further As David Blatner said on the InDesign Secrets podcast 194, the QR code command in InDesign is missing a few features. He was especially concerned that there is no data merge function that would allow you to take a database of information and add a QR code to the layout. This is particularly helpful if you are creating the badges for a con­ ference. QR codes could be generated as part of a data merge of the information for the badges. Fortunately, the amazing wizards at Rorohiko have created Tada QR! This extension adds more power to generating QR codes. Just a few of Tada QR!’s features: »» »» »» »»

dit the contents of a QR code and watch it update in real time E Bulk-generate QR codes using GREP Link the QR contents to text frames so the code always mirrors the text content Automatically assign object styles to the generated QRs

29


The Case for QR Codes

Software for reading QR codes There are many QR code reader apps for Android phones available at the Google Play store. Even better, the Galaxy S IV and some Sony and Nokia models come out of the box with a QR scanner already installed. This trend may extend to future Android devices. Of course, the best feature for a smart phone would be pattern recognition that would automatically open a QR code reader if the code pattern appeared in the camera lens. While Apple doesn’t include built-in QR scanners in its mobile devices, there are easily over 250 readers in the App store. Some code readers work better than others. I have had great luck with the NeoReader and Bakodo for the iOS.

you can’t help but get excited. If you're like me, you’ll probably start spotting great places and uses for QR codes everywhere you go. In the meantime, here are just a few more ideas to get you thinking.

Pushing the envelope

»» A cookbook can include QR codes to show videos to demonstrate the tricky parts of recipes. »» Magazines can use QR codes to bring audio and video content to print versions. »» Restaurants can post QR codes at every table so diners can access a list of daily specials. »» With a QR code on a movie poster you could view a trailer, and even buy tickets. »» Household appliances can have QR codes linked to the owner’s manuals, or the manufacturer’s customer service number or email address.

There are countless ways to enhance print content with QR codes. Couple that with the fact that it’s almost trivially easy now to create these codes with InDesign CC, and

And to think, all of this (and more) is possible to create with InDesign, partly because of one man’s struggle to assemble a kids’

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trampoline. After reading this article, I bet you can tell how I feel about QR codes. But just in case it’s not totally clear, scan this illustration for the answer.

n Sandee Cohen is the author of the InDesign CC Visual QuickStart Guide as well as the co-author, with Diane Burns, of the new book Digital Publishing with Adobe InDesign CS6.

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By Mike Rankin

A Closer Look at Check Spelling

Take a deep dive into the sometimes mysterious inner workings of InDesign’s Check Spelling feature.

You can find the original version of this article at InDesign Secrets.

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A few years back as I was preparing my handouts for a conference presentation on InDesign, I was struck by two things as I checked the spelling in my files: »» the fact that I always type “stlye” instead of “style,” and really need to set up an autocorrect fix for it, and… »» how much—after years of using it—I was still really confused by some parts of InDesign’s Check Spelling dialog box. Ever since I first started using InDesign, Check Spelling had perplexed me a little. Neither a panel nor a true modal dialog box, it walks forever in GUI limbo, along with its weirdo brethren Find/Change and Tabs. One of the most subtle enhancements of InDesign CC is the fact that we can now

fully navigate most dialog boxes via the keyboard. Almost every checkbox and field is now accessible by tabbing and using your arrow keys. If you use the mouse for everything, you might not care much, but I feel like I should be able to run a full spell check from the keyboard. Back in Ye Olden Days, I used to race through spell checking QuarkXPress documents with three very intuitive keyboard shortcuts. Command+S for Skip, Command+L for Lookup, and Esc for Done. Spell checking was a mouse-free, bangbang-bang-you’re-done kind of task. With InDesign, I couldn’t understand why I could only occasionally close the dialog box from the keyboard or why it seemed

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A Closer Look at Check Spelling

to jump back and forth to random stories instead of moving page-by-page straight through a document. I vowed to examine the workings of that dialog box with a magnifying glass, to find out once and for all if it really sucked, or I had missed something. Here’s what I found.

Keyboard Shortcuts: Undocumented and Inconsistent You probably know that Command/Ctrl+I opens the Check Spelling dialog box. But you might not know that you can also use Command/Ctrl+I to skip to the next flagged word. And you might be amazed at how much faster a spell check job feels when you use this shortcut. Even better, with InDesign CC, Skip is now highlighted as the default choice as you check spelling, so all you have to do is press Return/Enter to skip (Figure 1). In InDesign CC, you can tab to highlight each of the various buttons and fields in the

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Figure 1: Skip is selected by default in InDesign CC.

Check Spelling dialog box. Unfortunately, it’s a bit of a tease. In most cases (all of the buttons), if you press Return or Enter, you’ll continue to skip to the next flagged term, regardless of which button is highlighted in the dialog box (Figure 2). Prior to CC, pressing Tab moved the focus back and forth between Change To and Suggested Corrections, where you could use your arrow keys to choose a correction,

Figure 2: Note the thick border around the Skip button, which indicates that it (and not the highlighted Done function) will be applied if you press Return or Enter.

and then press Enter to apply the change. And you can still tab to these fields and use them the same way in InDesign CC. That’s the good news. The bad news is, regardless of which version of InDesign you’re using, there are no shortcuts for two of the most important commands in the Check Spelling dialog box: Ignore All or Change All—and you can’t even make up your own. There

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A Closer Look at Check Spelling

are no entries in Edit > Keyboard Shortcuts for these commands. You can add a shortcut to invoke the built-in dictionary, but it won’t work when the Check Spelling dialog box is open.

The Spelling Loop-de-Loop Ever wonder how InDesign chooses the order in which it spell checks stories? In a complex document, it can send you bouncing back and forth from spread to spread. Here’s the deal. Stories are ordered chronologically according to when they

were put on a spread or pasteboard via drawing, duplicating, pasting, or dragging in from a library or snippet. That chronological order is what InDesign follows during a spell check. When you don’t have your cursor in a text frame, the spell check starts with the first flagged word in the oldest story and works its way to the newest story (regardless of page location). The four unlinked frames in Figure 3 were created in order, from left to right, so the spell check proceeds exactly the same way.

Figure 3: When you have nothing selected, InDesign checks spelling in a document from the oldest story to the newest.

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When your cursor is in a text frame, it gets a little more complicated. The spell check starts at the cursor and moves forward to the end of that story. Then it loops back to the beginning of the story and moves forward until it reaches the point where it started (Figure 4). Then the spell check moves on to the next chronological story and continues through the document until it reaches the youngest story. After that, it loops back to the oldest story and continues on until all stories have been checked. Dizzy? Me too.

Figure 4: When you have a cursor in a text frame, Check Spelling loops through the text in that story first before continuing on to the next one.

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A Closer Look at Check Spelling

Class Dismissed Before the arrival of InDesign CC, another thing that bugged me about the Check Spelling dialog box was that I couldn’t always dismiss it via the keyboard. Escape and Command+period seemed to work only sometimes. And sure enough, that is the case. For InDesign CS6 and earlier, there are four scenarios:

Change To has focus (highlighted): Both Command+period and Esc work to dismiss the dialog box (Figure 5). Suggestion Corrections has focus: Command+period dismisses the dialog box on the Mac. If you press Esc, the spell check is canceled, but the dialog box is stuck onscreen with nothing in focus, and neither Command+period nor Esc will dismiss it

Figure 5: In CS6 and earlier, it was easy to dismiss the dialog box via the keyboard with the Change To field highlighted.

Figure 6: With Suggested Corrections selected, you had fewer options for dismissing the dialog box.

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(Figure 6). This is the one that used to drive me nuts. One thing you can do is press Tab to move the focus back up to Change To, and then press Esc. A similar thing happens if you switch to another application in the middle of a spell check with Suggested Corrections selected, but it’s even worse. When you come back to InDesign, the document page has focus, not the dialog box, even if it’s front and center on your screen. You can’t dismiss the dialog box via the keyboard, unless you first press Command+I to start another spell check. Ready to Check Spelling (green check): Both Command+period and Esc work. It’s your reward for completing a full spell check (Figure 7, next page). Ready to Check Spelling (no green check): neither Command+period nor Esc works. This is your punishment for either clicking on the document or switching to another application after completing a full spell check (Figure 8, next page).

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A Closer Look at Check Spelling

Figure 7: In CS6 and earlier, the green check indicates you can dismiss the dialog box by pressing Escape.

Figure 8: No green check means you’re going to have to take your hands off the keyboard to get this dialog box off your screen.

Fortunately, InDesign CC makes it a cinch to dismiss the dialog box from the keyboard. Just press Esc. It always works, no matter what you have selected in the dialog box. So there you have it, perhaps more than you ever wanted to know about InDesign’s Check Spelling feature. It’s still not my favorite dialog box, but it’s a bit easier to deal

with when you know what to look for. And if you’re working with InDesign CC, it works smoother (and faster) than ever.

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n Mike Rankin is Editor in Chief of InDesign Magazine and CreativePro.com, and he’s the author of several lynda.com video training series, including InDesign FX and InDesign CC: Interactive Document Fundamentals.

35


By David Blatner

Swapping Out Master Pages

Knowing when to use Primary Text Frames and Layout Adjustment makes the difference While InDesign makes so many aspects of document formatting easy, sometimes it can be baffling how to accomplish a seemingly straightforward task. Here’s a great example: You have three different master pages—each with a different number of columns and text frame size. Right now, all your document pages are set to a single column, but you want to apply the other master pages and have InDesign update the text frames automatically. Simple, right? Change the master page, and the document page should update accordingly. But it’s not that easy. When you apply a master page that has a different number of columns (or margin size, or size of the text frame, or whatever), InDesign only changes the underlying guides on your document pages. Any text frames or graphic frames that have text or images in them are left alone (Figure 1)! There are two solutions to this problem: Layout Adjustment and Primary Text Frames, each with its own pros and cons. But it’s important that you know about both of these features in order to choose the right approach.

Figure 1: The original document (top) and what happens after you apply a different master page (bottom). The text frames on the document pages don’t change!

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Solution 1: Layout Adjustment If you have already laid out your document—flowed the text, and so on—then your best bet is probably to turn on Layout Adjustment.

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InStep: Swapping Out Master Pages

1. Make Frames Touch

The key to making Layout Adjustment work is to ensure that every object that needs to change size is touching a guide. In general, I find this method works best with margin guides (page or spread guides are supposed to work, but it’s wonky and unpredictable). So, in the case of a book with one main text flow, you want the text frames to extend out to the margins.

2. Turn on Layout

As I mentioned earlier, changing the margins or columns (on the page, spread, or master page) won’t affect existing frames unless you first enable Layout Adjustment. You can activate this feature in a couple of places. In CS5 and earlier, you could choose Layout Adjustment from the Layout menu. In CS6 and later, you need to choose Layout Adjustment from the Liquid Layout panel menu (to open this panel, choose Layout > Liquid Layout). Or you can choose Layout > Margins and Columns, click the Enable Layout Adjustment checkbox, and then click OK.

Margins

Adjustment

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InStep: Swapping Out Master Pages

Note that if you enable Layout Adjustment in a document that uses Liquid Layout, the Liquid Page Rules become disabled—it’s one or the other. (Liquid Layout helps you manage your objects when the page size changes, but unfortunately it doesn’t help you when you need to change master pages like this.)

3. Apply the Master Page

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Once you have enabled Layout Adjustment, you can apply your new master page to the document page: »» Drag the master page icon over the page icon in the Pages panel; or »» Select the page(s) you want to affect in the Pages panel and then Option/Alt-click on the master page you want to apply; or »» Select the page(s) in the Pages panel, and then choose Apply Master to Pages from the Pages panel menu.

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InStep: Swapping Out Master Pages

If the margins or columns are different in the new master page, the document pages (and, more importantly, the text frames on those pages) are updated. For example, if you had one big text frame on a single-column page, it would be turned into two frames (threaded together) if you apply a two-column master page. Technically, you don’t even have to apply this adjustment as a master page. You could just select the page in the Pages panel and choose Layout > Margins and Columns to make the change locally. But I think doing this via a master page is more elegant and flexible in the long run.

Solution 2: Primary Text Frames The best option—better than relying on Layout Adjustment—is always to build your document from the ground up, ready for maximum flexibility. So if you think you may need text frames to change size, consider using primary text frames. On the other hand, if you have already created your document and flowed text onto pages, then this solution might not work for you—it depends on how you built your document. This is geeky, but bear with me: This technique will work if, when you first set up your file, you put text frames on your master pages and then flowed text into those frames on your document pages. However, this solution will not work if you just flowed text into new text frames on your document pages (the way most InDesign users—including me—have worked for the past decade), because you cannot retroactively turn those frames into primary text frames.

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InStep: Swapping Out Master Pages

Let’s look at how you can create primary text frames in a new document.

1. Use the New Document Dialog Box

When you first create a document, you can select the Primary Text Frame checkbox in the New Document dialog box. (This feature was first introduced in InDesign CS6. In earlier versions, there was a Master Text Frame feature that was much less interesting and useful.)

With Primary Text Frame enabled in a new document, InDesign adds a new text frame on your master page (or, in the case of a facing pages document, linked frames on the left and right sides of your master page spread). Those text frames are then labeled as “primary text frames” automatically.

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InStep: Swapping Out Master Pages

2. Make the Second Master Page

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In this document, we’ll create a second master page (choose New Master from the Pages panel menu). This technique works only when there are primary text frames on more than one master page, but InDesign will only add them for you automatically to the first one. So we need to add primary text frames to this new master page. If we want a 3-column page, and we can get it in one of two ways: by creating a single 3-column text frame or by making three frames that are threaded together. In this case, we’ll choose the latter, just because it helps demonstrate how primary text frames work a little better. First we’ll choose Layout > Margins and Columns, and increase the columns to 3 so that we have guides to help us draw the frames more quickly. We’ll also increase the margins on all four sides—this is not required, of course… I just want to show that you can.

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InStep: Swapping Out Master Pages

3. Create a New Primary Text Frames

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To add a primary text frame, draw out a regular text frame on the master page, and then use the Selection tool to click the Primary Text Frame icon in the upper-left corner of the frame. There can be only one primary text frame on each page, but you can thread more than one frame on a page together. In this case, because I need six frames (one per column, three per page), I just make one, duplicate it five times, and put each frame in its own column (helped by the column guides). Then I thread them all together (click with the Selection tool on the out port of the first one, Option/Alt-click on the next four, and then just click on the last one). Finally, I select any one of these six frames and click the Primary Text Frame icon in the upper-left corner.

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InStep: Swapping Out Master Pages

4. Flow the Document

Now that I have primary text frames on two different master pages, I can flow my text into the document. I choose File > Place to select the Word document I want to import. Because I know there is already a primary text frame on the first page of my document, I can simply click anywhere inside the page margins, and InDesign places the story. Also, because Smart Text Reflow is enabled by default in new documents, InDesign automatically adds additional pages and threads them together. (Sometimes it takes a few seconds after placing the story for this to work, because InDesign adds or removes pages only when you pause.)

5. Apply the Master Page

By default, all the new document pages are set to Master Page A (our one-column master in this example).

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InStep: Swapping Out Master Pages

Now you can apply the second 3-column master page to one or more of your document pages (using the techniques I mentioned earlier in this article), and you’ll see that all the text automatically flows into the proper text frames!

Seeing is Believing Sometimes seeing a feature in action is easier than reading about it. If that’s true for you, consider watching one or both of these movies at lynda.com: Anne-Marie Concepción described the Primary Text Frames feature in her InDesign CS6 New Features title. I also showed it as one of the movies in our InDesignSecrets title. Whichever solution you choose—Layout Adjustment or Primary Text Frames—you now have the power in your hands to update and reformat your documents much more easily and quickly than ever.

n David Blatner is the co-host of InDesignSecrets and the co-author of the book Real World InDesign CC (Peachpit Press).

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By Nigel French

InType: Learning to Love the List

With a little care and effort up front, you can create great-looking numbered and bulleted lists.

Figure 1: Just a tiny sample of the evidence that we have become addicted to lists.

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Maybe it’s just a sign of our shortening attention spans, but these days we seem to want more and more of our information in quickly-digestible bullet points. And then there’s our insatiable need to quantify. We absolutely love lists: the Top Ten this, the 100 Greatest that, 12-step programs, 50 ways to leave your lover, and so on. Lists have gotten so popular that they’ve spawned a whole new journalistic category: the listicle, and judging from its power to get people to buy magazine and read blog posts, it seems like it’s here to stay (Figure 1). So with all these lists to work with, we can be thankful that InDesign has robust tools for creating bulleted and numbered lists.

The mechanics of creating bulleted and numbered lists are straightforward, but what about the design considerations—and those quirky problems that sometimes arise when working with numbered lists, like how to align the number, how to continue numbering across stories or documents, and what to do if you need to export your lists and retain those bullets or numbers? Before we dig deeper, here are the basics: Bulleted and numbered lists are formatted with automated hanging indents, with either a bullet character or the number as the first (hanging) character(s). To apply either a bulleted or numbered list format to selected text, Option-click (or

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InType: Lists

Alt-click) on the Bulleted List or Numbered List icon on the Paragraph Formats level of the Control panel to open the Bullets and Numbering dialog box (Figure 2), and then choose the list type, the bullet or numbering style, and the alignment. As always, select Preview to see how any changes affect your selection. Conveniently, you can select a character style to be automatically applied to the bullet or number; if you don’t have one already made, choose New Character Style and make one on the fly. Once you’re satisfied with how things look, click OK, and then capture the formatting in a paragraph style by choosing New Paragraph Style from the Paragraph Styles panel menu.

Bulleted lists So far, so good, but here are some things to consider when making bulleted lists, a veritable list about lists: »» If you’re tired of using the same old circular bullet character, use the Add button to choose a glyph from a different font. This

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baseline shift and possibly the font size for that character style. If your text begins with a cap, align the bullet vertically to the cap height. If the text begins with lowercase characters, align the bullets to the x height (Figure 3).

Figure 2: The Bullets and Numbering dialog box, where you specify the numbering or bullet style as well as the list’s alignment and amount of indent

is handy, especially if you’re after a dingbat that’s unavailable in your text font—checkmarks (✔) and pointing hands (☞) are best avoided unless you’re after a retro look— but sometimes your chosen bullet may not vertically align perfectly with the rest of the text. The solution? Apply a character style to the bullet character, and adjust the

Figure 3: In the top example, the bullet is out of vertical alignment with the text that follows. In the second example, the scale and position of the bullets has been adjusted to the x-height—applicable since the text is lowercase. In the bottom example, the position of the bullet is adjusted to the cap height of the text.

»» Typically, bullets use hanging indents, so you’ll need to make the first-line indent the same as the left indent but negative; for example, if your left indent is 11 pt, then make the first-line indent –11 pt. When you plug in a negative first-line indent, the Tab

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InType: Lists

field automatically becomes blank, the tab being set at the left indent value. An em space is usually a sufficient amount of indent when working with hanging indents, but you will need more if you’re working with a numbered list that includes two- and three-digit numbers. »» If you prefer your bullets to be flush rather than hanging, you’ll probably want less space after the bullet. You can replace tab character (^t) in the Text After field in the Bullets and Numbering dialog box with a space or an en space from the drop-down menu to the right of the field (Figure 4). »» Keep punctuation to a minimum while adhering to the house style. Unless the bullet point is a full sentence, don’t end it with a period. »» Add space before the first and after the last item in the list (Figure 5). After you’ve made a bullet paragraph style, make two variants based on it: bullet_first with extra space before, and bullet_last with extra space after.

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The main symptoms of stroke can be remembered with the word FAST: Face-Arms-Speech-Time. zz Face – the face may have dropped on one side; the person may not be able to smile or their mouth or eye may have dropped zzArms – the person with suspected stroke may not be able to lift one or both arms and keep them there because of arm weakness or numbness zz Speech – their speech may be slurred or garbled, or the person may not be able to talk at all despite appearing to be awake zzTime – it is time to dial 999 immediately if you see any of these signs or symptoms If you suspect that you or someone else is having a stroke, phone 999 immediately and ask for an ambulance. Figure 4: Flush left bullets with a word space after the bullet character The main symptoms of stroke can be remembered with the word FAST: Face-Arms-Speech-Time. zzFace – the face may have dropped on one side; the person may not be able to smile or their mouth or eye may have dropped zzArms – the person with suspected stroke may not be able to lift one or both arms and keep them there because of arm weakness or numbness zzSpeech – their speech may be slurred or garbled, or the person may not be able to talk at all despite appearing to be awake zzTime – it is time to dial 999 immediately if you see any of these signs or symptoms If you suspect that you or someone else is having a stroke, phone 999 immediately and ask for an ambulance. Figure 5: A bulleted list with a half-line space before the first and after the last bullet item

»» Presumably you want your bullet and number styles to be stylistically the same except for the list type, so base your number list style on your bullet style or vice versa. That way, if you need to change paragraph style specs, you’ll need to make only one change. »» Indenting the text after the bullet means you lose the strong flush-left alignment of your text, so some people prefer outdenting the bullet to strengthen the left axis of the text (Figure 6). This requires The main symptoms of stroke can be remembered with the word FAST: Face-Arms-Speech-Time. zz Face – the face may have dropped on one side, the person may not be able to smile or their mouth or eye may have dropped zz Arms – the person with suspected stroke may not be able to lift one or both arms and keep them there because of arm weakness or numbness zz Speech – their speech may be slurred or garbled, or the person may not be able to talk at all despite appearing to be awake zz Time – it is time to dial 999 immediately if you see any of these signs or symptoms If you suspect that you or someone else is having a stroke, phone 999 immediately and ask for an ambulance. Figure 6: Outdenting the bullet character maintains the flush-left alignment of the text.

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InType: Lists

indenting the body text by the same amount that you indent the bullet. »» Because they tend to be short and pithy by nature, bulleted lists don’t do well with justified alignment. With lines that are inevitably short, there will be big word spaces that make an even type color impossible. For this reason, even if your body text is justified, your list paragraphs will work better ragged. »» If you opt for ragged alignment with your bullets, you’ll need to be vigilant about uneven rags. It’s tempting to use the Balance Ragged Lines feature, but this will likely create as many problems as it solves. It’s up to you to fix the rag manually by applying No Break to phrases you want kept together or adding some forced line breaks. »» For bulleted lists in instructional-type texts where “bottoming out” of columns may not be necessary, consider using Keep Options to keep all the lines in the

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paragraph together. That way, you can avoid orphaned lines ending up at page or column top. »» Bulleted lists don’t fare well with Optical Margin Alignment. If you’re using Optical Margin Alignment on your story (a good idea in my opinion), choose Ignore Optical Margin Alignment in Paragraph Style Options to make exceptions of your bullet and number lists. »» For longer lists, consider using the Split Column feature to divide the list into two sub-columns (Figure 7).

Backpacking Checklist While gear can add to your wilderness adventure, it is possible (and some say preferable) to take as little as possible. For some tips about lightening your load, read our Lightweight Packing article. Add or subtract items to match the weather, and your trip plans. The Essentials zz Map zz Compass zz Sunglasses and sunscreen zz Food zz Headlamp/flashlight zz First-aid kit zz Water

zz Matches – in waterproof container zz Fire starter zz Knife zz Repair kit zz Trip plan – left with a friend zz Whistle

Numbered Lists All the considerations we have for working with bulleted, or unordered, lists also apply to numbered lists, and here are a few considerations specifically for numbered lists: 1 Numbering implies a specific order of steps, and the benefit of autonumbering is that if you rearrange steps, the numbers update accordingly.

Figure 7: Splitting a bullet list into sub-columns

2 Applying autonumbering is pretty self explanatory: instead of bullets, choose numbers and the style of numbering, the character style for the number, and the alignment, and you’re done.

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InType: Lists

3 If you want the numbering to begin at anything other than at one, change the Mode to Start At, and enter the number you want. 4 Personally, I prefer to omit the period after the number, since the space between the number and the item is sufficient differentiation. As useful as “live” numbers are, there are a few aspects of working with numbered lists that can cause frustration.

Numbering across frames Numbering lists that continue across unthreaded frames (and across documents) is easy enough to accomplish when you know where to look, but the necessary component—list styles—is somewhat buried and a little obscure. List styles, a peculiar variant in the pantheon of InDesign styles, have only two checkbox options. The “[Default]” list style applied to numbered lists does not allow numbering across unthreaded text frames,

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so you’ll need to create a new list style and incorporate it into the paragraph styles for those paragraphs you want sequentially numbered. In the Bullets and Numbering dialog box, choose New List from the List drop-down menu, name the style, and check both of the available options (Figure 8).

Creating a Multi-level List These days I prefer to use InDesign rather than Word for most of my word processing tasks, but there is one area where Word still has the edge, and that is when it comes to creating multi-level outlines. And yet, while InDesign doesn’t give you the convenience of easily collapsing and expanding different levels of your outline (though you can fake it quite well with Conditional Text), it is possible to make robust multi-level outlines with numbered lists. To make this happen, you need to specify the level number, insert a number placeholder to indicate the previous level,

Figure 8: The New List dialog box

and check Restart Numbers at This Level (Figure 9, next page). Note that increasing the amount of left indent with each level is sufficient differentiation to establish hierarchy in a numbered list. There’s no need to also introduce additional sizes, weights, and font styles.

Aligning Numbers If your lists contain single- and double-digit figures, then you’ve doubtless experienced problems trying to right-align the numbers with each other. To achieve this, in the Bullets and Numbering dialog box, set the Alignment to Right, and then increase the left indent and/or decrease the first-line indent to move the text to the right and create enough space for the numbers on

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InType: Lists

01 Level 1 01.01 Level 2 01.02 Level 2 01.02 a) Level 3 01.02 b) Level 3 02 Level 1 02.01 Level 2 02.02 Level 2 02.02 a) Level 3 02.02 b) Level 3

Figure 9: The numbering options for the Heading 2 and Heading 3 styles shown above.

the left of the text. Getting the right combination of left indent and first-line indent can be tricky. Here’s a suggested approach: using the frame tool (with the stroke set to None), draw a box to measure the rightmost

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edge of the two-digit numbers (having done so, delete the frame). Now subtract this number from your left indent value, make it a negative number, and you have

your first-line indent amount (Figure 10, next page). An easier, alternative approach is to use a two-digit numbering style (assuming your numbered list doesn’t go beyond 99). This way, with two digits, using lining numbers, i.e., glyphs with the same set width, the numbers will always align.

Converting to Text One last consideration with bullets and numbers: if you plan to export an InDesign story to an RTF file, you’ll need to convert the automatic numbers (or bullets) to text— otherwise, they’ll be stripped out of the converted document. Select the list, and choose Type > Bulleted and Numbered Lists > Convert Numbering to Text. You will now be able to select the numbers or bullets as text. The numbers will no longer be “live,” but they will survive intact when you export the story. Another reason for converting numbers to text is to create a step list that uses

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InType: Lists

drop cap numbers (Figure 11), since there is no way to combine drop caps with live numbers. Lists, then, are not rocket science, but there is more involved in creating

good-looking lists than first meets the eye. Following these basic rules will ensure that your bullet and number lists are readable— and quickly digestible. Like so many other aspects of InDesign, the initial setup of the

Top 100 Greatest Movies (imdb.com) The movies on this list are ranked according to their success (awards & nominations), their popularity, and their true greatness from a directing/writing standpoint. 1 The Godfather 2 Schindler’s List 3 Raging Bull 4 Shawshank Redemption 5 Casablanca 6 One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest 7 Citizen Kane 8 Vertigo 9 The Wizard of Oz 10 Titanic

list can take a few extra minutes, but that prep time upfront pays dividends when you find yourself using these common types of paragraph again and again.

Creating a Drop Cap Style 1  2 

Insert your Type tool into the paragraph you want to affect.

1 The Godfather 2 Schindler’s List 3 Raging Bull 4 Shawshank Redemption 5 Casablanca 6 One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest 7 Citizen Kane 8 Vertigo 9 The Wizard of Oz 10 Titanic

In the Control Palette Paragraph Formats type a number for Drop Cap Number of Lines.

3 

Type the number of drop cap characters you want (usually 1) in the Drop Cap One or More Characters field.

4 

From the Paragraph Styles panel menu choose New Paragraph Style.

5 

Name the style “Drop Cap” or something similar; click OK and it will appear in your Paragraph Styles panel.

6 

To “nest” the character style into the Paragraph style definition Ctrl (right-click) the Drop Cap style in the Paragraph Styles panel to edit the style. Choose Drop Caps and Nested Styles from the list on the left. From the drop down menu choose the Character style you wish to apply to the drop caps character(s).

Figure 11: To use drop caps in a numbered list like this, you must first convert the numbers to live text.

n

Figure 10: The appearance of a numbered list with with both one- and two-digit numbers can be improved by right-aligning the numbers and subtracting the width of the numbers from the Fist Line Indent value.

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9 The Wizard of Oz 10 Titanic

Nigel French is a graphic designer, photographer, author, and teacher living in Brighton, UK. He is the author of InDesign Type and Photoshop Unmasked, both from Adobe Press, as well as several titles in the lynda.com online training library, including InDesign Typography.

9.5pt

51


By Scott Citron

InReview: IndyFont/IndyFont Pro Amazing scripted solution allows you to create real OpenType fonts directly in InDesign. IndyFont/IndyFont Pro indiscripts http://www.indiscripts.com IndyFont = free; Pro = €59.00 (~$78 US) Mac and Windows, CS4–CC Rating:

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IndyFont 1.1 is a Javascript that creates valid OpenType fonts directly inside of Adobe InDesign. That’s right: it turns InDesign into a font-creation app. These fonts can be used in any program that recognizes the OpenType format, including, of course, InDesign itself. To be fair, IndyFont is not a substitute for a professional font editor like Font Lab Studio, Fontographer, RoboFont, or Glyphs. For example, unlike professional font apps, IndyFont cannot edit existing fonts, instead only those it creates itself. However, IndyFont is a handy tool to use when you need to create a custom bullet or ligature. To give credit where it’s due, IndyFont was originally developed by Theunis de Jong

(also known as Jongware) in 2012 before being updated, and now co-authored by French scripter-extraordinaire Marc Autret. And while this is a script, it is one of the most complex and powerful scripts on the market, performing a task that few people thought would be possible. Installation on Windows and Mac is easy. In InDesign CS5 and above (Mac), place the IndyFontPro.jsx file inside the Adobe InDesign > Scripts > Scripts Panel folder. On Windows (CS5 and above), open the InDesign Scripts panel (Window > Utilities > Scripts), right-click the User folder, and choose Reveal In Explorer. Drag IndyFontPro.jsx into the Scripts Panel folder to install.

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InReview: IndyFont

Figure 2a: Click to add to menu

Figure 2b: Indiscript menu item

Figure 1: Access from the Scripts panel

Using IndyFont is also easy. You can access it the first time by double-clicking the script from the Scripts panel (Figure 1). Once it’s running, you can add the Indiscript menu item by clicking a button in the IndyFont user interface (Figure 2).

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Creating a custom bullet, for example, is a cinch. Let’s say I’m designing an instruction manual and would like to use this pencil icon for emphasis as a bullet. I start by creating a new, blank document of

any size. Next, I click the IndyFont script in the Scripts panel or choose IndyFont PRO from the Indiscripts menu in the InDesign menu bar. The main dialog box opens (Figure 3, next page).

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InReview: IndyFont

Figure 3: The main IndyFont dialog box

In the Characters field I type /bullet. Next, I click the plus sign (+) to the right of the field to insert the /bullet (Unicode 2022) into the Glyph list (Figure 4). Note the green label that appears, telling me that a glyph has been added. From here I click the Create button in the lower right. Doing so creates a template. On page one of the template is the IndyFont header (Figure 5).

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Figure 4: Access the Characters field in the main dialog box

Figure 5: IndyFont header

The header lists Identification metadata such as font copyright information,

description, version, and license, as was displayed in the main dialog box. But page two is where the magic happens. On the page is a 1000-point sample image of a standard bullet (Figure 6, next page). The sample image indicates the scale that must be used when creating my bullet. To the right of the sample image is a green line, which represents the right side bearing of the font. For more information about font

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InReview: IndyFont

Figure 6: Sample image of a standard bullet

widths, side bearings, and more, see this article at InDesignSecrets. The horizontal line across the lower third of the page represents the glyph’s baseline. Now I just need to draw my custom bullet character—or paste paths in and fill them. Be forewarned that IndyFont is very picky about what it finds on page two. Only objects filled with Paper or Black may be used. If IndyFont detects anything not to its liking (for example, an applied stroke), it will refuse to export the font. Here in Figure 7 we see our bullet artwork ready to go.

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Figure 7: Bullet artwork

When I run the IndyFont script again, we see that the OTF Export button is now available (Figure 8). (Note: the first time I tried

this, the OTF Export button was grayed out. When I went back and selected the pencil artwork, I discovered an invisible stroke had been applied to one of its pieces. Once I cleaned up my mistake, I could run the script and use this button.) The script will ask you where you want to save your new font. Technically, you can save your font anywhere, provided your font manager knows its whereabouts. However, to make things easy, I saved the file in Applications > Adobe InDesign CC > Fonts. That Fonts folder is convenient if you’re only going to be using the font in InDesign. Once the script has finished, a confirmation dialog box appears to tell you your font is ready for use (Figure 9, next page). Figure 8: Saving your new font

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InReview: IndyFont

Figure 9: Confirmation dialog box

To test my font, I opened a new blank document and created a simple bulleted list (Figure 10).

Figure 11: Creating a Bulleted List paragraph style

Figure 10: Bulleted list

Next, I created a Bulleted List paragraph style (Figure 11). In the Bullets and Numbering panel of the Paragraph Styles panel, I added a custom bullet (Figure 12). From here I added the Pencil Bullet glyph to the paragraph style, and in turn

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Figure 12: Adding a custom bullet

created a Pencil Bullet character style that would be applied to the first glyph of this style. At first, the pencil bullet was so tiny it couldn’t be seen. Why, I don’t really know.

But not to worry. To fix things, I re-opened the Character Styles panel and, with the Preview checkbox enabled, increased the point size of my bullet until it looked right to my eye (24 pt, in this case). I also made the bullet color red instead of black (Figure 13, next page). The whole process is genius. Yes, instead of creating a font I could have easily pasted the red pencils in as inline objects. And had I only needed a few instances of this graphic, I probably would have done exactly that. But in the case where a custom bullet is repeatedly used throughout a longer document, the idea of turning the graphic into a font starts to make sense. Suppose you wanted a font of your signature to use with special documents? Creating a custom signature font would be a snap with IndyFont, provided you know how to turn a bitmapped scan of your signature into a vector object in Adobe Illustrator, for example.

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InReview: IndyFont

And IndyFont isn’t just limited to single glyphs like bullets. For those who want to create more robust fonts with multiple glyphs, IndyFont Pro is your answer. Again, it’s no substitute for an app like Font Lab Studio, but in cases where you need more than one glyph per font, it’s an easy solution. Here are some of its key features: »» Mac OS / Windows compatible; works with Adobe InDesign CS4 through CC

»» Localized for English, French, or German »» Supports most standard glyph names and Unicode values »» Automatic scanning of complex artwork »» New font templates can be created from existing sample font in InDesign »» Supports standard OpenType features such as ligatures, small caps, swashes, oldstyle figures, and slashed zero »» Editable metadata identification fields for font version, copyright, designer, license notice, etc.

when the need arises for a custom font or glyph. And although IndyFont is technically able to create much more than a oneoff bullet or glyph, it’s doubtful that any serious typographer would choose it over Font Lab Studio, Glyphs, or Fontographer. But let’s not forget that these products all come with a steep learning curve and cost. Yet when the need is small, and time and budget are limited, it’s hard to argue that IndyFont is well worth the investment.

n

Figure 13: Changing the bullet color

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For complete information on building more complex fonts, consult the excellent IndyFont Manual that comes with the script. A few videos can also be found on YouTube, as well. Although I don’t expect a majority of designers will be running out to buy themselves a copy of IndyFont, it’s hard to argue with its usefulness

Scott Citron is the award-winning creative director of Scott Citron Design. Based in New York City, Scott specializes in publication and corporate identity systems for print and screen. In 2013 he and fellow NY IDUG co-chapter rep Bob Levine formed Tabulous.net, a company focused on providing design and production services to publishers moving InDesign content to the iPad and other mobile devices. He can be reached at scottcitrondesign.com.

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InDesigner: Yoga Journal

Yoga Journal www.yogajournal.com

By Diane Burns

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It would have been hard for the yogis and yoginis of ancient India to have imagined the multi-billion dollar industry that yoga has become today. Yoga and its ancillary products—from yoga mats to workshops to ayurvedic herbs—are estimated to generate over $6.5 billion annually in the United States. Of all the publications in this field, Yoga Journal stands out as one of the oldest and most successful. As this ancient system adjusted to modern times, Yoga Journal too has had to move its print publication, founded in 1975, into the digital realm. Fortunately, they had converted from QuarkXPress to InDesign in 2007; and in 2012, they decided to take the plunge with Adobe’s Digital Publishing Suite (DPS) to create tablet versions of the magazine. Aside from the business issues of promoting and including advertising in a digital

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version of the magazine, there were many technical and workflow issues to resolve, such as staffing and deciding the best approach to editing and proofing. And the designers had to learn how to use InDesign's interactive features and DPS. But for creative director Charli Ornett, the biggest challenge of all was adapting the design from print to a digital format in a meaningful way. The adaptation had to be all or nothing. As with other publications, in order to count tablet downloads as part of their circulation, Yoga Journal had to meet the requirements of the Audit Bureau of Circulations (recently renamed the Alliance for Audited Media), the organization that audits and certifies publication circulation numbers for advertisers. The magazine is required to create a “digital replica,” in which every word from the print issue is included in the digital version, as well as every photo. Text and

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InDesigner: Yoga Journal

images can be added to the digital version, but nothing from the print version may be omitted. Fortunately, like yoga, the seemingly free-flowing system of movements the magazine represents, underneath the surface Yoga Journal is highly structured and organized. Each issue (the magazine is published nine times annually) follows the same pattern. Editorially, in addition to two to three feature articles, the magazine includes departments containing multipart news stories as well as several instructional articles on yoga pose sequences with step-by-step how-tos. There are also departments that cover healthy eating and recipes, beauty tips, and mental and spiritual wellness. From a production point of view, text and object styles are applied meticulously in the print version, and files are constructed with nothing extra. These practices helped to make the conversion from print to the ­digital version go more smoothly.

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From a design perspective, the core approach was for the digital app to flow seamlessly. Any extra navigational and interactive components had to serve a ­content-driven purpose. For example, slideshows and swipes are used when there is a series of poses that users need to be able to practice. Videos are also used to show the various steps involved in a pose sequence, especially a complex one. Pop-ups are used when that’s the best way to present information, usually showing small snippets of text such as a sentence describing a pose’s benefits or an author’s bio. We asked creative director Ornett for three tips from her experience that might help other art directors and designers who are moving a publication into print. First and foremost, she advises “Don’t include interactivity just because you can. Think about your user more than all the fun stuff you can do. If your user wants to read in-depth articles, keep it simple and streamlined. Look at tons of other apps, but keep your reader/user in

mind at all times.” Secondly, she encourages creativity and experimentation, especially for smaller titles, and in fact, many issues later, feels that Yoga Journal is still figuring things out. Finally, Ornett offers a suggestion for the entire organization: “Don’t work this process only from the top down! Some of the people with the most interesting ideas are not the directors or managers. Let all your people bring ideas to the table and you will get much better results.” The following pages illustrate some of the ways Yoga Journal adapted pages from print to tablet.

n Diane Burns is an Adobe InDesign Certified Instructor and consultant based in San Francisco. She is co-author of Digital Publishing with Adobe InDesign CS6.

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InDesigner: Yoga Journal

In the print version, the magazine's Table of Contents is listed on two pages. Like many other publications, Yoga Journal's designers found that a long scrolling page, with hyperlinks for each article, works well for the tablet version.

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InDesigner: Yoga Journal

The “Om” department is a collection of news stories, trends, and small pieces on people, places, and things in the world of yoga. The print version in this issue runs for seven pages. For the digital version, the department was divided into two separate articles. In this first article, what had been single pages in the print layout becomes two pages, and in some cases images are added that do not appear in the print version.

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InDesigner: Yoga Journal

The three center pages of the “Om” department in the print version become a single article of six pages in the digital version. The order of the articles is changed, and sidebars are moved to single pages.

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InDesigner: Yoga Journal

The “Eating Well” department in the print version starts with a full-bleed photo, along with the beginning of the article. Additional photos have recipes next to them, as the article continues and finally jumps to pages in the back of the magazine, where the pages include ads.

The tablet version features three pages with full-bleed photos. Next to the photos, a button brings up a pop-up box with the recipes. The article then starts on the fourth page and continues to the end.

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InDesigner: Yoga Journal

The print version of the “Home Practice” department, which features a yoga pose sequence how-to, has summary information about the pose series on the first page. Next, a spread shows each of the 16 poses in the sequence.

The digital version starts with access to the summary info via buttons for pop-up boxes and a link to a video of the entire sequence. The second page shows a summary of each of the poses in the sequence, with access again to the video. The third page contains a slide show of images with detailed information about each pose.

2  THREAD THE NEEDLE

Return to all fours. Turn the right palm up and slide it under your left armpit. Twist to the left as you lower onto your right shoulder. Resist the left hip back. Press into the left hand to come up and do other side.

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3 GOMUKHASANA  COW FACE POSE, WITH LEG VARIATION

Return to all fours; sit back on heels. Place the left arm behind the back, palm out. Raise the right arm, bend the elbow, and clasp fingers. Release; do other side.

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By Jeff Gamet

InBrief: New & Improved Products

Welcome to the exciting world of InDesign CC! It’s exciting in a good way because it’s new and brings with it features we’ve been wanting for a long time. It’s exciting in a not so good way because add-ons we rely on might break. This month we take a look at some plug-ins that are ready to go even if you aren’t quite ready to jump into the CC world. PDF2ID Recosoft, $199 www.recosoft.com PDF2ID is a great plug-in that gives you more control when importing PDF documents than InDesign’s built-in importer does, and Recosoft has made sure it’s ready for InDesign CC. PDF2ID recreates the layout

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for the PDFs it imports, complete with styles, tables, images, annotations, grouped elements, multiple pages, and more. It even imports Microsoft’s PDF-like XPS file format. PDF2ID supports InDesign CS4 and newer, so you can use it now, and know that it won’t break when you eventually make the jump to InDesign CC.

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InBrief: New & Improved Products

Tada QR!

be saved as Illustrator-compatible files. Sure, you can make QR codes directly in InDesign CC, but Tada QR! gives you more control over how you make your codes, and makes it easier to spice them up with other graphic elements, too.

Rorohiko, $14.99 rorohiko.com

Veneer

retro concert poster. The OpenType font was designed by Ryan Martinson and includes a nice collection of decorative symbols to go along with its regular and italic faces.

Serial Sue JOEBOB Graphics, $33 www.fonts.com

Yellow Design Studio, $15/$39 (complete family) www.fonts.com Love them or hate them, QR codes are part of the design world, which means designers need a way to create them. Rorohiko’s Tada QR! (also mentioned in Sandee Cohen’s QR code article in this issue) is a plug-in for InDesign CS 5.5 and later that lets you make editable QR codes without jumping into a separate app. It supports linking codes to text frames so they dynamically update when the copy changes, using GREP to bulk-create QR codes, and creating linkable files that can be used in multiple layouts and documents. Plus, the codes you make can

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Veneer from Yellow Design Studio is a perfect example of how great-looking decorative fonts don’t have to be expensive. This san serif font has a contradictory look that totally works: It’s clean and grungy. That look lends itself well to callouts and stylized text and would look completely in place on a

Casual handwriting scripts can be a bear to use, because it’s hard to make one that’s easy to read for more than a few words. That’s not a problem Serial Sue shares. JJW van der Ham designed Serial Sue to feel very much like a written note, but without the usual illegible characters we scribble by hand. It doesn’t feel stilted, which is another problem handwritten scripts can suffer from, and letters flow naturally from one to another. Serial Sue is great for decorative works and callouts even though it can feel a little aggressive at times.

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InBrief: New & Improved Products

InGutter, HurryCover, FontMixer Indiscripts, free www.indiscripts.com

Compatibility with mission-critical scripts can be a showstopper when it’s time to upgrade to a new version of InDesign, so

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Indiscripts has been hard at work making sure its tools are ready for Creative Cloud. InGutter 2, HurryCover 2.022, and FontMixer are all up to speed and ready to go when you make the move to InDesign CC. For those who aren’t in the know, InGutter gives you better control over the gutters between columns in InDesign CS4 and higher, and supports creating rules between text columns even when working on non-rectangular paths. HurryCover 2 handles the hard work in creating book covers and dust jackets: you provide the front and back cover dimensions, spine size, and dust jacket flap sizes, and it builds a template that perfectly fits your book. When you make changes to the cover’s dimensions, it automatically resizes your layout elements to fit, too. FontMixer is a tool that lets you create a composite font from two fonts you already have. It’s handy when a typeface that you like is missing a piece you really need, like

an accented character. Indiscripts designed FontMixer for IndyFont, but it works well for anyone who needs to mash together typefaces for their design projects.

Blurb PDF to Book Blurb, $3.99 and up www.blurb.com If you rely on Blurb to make custom books, you can just keep on working when you make the move to InDesign CC, since the company’s plug-in is now CC ready. The Blurb plug-in helps you set up your books for their printing system, and includes a specifications calculator to make sure the PDFs you make from your InDesign files are ready for publishing. You can order as many or as few books as you like, and they’re all printed on quality papers with good bindings, and discounts kick in when you order ten or more copies. Turnaround times are fast, too; orders arrive within ten days.

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InBrief: New & Improved Products

Smart Styles WoodWing, $199 www.woodwing.com

Smart Styles only occasionally, you can purchase a subscription for $9.99 a month.

italics. And it supports several languages, so you can use it for international projects, too.

Flexo

n

Durotype, $49/$279 (complete family) www.fonts.com

Smart Styles from WoodWing is on board with InDesign CC and InCopy CC support. The plug-in lets you drag and drop formatted objects into its Library panel and then use the styles it creates to format other items in your documents. Smart Styles supports custom styles for frames, text, and other objects in your layouts; Liquid Layout rules and actions for buttons; QR codes; exporting for alt text; and more. If you need

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Jeff Gamet is The Mac Observer’s Managing Editor, contributing editor for Design Tools Monthly, and the author of “The Designer’s Guide to Mac OS X.” You can find him on several podcasts including Apple Context Machine and We Have Communicators, too. For a free issue of Design Tools Monthly, visit www.design-tools.com.

Flexo from Durotype was designed by Ben Blom with an approachable feel that works well for both headlines and some body text, with organic yet geometric smooth lines. It catches your eye without being obtrusive, and includes enough styles to meet many of your design needs. This OpenType font is available in Regular, Thin, Light, Heavy, Medium, Bold, and Black with matching

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InDex: Your Key to Our Content

The InDex

Can’t find that article you saw in an earlier issue? Wondering whether we covered that obscure plug-in? Never fear, the InDex is here.

Index for issues 1 through 55, July 2004 through September 2013

MAGAZINE

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The first issue of InDesign Magazine was published in July 2004. Since then, we’ve cranked out thousands of pages on hundreds of related topics. While it’s possible to use Acrobat to simultaneously search all past issues of the magazine for one word or phrase, many readers have clamored for a formal index at the back of each issue. However, with 55 issues to account for, that’s not feasible. Instead, the InDex will live as a PDF you can download for free. If you come across a topic you want to know more about, but it’s in an issue you don’t have, you’re not out of luck. We sell back issues at www.indesignmag.com.

If the topic you’re looking for isn’t in the InDex, you have one more way to search: that PDF trick we mentioned. To make it work, all of your magazine issue PDFs must be in one folder. Open any issue in Acrobat, and then press Shift+Command+F (Shift+Ctrl+F on Windows). In the Search window that appears, be sure that you click the radio button that says “All PDF Documents in,” and in the dropdown menu below that, choose the folder in which you placed your magazine issues. You’re on your way to finding anything in any PDF!

Click here to download the InDex.

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While this PDF is for your eyes only, you can tell your friends about the great discounts they can enjoy right now: $10 Off a 1-year subscription (coupon code friend) $15 Off a 2-year subscription (coupon code friend2) Send them to www.indesignmag.com/ purchase.php

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Idm issue 55