Page 1

Issue 27

To the rescue! Action heroes build resilience and combat anxiety.

The ageless art of yoga How to embrace the ancient practice if you’re nine or 90.

Chia pudding with coconut and yoghurt

Kicking goals off the field For game-changing results in Aboriginal communities.


CONTEN 12 08

20

16

FEATURES

FAVOURITES

08 Training the heart and soul

04 The buzz

11 In focus

06 5 mins with...

18 Recipes

06 Q&A

26 Get connected

07 Is it true?

27 Mindfulness

Exercise can boost more than your fitness.

12 Kicking goals off the field Former footy stars are paving the way in corporate Australia.

16 The Farm comes to the city

The Three Blue Ducks grow their foodie empire.

20 To the rescue! Teaching our children ‘super powers’ helps build resilience and combats anxiety.

24 The ageless art of yoga How to start your yoga journey if you’re nine or 90.

2

guhealth.com.au

|

INFORM | ISSUE 27

11

colouring page


NTS

GM’s MESSAGE

Hello and welcome to Issue 27 of Inform. As we’re nearing the end of the year, it’s a chance to take some much needed down time and reflect on the year that was. Often the focus is how to improve ourselves in the New Year, however Indigenous ex-footballers David Liddiard and Michael O’Loughlin provide inspiration on how you can give back to your community to help others and in turn improve yourself. See their story on page 12 to read more about how they’re kicking goals off the football field to help bridge the gap in Aboriginal communities. In this edition we explore the theme of community. We look at the benefits of training in a sporting community and why you should embrace yoga at any age, including together as a family or group with AcroYoga.

24 Managing Editor: Rachel Pace Features Editor: Emma Brown Art Director: Jodie Griffiths Contributors: Gretchen Masters, Ricci Hoffman and Dr Sacha Rombouts. Inform is published by GU Health. This magazine may not be reproduced in part or in full without the written permission of the publishers. All expressions of opinion are opinions of the authors only and published on the basis that they are not regarded as representing the official opinion of Grand United Corporate Health Ltd (GU Health) unless expressly stated. GU Health accepts no responsibility for the accuracy of any of the opinions, advice, representations or information contained in this publication and readers should rely on their own advice and enquiries in making decisions affecting their own health, wellbeing and interest.

Contact Us: Post: Reply Paid, GPO Box 2988, Melbourne, Vic 8060

As we spend much of our lives at work or school it’s important to be mindful of checking in with our family members. Child Psychologist, Dr Sacha Rombouts shares how families can build resilience and combat anxiety by believing in action heroes, from page 20. The Co-owner and Head Chef of the Three Blue Ducks restaurants, Darren Robertson and a home grown farmer from Orange, Chontelle Grecian share their advice on how to cultivate and cook from your own garden. The head chef shares some of his favourite recipes on page 18. We’ve also launched a new section called ‘Get connected’ which reviews apps, books, videos and podcasts to help you connect with your family, your world and yourself. All the best for the upcoming holiday season. Until next time,

Gary Elliott Executive General Manager GU Health

Ph: 1800 249 966 Email: corporate@guhealth.com.au guhealth.com.au

Grand United Corporate Health Ltd (GU Health) ABN 99 002 985 033 GPO Box 2988 Melbourne VIC 8060

Re-think Reduce Reuse Recycle

Did you know that you can claim your extras in three easy steps? Forget the time and effort it takes to mail us a claim form. In three easy steps you can submit your claim with our easy-to-use Flex-eClaim online claiming system. To get started, just log into Online Member Services at guhealth.com.au and select ‘Flex-eClaim’ from the Claims dropdown menu option.

Cover image credit: by photographer Wayne Quilliam.

guhealth.com.au

|

INFORM | ISSUE 27

3


THE BUZZ

Movember This Movember, grow your moustache for men’s health. The aim of Movember is to raise funds and awareness on prostate cancer and depression in men.

Sign up here: au.movember.com

Donate Life Thank You Day

20

To honour organ and tissue donors and their families by saying ‘thank you’.

NOV

Read the life-saving stories from people touched by donations:

donatelife.gov.au/thank-you-day

20

NOV

Universal Children’s Day A day to celebrate children’s rights such as the right to health, to education, to play, to family life, to be protected from violence, to not be discriminated, and to have their views heard.

Find out more: un.org/en/events/childrenday/

1

DEC

20-26 NOV

Skin Cancer Action Week With two in three Australians diagnosed with skin cancer by age 70, the week reminds us of the importance of sun protection and early skin cancer detection.

Resources can be found at: cancer.org.au 4

guhealth.com.au

|

INFORM | ISSUE 27

World AIDS Day Show your support for people living with HIV and to commemorate those who have died by wearing a red ribbon.

Find out more: worldaidsday.org.au


International Day of People with Disability Help break down disability barriers and celebrate abilities.

5

DEC

Visit: idpwd.com.au

3

DEC

International Volunteer Day Do you want to donate your time?

Find a volunteer opportunity here: volunteeringaustralia.org

21

DEC

Summer solstice – the longest day of the year.

26 JAN

National Apology Day The anniversary of the apology to Australia’s Indigenous peoples, for past laws, policies and practices that have impacted on Australia’s First Nations Peoples, particularly members of the Stolen Generations.

Find out more: australia.gov.au/aboutaustralia/our-country/our-people

13 FEB

Australia Day A day to come together to celebrate what’s great about Australia and being Australian.

Go to: australiaday.org.au guhealth.com.au

|

INFORM | ISSUE 27

5


FAVOURITE

Q&A Q: My partner and I are trying to have a baby,

5 mins with...

when should I upgrade my membership to be covered for pregnancy? Suzie, NSW

Name: Sandra Helou Position: Head of Product, Marketing and Communications Time with GU Health: 5 years My new role at GU Health involves... working on exciting new communitybuilding projects that’ll see GU Health and its members into the future. People who know me would describe me as... tenacious. Being part of the GU Health team has impacted my wellbeing by... allowing me to work within a company and with individuals who share my personal values – it’s been such a positive experience.

If you have any questions about health insurance that you’d like us to answer, email them to magazine@guhealth.com.au We recommend that you upgrade your cover to include pregnancy and birth-related services well before you think about conceiving. This minimises any stress and out-of-pocket expenses as there is a 12-month waiting period on cover for pregnancy and birth-related services. Changing your cover to family status is also important to make sure that your baby is covered from birth. How do I check if I’m covered for pregnancy and birth-related services, and have the right hospital cover? • Check Your Cover at a Glance and Your Plan Information, which you would have received in your GU Health Welcome Pack. • Refer to your Online Member Services at guhealth.com.au to see if you’re covered for ante and post-natal classes. • Or call your Member Relations Team on 1800 249 966. Will my baby be covered too? If you’re on a single membership and have the right hospital cover, you can receive benefits for the costs of the birth. If your baby needs to be admitted in their own right as a private patient, they won’t be covered.

I spend most of my time... with my one year-old and working on building our new home.

To protect you and your family we recommend you upgrade your cover to family as soon as you’re aware of the pregnancy, so the baby is covered from birth and a 12-month waiting period doesn’t apply. At a minimum, you will need to upgrade within at least 60 days before the expected due date.

My challenge for 2016 is… balancing being a new mum with maintaining my personal goals.

Depending on your level of cover you may need to consider that a second excess will apply if your baby is admitted to hospital.

The best advice I’ve ever been given is... the stories your mind tells you aren’t always true! My favourite forms of exercise/activity are… yoga and spin. And I love to paddle board when I get a chance. I am most inspired by… travel. ˜

6

guhealth.com.au

|

INFORM | ISSUE 27

If you’re on a family membership and have the right level of cover, your baby is automatically covered from birth. Inform us immediately after the birth to make sure the baby is added on your membership so no waiting periods apply. We’ll allow up to a maximum of 12 months to add your newborn to an existing family membership before waiting periods begin to apply.

Whether your pregnancy is planned, long awaited or a surprise your Member Relations Team is here to help you. Simply call us on 1800 249 966 with any questions you may have about your cover relating to pregnancy and birth-related services.


FAVOURITE

Is it true? Does being a dad make you happier? Surprisingly, yes! We asked a couple of experts why they thought being a father made men feel better off. Some call it the hardest job in the world, but the latest findings from the Australian Unity Wellbeing Index reveal men are happier when they have kids.

“As much as they might complain about kids’ activities, they receive hidden benefits that add up to being less isolated than other men their age.”

meaning to the mundane”. He says a man can achieve all the wealth he needs, but “if you don’t get it right with kids, all the rest is meaningless”.

Home and away

Benefits at work

While dads today might be doing more parenting than their dads ever did, author, therapist, educator and dad Timothy O’Leary says the biggest reward is the love men get back from kids and partners. Tim suggests that being a dad might help give purpose, satisfaction with relationships and greater sense of community. “It’s not that men without kids aren’t happy, but around midlife many men fall into the trap of focusing too much on work and not enough on relationships, whereas dads who are involved in the lives of their children are chatting to other mums and dads at soccer or gymnastics,” Tim says.

Even though it’s expensive to raise a family, Tim suggests at work, dads are more likely to be seen as stable and reliable employees, and increased empathy gained from parenting often translates into the workplace where they show greater understanding. “The flip-side of all this is that many dads, especially new-dads, struggle with work-life balance, where they find their career taking off at the same time their new family’s needs are highest. We have to give new dads flexibility,” he adds.

Dr Rifi says: “Being a parent is the hardest job in the world. Any parent knows that raising children is a difficult feat. No one challenges you like your own children.”

Good times, bad times The 2015 Australian Father of the Year Dr Jamal Rifi, of the Belmore Medical Centre, Sydney, says being a dad “gives

So why do it? Dr Rifi believes the answer might be a combination of genetics and the fulfilment of a subconscious need in some men. “The sense of completion and accomplishment we get from being a father is probably imprinted in our genes,” he says. “Like a key to a lock on a safe that you didn’t know you had buried, children unlock their parents’ memories of childhood, laughter and life experience.” ˜ guhealth.com.au

|

INFORM | ISSUE 27

7


FEATURE At the gym If you’re more of an indoor exerciser, the gym might be your best bet. Classes where you work with others, like boxing, lend themselves to meeting others more than sitting on a spin bike with the music up and your head down. Complex classes, like AcroYoga or a dance discipline, can also encourage conversation. You’re more likely to stop, listen and take your time to figure it out in small groups.

At work

Training the heart and soul Exercise can boost more than just fitness. You can have fun and make friends at the same time. If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together – African proverb. If you observe children they’re constantly exercising in groups, however this ‘exercise’ is disguised as play. Teenagers also spend most of their spare time with friends. But once you enter the workforce and take on the responsibilities of adult life, you may find that you tend to exercise solo, which can leave you missing out on a multitude of benefits. If you’re new to an area or don’t have family to spend time with each night, exercising in a group can be a great way to connect with others, which is one of our basic human needs. Think of it as a way to build your own community, make lasting friendships and maybe even meet a great love. 8

guhealth.com.au

|

INFORM | ISSUE 27

By doing something you enjoy, at a time that suits you, you’re more likely to meet like-minded people. For instance new mums have plenty of opportunities to meet other mums at antenatal classes, mothers’ groups and childcare. But you may find that the only shared interest is having a baby in the same month. However, if you attend a mums and bubs yoga class or an outdoor boot camp with childcare, you’re more likely to find new mums with similar hobbies and priorities. Traditionally, if you wanted to exercise with others you’d either join a sports team or go to an aerobics class. Fortunately, things have improved, here’s a selection of group activities that anyone can enjoy.

Maybe you feel like you already see enough of your colleagues. But by exercising together, you can form more meaningful friendships and meet people from other areas of the business. Options can range from a lunchtime walking group to hiring a trainer for bootcamp, to yoga in the boardroom or entering a social sports tournament. If you’re paying for a trainer, make sure that people commit to a few months at a time. Aim for continuity, without relying on people’s best intentions each week.

Train for good Charities regularly run training groups for big events, like running festivals and ocean swims. You can generally join these groups for free if you enter the event and fundraise for the charity. These groups are great for beginner and intermediate exercisers and can be a fantastic way to make friends. You’ll see each other up to four times a week over a period of months. Just make sure to choose training times and locations that suit you, so you’re more likely to turn up.


Connect online There are plenty of options for meeting like-minded training buddies online – see the box on the right for examples. Or simply search for what you need, such as walking groups in Melbourne, anyone? Kayaking on the Murray River? Or soft-sand running in Manly? Facebook is a great way to find local groups, as is eventbrite.com.au and meetup.com is genius. There are also groups for mums to train in and share the childcare. Groups who walk for an hour and then go for breakfast, and others who walk for days on end. You can join dance classes, swim squads, climbing groups and more. And the best bit? Most of these groups prioritise taking the time for a chat, so you’re bound to get to know people better than you would via more formal fitness channels.

Find a group that suits you AcroYoga

Join a sports team or club

A fusion of yoga, acrobatics and Thai massage, with a partner or trio to create poses, in the Sunshine Coast, Brisbane and Sydney, see: acroyoga.com.au. For children’s and family classes in Sydney: flyingyogis.net.au

From netball, triathlon to dragon boat racing check out your local association: netball.com.au triathlon.org.au or ausdbf.com.au

Learn and practice Spanish, whilst exercising at Centennial Park, Sydney: raquelholgado.com

Meetup From rock climbing, bushwalking to nightclub dancing, meet up with people who share your interests – or start your own group, Australia-wide: meetup.com

Can Too

Fit to travel If you’re single, or if you have a partner who is less adventurous than you, it can be tough to find the right travel buddy. So why not join others for a healthy holiday? There are yoga camps in Bali, ocean swimming in Europe, groups running marathons all over the world, multi-day cycle tours and mountains to climb. If you can think of somewhere you’d like to go or something you’d like to do, you’re bound to find a group that meets your needs. And make lifelong friends at the same time. There’s no need for exercise to be a solo activity. It’s meant to be enjoyable. If you prefer your own company, put on your headphones and go for it. But if you’re looking for company, distraction or any of the other benefits detailed over the page, now is the perfect time to give one of these groups a go. See the box on the right for inspiration on how to find a group to suit you.

Learn Spanish and exercise

Run, ride and swim for cancer research, professional coaching for swim races to marathon events, beginners welcome, in Sydney and Melbourne: cantoo.org.au

Fitness First for Teens FFIT Holidays gives 14 to 18 yearolds access to Fitness First clubs in NSW, ACT, Qld and Vic throughout school holidays for free: fitnessfirst.com.au/about-us/ fitness-first-for-teens

Fitness Singles An online site to find fitness dates and exercise friends: fitness-singles.com

GymbaROO Infants’ movement classes for six-weeks to five year-olds, to crawl, jump, hop, hang, climb, sing and dance, Australia-wide: gymbaroo.com.au

Pregnancy and mums and bubs Find classes Australia-wide from aerobics to Barre Body, Pilates and yoga: bubhub.com.au

Ocean Swim Safaris Group swimming adventures from Heron Island to Vanuatu: oceanswimsafaris.com

Sydney Dance Company Dance classes including ballet, contemporary, jazz, hip hop, Zumba, Pilates and more, from the ages of 16, beginners welcome: sydneydancecompany.com

Wett Ones This LGBT+ swim club, welcomes swimmers of all sexualities and genders. First three sessions are free, in Sydney: wettones.org

Yoga for over 50s Yoga classes in Sydney’s Eastern Suburbs for over 50s at all levels: tranquability.com u guhealth.com.au

|

INFORM | ISSUE 27

9


The benefits of exercising with others Motivation

Save money

Be inspired by the leader (if there is one) and by other participants.

A lot of group activities are free, or much cheaper than doing them solo.

Have more fun

Obligation

Let the people you meet provide variety and entertainment, so you’re more likely to enjoy exercise long-term.

You’re more likely to train consistently as no-one wants to be the unreliable group member who doesn’t turn up.

Encouragement Safety

Receive encouragement from others to keep going, push further and reach your goals.

There’ll be people to help if you become injured or unwell.

Pip can do anything with Can Too Pip Davis is living proof that you can achieve anything with support from an exercise group. She is training for the New York Marathon after undergoing a knee and shoulder reconstruction in 2014. Pip, pictured below centre, is professionally coached in a group by the Can Too Foundation in return for raising funds for cancer research. Pip started with the Foundation by completing the nine kilometre Blackmores Bridge Run in 2005, which was her first running event.

“I couldn’t do it on my own, I’m not dedicated enough,” says Pip. The business executive said that doing the long runs together, where you’re all training for the same event, whilst having a chat provides real camaraderie. “Even if you’re slow like me you can always find someone in the group you can run with at your pace. I’m not the most talented but no one cares, it’s all about participation. It doesn’t matter if you think you’re crap, you’re lapping everyone on the couch.” Pip says there’s much more to Can Too than running. “If I can change the

life of one person it’ll be worth it.” She’s raised over $10,000, with some of the grants going to researchers of non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, which her father passed away from when she was a teenager. She also got to meet one of the researchers, who was a guest speaker at a Can Too training session, and learnt about the developments they’re making in fighting the disease. “Can Too thanks me but I should thank them, it’s changed my life. I’ve met amazing people, received great support, especially from my coach Tim. I’ve made the best lifelong friends from the first Can Too I did in 2005.” Her coach, Tim Lindop, has run 13 marathons including the Berlin and Australian Outback Marathons. However, he says that he gets the most satisfaction seeing Can Too participants achieve their goals, from beginners doing their first five kilometre fun run to Pip doing the marathon. He says that in Can Too everyone is there because they’ve been touched by cancer. “There’s no egos, no superstars and they all help each other. The gains they make in the 12-week program is unbelievable.” ˜

10

guhealth.com.au

|

INFORM | ISSUE 27


IN FOCUS

More than a matter of speaking Speech Pathologist, Tamara Klein talks to Inform about how and when speech pathology can assist in your child’s development.

When someone mentions speech pathology, many of us think of someone who helps people with a stutter or lisp. While it’s true they can help with those issues, speech pathologists diagnose and treat a wide range of communication disorders, including difficulties with speaking, listening, understanding language, reading, writing and social skills. Speech pathologists can support people with difficulty communicating due to developmental delays, stroke, brain injury or from a learning disability. They also work with people who have difficulty swallowing food and drinking safely. Children and speech pathology Speech Pathologist, Tamara Klein of Brain-Train Therapy and Consulting

Ella was found to have autism and developmental delay. Speech pathology has helped improve her language and interaction skills. “For the last two years Ella and her speech pathologist have worked on phonetics and social skills,” Tamara says. “She has made much progress in this time, with weekly homework to reinforce what she works on in her sessions.” Holistic approach the key It’s not only patients who need to be involved. Tamara Klein says, “best practice research shows any therapy program should be conducted in partnership with parents, carers and teachers so they can learn strategies to support their child.” Tamara Guest agrees. “My husband and I completed a four-month program at The Hanen Centre®”, designed to help parents of children with autism learn strategies to assist their child. This involved class time and many home visits, which looked at family dynamics and ways to improve learning and interaction,” she said. “School has also been heavily involved through meetings and emails discussing diagnosis and progress.” Her main piece of advice for other parents would be to make sure to find a speech pathologist that you and your child connect with. ˜

Services says parents commonly looked to speech pathology if their child was not talking by the age of 2 and a half had difficulty pronouncing sounds or was difficult to understand. She said other issues included poor social interaction and play skills. “I’m noticing more referrals relating to children who are late talkers are delayed in their social skills or play,” she said. “I think this is partly due to increased awareness in the community and more knowledge about child development by early childcare staff.” A parent’s perspective Tamara Guest’s daughter, Ella, seven, has been seeing a speech pathologist for two years after her prep teacher noticed Ella was having difficulty recalling information. After a complicated diagnostic process,

Looking for a speech pathologist? You can visit our website guhealth.com.au and use the ‘Find a provider’ search tool.

guhealth.com.au

|

INFORM | ISSUE 27

11


FEATURE

Image credit: Quentin Jones/Fairfax Syndication.

Kicking goals off the field Former footy stars are paving the way in corporate Australia and delivering game-changing results for their communities. Words: Emma Brown When CEO and Indigenous advocate, David Liddiard OAM (pictured right), was a teenager in Sydney’s West during the 1970s he mostly ‘wagged’ school. He often played park football with the Colyton Colts. He was spotted by a Parramatta Eels talent scout and the next day the 19 year-old signed a contract. He was determined to make the first grade. His strategy was to leave the car in the garage and run everywhere. The strategy worked. He lapped his competitors at the 400 metre track to beat the local running record, the coach took notice and as they say the rest is history. David’s illustrious 14-year international rugby league career included being awarded the Dally M Rookie of the Year, playing for the Parramatta Eels, in two 12

guhealth.com.au

|

INFORM | ISSUE 27

grand finals, for Penrith, Manly and for four years in the United Kingdom. He’s now determined to beat the record on Aboriginal disadvantage which includes reducing the statistic that 54 per cent of Aboriginal youth don’t transition from school to employment or higher education. “I want to close the gap on that [figure] and we don’t have time to waste,” says David. The determination that drove David on the football field is now driving him in the corporate world. His aim is to deliver opportunities for his people, in an effort to bridge the gap in health, education, employment and prosperity between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.


“In Aboriginal communities that have had five generations dependent on welfare, if you’ve never seen your mum and dad work you’re bound to repeat that. That’s the kind of cycle that I’m keen to break.” This corporate leader has worked for thirty years to convince young Aboriginal people to not follow his path but to stay in school and to continue onto higher education. The Ngarabal man was the founder and first CEO of the National Aboriginal Sporting Chance Academy (NASCA), where he directed the focus on education to give young people ‘a sporting chance’. The Academy’s work included bringing Indigenous sporting role models such as Sydney Swans stars Michael O’Loughlin and Adam Goodes to tour remote Central Australia, to engage with schoolaged students, to encourage active, healthy lifestyles and inspire the kids to stay in school. “Young Aboriginals see Indigenous athletes on TV such as Adam Goodes and they want to be like them, which is great but realistically those kids can’t all be sportspeople. We need more role models not just sporting ones but in business, represented in senior levels in boardrooms, as entrepreneurs and in politics.”

“I want to see more Aboriginal people especially more women in corporate white collar roles,” says David. Chloe Wighton, a Wiradjuri woman from Gilgandra, NSW, started with NASCA whilst at school, she now sits as a director on the non-profit organisation’s board. She is undertaking a Masters of Museum and Heritage Studies after completing a Bachelor of Arts in Archaeology. Chloe was also nominated for Young Australian of the Year in 2014. “I want to see more Aboriginal people especially more women in corporate white collar roles,” says David. “I’d like them to be open to other careers such as in business, finance and journalism. I want to have a range of role models in all sectors and I want to open

their eyes up to every type of opportunity they could have.” His vision is for corporate Australia to join the team to provide employment opportunities, training, engage in mentoring programs, implement Reconciliation Action Plans and contribute funds to support programs that achieve these outcomes. One of the initiatives that David’s established is a leadership fund with 1.3 million dollars donated so far to pave the way for young Indigenous Australians to be supported through university.

Image credit: AFL Photos

Swans star’s soaring in business AFL great, Michael O’Loughlin (pictured above) who was also mentored by David as a young sportsman, is another inspiring role model, who’s kicking important goals. ”He’s set up a successful business and the Go Foundation, so other Aboriginal kids can see how people like Micky O are thriving after sport,” says David. The AFL premiership-winning player founded CMC Indigenous Services last year after he retired from the head coach position at the QBE Sydney Swans Academy. The specialist cleaning and property maintenance company is now operating in every state and territory in Australia in over 400 sites, has a majority of Indigenous employees and is 51 per cent Indigenous owned. Michael says that he goes above and beyond to employ as many Indigenous people as he can. “To make your own living, to know that you’ve earned that, gives a sense

of pride, so you can stand tall and then your kids and family see that. It’s often undersold that your job, whatever it is, brings self-esteem and confidence and has flow on effects in communities,” says Michael.

It’s the same sacrifice and dedication required to be fit and healthy, to be a strong player in footy – you need to do the same to train the brain in business.” He says that the lessons he’s learnt on the sporting field transfers easily into the corporate space. “Nothing changes in attitude – it’s still about putting in hard work, still seeing an opportunity present itself and taking it with both hands,” he says. “It’s the same sacrifice and dedication required to be fit and healthy, to be a strong player in footy – you need to do the same to train the brain in business.” “Our people are obsessed with AFL and rugby league. Sport for our people is an amazing vehicle to do other things, it’s about health, education, employment and the lessons you learn from sport.” The former AFL player and coach said that he wants to bridge the gap by inspiring young kids to play sport, have a healthy lifestyle, stay in school and take the next step up to succeed in the corporate world. Like Liddiard, he wants to instil that sport isn’t the only option and that to bridge the gap an emphasis must be placed on education. Michael established the Go Foundation in 2009 with former Sydney Swans captain Adam Goodes (who is his best friend and cousin). The foundation has raised over one million dollars, with every cent donated to paying for private education for Aboriginal school students. So far, 17 students have received fully funded scholarships to attend private schools in Sydney. “They don’t need to be sporty and the priority is to get more girls through the education system.” guhealth.com.au

|

INFORM | ISSUE 27

13


Image credit: Rick Stevens

The students also don’t have to leave home. Rather than living at the boarding schools they are day students which allows them to stay connected with their families. The business owner wears many hats including as a Sydney Swans Academy coach and as an ambassador for many causes including the movement to recognise Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in our constitution and for the Shoulder to Shoulder mentoring walk.

Stepping up for first grade results David has also given back for thirty years and has learnt that for game-changing results you must work strategically and commercially. “You can’t make a difference without being commercial,” says David. The former Parramatta Eels star has achieved great success with Indigenous employment and a strong corporate network through the Aboriginal owned and operated David Liddiard Group.

The walk from the Western Plains Zoo in Dubbo to Taronga Zoo in Sydney involved young Indigenous people travelling the 490 kilometres in a relay for two weeks (pictued above). The Shoulder to Shoulder program recreated the walking of country; to increase young people’s understanding of and connection to country, animals, people and stories.

The businesses range from manufacturing Aboriginal designed coffee cups, they’ve sold 30 million so far, to construction company – Birubi Australia, which employs more than 80 per cent Aboriginal staff.

“Lessons I’ve learned as a business owner on the journey, is that you learn as much as you can, earn as much as you can and give back.”

“Whilst insurance may not seem obvious, it’s an industry that touches every company and business and is in a unique position to be a vehicle of change by engaging with companies to add value on their insurance arrangements through an Indigenous-owned business.”

“That’s something I say often and I humbly believe it. I’ve had a really fortunate career playing football and to do what I love now it’s time to give back to other people. I’m not the sort of person who makes a profit and buys a boat, you’ve got to bloody give back.” 14

guhealth.com.au

|

INFORM | ISSUE 27

More recently he has focused on the professional pathways for Indigenous youth through his new company, Origin Insurance Group, of which he is the CEO.

The David Liddiard group of companies are also providing cultural awareness programs, reconciliation action plans, including training

Indigenous youths to be match fit for employment and training corporations on how to lift their game to recruit and retain Aboriginal staff. “We want to make money and have an impact on Aboriginal communities. That starts with creating awareness and empathy and changing stereotypes so that in the future, our workplaces and boardrooms are as accessible to Indigenous Australians as any other Australians”. The CEO said that he was lucky with his rugby league career to have had the most amazing coaches including


From front left David Liddiard, Michael O’Loughlin and Adam Goodes launching the Barangaroo South Aboriginal Participation Plan.

‘super coach’ Jack Gibson and he wants to provide mentors to other Aboriginal people so they can transition from school to work. The Executive Director of the David Liddiard Group, Andrea Harms, said that mentors were key to the success of the Warrigal program which resulted in an 80 percent employment retention rate for positions at Taronga Zoo, Westpac, Google and David Jones.

Indigenous gap is challenging and there’s a lot of work to do and I don’t want to waste any time.”

‘Aboriginal business is everybody’s business’.

This year, more than 300 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people joined Australian Unity (GU Health’s parent company), as part of the Home Care NSW transfer. Australian Unity, is now one of the larger employers of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in NSW.

The 2014 pilot hospitality apprenticeship program, run in collaboration with Westpac and the Compass Group, started with 15 candidates and 12 are still employed including one being promoted to a supervisor. The training included a fitness program and having mentors available 24/7 to troubleshoot issues, such as providing a solution if they didn’t have a bus or train fare to get to work. “All you need is to teach them the skills and harness their enthusiasm, then they believe and can see a future for themselves,” says Andrea. “We’ve been working with employers to show them that they need to provide an Indigenous mentor, number one. The mentor needs to walk through the workplace culture with them as it’s something they’ve never experienced

David has received a Churchill Fellowship and an Order of Australia medal to name a few. “I keep getting awards, it’s nice but it’s not the reason I keep doing it, it’s rewarding in its own way to get up and feel like you’re making a difference in someone’s life every day.” ˜

Chloe Wighton is pictured above graduating from a Bachelor of Arts in Archaeology.

before and have no understanding of and do a pre-employment program to teach things we take for granted.” David has a saying that: ‘Aboriginal business is everybody’s business’. “Until we work together as a nation to help close the gap, it’s going to go on for a long time, my message to corporate Australia is that we have to all work together, we can’t do this singlehandedly. In the past we’re run programs alone and worked in silos, we need to work as a team so we can have a bigger impact in communities,” he explains. “I’ve been trying to give back for 30 years and loved it, even though sometimes I’ve walked away in tears. The

For more information: cmcindigenous.com.au davidliddiardgroup.com.au go-foundation.org origininsurance.com.au guhealth.com.au

|

INFORM | ISSUE 27

15


FEATURE

The Farm comes to the city The Three Blue Ducks grow their foodie empire with a third eatery called ‘Bob’ popping up in Sydney’s Rosebery. As you enter the Three Blue Ducks latest restaurant called ‘Bob’, you feel as trough a slice of the country has been transported into Sydney’s urban suburbs. The venue resembles a farm shed surrounded by an alfresco dining garden, where another ‘Bob’ – the Argentinian barbecue grill, lives. Whole animals are roasted and fish barbecued on the grill – there’s even a wood fired oven and a charcoal pit too. The original Rosella soup factory has been transformed with funky mural art and pockets of greenery, complete with pumping James Brown music, that juxtaposes with the industrial glass and steel from the site’s origins. The eatery offers table service but with no fuss, no tablecloths, family-friendly, come-as-youare dinning. The design reflects the ‘honest’ food philosophy of the ‘Ducks’. Their trilogy of venues includes the Three Blue Ducks at The Farm in Bryon Bay and the café in Sydney’s beachside Bronte. One of the now five ducks (partners in the business and surfer mates) is chef, 16

guhealth.com.au

|

INFORM | ISSUE 27

Darren Robertson. His passion is for real food made with ‘sustainable as possible’ ingredients with big flavours and textural elements. That means food that’s either been planted, grows wild or was born. He even foragers for ingredients such as edible flowers nasturtiums, succulents, sea fennel and dandelions. Darren resides in Byron, but was imported from the UK where he worked at the Michelin-starred Gravetye Manor and was former head chef at the famed Tetsuya’s restaurant in Sydney. He says the key to sustainable cooking is to have good relationships with local suppliers, to always use free range eggs, pasture-reared beef and Australian fruit and vegetables. The Three Blue Ducks’ ‘Bob’ café and produce store is open for breakfast and lunch every day except Monday. The menu is abundant with vegetables including, a ‘wood fired breakfast bowl’ with roasted cauliflower, sweet potato, pumpkin, smoked eggplant and beetroot. There’s porridge made with carrots along with coconut, blackened pears, burnt

honey, nuts and seeds. Lunch includes roasted artichoke, charred octopus with corn, grapefruit, chili, mixed leaves and fermented radish. See Darren’s tips on the following page on how to cook your own home grown food.

For more information visit: threeblueducks.com


Darren’s tips on how to cook food from your garden: harvest to enjoy. You can cut off the tips and trim the leaves. See the recipe on the following page for barbecued prawns with charred kale.

Grow food that you’re going to eat. Herbs grow easily even in pots on a balcony, such as Australian natives lemon and cinnamon myrtle, to mint, parsley, basil, thyme, chives, chili, rosemary and lemon verbena.

Utilise the whole ingredients such as whole fish and the leaves, skins and seeds of fruits and vegetables, to create simple yet powerful flavours, also with minimal washing up.

Herbs can be used in seasoning, marinades, infused in oils, dehydrated for powders, in cocktails, teas, curries, cookies and desserts.

Preserve fresh produce so you can enjoy in-season food all year around and minimise waste.

Carrots and kale are easy to grow, which you don’t have to

10 tips to cultivate your own ‘good life’ – with a living pantry For food that’s free from harsh chemicals, tastes better, saves you money, is good for you and the environment, grow your own food. You can turn your backyard, balcony or windowsill into a kitchen garden, which you can tend to as a family. The main ingredients needed are sunlight, good soil and water. Ex-city slicker massage therapist, Chontelle Grecian, became a selftaught, home grown backyard farmer in Orange. She shares her advice:

1

In the garden

2

3 4

Buy fresh herbs with roots, use what you want from the top and plant the roots, such as lettuces and bok choy, shoots from garlic, onions and shallots. Plant according to the seasons, including tomatoes, cucumber, onion, herbs, spring onion and celery in summer and cauliflower, lemons, garlic and some herbs over winter; see the Gardenate app for a planting calendar: gardenateapp.com.

5

6

Cultivate a worm farm or a compost to recycle kitchen scraps. Composts can be purchased from most councils and see the worm farm fact sheet in: earthcarers.org.au.

7

Pots are dependent on the potting mix for all their nutritional needs so quality potting mix is vital. Stores like Bunnings offer good advice.

8

The closer your garden is to a source of water the easier it is to water regularly. Remember pots tend to dry out quicker.

9

For free range eggs, chickens are really easy. In a standard size 1100 square metre block (even in urban areas) you can house a brood of hens. They need a secure pen at night like a converted garden shed to be safe from predators. They eat chicken feed and kitchen scraps.

Grow edibles that suit your region – see the planting guide in: aboutthegarden.com.au. Position your plants to get six hours of sunlight daily especially for fruit trees. Leafy vegetables and peas do better in part shade.

Egg shells prevent bugs. Dry them out, crush, then spread in a circle around crops, they add calcium and protein to the soil too.

10

Or get involved with your local community garden. See communitygarden.org.au for more information. ˜

To win a copy of Mark Labrooy and Darren Robertson’s The Blue Ducks’ Real Food, RRP $39.99 email: magazine@guhealth.com.au your home grown food tips. guhealth.com.au

|

INFORM | ISSUE 27

17


RECIPES

Barbecued prawns with charred kale and avocado puree

This meal won the people’s choice award for the prawn dish of the day at the Ballina Prawn Festival.

GF

WF

Ingredients 1 garlic bulb, peeled

Preparation:

Cooking time:

Serves:

2 hours

5 minutes

Approx 4

5 long red chillies, deseeded and roughly chopped 200ml olive oil salt flakes and freshly ground pepper

Method: 1. Preheat the oven to 160°C fan-forced (180°C conventional). 2. Add the garlic, chilli, olive oil and plenty of cracked pepper to a small ovenproof saucepan, cover with foil and place in the oven for 1½ hours. 3. Meanwhile, using a sharp knife, butterfly the prawns by cutting them lengthways along the belly and through the heads until you can open them out flat. Leave the legs on, as they get nice and crunchy once grilled. 4. For the avocado puree, place the avocado flesh, buttermilk and lemon juice in a food processor and mix on high until smooth. Season to taste and set aside. 5. Remove the saucepan from the oven. Tip the contents into a food processor and blitz to a paste. Halve the garlic paste, mixing the parsley through one half. 6. Preheat the barbecue grill and plate on high. Brush the flesh side of the prawns with the parsley and garlic mix and season well. Grill the prawns flesh side down for a minute or so. Flip and cook for another minute or so until just cooked. They will cook quickly, so be careful. 7. Take the prawns off the grill, sprinkle with the lemon zest and squeeze over the juice. 8. Drizzle the vegetable oil on the barbecue plate and throw on the kale and the other half of the garlic paste. Season the kale and cook until wilted. 9. Divide the kale between the plates, stack four prawns on top of each mound of kale, generously dollop some avocado puree on the side and serve.

18

guhealth.com.au

|

INFORM | ISSUE 27

16 large green prawns, deveined, shells and heads on 1 small handful of flat-leaf parsley, leaves picked and finely chopped 1 lemon finely grated zest and juice 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 1 large bunch of kale (about 600g), leaves stripped and roughly chopped 2 avocados 75ml buttermilk juice of ½ lemon salt flakes and freshly ground pepper

Recipes and images from The Blue Ducks’ Real Food by Mark LaBrooy and Darren Robertson. Available now, Plum, RRP $39.99.


Han’s chia pudding with coconut and yoghurt

Girlfriend of Three Blue Duck’s Head Chef, Mark LaBrooy, Hannah Reid, created this recipe at the start of their health food journey.

GF

WF

V

Ingredients 125g chia seeds

Preparation:

Cooking time:

Serves:

1 young coconut, water separated and flesh chopped

Overnight

5 minutes

Approx 4

200g mixed frozen berries 150g yoghurt

Method: 1. Add the chia seeds, coconut water and flesh, and berries to the jar and mix. It will be quite a grainy and gooey mix to start with, but don’t worry, the chia seeds will draw a lot of moisture out of the berries and it will thicken and become more gelatinous.

handful roasted almonds and/or your favourite nuts and seeds, to serve raw honey or honeycomb, to serve fresh berries, to serve

2. Put on the lid and refrigerate overnight. 3. In the morning, stir the yoghurt through the mix. If it’s a bit dry or a bit too gooey, stir through a little more yoghurt until you reach your desired consistency. 4. Serve in breakfast bowls with some sesame seeds, roasted almonds, hazelnuts, pumpkin seeds or any other seeds and nuts that you like. Drizzle over some honey (or add some honeycomb), scatter over a couple of berries and serve. *Please note: you’ll need a 1 litre glass jar with a lid. You can prepare the dish the night before and it lasts for two days.

TOP TIP

Chia seeds are derived from the desert plant Salvia Hispanica. Although tiny, they pack a nutritional punch in good fats, fibre, protein and minerals. They’re a great source of omega-3 fatty acids – important for heart health and brain function. They’re an excellent source of iron, magnesium and zinc. They’re gluten free, too.

Darren Robertson, who is also a head chef at Three Blue Ducks’, philosophy is to use ‘sustainable as possible’ local ingredients. See his tips on how to cook from your own garden on page 17. guhealth.com.au

|

INFORM | ISSUE 27

19


FEATURE

To the rescue! As children appear to be more stressed than ever before, Child Psychologist Dr Sacha Rombouts shares how teaching our children 'super powers' can help. As a Child Psychologist running my own private practice, Happy Minds in Brisbane, I have noticed a significant trend – parents are bringing their children to the practice to develop resilience skills rather than for treatment of diagnosed mental health disorders. This ‘casting of the net’ to a wider demographic could be due to a few factors, including that our 20

guhealth.com.au

|

INFORM | ISSUE 27

children are becoming more stressed at younger ages than ever before.

help. The skills that I teach, everyone can use.

This may be because children and young people are under different kinds of stress, with unprecedented exposure to stressors from both their online and offline worlds. Parents are looking for answers to understand why this is happening and for skills to be able to

The main type of therapy I use is called Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), which has been supported with research for the past 20 years. Yet there has been limited application of this therapy with children. ACT is about giving people the skills to


become more psychologically flexible, or resilient, and is therefore an appropriate framework to teach resilience to families. I wanted to find a way so lots of children, not just the ones that come to my practice, could develop these skills. I found a very talented artist, Gabe Rose, and we worked together to create action heroes to teach the six ‘life powers’ to children, an adaption of the six core ACT processes. Action heroes and anxiety Anxiety is experienced as a cognitive, emotional and physiological event which typically occurs in our body as increased heart rate, sweating, shaking, and breathing quickly. The Bugg can help us to ‘switch on’ to what’s happening in our body. Paying attention to our

Claws

The Bugg

Claws is the leader of the action heroes he represents our values which help guide us in life. When we get caught up with unhelpful thoughts or unpleasant feelings we can be pulled away from our values. Claws teaches us how to get back in touch with what really matters to us. This is big picture stuff involving questions such as 'who is the person I want to be right now?' Claws helps us to refocus on values such as kindness, playfulness, connection and perseverance. Our values give us a sort of roadmap for how to approach life. Living by our values gives us a greater sense of fulfillment and wellbeing.

The Bugg is all about mindful awareness and his catchphrase is ‘Switch on’. In each moment we can learn to ‘switch on’ to different things such as what we can see, smell, hear, taste and touch. Switching on helps us to get out of our minds and back into the now. Rather than being focused on the past or worried about the future, being present in the moment can help us become calmer, we can think more clearly and are better able to deal with stressful situations. Mindful awareness can be done anywhere at any time. Whether it’s eating an after school snack, lying on the grass, or having a bath at the end of the day – we can always ‘switch on’ to the here and now. u guhealth.com.au

|

INFORM | ISSUE 27

21


The Defusor

The Defusor helps us to watch our thinking without getting caught up in our thoughts. Thought fusion occurs when we really believe our thoughts are true and start to treat them like they’re facts. Our thoughts stick to us like post-it notes. We’re then steered by these thoughts and can make unhelpful choices that don’t match our values, like avoiding a social activity because we are fused with the thought that no one likes us or that we won’t know anyone. Children have lots of fun learning about the Defusor’s powers. We all get anxious sometimes and we all have worries. We can get caught up in these worries and forget that these are essentially just thoughts. In any situation we can respond to the content of those thoughts, such as debating with the thought or we can practice changing how we relate to the thoughts.

T-Flex

T-Flex helps us to find ways to act in line with our values. We can only act in the present moment, not in the past nor the future. We can learn to understand our own behaviour in different situations, to problem solve and to plan for challenging times. We can assess our actions in terms of their workability – does a particular action work for us, for those around us, in the short and long term? 22

guhealth.com.au

|

INFORM | ISSUE 27

Skye

Skye teaches us about our feelings and lets us know that all our feelings are a normal part of being a human. Like all of the colours of the rainbow, we need all of the feelings to make a life. We tend to try to avoid feelings that we don’t like and then avoid the situations where those feelings might come up. It’s important that we understand our feelings, we get to know them and learn ways to approach these feelings instead of letting them control our actions.

breath helps to slow it down and when we immerse ourselves in our breathing, following it in and out, then we become calmer and better able to think.

None of us likes the feeling of anxiety and when it controls us it can exact a heavy toll on our lives. None of us likes the feeling of anxiety and when it controls us it can exact a heavy toll on our lives. Skye helps us to learn how to approach anxiety. We do this by exploring the feeling – what colour is it? Is it hot or cold? Is it hard or soft? What sort of object would it be? Can you draw the feeling? Approaching anxiety in this way helps to break the hold it has over us. Using the Defusor’s powers can help to overcome anxious thoughts, such as worries about the future. Perspecta helps us to see ourselves in many different ways. Examining times and situations when we’re not feeling anxious can let us discover new powers that we can put to use in anxietyprovoking situations. We can also realise

Perspecta

Perspecta has the power to jump inside another person’s body so that we can see the world from their perspective. She helps us to step out of our own perspective, to be open to connect with other people and to solve social problems. Perspecta can teach us to see ourselves differently. She can teleport to different places and travel through time. These important powers help us see that we change across situations and over time. Whenever a child or parent says that they are an anxious person Perspecta can help us to move beyond that one way of seeing ourselves. So we learn that we feel anxious sometimes (just like everyone else) but that we are also more than this one experience. that we are not anxious all of the time. We are more than just the anxious feeling. Anxiety is often tied to what is important to us, for example, the child that feels lonely in the playground has a desire to connect with other children. However, anxiety can stop that child from being able to make friends and keep them. Claws can guide us to reconnect with why we care about particular situations. These values can help us act in different ways rather than just acting on our thoughts and feelings. This element of the ACT approach gives us skills to overcome ‘problems’ and shows us a positive direction to move in once we are freed up from our thoughts and feelings. To act positively on anxiety may require some planning and this is where T-Flex is really helpful. Before they start using their new powers do some power training with your child, see the box on the following page for how to create a Power Practice Plan. The action heroes allow children that have problems learn life powers rather than having to come to see a psychologist like me. ˜

u


Power Practice Plan: 1. Power training • Ask your child to choose a hero, learn about their powers and practice them, such as defusing from thoughts. 2. Planning • Ask your child to think of a challenging situation and identify the unhelpful thoughts and difficult feelings they experience, such as feeling anxious. • Ask them what powers will help, when and where will they use them? • Encourage them to do power practice to prepare for future situations. 3. Using the Action Heroes in the moment • Encourage your child to make sure they have their powers ready to use anytime. • Remind them they can use combinations of powers. • Talk to them about how they can ‘switch on’ to the present moment. 4. The review • Ask your child to choose a situation to review how they acted. • Let them know that this helps to learn, strengthen and refine their powers. • Ask them which powers they used? Did they work well? • If not, what got in the way and what could you do differently next time?

To find out more information about the action heroes and their resources including decks of cards please visit: actionheroes.com.au

Looking for a child psychologist? You can visit our website guhealth.com.au and use the ‘Find a provider’ search tool. Image credit: Gabe Rose. guhealth.com.au

|

INFORM | ISSUE 27

23


FEATURE

The ageless art of yoga Yoga is defined as an age-old practice but its benefits are still relevant today and when it comes to who can enjoy them, it's ageless. Do you want to find a practice that improves your strength, flexibility and fitness and allows you to feel energised as well as calm? Then consider giving yoga a try. It means 'to yoke' – union with your higher self. If you’ve wanted to try yoga but found the thought of being surrounded by people tying themselves in knots, when you’re flexibly challenged, don’t be put off. The health and wellness benefits are so great, ranging from minimising memory loss to improved sleep and reduced stress. Yoga teacher, freelance dancer and choreographer, Jane Dickey started her yoga journey 20 years ago in the Iyengar method. She was encouraged to teach after extending a 30-day Bikram Yoga challenge to 100 days of yoga practice. She completed Bikram and Ashtanga Foundation teacher training and represented New Zealand, in the 24

guhealth.com.au

|

INFORM | ISSUE 27

International Yoga Championship: the Bishnu Charan Ghosh Cup in Los Angeles. Jane's advice for those new to yoga is to: 'find a teacher that you connect with'.

Yoga should feel like when something 'uncomfortable becomes comfortable'. "A qualified yoga instructor will make sure you're practicing safely and taking the correct steps to improve. You can also compliment regular yoga classes with your own practice at home," Jane says. "You should commit to practicing three times a week."

"Yoga should feel like when something 'uncomfortable becomes comfortable'." "Breathe into stretches so you feel something shift or soften to make changes in your body." She also advises to practice poses you’re not good at to improve your


The aim is not to be the best and not about the destination but enjoying the process of getting there.

weaker areas and to become balanced both physically and psychologically. "It's the poses that you're good at that brings you back to yoga and keep you inspired."

You can start at any age You don’t need to be a lycra-loving 20-something to reap the benefits of yoga. The practice can help alleviate and prevent every aspect of ageing.

The breath is a bridge between your body and mind.

Tranquability Yoga teacher Mary Abraham shares how to embrace yoga in your twilight years. She teaches over 50s, with her most flexible student being 81 years-old.

Focus on the breath Jane says the breath is a bridge between your body and mind. The focus creates a union, a meditative centeredness which develops more awareness in your body. For example to release tension in your shoulder focus on exhaling to soften that area. ‘Savasana’, the pose where students lie down and relax at the end of yoga classes is important, as is having a day off a week, this allows your body to repair.

Tips for beginners to yoga: • Start with a private lesson. • Inform the teacher that you’re new to yoga, if you have injuries or if pregnant. • Start with gentler styles Hatha or Iyengar. • Try different yoga styles and teachers to find which suits you • Remember don't try to compete with anyone else. • Listen to your breath – back off and take a break if you feel you're breathing too hard. • Avoid eating within two hours before a class. • Be consistent, find a time of day such as a morning practice that works and stick with it. Kids yoga turns traditional sport on its head Amanda Fuzes teaches AcroYoga to children and families she says that the ancient discipline that originated in India over 5000 years ago, is ideal for those newest to the planet. "As children generally have greater flexibility than adults it’s not uncommon for youngsters to perform more advanced poses than experienced yogis," says Amanda.

"Kids want to be upside down and flipping inside out." “But AcroYoga’s about much more than being hyper flexible, you can do gymnastics till your 12, but yoga till your 90.” AcroYoga combines mindfulness with acrobatics. Children create sequences of partnered formations, with their peers or family, and then ‘fly’ to inspire fearlessness, agility, coordination, cooperation and confidence. Creating poses together, such as pyramids, builds trust and selflessness amongst children. Rather than competing against each other as they do in sport. "They also learn karma, that if they don't focus their actions, this will have a direct impact on someone else," says Amanda. Family poses, including the ‘throne’ where the child or ‘flyer’ sits above their parent or ‘base’, encourages bonding and being in the moment. Children can start as young as 18 months and continue till they're 18 at the Flying Yogis studio in Sydney. “We give them tools on the mat to help them with success off the mat in life.” One of Amanda’s students started with low muscle tone, hyper-mobility causing her bones to dislocate, difficulty with concentration and fitting in at school. As she practiced to engage her muscles to do handstands and back bends, other positive changes occurred. She’s now more socially connected and her improved focus had a huge impact on her school results. Amanda teaches her students to ‘channel their guru’, to visualise that they can do anything, to be positive, have faith and keep practicing. “Don’t say I can’t; say I can’t do it yet.”

"Seek small classes with qualified and experienced teachers, labelled as seniors, ’Golden Yogis’, restorative or beginner classes", says Mary. These classes are run at a slower pace and include props to modify poses such as blocks, chairs, bolsters, blankets and straps. And the ‘wall is your best teacher’, especially if your balance isn’t good. Poses such as Trikonasana or triangle can be modified by leaning on a chair against the wall. Yoga benefits include preventing or managing osteoporosis, arthritis, back pain, high blood pressure, combats stiffness, increases core stability, balance and bone density, ideally suited to an ageing population. "Yoga practice can allow people to live independently for longer," says Mary. "Patients undergoing surgery can be better prepared and recover better". Classes can also provide a social outlet, with yoga studios encouraging a sense of community. “At any age you can try or come back to yoga. The poses combat sedentary lifestyles and increase mobility in joints. You can learn a toolbox of skills on the mat that are transferable to life such as performing twists and lengthening the trunk for digestion". Beyond the health benefits Mary said that she wants to encourage others to try yoga so she can give back to the practice that has enriched her life in so many ways. ˜

Find a yoga teacher to suit you: yogaaustralia.org.au/searchregistered-teachers. guhealth.com.au

|

INFORM | ISSUE 27

25


FAVOURITE

Get connected Apps, books, videos and podcasts to help you connect with your family, your world and yourself. Listen

Watch

Stuff You Should Know

Tasteology

With this podcast you’ll be able to answer almost any pesky question from your young ones or satisfy your own curiosity, from how do lighthouses work to how Chaos Theory changed the universe?

Find out how to connect with taste, by letting your appetite guide you to consume what your body needs. There are four bite-sized 15 to 20 minute online episodes: Source, Chill, Heat and Experience.

Cost: FREE

Cost: FREE

stuffyoushouldknow.com/podcasts

aeg.co.uk/taste/inspiration/tasteology

Create

Wanderlust: A Modern Yogi’s Guide to Discovering Your Best Self

Touchnote Get creative – shoot, design and send your own greeting or postcards from your smart phone. Use the app on your: iPhone, iPad, Android mobiles and tablets and on computers with touchnote.com

26

Read

Discover a broader understanding of yoga – not just as a physical practice, but as a principle for living. Navigate your personal path and find your true north. By Jeff Krasno with Sarah Herrington and Nicole Lindstrom.

Cost: From $2.99 including postage for a postcard.

Cost: RRP $26.99

touchnote.com

wanderlust.com/wanderlust-book-discover-your-best-self

guhealth.com.au

|

INFORM | ISSUE 27


Mindfulness colouring page This focal point of this artwork is the main river pathway. The end point of the pathway represents a destination being strived for, reconciliation. Champion Indigenous ex-Sydney Swans footballer and entrepreneur Michael O’Loughlin chose this painting to represent his company CMC Indigenous Services and its commitment to giving back to the Aboriginal community. Read his story on page 12.

Artwork credit: A Gathering of Streams Mitchell Barwick of the Kamilaroi people Hunter Valley NSW – November 2015 guhealth.com.au

|

INFORM | ISSUE 27

27


CLAIM ONLINE in three easy steps step

1

Take a photo

Snap your receipt by taking a photo with your phone/tablet device, or scan a copy, and upload it into Flex-eClaim.

step

2

Fill in your details

Fill in a few easy details about your claim.

step

3

Click to submit

Confirm your details, benefit amount and submit your claim.

Forget the time and effort it takes to send us a claim form. You can claim your extras in three easy steps with Flex-eClaim.

Inform 27  

Hello and welcome to Issue 27 of Inform. As we’re nearing the end of the year, it’s a chance to take some much needed down time and reflect...

Inform 27  

Hello and welcome to Issue 27 of Inform. As we’re nearing the end of the year, it’s a chance to take some much needed down time and reflect...