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G E TA M UNG ST IT


ISSUE 03, 2015 / FREE EDITORIAL TEAM Jessica Brown - Editor in Chief Rebecca Marshallsay - Editor in Chief Erwan Guegan - General Content Editor Hayley Payne - General Content Editor Angel Nikijuluw - Visual Editor Ashleigh Watson- Features Editor PUBLISHER Cameron Harrison TALENTED CONTRIBUTORS PHOTOGRAPHIC Dan Carson Erwan Guegan Steve Harris Christian Nimri Aidan Ryan EDITORIAL Jessica Brown Adrian Chapman Aidan Gray Erwan Guegan Amber Gulamali Cameron Harrison Belinda Hilton Rebecca Marshallsay Angel Nikijuluw Christian Nimri Hayley Payne Kirsty Seymour Paul Veitch Ashleigh Watson DESIGN

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF COUNTRY Griffith University Gold Coast Student Guild acknowledges the people who are the traditional custodians of the land, pays respects to Elders, past and present, and extends that respect to other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples. SUBMISSIONS Are you a budding student journalist, photographer or have a random idea that could be a great story? Getamungstit accepts art, photo and story submissions for consideration however there is no guarantee your work will be published. Email us at getamungstit@ griffith.edu.au

DISCLAIMER The opinions expressed in this publication may not reflect those of the Griffith University Gold Coast Student Guild. The information contained within this edition of Getamungstit was correct at the time of printing but could be subject to change. If any article, document and/or publication is inaccessible and you require copies and/or more information, contact the Student Guild where staff will ensure your requests and needs are met.

Liveworm Gold Coast by QCA Students Creative Director - Alejandra Ramirez Vidal Studio Administrator - Sharon Searle T +61 7 5552 7262 E goldcoast@liveworm.com.au W livewormgoldcoast.com COVER ARTWORK Tayla Thurlow ADVERTISING Jessica Brown Marketing Manager GUGC Student Guild T +61 7 5552 8651 E j.brown@griffith.edu.au W gugcstudentguild.com.au CONTACT Griffith University Gold Coast Student Guild, The Link (G07) PO Box 96. Griffith University QLD 4222 E getamungstit@griffith.edu.au W gugcstudentguild.com.au/getamungstit

Article Title


10

18

18

8 30

Contents Contributor spotlight

4

Message from the President

6

Body facts

7

Briefs: Gender bending in contemporary circus

8

Stop taxing my… shaving cream?

10

Being sexy ain’t easy

12

Fuel your body on a budget

14

Difficult to discuss: Self–injury

18

Vox pop

20

Did you brush your teeth this morning?

22

Bodies on film

26

Product review - Group fitness

28

To beard or not to beard?

30

Research in review

32

Snapped on campus

34

What’s on

38

Winter essentials under $30

40

Feature artist – Monique Montfroy

42

Online – Top blogs

44

Entertainment

46

Being creative

50

Get the hell outta here

52

47


Contributor spotlight

Angel Nikijuluw VISUAL EDITOR

Ashleigh Watson FEATURES EDITOR

Fresh out of high school, Angel is a first year business and journalism student who hopes to achieve big things through majoring in entrepreneurism and self-employment. Growing up, she’s has always had an interest in editorial writing and the visual imagery in magazines - often creating and designing concepts for her own publications. In 2013, Angel took on the role as the Art, Food, Beauty and Lifestyle Director of the cultural website homebodynobodies.com - a role which led her to fulfilling her passion in writing, editing and online journalism. She has since been chosen to write for Eyeline Magazine, along with photographing and reviewing the touring festival Groovin The Moo in Maitland this past May.

Ashleigh is a PhD candidate within the School of Humanities. Her research explores how the public and academics actively engage with ideas through art and other creative mediums, specifically within the field of sociology. Her thesis involves writing a novel that questions what an ‘Australian way of life’ means. She is affiliated with the Griffith Centre for Cultural Research and tutors first year subjects within Humanities. Ashleigh also co-directs the Smallroom Writers Collective. She has had a handful of short stories published including three in Griffith’s Talent Implied. Her favourite writers are Joan Didion, Juno Díaz, Roberto Bolaño, and Jhumpa Lahiri. Ashleigh likes black coffee, the snow, summer, and going to the cinema.

She specialises in music reviews, beauty reviews and gig photography; and when she isn’t on campus studying, she’s usually blogging or wasting her money on makeup. By joining the Editorial Team at Getamungstit, Angel is hoping to further follow her aspirations whilst providing fresh and interesting content for Geta readers.

Contributor spotlight


Getamungstit is excited to introduce you to our talented and passionate Editorial Team.

Erwan Guegan

Hayley Payne

GENERAL CONTENT EDITOR

GENERAL CONTENT EDITOR

Erwan is a first year dual master in business and marketing. He grew up in Noumea, New Caledonia before moving to Brisbane to complete a Bachelor of Communication at UQ. He is very proud of his country and thinks it has some of the most beautiful natural scenery including the world’s largest coral reef lagoon. This has fostered his love of all things to do with the ocean. A passionate and curious person, Erwan has a thirst for knowledge, loves travelling and making new friends from all over the world. He is passionate about photography and always tries to keep an open mind, to observe the subtlety of the world we live in and to share his perspective with others. He is very excited and proud to be part of the Getamungstit Editorial Team.

Hayley is a second year government and international relations student with a passion for writing. She grew up in Melbourne, before moving to Batemans Bay in NSW where she completed her schooling. Upon graduating high school in 2012 she travelled to the US and Europe for a gap year, achieving the dream that she had been saving for since she was old enough to work. While travelling Hayley became increasingly interested in world affairs, which led her to Griffith University in 2014. Hayley volunteers with Griffith Mates and is a blogger for Griffith International’s blog, Explore! When she isn’t studying, Hayley spends her time at the cinema, reading (anything and everything), writing, taking her dog to the beach, and exploring the Gold Coast. She believes that happiness is key to a successful career and is following her passion for writing by joining the Getamungstit Editorial Team.

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MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT Welcome to Semester 2, and the ‘body edition’ of Getamungstit. Welcome back to our continuing students, and a special welcome to those new students starting this semester. The mid-year break quickly trotted past, and the semester is about to jump out of the gates with our largest social event of the year - Race Day. This year we have moved to a larger area to accommodate our greatest number of attendees ever, who are in for a rearing day at the turf club. *end of lame dad jokes* A big congratulations to our 270 students who competed at the Northern University Games, held in Toowoomba earlier this month. We had a number of teams qualify for the Australian University Games, which will be held here on the Gold Coast from September 27. Contact our Sports Officer if you are interested in getting involved - Unigames is a must do during your time at uni. Your Student Guild Board and staff have continued to develop programs, events and support services ensuring your student experience is enjoyable and memorable. The Link Lane food atrium is fully operational, with our great mix of affordable and delicious food options - Burger Urge, Flavour Asia and Providore University. The first half of this semester is packed with events, including Sign-on Days to join clubs you wish you’d joined earlier this year, Comedy Night, Textbook Fair and Market Days. And if you’re not already excited about Oktoberfest, you should be! The Uni Bar will take you to the beer halls of Deutschland on October 10, so don your lederhosen and grab your steins, this is an event not to be missed. If you found it challenging to manage your studies and other commitments in Semester 1 , or you are new to university and would like any support, make your way to our Student Support Hub (located at G01_3.45) where our friendly team of support, advocacy and academic staff will be able to assist. We are always looking to improve what is available to our students, so if you have any feedback or suggestions, let me or any of your Board members know! Cheers, Mr President.

Message from the President


BODY FACTS The human body is an amazing thing. Here are 10 weird and wonderful facts you can bust out at dinner parties or store for your next trivia night.

1

Your body produces about a litre of mucus every day.

3

1L

You shed about

2 600,000 skin particles every hour.

Your taste buds are replaced every 10 days.

5

4

Your ears and nose continue to grow throughout your life.

The jaw muscle (masseter) is the

STRONGEST

muscle in your body.

6

Studies have found that people with

BLUE EYES

have a higher alcohol tolerance.

9 7

You use up to

200 MUSCLES

to take one step.

8

Your body has enough iron in it to make a 3 inch long metal nail.

10

The human brain produces enough electricity to power a small light bulb (when awake).

Your bones are composed of

31% water.

Facts courtesy of http://www.factslides.com/s-Your-Body

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Briefs: Gender bending in contemporary circus By Kirsty Seymour

Circus, by definition promises its audience super humans performing “impossible” physical feats of talent and dexterity. There is an expectation for ‘the edge of your seat’ moments; there will be muscles, there will be flight, you will be impressed by what a circus body can do. Contemporary circus artists could leave it at that and still present an idea about the possibilities of the human body. Nevertheless contemporary circus brings another innovative layer to the artform in its ability to challenge social norms and push boundaries of preconceived notions of what bodies can do according to the gender they are assigned. Circus conveys numerous philosophies and questions about the body and Brisbane based company ‘Briefs’ is no exception. Briefs is an all-male mash up of circus, vaudeville, drag and burlesque, featuring some of Australia’s most prolific contemporary circus artists. Their work is edgy, risqué, highly skilled and not for the faint hearted. The very first show in 2008 was a slapped together “speak easy” vaudeville mixed bag, performed in the back of a bookshop in West End. Since then Briefs has grown to become an international hit with a strong cult following and successive tours to London, Berlin, Edinburgh and New Zealand. Briefs describe their work as: “Briefs is an all male sharp shootin cabaret of burlesque with balls, high-flying circus bandits & savage gender offenders”.

Using circus to explore what masculinity can mean in a contemporary society their work plays with the idea of the ‘macho man’, drag, and fluidity of the male form, the quirky and the queer. Recent reviews have described their work as an “Aussie Cirque du Soleil meets Ru Pauls Drag Race”. Performer and creative director Fez Fa’anana explains: “Briefs likes to toy with notions of identity, masculinity and politics in a glittery way”. The distinguishable tropes of circus are present in Briefs through the apparatus and the group acrobatics that the audience have come to recognise and expect: trapeze, juggling, hula hoops and so on. However there is glitter and drag thrown over the top, creating an all the more enticing and thought provoking version of what circus has to offer to a contemporary audience. Theatre academic Peta Tait observes that; “The circus spectacle is bodies in motion” and also that “Circus physicality is inseparable from social ideas”. Briefs demonstrates these observations in their use of the body as a mechanism for social expression, a voice and a way to provoke thought in their audience through the physical aesthetic of circus. The content within the shows (circus skills aside) can be

Briefs: Gender bending in contemporary circus

anything from gender bending drag to political outbursts in the middle of a group acrobatic scenefor example in the most recent work, ‘Briefs the Second Coming’, one of the acrobats screams out his expletive thoughts on Tony Abbott mid hula hoop trick. The contemporary circus body becomes a billboard for social ideas, political thoughts and in the instance of Briefs, gender blurring.

Briefs’ trapeze artist and acrobat who was also crowned “2012 King


of Burlesque”, Mark Winmill takes preconceived ideas of gender and throws them out the window. He repackages them so that the audience is presented with a mix of grace, strength and brattish humour. His aerial performance displays both his physical strength

and muscle definition, showcasing his “masculinity” while at the same time he possess grace, flexibility and fluidity- traits that are usually associated with being feminine. In Briefs, Winmill performs his acts in and out of drag attire.

One act may see him looking ’rugged’, shirtless in jeans scaling the trapeze, the next in a sequin bikini and high heels hula hooping to a 90’s techno track. There is an absolute air of non-conformity. There is no line between feminine and masculine. He is not disembodied from his “manliness” in any way he can switch it on and off or merge it with the “femme” or “queer”. Briefs is unapologetic in its artistic process and how it presents itself, nothing is watered down or “tamed”, and yet they now have a diverse audience demographic. They have enjoyed continuous success on both the national and international stage with five star reviews and sold out seasons. The company has been recognised with several notable arts awards and continues to push the boundaries of circus, theatre and burlesque. They have mastered the fine balance of appealing to a general audience while still maintaining their social and political edge. Briefs are currently on tour in Europe, stirring up audiences at nightclubs, theatres and Spiegel Tents and will return to Australia in October. You can find out more about Briefs at: thebriefsfactory.com

When the constructed status of gender is theorized as radically independent of sex, gender itself becomes a free floating artifice, with the consequence that man and masculine might just as easily signify a female body as a male one, and woman and feminine a male body as easily as a female one. - Judith Butler

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Stop taxing my… shaving cream? By Hayley Payne In Australia the Goods and Services Tax, better known as GST is not something that we often have to think about. It is automatically applied to the majority of our goods and services, with exceptions being made to items that are regarded as necessary. In Australia, GST is automatically added to the items we purchase, unlike in the United States for example, where tax is added at the checkout. In the last few months there has been much attention around the GST added to women’s sanitary products. This debate may seem recent, however it goes back to 2001 when the GST was first included under the Howard government. People soon realised that sanitary products were considered, by the government, to be a luxury item while other personal items, such as condoms, are considered as health items and therefore excluded from the GST. The main argument of the debate is that sanitary products are an

essential product for women’s health and therefore should not be taxed. Those against scrapping the tax are arguing that there are many other health care products which could be labelled as essential to a person’s health. These arguments are coming from both men and women, with even some selfproclaimed feminists getting on board and shaming the women who started the petition. One of the arguments against has been to raise the idea that shaving cream is essential to men’s health; some agree and some don’t, labelling this argument as ridiculous compared to the need for sanitary products.

So what other everyday health products are taxed? The majority of them. Shampoos and conditioners are taxed, as is soap, toothpaste and deodorant. It is up to the individual as to whether these are essential products to one’s health. Obviously maintaining personal hygiene is Stop taxing my… shaving cream?

important, however the argument is raised that these products aren’t as necessary to a person’s health as sanitary products. The debate gets interesting when it comes to the taxation of products such as toilet paper and nappies. Both nappies and toilet paper are essential in the disposal of human waste. So are they in line with sanitary products when it comes to the ‘period tax’ debate? It would seem that there is a heavy focus on removing the GST from nappies, but not much attention on toilet paper. These are just a few examples of health products that the GST is applied to, demonstrating why it is such a complex argument. Should sanitary products be exempt from GST as condoms are? (periods are natural, just like sex). Or should the GST remain the way it is? (why should they not be taxed when other everyday health products are?). Or should they just change the Goods and Services Tax and apply GST to everything?


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The porn industry has long been criticised for creating body image issues for women. Less discussed, however are the unrealistic expectations that are also set for men. A female porn star’s body is not easily attainable. It is completely shaven from the neck down, tanned from the toes up, and chiselled by a sex god. But people seem to forget that male porn stars set the same unrealistic expectations for men. And on top of that, men have to compete with extreme endowments and stallion stamina. If you are a woman, perhaps you blame the porn industry for its influence on downstairs grooming that sees you spending hours on uncomfortable waxing and shaving. It is worth taking a second to consider the fact that the men are mostly clean shaven too. Do not underestimate the patience,

Do not underestimate the patience, risk and surgical precision involved in shaving a man’s genitals...

risk and surgical precision involved in shaving a man’s genitals (it can be quite a painful ordeal). What I’m trying to say is, would you rather mow a flat yard with a ride on mower or use a push-mower for a yard covered in anthills? When it comes to optimal body shape, men and women are in a different competition. Women are desired to be slim and toned whilst men are favoured to have a big muscular frame. Whilst the pressure to lose weight should not be downplayed, men’s battle to emulate a sex god figure is not easy either. What I’m trying to say is, it’s not just a matter of cutting carbs and upping the kale, men also need to dedicate their life to the gym make the Herculian gains necessary to measure up (around the biceps that is).


Opinion piece by Aidan Gray

Thanks to pornography there is an expectation that a man will measure up when he drops his pants; average size is 10 inches according to any porn site ever. Although some men may try everything from penis pumps to medieval stretch techniques, it is next to impossible to increase the size of a man’s member without surgery. Women may find themselves acquiring breast implants to satisfy these high expectations but for men, penile surgery isn’t as easy as injecting silicone. To put it in layman’s terms, anyone can blow up a balloon but only a master can twist it into an anaconda...

Everybody knows that pornography creates unrealistic expectations about the ease and frequency of the female orgasm. The pressure is also on for the men as porn would have us believe that premature ejaculation is a myth. It may come as a surprise to the few lucky men who have great trigger control, but for those that are trigger-happy and shoot too soon, the struggle is all too real. In porn men are portrayed as studs that can perform sexually at an intense rate for hours on end while keeping the juice in the fridge. While it may seem better to orgasm quickly rather than not at all, a magical vibrating device does not exist to help men with this problem. Men are left feeling impotent while women are only two AA batteries from shameless bliss.

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Men are left feeling impotent while women are only two AA batteries from shameless bliss. In short, sometimes it’s easier to shoot first and ask questions last, despite popular belief. So ladies, please remember that although we’ve kept our guards up longer than a male porn star’s wood in an orgy, us men deal with some of the same physical and psychological strains of trying to be sexy. I hope this article has given you some insight into the struggles of sexual influence through my poetic words of wisdom and offers a new outlook from a man’s perspective.


FUEL YOUR BODY ON A BUDGET By Hayley Payne

Before coming to university most of us were lucky enough to live in the comfort of our family home. Attending university often means moving out of home and living by ourselves or with housemates for the first time. Most of us will soon find that we have absolutely no money and our cooking skills have diminished to pouring some hot water over ramen noodles and putting them in the microwave. A mistake that is made by many university students is walking into a supermarket and throwing cheap processed meals into their trolleys. A grocery shop of ramen noodles, hot dogs and frozen pizzas may be cheap, but it certainly isn’t doing your body, or your study any favours. Below are five top tips to fuel your body on a student budget.

Prioritise Making a monthly budget is a fantastic idea in order to track your spending. It also allows you to see where all your money is going and whether that money could be better spent elsewhere. If you are spending all of your pay partying on the weekend, only to find you have no money left for food on Monday, it may be time to reconsider your priorities when it comes to your body. If you have an expensive hobby or shopping addiction, decide if any of that money could be better spent on ensuring your body is filled with nutrients.

Fuel your body on a budget


BYO lunch

Plan!

You may be completely surprised at the amount of money you can save by bringing your own lunch to uni. The average price for a meal at Koala Café is about $7, if you add a drink it takes you to about $10-$12. A staple diet for most uni students includes a couple of coffees a day and often, at least one of those is purchased form a café. If you don’t mind the taste of instant coffee this is a cost that can be easily resolved. Most buildings around campus have small kitchenettes (generally located near the bathroom). They usually provide a sink, boiling water and a microwave (a great alternative to long lines at the main microwaves). If you buy a reusable coffee cup and come prepared you can have unlimited refills of coffee for less than a quarter of the price you would pay for barista coffee. Just say you come to uni four days a week and bring sandwiches or leftovers from the previous night, and your own coffee; you could be saving around $40 a week.

I am sure that everyone has experienced the horror of the first grocery shop after you move out of home. They often cost three times what you would expect and once you arrive home there doesn’t even seem to be anything to eat. Planning your shopping is so important for this reason. Before you go; raid your kitchen and see what you already have that can be supplemented to create new meals. There are hundreds of websites and blogs that specialise in budget meal ideas. Find a few recipes that have similar ingredients to cook, this helps you to save money and eliminate wastage. Writing a list and calling it a plan doesn’t always equate to savings in the supermarket. If you have the time, take an hour to plan out your weekly breakfasts, lunches, dinners and snacks. Being winter, you could purchase a box of oatmeal and ingredients for a tomato soup (five lunches worth) for around $10. Then all you have to worry about is dinner and some healthy snacks.

Play the field

Cook large

Don’t put all of your eggs in one basket when it comes to your weekly grocery shop. Unfortunately, this isn’t a realistic option for everyone due to time constraints, however if you do have the time it is well worth it. Before you search for recipes and write your shopping list; have a look to see what specials are on offer at your local supermarkets, butchers and vegetable barns. Don’t be afraid to buy up in bulk when you find a great deal, check online for the freeze life of each food first though. Most shopping centres usually have a fresh food section where you will find the above, making it simple to shop around. All the major supermarkets now have all the prices of their products available online – making it easy to compare prices. If you don’t have the time to go from place to place Aldi is probably your best option. There are multiple forums online where people have rated Aldi goods compared to supermarket brand goods, making it easy to decide what to buy and where.

One of the main reasons that uni students spend so much on food is that we simply just don’t have time to cook. There have been times for all of us when we are sitting staring at the same essay for 12 hours straight and the last thing on our minds is cooking. This often leads to $5 pizzas from Pizza Hut and other takeout options. This is an issue that can easily be solved. During the planning stage of your grocery shop, look for a recipe that can easily be made in bulk, such as stir-fry or pasta. These can then be separated into bowls or containers, ready to be reheated for a quick, cheap and healthy dinner during the week. If you ever have leftovers that you won’t use, freeze them as a ready-to-go meal for one of those days when you can’t be bothered or simply don’t have time to cook.

THESE TIPS SHOULD HELP YOU TO FUEL YOUR BODY READY FOR A BUSY SEMESTER TWO! 15


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Article Title


CREATIVE CONCEPTS \\ GRAPHIC DESIGN \\ PHOTOGRAPHY \\ ILLUSTRATION IMAGE RETOUCHING \\ PRINT & WEB \\ SOCIAL MEDIA \\ BRANDING Liveworm Gold Coast is staffed with a collection of skilled multidisciplinary design students, guided by a highly experienced team of industry professionals. The studio is also a creative incubator for student industry concepts, supporting the local business and cultural community. The studio opened its doors in 2008 after being converted from a grungy fine art and sculpture workshop into a creative studio and incubator space – under the wing of the 130 year old Queensland College of Art.

Liveworm Gold Coast designers are the future experts of their field. They know what’s current, enjoy predicting future trends and utilising classic design strategies. In the midst of a new studio image and direction Liveworm Gold Coast is working towards a stronger position within the evolving creative Gold Coast culture. The team of students and staff embrace the changes that are occurring locally and globally and enjoy creating design outcomes that reflect this unique approach.

CONTACT US goldcoast@liveworm.com.au

facebook/livewormgc

p

07 5552 7262

@ livewormgc

w

livewormgoldcoast.com

e


Difficult to discuss: Self–injury By Belinda Hilton

Self-injury can be difficult to talk about. Even choosing how to refer to the behaviour is problematic. Most mental health organisations and academics within Australia use the term Self-harm or Deliberate Self-harm (DSH). The DSM-V outlined Nonsuicidal Self-Injury (NSSI) as a condition for further study and many international researchers are favouring the term. When I first came across a term for the behaviour, ‘Self-mutilation’ was most commonly used. In less formal circles you may hear the behaviour referred to as Cutting. However self-injurious behaviour is not limited to self-cutting although that may be the behaviour most known to the general public. The definitions listed for each term can vary slightly. The labels are used interchangeably by some and seen as uniquely different by others. The inclusion of NSSI as a condition for further study in the DSM-V released in 2013, highlights that there is growing research into the behaviour. Awareness and understanding of mental health continues to grow but many mental health issues remain taboo, stigmatised or simply misunderstood. For the past two and a half years I have been researching and writing about self-injury. In 2012 I had a recurrence of self-injurious behaviour. Self-injury had been an issue for me previously, my first recallable incident occurring at the age of fifteen, however I had mistakenly thought (or perhaps was simply in denial) that it was something I’d “grown out of” or had “overcome”. While I wasn’t a stranger to the behaviour as such, I still found my own behaviour

(the urge to hurt myself) strange. I wanted to understand why I thought about and ultimately did at times injure myself. That need to understand could be pursued as I was in the early stages of research for my PhD and my supervisor and councillor supported my decision to make self-injury and my experiences with the behaviour the focus of my creative writing doctorate. I am now nearing the submission date for my PhD and am finalising the first draft of a novel which discusses self-injury. To say I’m comfortable discussing self-injury, my self-injury, is inaccurate. I have done a number of public research presentations where I openly acknowledge that I self-injure, within my university, and at national and international conferences. Many who have attended these talks had shared their personal experiences with self-injury or other mental health issues with me. I’ve had people ask questions because they know someone who self-injures, I’ve had others ask simply because they are interested. My research and writing has allowed these conversations to happen by both giving me a platform to discuss self-injury but more importantly by giving others a chance to engage in the discussion. Talking about self-injury from this perspective has been, for the most part, rewarding. Most responses to my presentations have been positive and more importantly, respectful and sensitive. There have been questions or reactions that have been hurtful, though I think in most cases they were not intended to be. Presenting on the subject is often uncomfortable, sometimes I get the shakes, or my Difficult to discuss: Self-injury

To say I’m comfortable discussing self-injury, my self-injury, is inaccurate. eyes well up, or my voice cracks. Sometimes I feel really crappy after a presentation, triggered or I simply need a moment to myself. Mostly though the experience has helped me to form a narrative and find a language to talk about my experiences with self-injury. Private conversations and talking about my self-injury outside of academia is a different experience. I am much more selective as to who I talk about my experiences with, when I might be willing to discuss the issue and even how much I reveal or say on the issue. When I first experienced the behaviour there was mixed reactions from those who knew, guessed or assumed. Some people treated me angrily, others didn’t know what to say and avoided the subject, some tried to “fix me” or weighed in on how I should go about “recovery”, some thought I should be feared (thinking I might be violent) and many said really hurtful things. I still experience some of these reactions although I think people have become better equipped to react appropriately when confronted by someone who is experiencing (or has experienced) a mental health issue. Not everyone is going to react well but I hope that someone does. If someone discloses self-injury to you or you wish to discuss it with them, please be respectful and considerate. Do some reading, ask questions with some sensitivity,


don’t try to “fix” or “stop” them but offer whatever support you can – that might be a hug at the time, that might be assistance seeking professional help or further information, it might be first-aid, it might be helping to dispose of shards/sharps/tools or a willingness to hang out when the individual is experiencing urges. Self-injury is complex, what is helpful to one person might be harmful to another. Listen without judgement. Recovery is a slippery term as too often when discussing selfinjury, it’s seen as an absent of the behaviour - this is problematic. I don’t like people asking me about “my recovery”, or if I’m “recovered” or suggesting how I should try to “recover”. Such conversations are only the business of me and my councillor (and my councillor would not phrase the discussion using that term). Instead I’d like to recognise that I feel better within myself than ever before

and that I’ve actively worked to feel this way. I acknowledge that my research and writing has been useful as a component to that. I’m pleased that I have been able to discuss self-injury with people who may not have otherwise discussed the topic. I am excited to learn more and continue to research and discuss self-injury, hopefully in a way that can improve support for those who do experience self-injury. More importantly I’m coming to terms with my own experiences and this is what I’ve been working towards and will continue to work at. Talking about self-injury is difficult but remaining silent can be much tougher. Who can you start a conversation about self-injury with: a loved one, a professional or support service or maybe, you might start that conversation with yourself?

19

*my preferred term is nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) **I have used the term “self-injurer” to describe myself in an effort to confront and accept my own behaviour. I’d advise others to instead say “an individual who self-injures” as this distinguishes self-injury behaviour from identity.

Need support? Call Lifeline crisis support 13 11 14 or find them online lifeline.org.au

Need information? beyondblue.org.au au.reachout.com lifesigns.org.uk selfharm.co.uk itriples.org


Best feature or body part?

VOX POP

Alexander E My brain and my beard.

Getamungstit posed some deeply personal, hard-hitting questions this edition to find out all about your bodies. By Christian Nimri Sean M My hair, because it’s beautiful.

Beards, yay or nay?

Kenny P My rock solid baby cows (calves).

Bailey M Nah.

Vox pop


Do you consider leggings to be pants?

Do you have any tattoos?

Lara B Yep, I’ve got two. Dragonfly and a moon phase.

Alicia P No, they’re just not pants, they belong under a skirt or a dress.

Benjamin G No, I’m not allowed to get any. I’ll get cut out of the will if I do.

Sarah P [Before I even finish asking question] No, no, no! No! Definitely not.

Do you shave your legs in winter?

Danielle M Yep… Not a fan of hair.

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Did you brush your teeth this morning? By Erwan Guegan Did you brush your teeth this morning? Chances are that most of you did. Research shows that most adults brush their teeth at least twice a day with an emphasis on the morning and the evening. It’s basic hygiene and it makes you feel fresh and confident when otherwise, bad mouth hygiene tends to make you feel uncomfortable and insecure.

Why is that? Well, survey shows that when meeting a new person teeth/ smiles are rated the second most important attraction feature, after personality, and the most important body feature surveyed (including body shape, height, hair, face and eyes). So they are worth taking care of! Furthermore, if you have a job in management you should know that two thirds of employees have less respect for a superior with bad oral hygiene. In fact, bad breath has been voted the least attractive trait a co-worker can have, so be more popular around the water cooler by brushing and flushing your teeth more often. However, despite the fact that we all agree that good oral hygiene is important... our comportment tends to differ with our beliefs. According to a survey 73% of people would rather go for grocery shopping rather than floss their Did you brush your teeth this morning?

teeth. I sure can understand how the idea of going to the grocery store and filling your fridge with tonnes of fresh and delicious food can sound more appealing than flossing your teeth (especially in winter, when all you wanna do is stack up food and hibernate with a full stomach) but come on! We have to make the effort and take care of those little choppers that help us chew all that tasty food we love so much. We all want to fit in, and we know that bad oral hygiene doesn’t sound cool to anyone... so when people were asked if they regularly floss, 60% of the interviewees said yes, however, sales indicate that the true figure is actually more like 5%. But everything is going to be okay. Even if one in five of us cannot remember when we last changed our toothbrush the Griffith Dental Clinic team are here to help. The $150m 10-storey new health science building can


FUN FACTS The most valuable tooth was that of Sir Issac Newton purchased by a businessman for $4560. Which he used as a ring. accommodate around 2000 students undertaking everything from medicine to physiotherapy and dentistry. This new stateof-the-art facility includes over a hundred dental chairs and professional dentists including specialist to treat almost every dental need or medical concern you may have. Afraid of those enclosed dental offices that makes you feel trapped? You’re in luck as this one is beautifully lit up with wall-to-wall windows creating a nice and relaxed atmosphere. It is highly recommended that you get a check-up from your dentist every six months. Maybe you think your teeth are fine but think about it... Your smile is your best weapon and good hygiene is essential in our everyday social, professional and love lives. For example, planning to go out tonight? On a night out, 80% of us would be more likely to talk to somebody we didn’t know if they smiled at us! But nearly half the population are unhappy with their teeth, with discoloured teeth being the main reason. I know how going to the dentist can seem unpleasant, with all those weird and scary noises but the Griffith team are cheerful, lively students and you should not fear to place your precious fangs in their passionate and professional hands.

The average person spends 38 days brushing their teeth during their lifetime. Modern toothpaste has only been available for the past hundred years. Before this invention, humans used charcoal or ground chalk, ashes, lemon juice, and honey-tobacco mixtures to clean their teeth. Your mouth produces over 25,000 quarts of saliva throughout your life. That’s enough to fill two swimming pools! Saliva protects your teeth from bacteria in your mouth. Tooth decay is the second most common disease after the cold. Tooth enamel is the hardest part of the human body. It is a weird belief that those who smile in school yearbook photos are more likely to have a successful career and marriage than those with dull or lifeless faces.

You will have even less excuses knowing that new patients are offered one free screening appointment and one free initial comprehensive exam, including x-rays. Not convinced yet? Well how about the fact that Griffith students, staff and Gold Coast University Hospital staff members get a 40% discount. So, what are you waiting for?

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GRANDMA’S STRANGE REMEDIES (please do not try this at home)

Toothache: Apply the following mixture to achy tooth - figs, saffron, mustard seed and plaster of myrrg or boil earthworms in oil and drop the oil into the ear holes or rub the tooth with dried cow’s dung! Tooth decay: Rinse with a mouthwash made by boiling dog’s teeth in wine. To make loose teeth firm, tie a frog to your jaw. Rub whisky on a baby’s sore gums during teething. Kiss a donkey to cure toothache. Eruption of wisdom teeth signifies you are halfway through your lifespan. Place an aspirin on a tooth instead of swallowing it to cure toothache.


Article Title


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BODIES ON FILM Although spring is in sight, it is still cool enough to justify spending Sunday (or any day without tutorials) on the couch watching movies. Humans are a narcissistic bunch and the body is the subject of countless films: bodies gone bad, body makeovers, body swaps, spectacular bodies, the body and identity and bodies at their physical peak. Sit back, enjoy... and apologies if the title led you to expect a more titillating selection. By Rebecca Marshallsay

Warm Bodies (2013) Warm Bodies is a typical romcom. You know... boy meets girl, boy’s brains are eaten by a zombie, zombie develops feelings for girl, girl is initially unimpressed by the whole situation. The zombie in question, “R” is played by the very sweet Nicholas Hoult whose romantic feelings for Julie (Teresa Palmer) are somewhat thwarted by the fact that he is a legit flesh-eating zombie (no Twilight style quasi-vegetarian vampire loophole here). It’s like The Walking Dead but a billion times less depressing.

Contagion (2011)

The Change Up (2011)

Gattaca (1997)

Stephen Soderbergh’s Contagion is a tense bodies-gone-bad thriller with an ensemble cast including Gwyneth Paltrow, Matt Damon, and Jude Law just to name a few. Contagion follows the spread of the fictional MEV-1 virus (meningoencephalitis modelled on the real life Nipah virus) as it claims lives and breaks down social order. The multi-narrative film focuses on the experiences of the ‘everyday family’, health professionals, scientists and a conspiracy theorist as they struggle to cope with the apocalyptic pandemic. You will never want to touch your face again after this one.

The Change Up is the most recent of a long line of body-swap films. Starring Jason Bateman and Ryan Reynolds, as the straight-laced family man and carefree bachelor respectively, the two friends switch bodies when they simultaneously wish for each other’s lives whilst peeing into a fountain (classy stuff). What follows is vaguely amusing but mostly underwhelming as the pair face a range of predictable dilemmas, primarily centred around their new sex lives. Better than a poke in the eye with a sharp stick. But only just.

In an age when humans are genetically engineered for perfection, social class is determined by your DNA. Ethan Hawke plays Vincent, a wouldbe astronaut whose natural conception means that he is ‘in-valid’ and considered inferior to genetically manipulated humans without flaws or predisposition to disease. Vincent risks everything to pursue his dreams and embarks on the dangerous game of posing as a ‘valid’ by paying for genetic material including skin cells and blood samples from a reclusive ‘valid’, Jerome (Jude Law).

Bodies on film


Miss Congeniality (2000)

Warrior (2011)

Shrek (2001)

Miss Congeniality makes it onto the list by virtue of being one of the least offensive make-over films (what was the central premise of Grease again? That’s right — change everything about yourself in order to be accepted). Previously ‘one of the boys’, FBI Special Agent Gracie Hart (Sandra Bullock) is forced to embrace her feminine side when she goes undercover at a Miss United States pageant under the pseudonym Gracie Lou Freebush.

The under-acknowledged Warrior, is an incredibly well acted sports drama starring Tom Hardy and Australia’s Joel Edgerton as estranged brothers. After their alcoholic father drove their family apart, Tommy (Hardy) and Brendan (Edgerton) have led separate lives. Hard times lead both brothers to a winner-takes-all mixed martial arts tournament that will force them to confront each other and their own demons. Not just for MMA fans, this emotionally gripping drama sits with the best of the best fight films.

Shrek is the ultimate body and self acceptance film. After living a life of solitude, ogre, Shrek, finds the only way to keep the evil Lord Farquaad from encroaching on his home is to rescue Farquaad’s wouldbe bride, Princess Fiona, from a dragon guarded tower. Apart from offering giggles to adults and kids alike, Shrek’s adventures teach us to love the skin we’re in. And to channel Donkey, the film Shrek is like parfait; and have you ever heard anyone say “Hell no, I don’t like no parfait?”

Fight Club (1999)

Remember the Titans (2000) Conan the Barbarian (1982)

Disenfranchised from his white collar job, ordinary Jack (Edward Norton) follows the lead of the mysterious and mayhem-driven Tyler (Brad Pitt) in order to escape his frustratingly dreary life. The duo form a fight club, where everyday men can come and beat each other up to relieve their frustrations. Based on a novel by Chuck Palahniuk, Fight Club is ostensibly about consumerism, however the themes run much deeper than that, exploring the emasculation of men in the 20th century and nihilism. Or if you don’t want to think that hard it is just a really cool movie.

Remember the Titans is a feel good film that tells us that sporting prowess and team spirit will conquer all, including bigotry and racism. Set in 1971, the film follows the journey of black football coach Herman Boone (Denzel Washington) as he accepts a job at a newly desegregated high school. The tension between white and black players mirrors the simmering racial tension in the broader community... but we know that a sporting success will get everyone there in the end. Very loosely based on a true story.

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One of the most famous bodies of all time, Arnold Schwarzenegger, stars in the old school version of Conan the Barbarian. Fresh out of bodybuilding, this is one of Arnie’s first leading roles. The eponymous barbarian, Conan (Schwarzenegger) sets out on a quest to avenge the deaths of his parents in a world that is dominated by dark sorcery and the power of steel. At time of release, film critic, Roger Ebert, described Conan as a “sort of psychopathic Star Wars, stupid and stupefying”; a glowing endorsement if you’ve ever heard one.


Product review - Group fitness By Rebecca Marshallsay Most of us are creatures of habit when we hit the gym. We have the classes we like, the machines we are comfortable with (i.e. the ones we know how to use without looking like a doofus) and a set routine that we follow with a regularity that any prune juice would be envious to inspire. Monday treadmill and legs, Wednesday - Body Pump, Friday - biceps, biceps, biceps... Part of this habit is fostered by the great gym divide. For many gym junkies, the weights room is the only place to be. And your concerns about classes are legitimate:

What if they only give me one way to work out my biceps? How will I get mad gains if my friends aren’t standing around me watching while I do the exercise? What if someone kicks over my protein shake? Group fitness is a fun way to shake up your fitness routine and develop new skills; strength, flexibility, cardio... they’re all covered. And with an instructor to hold you accountable, you will find that you get more out of your 60 minutes than when you’re left to your own devices... ooh, I’d better respond to this text... wait while I skip this song... I should take a selfie so everyone knows I worked out

GRIT STRENGTH

today... someone’s on my machine, I’ll just ‘stretch’ while they finish up... And the good news is that the dumbbells will still be waiting for you after class if you feel that your guns haven’t adequately received the TLC they deserve. In the spirit of the Body Edition, Getamungstit is encouraging you to try out something new at the gym in Semester 2. We have reviewed a selection of the group fitness classes available at Uni Fitness to give you just a taste of what you can expect when you bust up your routine and try out a new class.

RPM

Grit Strength is a high intensity workout built around the principles of metabolic conditioning. Classes combine weightlifting, running and plyometric exercises to increase strength and aerobic capacity. The Grit series also includes a dedicated cardio class to take your aerobic fitness to the next level and plyometric class for explosive power and speed.

Join the peloton and saddle up for RPM. This is an indoor cycling class that, with a little bit of imagination, allows you to complete the Tour de France without leaving campus (and thankfully sans lycra). With a lot of doof doof music to keep you motivated, RPM is styled on terrain training with hills, flats, mountain climbs, interval sprints and time trials.

It’s like CrossFit without the cult and the compulsion to flood Insta with pics of you lifting a barbell, looking at a barbell, standing in the general vicinity of a barbell...

The beauty of the stationary bike is that no one will ever know how uncoordinated you really are or your dirty little secret, that because your parents never let you pedal further than the end of the driveway you are now a fully grown adult who is too scared to ride in traffic. Thanks Mum.

The best thing about Grit Strength is that because of all the sweat, no one will be able to tell if you cry. You’ll sweat, you’ll hurt, you’ll love it.

RPM is your chance to be Lance Armstrong... well maybe not Armstrong...... Cadel Evans, he’s still clean right?

Product review


ZUMBA Did you know that Zumba is Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson’s favourite workout? 100% fact... according to a friend of a friend of mine. For a while there it looked like Zumba might just be an infomercial fad with the flimsy staying power of the thigh master or that belt thing that just vibrates your fat away. But the good news is that Zumba is here to stay and it is available on campus. Zumba is a highly addictive choreographed exercise class inspired by Latin dance. Not sure you are coordinated enough? With catchy tunes, easy to follow steps and a heavy squint at the mirror it is easy to convince yourself that you are the next J.Lo or Beyonce. Don’t think you have the requisite pep or high ponytail for Zumba? The energy is infectious so it’s just a matter of fake it till you make it. Before you know it you will be Merengue marching your way to a tight, toned and terrific bod.

BODY BALANCE Always wanted to try pilates, Tai Chi or yoga? Not 100% sure what the difference between them is and too embarrassed to ask? Body Balance is the answer - it has conveniently packaged the three disciplines together to develop your strength and flexibility through calm, focused movements, stretches and poses. Friends and family will be none the wiser to your ignorance regarding the distinguishing features of each discipline as you can confidently answer that you are now a master of all the zen driven fitness regimes. Body Balance is not just about the physical. It also offers a quiet place to practice mindfulness and meditation as you use controlled breathing and concentration to enhance your experience. The busier you are the more you need to set aside some time to stop past a Body Balance class.

BODY COMBAT Stepping into a Body Combat class is an immersive experience much like Neo’s lightning-fast programming in The Matrix: I know kung-fu. The instant confidence inspired by the martial arts based routines and pumping music will inspire you to unleash your inner bad-ass. Whether your inner hero is Johnny Cage or Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Body Combat is the place for you. Body Combat draws on a range of disciplines including boxing, karate, Taekwondo and Muay Thai. Strike, punch, kick, elbow and generally unleash a can of whoop ass on your imaginary opponent to release stress and burn calories. Like me you might be a 5-ft nothing pacifist but Body Combat is guaranteed to leave you feeling like the next Ronda Rousey or Randy Couture.

You can find out more at: gugcstudentguild.com.au/uni-fitness

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TO BEARD OR NOT TO BEARD? By Rebecca Marshallsay

The humble beard Beards have been in and out of fashion throughout recorded history. The current incarnation of the beard - often referred to as the hipster beard - has the minor distinction of being the first major beard of the 21st century. Whilst historical beards, such as the Tudor beard, had a clear provenance (the Tudor beard was modeled in the square style favoured by King Henry VIII) the hipster beard is a more ambiguous creature. Its origins are unknown and, unlike many historical beards, it does not follow one style or shape. The purpose of the hipster beard is also unknown. What is its message? Where did it come from? Does it want to be friends? Despite personally being a big fan of the beard, I have a sneaking suspicion many hipster beards have been grown to cultivate an air of mystery in favour of developing an actual personality (in much the same way that emo-ism was adopted in 2003).

Due to social media and the millennial predilection for self reflection, the hipster beard has also brought beard fascination to unprecedented levels. Even mainstream media is fascinated with the beard... Are beards on the way out? What does your beard say about your personality? Do women find them more attractive? Although we have taken it to a new level, we are not the first to speculate about the beard. Darwin suggested that humans evolved with the ability to grow beards because ladies found potential mates with some serious chin hair more attractive. Beards have even been the subject of a journal article by Barnaby Dixon and Paul Vasey in Behavioral Ecology. Drawing on their own research and previous studies, Dixon and Vasey found that correlations between attractiveness and beards were somewhat confusing and contradictory. In a straightforward ‘who is better looking?’ scenario, Dixon and Vasey’s study found that clean shaven men came out on top. But when it came to secondary factors, the beard may have a more subtle influence.

To beard or not to beard?

For example, women also found that bearded men looked older. Some researchers believe that this plays in the hirsute man’s favour as women typically prefer a partner who is 2-3 years older. Beards have also been found to be associated with increased self-confidence and higher social status. It has also been posited that in tribal situations, beards lent credibility to the fighting capacity of men by increasing the apparent size of their jaw line and thus their masculine prowess. In contemporary society, female preference for higher levels of masculine traits varies from person to person and can even vary for the individual depending on their hormones. But maybe we are reading too much into it. Maybe men just grow beards because they can’t be bothered shaving and maybe women think a good personality is


more important than a beard (or a lack thereof). Centuries of beard fascination suggest that there might be a little more to it though. Love them or hate them, there is certainly something intriguing about a beard.

The World Beard and Moustache Championships The World Beard and Moustache Championships have been hosting competitive displays of facial hair since 1990. In 2015 approximately 350 hirsute competitors will gather in Leogang, Austria to compete for the glory of the best beard or moustache in a range of categories. There are three major categories: Moustache, Partial Beard and Full Beard. Each of the major categories includes several sub-categories, each with detailed guidelines regarding hair length, shape and permissible use of styling products. The Moustache subcategories cover a range of styles including but not limited to Natural, Imperial, Dali and Hungarian.

Partial Beard is dedicated to goatee and sideburn focused looks such as the Goatee Natural, the Musketeer, and the Fu Manchu. In 2009, a once-off special subcategory was added called the Alaskan Whaler. This category allowed for the intimidating and divisive, full-beard no-moustache mode of grooming. But without a doubt, the Full Beard category is the big league. You might prefer Full Beard Natural which is, as the name suggests, a beard and moustache au naturel - no styling, curling or products permitted. Or perhaps Full Beard Style Moustache which requires an untamed beard but allows the competitor to style their moustache in a distinct fashion. The Verdi category is for shaped beards no more than 10cm in length with a styled moustache whereas the Garibaldi category sees bigger beards (no more than 20cm in length) but they may not be styled.

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Research in review Universities are interesting places. Hopefully it won’t come as a shock to you that there is a whole lot of stuff happening beyond your lecture theatre and the Uni Bar. Much of this ‘stuff’ includes original, important and innovative research. To celebrate the Body Edition we wanted to give you a quick snapshot of some of the exciting body focused research taking place right here at Griffith.

Stem cells to treat ACL injuries

Legal implications of sex assignment

With more than 10,000 cases reported a year in Australia, chances are you know someone suffering from one of the most common sporting injuries, a damaged anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). This common knee injury has traditionally required multiple reconstructive surgeries to try and repair or minimise the effects of the damage. Traditional surgery sees a good to excellent outcome in about 60% of cases only.

When a child is born with intersex traits (a range of congenital physical traits or variations that lie between ideals of male and female), more often than not parents and medical practitioners will ‘decide’ what gender the child should be and make the required physical changes via surgery. Often this has significant identity issues down the track when the individual finds they identify more strongly with the alternative gender.

There may be a more sophisticated solution emerging from Griffith over the next couple of years. Dr Sudheesh Kumar and Dr Cedryck Vaquette have pioneered a technique that uses advanced tissue biomedical engineering to generate new ligament tissue in a lab.

PhD candidate in Law, Sky O’Dwyer believes that Australia currently overlooks surgical, medical, and hormonal sex assignment of intersex babies and children often to their detriment. O’Dwyer’s research seeks to demonstrate that Australian law already has ways of protecting intersex children from unnecessary sex assignment procedures – they simply aren’t being used. O’Dwyer is investigating the areas of family law that should be enacted to ensure that individuals are allowed to decide what changes, if any, should be made to their bodies when they are ready to do so themselves.

According to Dr Kumar this technique would see stem cells taken from the injured patient’s own tissue to be developed in vitro before being implanted back into the knee via arthroscopy. The treatment, which is currently heading into pre-clinical trials, could see a significant reduction in the negative side effects currently experienced by those undergoing traditional surgery for ACL injury. Dr Sudheesh Kumar, Menzies Health Institute Queensland

Research in review


Making beer better for you This is not a joke. Griffith University is exploring ways to make beer better for you. Associate Professor Ben Desbrow of Griffith’s Menzies Health Institute Queensland has been hard at work to try and determine if beer can be improved to make it more hydrating without compromising the taste. And the very good news for beer drinkers is that the answer is a resounding yes. His research has found that adding electrolytes to beer can increase an individual’s fluid retention, the results of this study have been published under ‘Manipulations to the alcohol and sodium content of beer for post exercise rehydration’ published in the International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism. The study is focused on low level beer consumption and is not seeking to position beer as a sports recovery beverage but rather to enhance its health profile for people consuming it after general exercise such as trades people at the end of a day’s work Associate Professor Ben Desbrow, Menzies Health Institute Queensland

Dementia care enhanced by robots For several years now, Professor Wendy Moyle and her research team based out of Griffith’s Centre for Health Practice Innovation have been investigating how companion robots can assist people living with dementia. The robots in question are PAROs, invented in Japan by Dr Takanori Shibata. The PARO robots are designed like baby harp seals complete with fur and expressive faces. The robots are designed to respond to sound and convey emotion. The robot seals have been trialed in aged care settings and Professor Moyle believes that the robotic seals may reduce the physical, behavioral and psychological symptoms of people with dementia particularly those triggered by agitation and anxiety. The robots are not intended to replace human interaction but may offer comfort and interaction to people when they are alone, much as a pet would. The research received more than $1 million funding from the National Health and Medical Research Council to conduct a large scale study into their effectiveness in care facilities throughout South East Queensland.

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G U- BALLI L- D

Friday 5 June @ piters Gold Coast Ju

Snapped on campus


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RKET M A- DAYS -

Fo r t n i g h t ly W e d n e s d a y s Fr o m W e e k 2 @ Gr a s s e d A rea Outside Library

Snapped on campus


F E AT UR ING

P ER F ORMA N CES

B Y:

NAZEEM HUSSAIN | ELLEN BRIGGS JACOB LINGARD | JOE SHAFFER

LIVE @ THE UNI BAR

TUESDAY 4 AUGUST - 7.00PM TIL LATE TICKETS $5 FOR GRIFFITH UNIVERSITY STUDENTS, $10 FOR NON-STUDENTS EACH TICKET INCLUDES A COMPLIMENTARY BEER, WINE, BASIC SPIRIT OR SOFT DRINK TICKETS AVAILABLE FROM GUGCSTUDENTGUILD.COM.AU 18+ VALID PROOF OF AGE ID REQUIRED. CURRENT 18+ CARD, DRIVER LICENSE (IN ENGLISH) OR PASSPORT ACCEPTED.

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SECOND-HAND TEXTBOOK FAIR

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facebook.com/gugcstudentguild Article Title

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(UNDER $30) Ah, winter. The season to let your leg hairs flourish, fear the inevitable spread of airborne flu germs and cover up that comfort food tum with an oversized hoodie. Despite the fact here on the Gold Coat we are a long way off reaching sub-zero temperatures during the cooler June

to August months, we can still join in on the winter fashion fun (particularly handy for time spent in lecture theatres still set to summer temps). Geta has scoured local shops for some great bargain buys sure to keep you toasty (and stylish!), all for $30 or less.

Lowbrow beanie in Jet Black City Beach - $19.95

Unisex Nordic Hat (beanie) Daiso - $2.80 College Trackie in Shiraz Factorie - $29.95 (comes in a range of colours and they have the same trackies in a women’s cut too!)

The Emblem single pack active socks Cotton On - $9.95 ea

Wembley men’s slippers with memory foam in Charcoal Target - $30.00

Winter essentials under $30


Mooloola spell snood (scarf) City Beach - $15.99

High neck split hem sleeveless knit top in Light Grey Ally - $29.99

We scored these at 3 for $10.00!

Ankle novelty sock in Navy Donuts Rubi Shoes - $4.95

The boot sock in Black & Oatmeal Rubi Shoes - $6.95 ea

Women’s boots with nonfunctional zip detail in Black Kmart - $25.00

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Feature artist – Monique Montfroy Interview by Angel Nikijuluw

Digital Media student Monique Montfroy speaks to Getamungstit about photography, visual storytelling, and her latest project, ‘Bois To Men’.

How did you become interested in photography? I think it was probably through my dad which sounds a bit cliché, but he used to develop a lot of film in our bathroom when I was young. I didn’t think I wanted to be a photographer when I was younger - I wanted to be an artist or animator. But something just changed, and I started taking a lot of photos of friends and family when I was 16-17 years old and I just thought photography was the way to go.

You have previously stated that you enjoy capturing ‘diversity and people’. Have you always been interested in this? Why did you decide to focus on engaging with global communities? When I decided to focus on photography, I was always more interested in capturing the moment and not setting stuff up, just going with the flow. I have always been interested in travelling and exploring; I love to see the way people live and the differences from one culture to the next. I think there are lots of people

Feature artist

in the world that have great stories and they need to be told because no one hears about them. The news just portrays all the bad things happening because that is what sells. Photography is a great medium to convey stories, ideas and opinions. If people understand other people and their differences, maybe the world could be happier and in harmony.

In your series ‘Bois To Men’, you explore the roles and identity of Australian men in the 21st century. How and why did you becoming interested in this particular topic?


I was looking at identity on the Gold Coast in particular when I started this project, and at the way people portray themselves and what they put out for the public eye. I had to focus my idea, so I decided to look at the way men express their masculinity and find out what masculinity meant to them. How has it changed over time in Australia and what attributes does masculinity have in contemporary Australia now?

How important is it for you to communicate the role of feminism in this series?

I want this project to be collaborative, honest and authentic. Having a feminist approach to the series gives subjects agency. If I was to take a more patriarchal stance, the whole project would be totally different and would not give the subject a chance to be real or express themselves properly.

Your work has an in-depth concept, but a rather simple aesthetic. Why did you choose this? I chose to have a simple aesthetic because as mentioned, the concept is so in-depth. I wanted

it to be easy for the viewer to see all the tiny details and differences between each subject. I took inspiration from Richard Avedon, the simple black and white image on a white background brings it back to just the person. This method gives each subject agency, the images are uniform and there are no distractions in the background for the viewer. If you would like to be a part of Monique’s extension of the ‘Bois To Men’ series, send her an email at monique. montfroy@griffithuni.edu.au. moniquemontfroy.com

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Online – Top blogs

Mushburger

27b/6

The Culture-ist

Mushburger is a cultural hub for all things surfing. If you are interested in surfing events, surf culture, festivals, coastal environmental issues, or travel then Mushburger is your one-stop procrastination station. This blog collective brings together more than 1500 surf related blogs from professional and amateur surfers, bloggers and industry professionals.

27b/6 is the home of Australian satirist, David Thorne. You may have heard of Thorne when his ‘Man who tried to pay bill with drawing of a spider’ was Facebook flavour-of-the-month a few years ago. What you might not know however is that Thorne is no one-hit-wonder, having authored dozens of humourous essays that will leave your eyes watering and see you snaughling (snort-laughing) in a most undignified manner.

The Culture-ist is a collective lifestyle blog with the lofty goal of creating social change by tapping into a community of likeminded travellers, changemakers, millennials, dreamers and foodies. There is lots of thought-provoking content focused on sustainability and community-centric living such as ‘Eco-friendly Funerary Practices’ and ‘The Trickle Effect of (Over)consumption’.

The site handpicks a changing selection of new and noteworthy posts to profile and allows you to bookmark your favourite bloggers. If you are an aspiring surf writer yourself, you can submit your blog for consideration. There is also a section called ‘Latest Instagram from our Faves’ to help you freshen up your Insta feed. You pretty much never have to get back in the water again; you can live vicariously through Mushburger. mushburger.com

If you missed the spider excitement when it did the rounds you can find it under ‘Overdue Account’; other favourites of ours include ‘Justin’s Floodlight’ and ‘Obvious Foggot.’ Often inappropriate, Thorne’s dry humour and acerbic wit is not quite for everyone. But on the chance that you end up on the positive side of the love-or-hate-it divide, it is worth a peruse. 27bslash6.com

The only drawback is that for every five great posts or so The Culture-ist will step up and hit you in the face with a heavy dose of hipster claptrap such as ‘Try These Amazing Superfoods During Your Next Visit to Costa Rica’ (said with all the jaunty confidence that you might encourage someone to try a new brand of oats next time they’re at the supermarket). That said, overall The Culture-ist is a great place to find inspired content with a bit of social substance. thecultureist.com

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Entertainment

Jurassic World (2015) 125 min Rated M Action, adventure Director: Colin Trevorrow By Paul Veitch We’ve been waiting some time for this sequel; a successor to one of the most beloved films to come out of the 90s. It does not even meet the standard. The first movie was built on the foundation of its characters. This movie is built on the basis of its special effects. And while those terrible, TERRIBLE, special effects provide two hours of visceral monster-movie, bad CGI does not a good movie make. Bloody hell, what happened to you, ILM? This was the absolute worst first impression I’ve gotten from a film. Rushed characters, cliché after cliché and that classic, beautiful instrumental score by the blessed John Williams being completely misused. This is the time in the story that’s supposed to get us to like what we’re seeing, thus be excited for what’s coming.

The bare minimum does not excite an audience, it pisses us off. This movie follows the sad, disheartening current trend of giving us the bare minimum to invest us in its characters. We know what they act like, and that’s about it. Even then, their personalities do such 180s that in the end we’re left with whiplash, not character investment. And for a movie attached to the legacy of a character-driven storyteller like Steven Spielberg, that’s just sickening. In the same vein, perhaps this movie’s greatest sin is not so much that the characters are bad, but that they are unrealistic. The makers of the original film made a point of getting good actors (yes, even Jeff Goldblum) to play real people. Because if the people were real, then the story was real; it was as though we were watching real events, not a story. This movie makes every single character an utter eccentric, not real at all. If we know that everything we are seeing is fake then we are painfully aware that it has no consequences,

Entertainment

so why be worried or excited for our main characters? However, in spite of all of that, this movie has a saving grace that keeps it from damnation, and that is its monster-movie appeal. Each time a new threat is introduced, even if it is kind of suddenly, that threat is made threatening. There is never any doubt that these dinosaurs can kill! This threat translates into monster-movie carnage that sucks you into the moment and leaves you taking deep breaths and being glad you watched this movie. It’s just a shame that we can’t feel this vibe throughout the whole movie, what with the “monsters” being treated way too much like people to always be “monsters”. The climax’ll at least get your blood pumpin’, trust me. So, watch this movie if you want a brainless monster mash, just remember and ignore its sad attempts to make you believe that its anything else. Final Verdict: Worth a Rent


Mad Max: Fury Road (2015) 120 min Rated MA15+ Action, adventure, sci-fi, post-apocalyptic Director: George Miller By Erwan Guegan Dive into the mind of cinema legend and father of the Mad Max universe, George Miller. In 1979 Miller gave birth to the brokenvehicle-car-chase movies and is now back to ignite his world in his new movie Mad Max: Fury Road. This amazing mix between new cinematographic technologies and real-life stunts and explosions will immerse you more than ever in this post apocalyptic universe and let you experience something truly spectacular. Mad Max: Fury Road is the fourth part in the action movie Mad Max franchise and will satisfy the old fans but also blow the minds and conquer the heart of a whole new generation. Fury Road is a real re-imagination and even more immersive and detailed version ofthe Mad Max universe and

creates a real sense of authenticity of this insane universe. If you are planning on getting any popcorn for the movie, get the large box. If you are like me you will finish it in no time as you frenetically dig into the box while holding your breath as trucks and people get flipped in the air in spectacular explosions — blowing everything up and your mind in the process. You will leave your seat with a mixed feeling of excitement and exhaustion, as this action packed masterpiece barely lets you catch your breath throughout the entire movie. This sense of relentless action wouldn’t be possible without the amazing work of the stuntman and the incredible soundtrack made by Junkie XL and his team. Featuring Tom Hardy (aka: Bane) as ‘Max Rockatansky‘, former MFP Pursuit Officer and now full time Road Warrior. Previously portrayed by a young Mel Gibson, this new interpretation offers another perspective to the character. Max has always been the symbol of the anti-hero, with his dark history and a knack for hunting down road gangs in his V8 interceptor 47

in the post-apocalyptic Australian outback. Although Max always appeared as being the most (if not the only) sane person in this crazy universe, someone to whom the spectator can relate, a tortured but yet still righteous man. Mad Max: Fury Road might help you realise that not everyone is actually as insane as they first appear. Other survivors are also trying to do the right thing such as the wicked ‘Imperator Furiosa’ interpreted by Charlize Theron who is to me the real hero of the movie and one of the most bad ass female characters in the history of cinema. Honourable mention to Nicholas Hoult for his great performance in interpreting Nux, who first appeared as another insane War Boy Warrior from the Immortan Joe’s Fanatical army but to whom you will quickly get attached. Dramatising story that’s in constant movement is very tricky but George Miller does it to perfection and will teleport you to his detailed and fascinating world. So put on your seatbelt and hold on to your seat ‘cause you are in for a hell of a ride.’


How Big, How Blue, How Beautiful Florence + The Machine By Angel Nikijuluw Erupting into a cluster of messy percussion and strings, closely followed by the idiosyncratic vocals of Florence Welch, How Big, How Blue, How Beautiful documents a breakup that is seemingly of chaotic proportion. With assistance of producer Markus Dravs, Welch has achieved

10% Happier

Dan Harris

Dan Harris is an American news anchor and author of the lengthily titled 10% Happier: How I Tamed the Voice in My Head, Reduced Stress Without Losing My Edge, and Found Self-Help That Actually Works–A True Story. After suffering an on air panic attack in 2004, Harris realised that the highly competitive world of news journalism and his own ambitions and anxieties were taking a toll on his physical and mental health. 10% Happier is a memoir that charts Harris’s journey to find a more mindful and balanced way of existing. From ‘The Secret’ to Deepak Chopra, Harris was frustrated that

a combination of soulful ambience with an alt-pop-rock edge: all of which exemplifies inordinate emotion, powerful vocal lines, and once again, her fixation with ocean and water analogies. Her lead single ‘What Kind of Man’, released back in February, showcased another facet of Welch, transitioning from brooding vocals to thunderous chanting and brass. Further, tracks such as ‘Delilah’ and ‘How Big, How Blue, How Beautiful’ demonstrates a similar

every grain of wisdom he found was couched in a fog of hyperbole and self-help fluff that he found hard to stomach: until he found meditation. Harris sums up his previous attitude to meditation by channeling 30 Rock’s hippy-hating Jack Donaghy (Alec Baldwin); “Meditation is a waste of time, like learning French or kissing after sex.” But after putting his skepticism aside, Harris found that meditation was a practical way to combat one of the biggest sources of most people’s unhappiness: the voice in our own heads. Whilst the book is mostly memoir, there is enough practical advice to get you started on your own path to a happier way of living. This book doesn’t offer a simple life-changing secret. You won’t have a core-shaking, Entertainment

method, presenting big, loud sounds, accompanied by a sense of delicacy and emotional vulnerability. While her two previous records reflect a slightly more emotionally stable Florence Welch disguised in whimsical harps and upbeat tones, How Big diverts from the usual formula of her previous work, yet still retains a style of the theatrical nature Welch has established since her debut record Lungs back in 2009.

transcendental experience. But if you follow Harris’s advice you might just end up 10% happier.


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Being Creative CROSSING THE RED LINE By Ashleigh Watson

M

y boyfriend does not mind the blood.

Not that there’s much of it. Half a beat of hesitation and the slow roll of a too-tight condom is all it takes before I take my tampon out. There’s the movement, the humidity. The yellow light. Skin on skin. A striking lack of thick, gooey red spraying onto the ceiling and walls. There is no B-grade horror. We keep at it, we finish. Nothing more. Nothing less. We forget our boldness until I slide out of bed in the morning and the condom, now yellowing and brown, sticks to my heel. I bin the plastic and we laugh. My blood, my menses, my secret dirty thing is there, spread on the carpet, with less consequence than spilled milk. No longer a secret women’s business to be discussed only in bathrooms and whispers. He showers and I sponge the carpet clean. Rinsing the cloth in the kitchen I picture my fifth grade teacher stammering through a sex-ed lesson. ‘M-menstruation,’ he’d said, horrified. The first time I got cramps I lied and said I’d run into a table. The first time I left a bloodied pad on the bathroom floor, still stuck to my grey undies, my sister screamed and my mother distracted my brother until the mess was ‘sorted.’ There was never a second time. Everything comes down to etiquette.

‘One of the only times menstruation is even hinted at in public is when PMS becomes a punch line (Mad Cow Disease is already taken).’ Periods from lunchrooms to TV screens 101: a mysterious blue liquid is gently soaked into white cotton. Cats, white yoga pants and Wonder Woman stand in for the bloating, the cramping, clots and stained underwear. Blood is absent. One of the only times menstruation is even hinted

at in public is when PMS becomes a punch line (Mad Cow Disease is already taken). It’s casually attributed to any display of unenthused emotion, whether or not a gal is in fact ‘on the rag.’ The cyclical ‘sensitivity’ and ‘hysterical outbursts’ are tiptoed around as if bleeding women are howling werewolves who will, soon enough, retreat back into the shadows.

‘Menstruation rarely gets a mention once you’ve escaped the purgatory of synchronized cycles in high school.’ Even in the ad spoofs, periods are invisible. In real life menstruation is seen more and less. More, because at the end of a day despite scented tampons and dim bathroom lighting that thick stringy liquid still isn’t blue. And less—much less. I’ve bled just once in the past eleven months, skipping sugar pills for the convenience. Not having your period is something we don’t talk about either. Period sex is not exactly a conversation topic amongst my girlfriends. My sister still hides tampons in the cupboard under the sink. Menstruation rarely gets a mention once you’ve escaped the purgatory of synchronized cycles in high school. The traumatised expressions of boys in biology and torturously loud crinkling of plastic tampon wrapping in the toilets teaches us more than we need to know—see no, hear no, speak no evil. But there are people talking. Menarchists. Freebleeders. Bloggers riding the crimson wave, writing about the politics of menstruation. These activists question the current feminine care industry. They circulate period-friendly information, art, and humour through websites, zines, blogs, and parodies of current advertising. They reject big brands and promote alternative care products which ‘empower, inspire and

Being creative


BRINK OF PARENTHOOD By Aaron Chapman

In our bedroom tonight a storm: clouds swirl on the textured ceiling, through blinds the moon is a dim streetlight throwing piano keys across your skin, educate’ women. The silicon Diva Cup claims their product does exactly this—collecting blood rather than absorbing it, making it visible before washing it away. More radical than these activists are freebleeders who use nothing at all. Despite my eager boyfriend and newfound bedroom freedom, my willingness to sponge blood from the carpet and wash our bed sheets does not extend to soaking blood from my underwear once a month. Tampons are a luxury and a freedom. Previous feminists championed the minimisation of menstruation. This new movement is not so much pro-blood as anti-shame. These people are standing up for the progression of information, for the development of affordable eco-friendly products, and for an end to a culture where menstruation is still a taboo. Activists believe language matters. And while rhetoric isn’t something we consider while trying to hold our bladder long enough to pull out the tampon and avoid pissy fingers, they’re right. Language matters. It shapes our understanding. Only talking about ‘women who menstruate’ ignores the trans* men who neither dress, act or identify as females but still have a uterus and bleed. Young people tired of hearing that periods are shameful and unclean are flying the red flag. I’ll start by crossing the thin red line.

afraid of dark and lightning the reasons your fingers sleepwalk to my sternum, rain is pooling in the deep end of your belly button. I calibrate my hands to the currents of your body, saying spit the gum that you were chewing like raw meat, then moving between your cheeks with tongue. I know it’s safe the way you play the scaled passages of my ribbed condom, but I’d rather plant my seed and keep you in partial shade, to watch a child bloom, and grow, into another you never leaving me. Our storm divides over distant ridges, naked spines lying here in our sea. We don’t open books at the last page, or kiss and say goodnight rolling over to sleep. We eat summer fruits from each other’s hands like the obedient goats at a petting zoo. I brush my teeth in the toughest corners, and you exfoliate underneath your eyes to make sure we’re still beautiful when that child starts asking questions about sex, about love. To replace our fluids I drop ice cubes into a stainless steel bottle and listen for their explosions. Only then do we say: see you in the morning.

Do you want to see your work in print? Getamungstit is seeking high quality submissions of short fiction, creative non-fiction, poetry and other genres for our creative section.

Check out the Contributor Guidelines at gugcstudentguild.com.au/getamungstit for further information. 51


Get the hell outta here Tamborine Mountain By Amber Gulamali Studying on the Gold Coast is, for most of us, all about the sun, the ocean and the bars and clubs where we can party it up till early in the morning. However, what is right behind us offers something completely different; a place to wind down, relax and observe nature. When you need some time away from your books and want to see the other side of the Gold Coast then grab this magazine, put on your trainers and hop in the car... destination: Tamborine Mountain.

to enjoy a stunning view of the Gold Coast. Once you’ve taken enough photos get back in the car and continue the trip to Knoll Rd, North Tamborine, for the first walk of the day.

Unless your car can handle really steep ascents, the best route would be via the M1 to Oxenford and take the exit to Tamborine Mountain. If you’ve left early enough, let’s say around 9.30am, make a quick stop at Eagle Heights Mountain Resort

If you’re up for another walk, get back in the car and drive to the Curtis Falls. The short trek is just a 30 minute return but if you want to see a bit more you can continue on the Lower Creek Circuit which will take about an hour in total.

The Sandy Creek Circuit is an easy trek of an hour with scenic views. The trail continues into the rainforest where you can hear all sorts of birds. If you go during the winter you might catch the lyrebird and its unique sounds. Almost half way through you’ll get to the viewpoint to admire the Cameron Falls and the rest of the rainforest.

Get the hell outta here

After the treks it’s time to relax and grab a drink. Tamborine Mountain has numerous wineries and breweries. One I’d recommend is Fortitude Brewing Company on Long Rd where you can taste all sorts of beer. Afterwards, head to the Gallery Walk where you’ll find artefacts and little cafes for a good meal. Save some space for dessert though because you’ll find more than enough fudge places along the road. Feeling adventurous? Try something like Caribbean lemon or Crème Brulee. If you don’t want to take the same route back then get on the Main Western Road towards Nerang or Canungra for a scenic route. If it’s a sunny day stop at the hang glider viewpoint and enjoy one more moment of pure peacefulness. All stops can be found in the free map available at every information centre.


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Getamungstit - Body Edition (July 2015)  

Your FREE Griffith University Gold Coast student magazine.

Getamungstit - Body Edition (July 2015)  

Your FREE Griffith University Gold Coast student magazine.