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H I S PA N I C S I N P H I L A N T H R O P Y

30 CELEBRATES

PORTRAITS OF LATINO GIVING & LEADERSHIP

M A R C H 2 0 14


Created in celebration of the 30th Anniversary of Hispanics in Philanthropy, a transnational organization whose mission is to:

Strengthen Latino communities by increasing social investments in the Latino and Latin American civil sector Increase Latino participation and leadership throughout the field of philanthropy Foster policy change to advance equity and inclusiveness


THESE 30 PERSONAL STORIES ARE A SMALL SAMPLE OF THE GENEROSITY, KINDNESS, AND ENTREPRENEURIAL SPIRIT THAT BINDS TOGETHER OUR FAMILIES, OUR COMMUNITIES, AND THE AMERICAS.


DEAR PARTNERS AND FRIENDS,

T

THIS SPECIAL PUBLICATION, CREATED BY HISPANIC EXECUTIVE magazine,

is meant to honor some exceptional individuals and inspire all of us. As Hispanics in Philanthropy (HIP) celebrates its 30th anniversary, we can’t think of a better way to illustrate our work than by launching the inaugural cohort of HIPGivers. These 30 personal stories—there are many more that we plan to feature in subsequent years—are a small sample of the generosity, kindness, and entrepreneurial spirit that binds together our families, our communities, and the Americas. Hispanic philanthropy has been around for a long time, although it has not reached the front page or the home page—until now! Our culture’s customs are rich in compassion, collaboration, and yes, philanthropic contributions. In recognizing our first set of HIPGivers, we wanted to showcase individual and institutional character as well as gifts, to inspire many others to step up their game and encourage all donors to take a look at investment opportunities in Latino nonprofits—now more than ever, they’re a high-yield investment. Why? Hispanics are an emerging market that will grow to be one in four Americans by 2050. Our nonprofits are hubs of new leadership and innovation. The social capital that they generate translates into healthier communities, a more educated and productive workforce, a more vibrant and diverse cultural ecosystem, and a more engaged and participatory democracy. Their impact could be definitive and funding these nonprofits now could turn the tide in a number of issues and policies. Finally, we want to be among those writing a new narrative about Latino/Hispanic Americas. A narrative that reframes our collective portrait as the givers that we are: givers of economic prosperity, of family values and resilience, of intellectual and cultural capital, of innovation and thought leadership—in short, givers of America’s present and future health and prosperity. It is a pivotal time to reframe these personal and collective portraits. We’re at a historic juncture in the evolving American experience of democracy. As the debate over immigration reform heats up, prejudice and fear may reignite old stereotypes and hatreds; it is up to all of us to debunk those falsehoods portraying accurately who we are and what we bring to this country. A humane and inclusive immigration reform will break a decades-long deadlock that has hindered our economy and detracted from our national character. Our warmest agradecimiento to all HIPGivers, the ones we honor in this issue and the many others, spread throughout the Americas.

DIANA CAMPOAMOR President, Hispanics in Philanthropy

NELSON I. COLÓN Chair, Hispanics in Philanthropy 5


TABLE OF CONTENTS 12 BENNY AGOSTO, JR. Trial lawyer, advocate, and philanthropist 14 ISABEL ALLENDE Award-winning author 16 MANUEL ARANGO Patron of the arts, environmentalist, and businessman 18 ARNOLDO AVALOS Founder, Avalos Foundatio 20 RICHARD BLANCO American poet, public speaker, and author 22 CARMEN CASTELLANO Co-founder & president, Castellano Family Foundation 8

24 RUFINO DOMÍNGUEZ SANTOS Labor leader and indigenous civil rights activist 26 LORNA FEIJÓO Principal ballerina, Boston Ballet 28 HERMAN GALLEGOS Co-founder, Hispanics in Philanthropy, Latino Philanthropist 30 ANA YRIS GUZMÁN TORRES Champion of youth rights

40 MARIA HINOJOSA Award-winning journalist, host, Latino USA 42 DOLORES HUERTA Labor leader and civil rights activist 44 ALBERTO IBARGÜEN President & CEO, John S. and James L. Knight Foundation 46 CESAR MILLAN “Dog Whisperer” and founder, Millan Foundation

36 ANTONIA HERNÁNDEZ President, California Community Foundation

48 LOURDES MIRANDA Businesswoman and founder, Miranda Foundation

38 ARGENTINA “TINA” HILLS Journalist and philanthropist

50 RONALD E. MONTOYA Business leader and Denver philanthropist


FEATURES 52 SISTER CONSUELO MORALES Human rights activist

70 DOUGLAS RODRIGUEZ Award-winning chef

54 DR. MARTA MORENO VEGA President & founder, Caribbean Cultural Center African Diaspora Institute

72 MARIO ERNESTO SÁNCHEZ Actor, director, and founder, Teatro Avante

62 SONIA NAZARIO Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist

74 FATHER ALEJANDRO SOLALINDE Director, Hermanos en el Camino migrant shelter

64 MIRTA OJITO Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist

76 LUIS ANTONIO UBIÑAS Nonprofit and technology consultant, innovator, and leader

66 DOUGLAS X. PATIÑO, PHD Trustee, Marguerite Casey Foundation

78 LEONILA VÁSQUEZ ALVÍZAR Champion of migrants on a perilous journey

68 CHARLES RICE-GONZÁLEZ Co-founder and executive director, The Bronx Academy of Arts and Dance

80 LUZ VEGA-MARQUIS President & CEO, Marguerite Casey Foundation; co-founder, Hispanics in Philanthropy

33 THE PURSUIT OF PAN-AMERICAN PROSPERITY The ties that bind the United States and Latin America permeate communities across all borders 56 PHILANTHROPY 2.0 A look at three tech innovations that are propelling nonprofits to new levels

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Special thanks to our features’ sources (in order of appearance): Gustavo Arnavat, United States executive director to the InterAmerican Development Bank; Amy Sample Ward, CEO of The Nonprofit Technology Enterprise Network (NTEN); and Lisa Pool, executive director of the Technology Affinity Group (TAG). Printed by Crescent Printing Company in Onalaska, Wisconsin. Reprinting of articles is prohibited without permission of Hispanics in Philanthropy and Hispanic Executive®. Hispanic Executive® is a registered trademark of Guerrero Howe, LLC. For more information on Guerrero Howe’s Custom Media Services, contact Vianni Busquets at (312) 564-2184, vianni@guerrerohowe.com.

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“WE NEED TO DEVELOP THE OPPORTUNITIES FOR HISPANICS TRYING TO GO TO COLLEGE AS WELL AS THOSE NOT EVEN DREAMING ABOUT IT, BUT WHO NEED TO HEAR THE IDEA SO THAT DREAM CAN FLOURISH.”


BENNY AGOSTO, JR. T R I A L L AW Y E R , A DVO CAT E , A N D P H I L A N T H R O P I ST

A PHOTO: FELIX SANCHEZ

AT THE END OF 2013, PRESIDENT OBAMA stated an unsettling

he represents victims of injury, Agosto, Jr. has the fortune of reality that, while shocking to some, many Hispanics have contributing scholarships to his alma mater, Houston Baptist been facing for generations. When the President says that “a University, and law school, South Texas College of Law. But it’s child born into the bottom 20 percent has a less-than-1-in-20 through the Mexican American Bar Association of Texas Founshot at making it to the top” in the current economy, it may dation, which he created in 2005, that he has been able to seem that self-made successes like Benny Agosto, Jr. and his fund more than $100,000 worth of Latino law education in first-generation peers came up in a vastly different era of equal the state. “We need to develop the opportunities for Hispanics opportunity. In actuality, his story remains an outlier in the trying to go to college as well as those not even dreaming narrative of the American Hispanic population. Rather than about it, but who need to hear the idea so that dream can a loss of socioeconomic mobility, Agosto, Jr. is troubled that flourish,” he says. “But if you don’t have the funds to help many Hispanics never had it to begin with. But it is through people attend these expensive schools, you’re just sending education, he believes, that they can begin to change that. them out to fend for themselves.” The formula that Agosto, Don Beno Agosto, Sr. was not disappointed when none of Jr. has found most successful is three-pronged: “If we are his five children took over the family business. Though the really going to be philanthropists,” he says, “we have to lead jewelry shop in the Bronx put food on the table, he and his with our time, our talent, and our money. We have to display wife stressed to all their children the importance of a college dedication to our cause, professionalism in our work, and education and the prospect of something greater. When he generosity in our giving.” moved to Texas to pursue his education, Agosto, Jr. saw just With two foundations to lead (including that of the Hishow valuable his upbringing was. “I saw the prejupanic National Bar Association) and his own career ORGANIZATIONS dice that exists that maybe I was oblivious to before to develop, Agosto, Jr.’s plate looks full, but ask him, Mexican American I got here,” he says. “In places like Texas, Hispanics and he will tell you his commitments are blessings, Bar Association of are already the majority, but that doesn’t translate not burdens. “We can’t fall asleep and just stop workTexas Foundation to the best jobs or influence in our government. I ing,” he says of Latinos like him who have “made it” Houston Baptist started seeing that education, not just the size of in their respective fields. University On the heels of a trip to the US capital, he is as our population, is what allows us to thrive in those South Texas impassioned as ever that the future of Hispanics is different socioeconomic levels.” College of Law Education is the first step to Hispanic empowerbeing built by their leaders today. “If we get comment and social mobility. Through the firm where placent,” he says, “our community is missing out.” 13


“WE ALL CREATE A LEGEND FOR OURSELVES. WHEN YOU CHANGE YOUR STORY, YOU CAN CHANGE YOUR LIFE.”

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ISABEL ALLENDE AWAR D - W I N N I N G AU TH O R

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PHOTO: LORI BARRA

A MILITARY COUP LED BY General Augusto Pinochet

In 1988, Allende visited California on a book tour in 1973 toppled Chile’s socialist reform government. and met her second husband. She soon married him Chilean President Salvador Allende died in the coup. and moved permanently to the United States, with He was Isabel Allende’s cousin. her children and grandchildren following soon after. At the time, Isabel Allende was working in Chile Paula, Allende’s daughter who died at a young as a journalist reporting on the poor neighborhoods age, inspired Allende to create The Isabel Allende of Santiago. She saw how poverty affects people, Foundation, dedicated to human rights. After publication of her book, Paula, which told the story of especially women and children. Pinochet’s regime was marked early on by reher daughter’s life and death, Allende wanted the pression and brutality, and Allende became involved income from the book sales to be spent honoring Paula in some way. with groups offering aid to victims of the regime. Ultimately finding it unsafe to remain in Chile, she “Paula’s motto, her mantra, was: you only have fled to Venezuela in 1975 with her now ex-husband what you give. So give, give, give. It will make you rich inside,” Allende says. and two children. In 1981, Allende learned that her beloved grandThe foundation gives financial support to several father was dying, and she began writing a letter to programs that are dedicated to the protection and him, recounting her childhood memories of life empowerment of women and children worldwide. in her grandparents’ home. The letter became the “My foundation is guided by the vision of a world in basis for Allende’s first novel, The House of the Spirits, which women have achieved social and economic justice,” she describes. published in 1982. The novel won worldwide acclaim, paving the way for Allende’s literary career. As one of the most famous and widely read Now, her books are translated into more than authors in the world, Allende is both a precursor 30 languages, and more than 60 million copies have and a reflection of the growing voice of the Latino been sold worldwide. Allende says her books are community. She was amazed at the changes that “stories of people who overcome great difficulties, have happened just over the past three decades. people who struggle against all odds and are able “We Latinos have influenced music, food, culture, not only to survive, but to thrive—especially women.” politics—and now we have generations of Latinos Allende believes that this is one of her great that are professionals,” she says with pride. Congifts to the world. “I can change, sometimes, how sidering the rapid growth of the US Latino poppeople tell their own stories and how they ulation, Allende believes the emergence ORGANIZATION of prominent Latino voices will make an confront their problems,” she says. “We The Isabel Allende all create a legend for ourselves. When important impact on US culture. “If we Foundation you change your story, you can change become one-third of the population, evyour life.” erything changes,” she says. 15


“THE MOST PRECIOUS HUMAN GIFT IS TIME, BECAUSE ONCE IT’S GONE IT CANNOT BE RECOVERED.”

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MANUEL ARANGO PATRON OF TH E A R T S , E N V I R O N M E N TA LI S T, A N D B U S I N E S S M A N

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PHOTO: JACOB HESSLER

DON’T CALL HIM A PHILANTHROPIST. The honorary chairman of the Mexican Center for Philanthropy (CEMEFI) believes the

to see Mexican business donating one percent of profits and an hour per week toward the greater good. Arango’s activism grew out of his interest in curbing the term centers on monetary contribution, shifting focus away from other paths to social change. environmental footprint of human industry on the planet. “Sharing time and talent … for the common good, for the He believes that an organized society is an important part of good of society,” is how Manuel Arango, also a member of CEMEthe equation for achieving real social change, adding that FI’s Committee of Former Presidents, defines philanneither governments nor citizens should have to go ORGANIZATIONS thropy. “Whether or not it includes money (which is at it alone. Caracol de Plata always welcome), the most precious human gift is “The great problems of humanity require large time, because once it’s gone it cannot be recovered.” alliances,” he explains. “Problems cannot be resolved Centro Mario Molina Arango founded and remains actively involved by the market alone, nor the government alone, nor with five nonprofit organizations: Compartir Fundación the citizens alone. We need an alliance between them. Compartir Fundación Social Social, the Mexican Center for Philanthropy, the Xochitla “Citizens have felt impotent and passive in the Foundation, the Mexican Foundation for Environmental face of market forces,” he continues. “And governConsejo Consultivo Education, and Caracol de Plata. ments have thought that it was a dance with partdel Agua Although nowadays he spends a good portion of ners, without civil society. But today the voice of the Encuentros his time on philanthropic endeavors, Arango came citizenry is the third leg we need to achieve balance.” Iberoamericanos de la Sociedad Civil to national prominence in Mexico as a businessman. Arango is also honorary chairman of the ConBorn in 1936 in Tampico, Tamaulipas, Mexico, Arango sejo Consultivo del Agua and serves on the board of Foro Iberoamérica went on to found Grupo Cifra with his two brothdirectors of the Centro Mario Molina, the Fundación Fundación para las ers, Jerónimo and Plácido. The firm grew to include para las Letras Mexicanas, and Transparencia Mexicana, Letras Mexicanas principal discount-retail chains in Mexico, including among others. Int’l Council of the supermarkets (Aurrerá and Superama), restaurants Internationally, he is a member of the Foro Fundación Amigos del Museo del (Vips and El Portón), and clothing stores (Suburbia). Iberoamérica, and he is on the advisory boards of Prado During the last 30 years, his principal business activthe Encuentros Iberoamericanos de la Sociedad Civil Mexican Center ity has been real estate development in Mexico City, and the International Council of the Fundación Amigos for Philanthropy Acapulco, and La Paz, Baja California Sur, Mexico. del Museo del Prado, in Madrid. Mexican Arango says that many ethical businessmen are Over the past two decades, he has also served on Foundation for content to obey the law, deliver profits to shareholdthe boards of the Council on Foundations, the World ReEnvironmental Education ers, and leave social welfare to the state. “But there is sources Institute, Public Radio International, the Institute another way of thinking,” he explains, “that tells us of the Americas, and Callaway Gardens, among others. Transparencia Mexicana we must also be concerned about the environment In addition to his philanthropic efforts and busithat allows us to succeed, and that we have to give ness success, Arango has produced several documenXochitla Foundation back to it. It is about giving, and to help change taries, including the 1971 Sentinels of Silence, the only things that are wrong.” To that end, he would like short-subject film to have won two Academy awards. 17


ARNOLDO AVALOS FOU N DE R, AVALO S FOU N DATION

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“WHEN YOU’VE ... WALKED THROUGH THAT DOORWAY of oppor-

Avalos is paying it forward with his own philanthropic efforts. In 2012, he and his wife, Alma, founded and funded the tunity ... you do not slam it shut behind you. ... You reach back, and you give other folks the same chances that helped Avalos Foundation, which is focused on providing educational you succeed.” support for low-income students. The Avalos Foundation has This quote, from first lady Michelle Obama, summarizes provided 14 college scholarships to high-achieving, low-income Arnoldo Avalos’s philosophy on giving back. students from the Upper Sacramento Valley—the same rural, Today, Avalos is a human resources executive who has helped low-income, underserved region where Avalos grew up. Additiontechnology giants such as Facebook, Google, and Cisco grow ally, the Avalos Foundation has sponsored two elementary school their employee bases and human resources programs. But he has afternoon programs targeting youngsters who are financially come a long way to achieve this success. Avalos immigrated at a disadvantaged and at risk. More recently, the Avalos Foundation young age from Juchitlán, Jalisco, Mexico, to Gridley, California. partnered with the San Francisco-based Latino Community FounHis family worked as farm laborers in peach, prune, and cherry dation to provide computers and Internet access to low-income orchards, traveling through Oregon, Washington, and elementary students in Pleasanton, California. ORGANIZATIONS In addition to the work he does with his founMontana during the summers to follow the fruit harAvalos Foundation vests. Avalos, the youngest of seven siblings, was driven dation, Avalos is a major supporter of the University to leave the arduous migrant life through education. of California Foundation and the East Bay CommuEast Bay Community Avalos credits a multitude of chance events and nity Foundation. Avalos also volunteers in his local Foundation factors to his current success, including his first internPleasanton school district and with local nonprofit Hermanos Unidos ship provided by the Congressional Hispanic Caucus organizations, such as Latinas Contra Cancer and the Institute, various subsequent educational scholarships, Pleasanton Partnership in Education, and he serves Latinas Contra and the personal support he received from his teachon the boards of the Latino Community Foundation Cancer ers and athletic coaches. He graduated with honors and Hermanos Unidos. Latino Community As the Latino community rapidly grows in the from the University of California, Berkeley, obtained Foundation a master’s in public policy from Harvard University United States, Avalos is eager to see Latinos continue Pleasanton and built a successful career in Silicon Valley. to break through barriers and shatter negative stePartnership in Education These opportunities and instances of generosity reotypes. He dreams of the day when seeing Latinos also taught Avalos the importance of philanthropy. at high levels throughout society will be the norm, University of California He recognizes the important roles that private indinot the exception. Until that day comes, Avalos Foundation viduals and foundations, along with a greater spirit plans to keep reaching back through the doorway of goodness in the world, have played in his success. of opportunity to help more young people succeed. 18


HE DREAMS OF THE DAY WHEN SEEING LATINOS AT HIGH LEVELS THROUGHOUT SOCIETY WILL BE THE NORM, NOT THE EXCEPTION.


RICHARD BLANCO A M E R I CA N P O E T, P U B LI C S P E A K E R , A N D AU T H O R

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WHEN IT COMES TO GIVING, POET Richard Blanco highlights

the inherent importance of sharing. The necessary time and money, he says, have “the most meaning and impact when we also give the greatest gift of all, which is sharing what we have been given. That is to say, sharing with our communities the talents, knowledge, and wisdom we have gained, and which have been passed on to us. It’s the gift that lasts a lifetime.” In Blanco’s case, poetry has been the gift that he has received and strives to pass on. “In writing for and about my community, and sharing my stories,” he says, “I feel I am empowering us to understand ourselves more holistically, which in turn leads to increased self-worth and—most importantly— connects us more strongly with each other.” When President Obama was reelected in 2008, Blanco was chosen as the inaugural poet, following in the footsteps of such American poetry giants as Robert Frost and Maya Angelou. In reading his poem, “One Today,” Blanco made history as the first Latino, first openly gay man, and the youngest writer bestowed with such an honor. Like his other collections of poetry, his first book of prose, For All of Us, One Today: An Inaugural Poet’s Journey, explores the negotiation of cultural identity and universal themes of place and belonging. Blanco’s commitment to giving back to his community emerged from his immigrant experience. As he puts it, he was “made in Cuba, assembled in Spain, and imported to the 20

United States.” Blanco was born on Feb. 15, 1968, two months after his family arrived as Cuban exiles in Madrid. A few weeks later, the family moved to Miami, where Blanco was raised. “My Tía Olga and Tío Armando had already set up an apartment for us in their building with two months’ rent prepaid and a job for my father,” he remembers. “We all stuck together and gave to one another because we knew it was the only way to survive and prosper. My parents and the close-knit community of Cuban exiles instilled in me a deep sense of mutual respect, compassion, and oneness.” Blanco attributes much of his dedication as a “giver” to his mother. Beyond sending material items to relatives in Cuba, his mother gave her love by never forgetting to write, send photos, and visit. By staying in touch, Blanco says, she ultimately gave him the gift of reconnecting with his family, whom he was able to finally meet when he visited Cuba for the first time in 1994. In sharing his journey to understand his own cultural identity, Blanco helps audiences see beauty in diversity while at the same time, reconnecting readers and listeners to the universality of the human experience. Blanco is hopeful that, as the Latino population increases in the United States, it will produce a more educated and informed perception of Latinos. He says, “There is a growing recognition and acceptance of the incredible contributions we’ve made in shaping the very character of this country over the centuries.”


“THERE IS A GROWING RECOGNITION AND ACCEPTANCE OF THE INCREDIBLE CONTRIBUTIONS WE’VE MADE IN SHAPING THE VERY CHARACTER OF THIS COUNTRY OVER THE CENTURIES.”

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“WE PUT A BROWN FACE IN THE FIELD OF PHILANTHROPY, [WHERE IT WAS OTHERWISE] ALMOST NONEXISTENT. THAT IS THE BIG GIVE.”

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CARMEN CASTELLANO C O - F OU N DE R & P R E S I D E N T, CASTE LLAN O FA M I LY F O U N DAT I O N

S PHOTO: GEORGE DELGADO

SOME OF US DREAM ABOUT WHAT WE WOULD DO if we won

Castellano was born and raised in Watsonville, California. the lottery—the toys we would buy and vacations we would Her parents were business owners, and they instilled in her take. But when Carmen Castellano and her husthe philosophy of giving back. “My dad was very genORGANIZATIONS band, Alcario, won the California Super Plus Loterous at heart … he could not see a person in need American GI tery jackpot in 2001, they took a different route, and not reach out to help them,” she recalls. “He Forum Scholarship creating a family foundation to give back to their would even give away his jackets. He would come Foundation community. home without a jacket and say, ‘Someone needed a American jacket, and so I gave it away.’” Even before they won, Castellano and her husLeadership Forum band were longtime givers. They always donated She has many such stories: her father would invite Class XX what they could to organizations in their San Jose hungry families for dinner, her grandparents raised Castellano Family community and were active volunteers at local nontwo children in need as sons of their own, and so Foundation profits. “When we won the lottery, my light-bulb on. Having grown up in this environment, giving Chicana/Latina moment was: ‘Oh my God, we can take this to a became second nature to her. Foundation whole other level!’” recalls Castellano, noting that When she was 20, an ambitious Castellano joined Latina Coalition of she took out a pad of paper and started to write out the board of Junior Ventures in her hometown. Now, Silicon Valley a list of organizations they could give to. she’s in her 70s and the mother of three grown chilLatina Leadership Over the years, the Castellano Family Foundation dren, and she isn’t slowing down. Castellano is a memNetwork of California Community has awarded grants to more than 140 organizations, ber of the board of directors for the National AssociColleges totaling more than $3.5 million. “We put a brown ation of Latino Arts and Culture, the Latina Coalition of Latino Community face in the field of philanthropy, [where it was othSilicon Valley, and the steering committee for the Santa Foundation erwise] almost nonexistent,” Castellano says of her Clara County Office of Education Artspiration. She is a Los Lupeños de foundation. “That is the big give: being visual and Fellow of the American Leadership Forum Class XX and San José being present.” has served on the boards of the San Francisco-based National Assn. of The foundation has gained great credibility Latino Community Foundation, the Mexican cultural Latino Arts and during its more than 12 years in operation, which organization Los Lupeños de San José, the Chicana/ Culture Castellano sees as another gift in itself. “I think one Latina Foundation, the Latina Leadership Network of Quadre Music of the other gifts we give to the community is that California Community Colleges, Quadre Music Group, Group we legitimize grassroots organizations,” she explains. and the American GI Forum Scholarship Foundation. Santa Clara County “They can say, ‘We’ve gotten the stamp of approval Reflecting on the generous nature of her parents Office of Education Artspiration from the Castellano Family Foundation,’ and it helps and extended family, Castellano wonders, “How do you learn, if not by example?” give them leverage in seeking other funds.” 23


“THE POVERTY AND DISCRIMINATION THAT PEOPLE SUFFERED GAVE ME A LOT OF COURAGE, AND THEIR WORDS WERE MY MOTIVATION.” 24


RUFINO DOMÍNGUEZ SANTOS LABOR LEADE R AN D I N D IG E N OU S C IV I L R I G H T S ACT I V I S T

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RUFINO DOMÍNGUEZ SANTOS, WHO HAS FOUGHT all of his life

In California, Domínguez Santos helped to found and for the human rights of Mexico’s migrant labor force and indigdevelop nonprofits, such as the Frente Indígena Oaxaqueña enous people, senses at least one direction in which the rapid Binacional—which, in 2005, became the Frente Indígena de growth of the US Latino population is heading. There already are Organizaciones Binacionales (FIOB)—and the Fresno-based notable lawyers, judges, mayors, state legislators, and members Binational Center for the Development of Oaxacan Indigenous of Congress whose heritages stem from Spanish-speaking lands. Communities (CBDIO). “Before long, there will be a president of Latino origin in the He received a Leadership for a Changing World award by United States,” says Domínguez Santos, noting that when that the Ford Foundation and New York University’s Institute for happens, “There will be less discrimination than there is today.” Sustainable Communities, and was chosen for a nonprofit leader’s sabbatical by The California Wellness Foundation, Domínguez Santos, executive director of the Oaxacan Inamong other honors. In 2010, he became the first migrant stitute for Migrant Services, a Mexican state agency, has seen and the first indigenous worker to be appointed executive the United States and its Latino community from the outside director of the Oaxacan migrant-services office. and the inside—as an activist on behalf of indigenous people, as a migrant laborer, and as a successful nonprofit leader. Last October, his Office of Migrant Services and the United As a Mixteco teenager, he sought to bring peace to his Food and Commercial Workers International Union, Local 5, signed a groundbreaking letter of understanding to colcommunity in a time when government officials and local landowners were persecuting indigenous people. “Thanks to laborate in ensuring that the rights of Oaxacan migrant my father, my brothers, and the people of my town,” workers and their families in the United States are ORGANIZATIONS he says, “I was given encouragement and strength protected. It is estimated that more than 800,000 Oaxacan Institute Oaxacans live in California. to change how things were.” for Migrant In 1983, when he was 18, he was tortured and When asked what inspired his dedication to Services forced to flee his hometown of San Miguel Cuevas, giving, Domínguez Santos recalls his high school Frente Indígena Juxtlahuaca, in Oaxaca. He made his way north, evendays, when he and other local indigenous youth de Organizaciones tually crossing Sinaloa state into Baja California. He were taught by Roman Catholic Marist Brothers. Binacionales entered the United States and initially worked in “They taught us to do things for those less forBinational the fields. After a time, Domínguez Santos settled in tunate without expecting anything in return, to Center for the Development California’s San Joaquin Valley, where he worked for fight for justice and for the truth … ” he says. “The of Oaxacan more than 25 years organizing migrant workers to poverty and discrimination that people suffered Indigenous Communities fight for fair wages and better working conditions, gave me a lot of courage, and their words were my and against discriminatory hiring practices. motivation.” 25


LORNA FEIJÓO P R I N C I PAL BA LLE R I N A , BO S TO N BA LLE T

I

IT IS DIFFICULT FOR LORNA FEIJÓO TO SPEAK ABOUT dancing in Cuba without getting emotional. For the Boston Ballet principal

is because ballet, to Cubans, is like baseball to Americans—a part of its cultural fabric. dancer, the island nation holds memories of her start in the Though her destination was different than most of her national school of ballet, as well as dreams of a return to the fellow émigrés, Feijóo’s journey is one variation on a theme Cuban stage. As one of the greatest dancers to perform the familiar to many Cubans living abroad. But her celebrity calls nation’s distinct style, which draws upon Latin and African attention to their shared experience. “Always is the moment roots, Feijóo toes a line between export and expatriate, sharing to support my community,” she says. “They deserve it. They Cuba’s art with audiences around the world. are very hard workers and I admire that.” Like so many first-generation Cubans living in the United Though she lives across the country from her sister and States, accomplished entertainers like Feijóo and her sister bemother in San Francisco, Feijóo values family above all else. fore her have made the difficult decision to leave their country. “Family,” she has said, “is the base of how you are, why you For Feijóo, the potential of learning from other choreographers are.” And it’s the Cuban family that has perhaps suffered the and growing as a dancer is what drew her to the United States. most from the unfortunate unfolding of the Castro revolution. Despite producing some of the most accomplished dancers Bringing to light the breadth of its impact, Cubamerican is one in the world, Cuba continues to face the flight of its stars to place Feijóo’s voice is being heard. As a champion of the film, other companies. she has joined the ranks of so many Cuban Americans who “Unfortunately, [my return to Cuba] doesn’t depend on yearn for a government as rich as their culture. me,” said Feijóo to the Havana Times in 2013 while On the stage, she continues to be an ambassador, ORGANIZATIONS discussing her desire to dance again on the Cuban showcasing the country that, despite geographical disBoston Ballet stage. “We miss the applause of Cubans,” she said tance, is never far from her heart. “I know [the United in a tearful testimonial for the documentary CuStates] would be very different without Latinos,” she Cuban National Ballet bamerican. “In Cuba when you dance, the audience says. “I’m proud to be part of them. It’s because of is impressive. It’s a knowledgeable audience.” That [them] that every day I give a little more of myself.” 26


PHOTO: GENE SCHIAVONE

“I’M PROUD TO BE PART OF [THE LATINO COMMUNITY]. IT’S BECAUSE OF [THEM] THAT EVERY DAY I GIVE A LITTLE MORE OF MYSELF.”


“WHEN I THINK OF THE WORD ‘GIVE,’ MY RESPONSE IS TO GIVE BACK TO THE COMMUNITY, ESPECIALLY TO THE VULNERABLE AND MARGINALIZED PEOPLE LEFT BEHIND.”


HERMAN GALLEGOS I

CO-FOUNDER, HISPANICS IN PHILANTHROPY, LATINO PHILANTHROPIST

IN THE 1960s, LATINO ISSUES RARELY RECEIVED consideration

again on his own. “I learned the importance of the charitable in American public life. Philanthropic boards were not aware sector in improving the well-being of people,” he says. This of their duty to reflect in their composition the communities lesson was also coupled with an appreciation of the public that they were seeking to help, and only one hand was needed sector. “I also learned to value the proactive role of government to count the Latinos in leading philanthropic-sector posts. in helping people during hard times when the unemployed, Herman Gallegos is among those few. like my father, received temporary work through the WPA, Gallegos has been at the forefront of a long process of Works Progress Administration.” These extraordinary gifts inspired in him a lifelong comaddressing the needs of underserved Latino communities and mitment to giving back to others. “When I think of the word increasing diversity in the US philanthropic sector. “I think that most people are fairly aware of poverty and discrimination—for ‘give,’ my response is to give back to the community, especially me the idea was not motivation of how to do something, but to the vulnerable and marginalized people left behind,” he says. what was the best way to do it,” he says. Among other personal successes, Gallegos spearheaded Philanthropy and activism, for Gallegos, were vessels one of the first Latino-targeted grants, which was awarded for making waves. In the early 1970s, he was one of the first by the Ford Foundation and driven by the vision of Dr. Paul Hispanics elected to such corporate boards as AT&T and the Ylvisaker, an urban planner, presidential adviser, foundation Union Bank of California, as well as the board of the executive, and educator who championed the urORGANIZATIONS Student Loan Marketing Association. Thanks to Ruth ban underclass. Gallegos also co-founded both the AT&T Chance, former executive director of the Rosenberg National Council of La Raza and Hispanics in PhilanFoundation, Gallegos was also one of the first Latinos thropy, was honored with the Ohtli medal from the Hispanics in Philanthropy to serve on a foundation board. He credits activists government of Mexico for his exceptional contriFred Ross, Jr. and community-organizing guru Saul butions to community empowerment, and served National Council of La Raza Alinsky with teaching him the art of empowering as a US Delegate to the 49th General Assembly of communities and, in turn, increasing their ability the United Nations. Rosenberg He recognizes the continued need for collective to engage in responsible change. Foundation Gallegos notes that his commitment to giving was gifts of community activism and advocacy, particStudent Loan very much inspired by learning how to receive. When ularly as Latinos come to comprise more and more Marketing Association of the US population. “I believe that our increasing he was nine, in the midst of the Great Depression, numbers will pose a challenge unless we engage in he lost his leg in a traumatic accident. His father Union Bank of California greater advocacy,” he says. “I don’t think we should was unemployed and couldn’t afford the $125 to purchase a prosthetic leg. So Gallegos’s elementary focus on those that are irreducibly Latino issues … By United Nations school principal contacted the Crippled Children’s working collaboratively with the greater communiSociety. It donated the $125 that he needed to walk ty, we will be more successful than doing it alone.” 29


ANA YRIS GUZMÁN TORRES CH A M P I O N O F YO U T H R I G H T S

E

EDUCATOR ANA YRIS GUZMÁN TORRES HAS LED the charge for

The approach has garnered much attention and many honyouths in Puerto Rico to overcome their past as high school ors for Guzmán Torres, who last year received a human rights dropouts, complete their high school education, and move on award from a Puerto Rican organization for professional social to vocational training or a university education. workers, as well as a Sister Isolina Ferré Medal for Excellence Guzmán Torres and her husband, Justo Méndez Arámbuin Service to Others and the Miranda Foundation’s 2006 Preru, are the heart and soul of Nuestra Escuela, a five-campus mio a la Solidaridad, among other awards. Nuestra Escuela alternative-education program for youths, typically between has also been selected as a “Best Practice Project” by the US the ages of 13 and 22. Before starting in-class instruction, all Department of Education and was chosen as an education students make an academic and emotional commitment as model by the Organization of Ibero-American States in 2005. part of a 12-step initiation process. The educational program The Nuestra Escuela institution, which Guzmán Torres provides teachers who coach and mentor students without the and her husband describe as their “mission of love,” has five threat of flunking. It uses tools to build students’ self-esteem campuses total: two near the inland city of Caguas, one in with a focus on social and economic entrepreneurship as a Loíza, and two on the islands of Vieques and Culebra. The vehicle to escape poverty and pursue their dreams. program was incorporated on Aug. 11, 2000, nearly “When we started Nuestra Escuela, I found my three years after the death of Méndez Arámburu’s ORGANIZATION true reason for being,” Guzmán Torres says. “I see a 15-year-old daughter, Ana Mercedes Méndez Jiménez. Nuestra Escuela miracle in the eyes of young people each time they Méndez Arámburu explains that, after his daughter decide to quit the streets to build a decent future.” died, she appeared in his dreams to urge him to create In addition to the routine academic subjects, the program a school and name it Nuestra Escuela. The school graduations emphasizes respect for all, regardless of age, and individualized take place every Sept. 10, in honor of Ana Mercedes’s birthday. attention to students so they are engaged participants in their Guzmán Torres says, “When we started Nuestra Escuela, own education, along with their relatives, tutors, and other I found the true reason for my being,” personnel within the school community. 30


“I SEE A MIRACLE IN THE EYES OF YOUNG PEOPLE EACH TIME THEY DECIDE TO QUIT THE STREETS TO BUILD A DECENT FUTURE.”

31


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THE PURSUIT OF PAN-AMERICAN PROSPERITY The ties that bind the United States and Latin America permeate communities across all borders BY MICHELLE MARKELZ

T

HE “LAND OF OPPORTUNITY” HAS

long been an epithet reserved for the United States. For generations, entrepreneurs, idealists, parents, and political refugees have dreamed of a better life against a backdrop of 50 stars and 13 stripes. In establishing that life, US Latinos have also strengthened the United States’ ties

with their native lands in Latin America, enhancing the interdependence and connectedness of the two regions. Joined by an invisible rope, the pulls of stability and struggle, prosperity and poverty can be felt by each nation along the line. This connectedness is mirrored in philanthropic efforts, to the extent that by helping communities in Latin Amer-

ica, we are, in turn, helping US Latino communities, as well. The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) is wellversed in such results. In the chill of the Cold War, “The IDB was created not only as a moral imperative to reduce poverty and inequality within the hemisphere, but to promote long-term growth and stability 33


18 million+ Hispanic immigrants have settled in the States

13% $666 billion+

of the world’s agricultural commodities, most of which is exported to the United States

in exports to Latin America in 2011, providing jobs to 4 million Americans

in remittances from US Latinos to family and friends in Latin America, representing more than 10% of the GDP in seven countries

GIVING AND RECEIVING A look at US-Latin American interdependence 34

SOURCES: INTER-AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK, PEW RESEARCH CENTER, THE WORLD BANK GROUP INFOGRAPHIC DESIGN: KYLE NEWTON

$61billion


throughout the region,” says Gustavo Arnavat, executive director for the United States at the IDB. Comprised of 48 shareholder countries in total, the IDB has 26 shareholders throughout Latin American and the Caribbean that are categorized as borrowing countries. These countries receive loans, grants, and technical assistance in numerous sectors of economic activity. Such investments have led to the construction of highways, bridges, ports, power plants, schools, hospitals, and many other projects that foment economic growth and, over the long run, stability. After more than 50 years, that assistance has proven fruitful. The World Bank Group reported in 2013 that almost one-fourth of Latin America’s exports were agricultural, and the volume is growing annually, representing 13 percent of the world’s agricultural commodities. Much of that trade is directly with the United States. “The United States is Latin America’s primary trading partner, and is first in imports from the region,” Arnavat says. “We invest more in Latin America and the Caribbean than any other country, accounting for approximately one-third of all foreign direct investment in those regions over the last decade.” Conversely, the United States has found in Latin America its biggest customer for American goods. Consuming, on average, three times more US products than China, Latin America contributed two-thirds of a trillion dollars to the US economy in 2011, providing jobs to four million Americans. “As [Latin America] continues to grow economically,” Arnavat says, “so will US exports and US jobs.” By 2011, more than 18 million Hispanic immigrants had settled in the states, according to the Pew Research Center. For many, America is where they live, but not the only place they call home. Creating a diaspora of Latin Americans with strong ties across borders, the Hispanic

“THE UNITED STATES IS LATIN AMERICA’S PRIMARY TRADING PARTNER, AND IS FIRST IN IMPORTS FROM THE REGION. WE INVEST MORE IN LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN THAN ANY OTHER COUNTRY.”

immigrant population proves that interest in Latin American prosperity extends beyond the federal government and is firmly rooted in the new, more diverse public. According to Gustavo Arnavat the IDB, in 2011, reExecutive Director for the United States mittances (money sent Inter-American Development Bank from those living in the United States to family and friends in Latin America) totaled $61 billion, more than prosperity in the region is not uniform; 10 percent of the GDP in seven countries economic inequality and impediments across Latin America and the Caribbean. to more robust growth continue to be Arnavat points out that the IDB has done present. While there is much work to groundbreaking work that has resulted be done, Arnavat is bullish about the in lowering the cost and facilitating the region’s prospects. Still, in its many ensending of remittances to the region, counters with emerging Latin American which benefits both Latinos in the Uniteconomies, the IDB has come up against ed States and their relatives on the other obstacles not always surmountable by side of the border. In the same way that funding, and their presence arguably US investment supports projects like the presents the greatest challenges to overconstruction of roads and the reformacome. “Sometimes the underlying cause tion of schools, remittances from Latin of underdevelopment is not a lack of American and Caribbean immigrants in economic resources,” Arnavat says, “but the United States is one of the drivers social norms and attitudes that create for development and stability in their a mismatch between capital allocation countries of origin. and individual capabilities.” In some “Besides increased trade [and ease of places throughout the Americas (just remittances], the United States’ investas it is throughout the world), gender, ment and leadership in the IDB helps racial, and ethnic discrimination keeps the nation in other ways,” Arnavat says. large portions of the population from Because it is a multilateral institution reaching their educational and profeswith capital to invest, “the IDB provides sional potential. Arnavat says, “this phea platform through which the United nomenon suppresses economic results at States can cooperate with other countries the micro or individual and enterprise in ways that promote US interests.” For levels, as well as at the macro or national example, the IDB is pursuing programlevel.” To truly move the needle as two ming that enhances the security of citregions in cooperation, political or soizens, especially in Central America, by cial solutions must be found to address providing incentives to young adults to these impediments to growth. In the stay in school or find regular employment meantime, organizations like the IDB instead of joining criminal enterprises and many others are working to support that often reach well into US territory. and maintain the US-Latin America relaThis serves as a reminder that while tions that foster the possibility of such improvements. the “Lands of Opportunity” are growing, 35


ANTONIA HERNÁNDEZ P R E S I DE NT, CALI FOR N IA C OM M U N IT Y FOU N DAT I O N

W

WHEN SHE WAS A CHILD, ANTONIA HERNÁNDEZ remembers

Chicano Movement, which was an empowering experience watching her parents shelter newly arrived Mexican immithat only solidified my passion to serve the community. grants, feeding them and providing them with clothes and a “I tutored students and taught English as a second language little money. “We were brought up in a home where sharing (ESL) courses while in college,” she adds. “I decided to attend was part of our daily life,” she says of her earliest philanthropic law school so that I could devote my life to advocating for and inspiration. “Today, my parents remind us of our good fortune advancing the rights of Latinos.” and our responsibility to share.” But her contributions to improving opportunities ORGANIZATIONS As president and CEO of the California Community for the underserved are not limited to her long careers American Foundation—which, with more than $1.3 billion in at MALDEF and the California Community FoundaAutomobile assets, is ranked fourth largest nationally in total tion, which she has led for nine years. She personally Association giving—Hernández explains that her life has been contributes about $30,000 annually to charitable orCalifornia “devoted to service for the betterment of the Latino ganizations, she has started two scholarship funds, Community community.” and she supports scholarships for immigrant Latino Foundation Hernández started her legal career in East Los law students. She sits, among others, on the boards Center on Budget Angeles, as a staff attorney for the Los Angeles Cenof the national American Automobile Association and and Policy Priorities ter for Law and Justice. She was the first Latina to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, as well as serve as counsel to the US Senate Committee on serving on the Commission on Presidential Debates, the Commission on Presidential the Judiciary before becoming the Washington, DC, JFK Library Foundation’s Profile in Courage Award ComDebates regional counsel for the Mexican-American Legal mittee, and the UCLA School of Law’s Board of Advisors. JFK Library Defense and Educational Fund (MALDEF) in 1981. And then, once a month for the past 15 years, Foundation’s She spent 23 years at MALDEF, a national Latino Hernández cooks dinner for about 50 homeless people. Profile in Courage Award Committee civil-rights litigation and advocacy nonprofit, where As Latinos increase their demographic represhe served for 18 years as its president and general sentation in the US population, Hernández says, “if Mexican-American Legal Defense and counsel. we do not improve our educational attainment and Educational Fund “My life journey is what has motivated me to economic standing, we will be large, poor, and marUCLA School of serve the public,” says Hernández, who graduated ginal. Our well-being and status rests on our ability Law from UCLA with a bachelor’s degree in history and to be engaged in our democracy and productive in a doctorate in law. “In college, I was active in the the economy of this country.” 36


“WE WERE BROUGHT UP IN A HOME WHERE SHARING WAS PART OF OUR DAILY LIFE.”


“BY PROMOTING ARTS AND MUSIC, WE ARE PROMOTING THE UNITY AND UNDERSTANDING OF THE PEOPLE OF THE WORLD.”

38


ARGENTINA “TINA” HILLS A JOU R NALI ST AN D P H I LAN TH ROP I ST

AFFECTIONATELY KNOWN IN PUERTO RICO AS “Doña Tina,” Ar-

America. Her work in the media led Columbia University to gentina S. Hills was first an accomplished business executive, confer upon her the prestigious Maria Moors Cabot prize in then was called on to head a Puerto Rican media conglomerate. 1977. She was also the first woman elected to the presidenShe used that business acumen to make Fundación Ángel Ramos cy (1977-78) of the Inter American Press Association (IAPA), the Puerto Rican powerhouse that it is today. which is dedicated to promoting freedom of expression in Born in Pola, Italy, Hills immigrated with her family to the the Americas. United States when she was 14 years old and grew up in New She made waves in the philanthropic sector, as well. Under York City. As a young woman, she worked for the Buitoni Co., Hills, who stepped down in 2008 after more than 50 years as which later became part of the Perugina Italian confectionery its head, Fundación Ángel Ramos awarded more than $65 company. She rose to become a senior executive of the firm, million to improve the quality of life of Puerto Ricans and to which is now owned by the Switzerland-based Nestlé Corp. support organizations that promote arts, culture, education, She met Ángel Ramos, the owner of a Puerto Rican media and human services. The foundation has since increased its conglomerate, and married him in 1950, moving to Puerto total awards to more than $80 million. Rico soon after. In addition to El Mundo, a major newspaper In addition, the foundation has, for many years, been on the Caribbean island, he owned WKAQ and other radio a major donor to the Puerto Rico Conservatory of Music. stations. He branched out into TV stations by establishing And Hills personally donated a collection of works by PuerTelemundo in 1954. to Rican artists to the Puerto Rico Museum of Art. “Arts and From 1950 to 1960, Hills was a close adviser and music are a common denominator of all the people, ORGANIZATIONS collaborator to Ramos. She shared in many of his regardless of their country, race, or religion,” she El Mundo business and philanthropic activities, including his says. “By promoting arts and music, we are promotwork with Fundación Ángel Ramos. After his death in ing the unity and understanding of the people of Fundación Ángel Ramos September 1960, she kept the foundation presidency the world.” She has served on the boards of directors of the and also became president of El Mundo, Telemundo, Inter American Press Association and WKAQ radio stations. American Society of Newspaper Editors (ASNE); the In 1963, she married Lee Hills, a Pulitzer prize-winAmericas Society; the Conservation Trust of Puerto Puerto Rico ning journalist who headed newspapers in Miami and Rico; the University of the Sacred Heart in San Juan, Conservatory of Music Detroit before becoming the first chairman and CEO Puerto Rico; the Miami Museum of Art; the University of the then-newly merged Knight-Ridder newspapers. of Detroit; and Barry University in Miami. Puerto Rico Museum of Art She likes to say that fate brought her to a career He was also a former president of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. in publishing while her commitment to and love for Telemundo As president of El Mundo, she was a crusader Puerto Rico became her legacy through the Fundación WKAQ for free speech and journalism, especially in Latin Ángel Ramos. 39


MARIA HINOJOSA AWAR D - W I N N I NG JOU R N ALI ST, H OST, LATI NO USA

M

MARIA HINOJOSA WAS TAUGHT, through her mother’s

which explored abuse at immigrant-detention faexample, to be a giver on both sides of the border. cilities and garnered much attention from policy“Our family never had any extra income, so writing makers on Capitol Hill and both the Spanish- and checks was not our tradition,” she recalls. “But every English-language media. During her eight years as year when we would travel to Mexico, my mother a reporter with CNN, she often took viewers into would load up suitcases of clothes and food that underserved communities that were otherwise we would give away as we drove through the small rarely shown on television. Among other highly towns and pueblos. prestigious journalism honors, she has won the “It was philanthropy from the heart,” she conRobert F. Kennedy Award for Reporting on the Distinues. “These were the lessons my mother instilled advantaged and the Overseas Press Club’s Edward in me as a very young child.” R. Murrow Award. “My life has been dedicated to telling the true Born in Mexico City and raised in Chicago, Hinojosa remembers how, from a young age, she story of Latinos in the United States,” Hinojosa says would go to Pilsen, Chicago’s predominantly Mexproudly. She believes that Latinos will increasingly ican neighborhood, and see poverty all around be portrayed as the people we really are: “part and her. She saw tremendous need during her visits parcel of this country but with a unique experience to Mexico, as well. as philanthropists.” Today, as a journalist, news anchor, and reportHaving founded The Futuro Media Group in 2010, a er for PBS and NPR, and as a social entrepreneur nonprofit production company based in Harlem, Hiand founder of The Futuro Media Group, Hinojosa nojosa and her team seek to change the mainstream creates a space for storytelling on a large scale that media’s narrative of Latinos. “We are negatively porreflects the real America. “My personal mission is trayed in the mainstream media in this country,” she to help be a voice of the voiceless,” she says. says. “I think 2014 is a transformational year when A four-time Emmy award winner, Latinos have decided to take control of our ORGANIZATIONS Hinojosa has drawn attention to critown narrative and of our destiny and to CNN ical issues and reported hundreds of tell our own American stories.” important stories, including those of She also sees transnational implicaThe Futuro Media Group immigrant work camps in New Orleans tions for Latino philanthropy, remarking, after Hurricane Katrina, of teen girls who “I believe that how giving is perceived in NPR are sexually harassed in their workplace, this country will change as more Latinos PBS and of the poor in Alabama. She was the become active philanthropists both here first Latina to anchor a Frontline report, as well as across the border.” 40


“I BELIEVE 2014 IS A TRANSFORMATIONAL YEAR WHEN LATINOS HAVE DECIDED TO TAKE CONTROL OF OUR OWN NARRATIVE AND OF OUR DESTINY AND TO TELL OUR OWN AMERICAN STORIES.”


“OUR VALUES OF SHARING, COMMUNITY, AND FAMILY ARE THOSE THAT CAN SHAPE OUR COUNTRY AND THE WORLD.” 42


DOLORES HUERTA L A BO R LE A D E R A N D CI V I L R I G H T S ACT I V I S T

H

HUMAN RIGHTS CHAMPION DOLORES HUERTA—a veteran of count-

civic engagement, marching, and joining hunger fasts for less nonviolent protests, agricultural boycotts, marches, and immigration reform, among other social-justice issues. fasts on behalf of farm laborers, immigrant families, women, Huerta, who was born in New Mexico and has 11 children, and civil rights—is energized by the US Hispanic community’s says that her activism stemmed from having witnessed the rapid expansion. plight of farm laborers in the 1950s, as well as from her family “If we can get the resources to organize and educate our roots. As with many Latino families, the presence of faith in community, we can make a tremendous contribution to soHuerta’s family was powerful, and she credits her mother, ciety,” Huerta says. “Our values of sharing, community, and Alicia St. John Chavez (no relation to Cesar), as the inspiration family are those that can shape our country and the world.” for her life of service. “She, like many in the Southwest, was a devotee of St. Francis of Assisi,” Huerta recalls. As the grande dame of the national Latino civil rights movement and a co-founder with Cesar Chavez of the United “The ‘giving’ in my life’s work has been to do the organizing Farm Workers, Huerta, 83, knows plenty about sacrifice and and advocacy work that needs to be done without a salary,” nonviolent organizing for social change. Huerta says. “The major ‘giving’ was the sacrifice that my She received the $100,000 Puffin/Nation Prize for Creative children made. Unlike my upbringing … my children were not Citizenship in 2002, which she used to establish the Dolores able to have [certain] amenities due to the lack of finances.” Huerta Foundation in 2003. Based in Bakersfield, California, Nevertheless, Huerta says, her children continue to be active in the foundation’s mission is to create a network of organized, her community-based organizing and policy-advocacy efforts. healthy communities pursuing social justice through She has received numerous awards for her ORGANIZATIONS systemic and structural transformation. The founcommunity service and advocacy for workers, imDolores Huerta dation has worked to achieve this transformation migrants, and women’s rights, including the OutFoundation through grassroots organizing in low-income, pristanding American Award from the Eugene V. Debs Equality California marily immigrant communities. Foundation, the Eleanor Roosevelt Award for Human “We have built a grassroots voter base that helped Rights, and the highest civilian award in the United The Feminist Majority pass the Affordable Care Act in 2010, stop parental-noStates: the Presidential Medal of Freedom. She is tification initiatives, increase taxes on the wealthy a California Hall of Fame inductee, and serves on People for the to provide more funding for education, and other the boards of The Feminist Majority, People for the American Way progressive legislation,” Huerta says of the foundaAmerican Way, and Equality California. Five elemenUnited Farm tion’s activities. As the foundation’s president, she tary schools, one middle school, and a high school Workers bear her name. continues to travel across the country promoting 43


TWO BROTHERS FOUNDED THE KNIGHT NEWSPAPERS WITH THE BELIEF THAT INFORMATION CAN CONNECT COMMUNITIES AND ENABLE DEMOCRACY TO THRIVE. IBARGÜEN HAS WORKED TIRELESSLY TO PROMOTE THAT MISSION.


ALBERTO IBARGÜEN

P R E S I DE NT & C E O, JOH N S. AN D JAM E S L. K N I G H T F O U N DAT I O N

W

WHAT DO JOURNALISM, THE ARTS, AND civic innovation have

Now Ibargüen, whose mother was Puerto Rican and father in common? They can all be used to strengthen communities. Cuban, leads the Knight Foundation. It is a national funder And they represent both the work and passions of Alberto with assets of more than $2 billion. Two brothers founded Ibargüen, president and CEO of the John S. and James L. Knight the Knight newspapers with the belief that information Foundation in Miami. Since 2005, Ibargüen has led the founcan connect communities and enable democracy to thrive. dation in giving nearly $900 million to fund projects across Ibargüen has worked tirelessly to promote that mission. those fields. However, the scope of his giving is much wider Under Ibargüen’s leadership, the Knight Foundation has funded entrepreneurial endeavors in many areas, than the grantmaking that he oversees. including the Knight News Challenge, an open contest Ibargüen’s work in the nonprofit sector began in the 1960s. After graduating from Wesleyan University, where he was edthat invites innovative ideas to help society confront the itor of the college newspaper, he joined the Peace Corps. He disruption upending journalism. He has applied that same lived and worked in Venezuela’s Amazon territory, eventually philosophy of experimentation for the public good to becoming a programming and training officer in the arts, where support for grassroots programs ORGANIZATIONS Bogotá, Colombia. After five years, he enrolled in law complements the foundation’s investments in El Nuevo Herald school at the University of Pennsylvania. He went on traditional institutions and in the civic life of the to practice law in Hartford, Connecticut, and then 26 communities where the Knight brothers once The Hartford Courant joined The Hartford Courant and began a distinguished owned newspapers. Ibargüen leads the foundation in striving to do career in journalism. John S. and James L. Knight He has been connected to the media world what John “Jack” Knight defined as the bedrock Foundation ever since. After his time in Hartford, he worked at purpose of his publications: “We seek to bestir the Miami Herald Newsday in New York, and then moved to Miami to people into an awareness of their own condition, become publisher of both the Miami Herald, which provide inspiration for their thoughts, and rouse Newsday won three Pulitzer Prizes during his tenure, and the them to pursue their true interests.” A respect for Peace Corps Spanish-language El Nuevo Herald, which won Spain’s the past and vision for the future is the touchstone of Ibargüen’s work in philanthropy. Ortega y Gasset Prize for excellence in journalism. 45


“WHAT IS IMPORTANT FOR [LATINOS] AS A COMMUNITY IS TO REALIZE HOW MUCH WE CAN INFLUENCE.”

46


CESAR MILLAN “ D O G W H I S P E R E R” AN D F O U N D E R , M I LL A N F O U N DAT I O N

A

ADJUST YOUR THINKING: IN FACT, you can teach an old

thought that was his calling when he moved to California and built a reputation as a dog walkdog new tricks—or at least a new way of behaving, based on the teachings of Cesar Millan. His work er. But when he learned of the staggering rate at shows, perhaps unintentionally, that there is much which dogs are euthanized in America (four to five we can learn about ourselves from man’s four-legged million per year) and the peculiar reasons why, he friends. We just have to change our perception. realized he needed to teach people, not their pets. When he was a teenager, Millan left Mexico to In Mexico, says Millan, dogs are in the streets. In pursue a childhood dream in the United States: to America, they are behind gates. Americans never be a world-class dog trainer. He had a rough start, falter in affection, but they are reluctant to provide battling homelessness and language barriers, but discipline. This imbalance makes dogs unstable, now, 10 years after he rose to fame on the National causing them to display anxiety and aggression. Geographic channel, his name is almost exclusively Though perceived as innate bad behavior, they are spoken in the same breath as the “Dog Whisperer.” actually symptoms. “When people believe dogs are His ticket to success was not something he found in violent by nature, that’s ignorance,” he says. “And America, but a gift he brought from home. ignorance leads to fear. I can show a different side Despite growing up in a poor family, Millan to a dog just because my perception is different.” found wealth in his upbringing. “I came from a Just as people can be fearful of dogs, they can background of spirituality and connection,” he says. also shy away from their own potential. “As a Latino Whereas his father taught him to connect to nature myself, I know we don’t always see ourselves as on his grandfather’s farm, Millan’s mother reinleaders,” Millan says. “We are very patriotic. We forced his belief in God. Learning to submit to his love our traditions, but we don’t think we can parents and a higher power—his “pack leaders,” as lead the way. What is important for us as a comMillan calls them—was an invaluable experience. His munity is to realize how much we can influence.” parents never allowed him to see his impoverished The Millan Foundation empowers dog owners to situation as an obstacle nor himself as a victim. They become “pack leaders” at home. In the community, protected him from perception, a culprit that affects Millan says, individuals have just as much power people and dogs alike. And it is through the Millan to make an impact. Foundation and his work with clients that “If I see something is missing or needORGANIZATION he tries to neutralize that problem. ed, it is my responsibility as a human Millan Foundation It’s a common misconception, espebeing to restore it,” he says. “We need a cially by new clients, that Millan’s expersense of responsibility to make the world tise is training dogs. Even Millan himself a better place.” 47


LOURDES MIRANDA

B U S I N E S SWOM AN AN D FOU N D E R, M I RAN DA F O U N DAT I O N

A

AFTER DECADES OF LIVING IN the continental United States

increase philanthropic incentives by increasing allowable and Europe, Lourdes Miranda was sad to find her native deductions on larger individual and corporate donations. Puerto Rico had changed in her absence. “I was taken by Miranda began her career in teaching, then moved to the surprise when I saw how polarized and divided the society nonprofit sector before founding a successful consulting firm, seemed to be,” she recalls. Communities were divided, she Miranda Associates Inc., which worked with the Peace Corps says, “along the spectrum: class, gender, political ideology, and other federal programs. However, she explains, “I was race—you name it.” never just in business.” Miranda also serves as a Museo de Arte To inspire and reward societal change, Miranda estabde Puerto Rico trustee. She was the co-founder and former lished the Premio a la Solidaridad awards program, honoring president of the National Conference of Puerto Rican Women, the nonprofit organizations that serve as models for bringing former president of the National Association of Women Business people together for the common good. Each year, the MiOwners, and a former board member of Amnesty International randa Foundation recognizes one winner that receives an USA. In explaining her decision to start a foundation, she original sculpture and $10,000, as well as two says, “I wanted to be able to spend resources in those ORGANIZATIONS honorary mentions that receive $2,500 each, and things that I consider important.” Amnesty an honoree for its special $5,000 Premio a la SoliHer commitment to bettering society was deepInternational USA daridad en Educación award, which is sponsored ened by a moving visit to Yad Vashem, the Holocaust La Red de by Banco Santander. Past honorees include Casa memorial and research center in Jerusalem. “My tears Fundaciones Pueblo, an environmental advocacy group, Centro flowed freely at the horrors of what happened to a Miranda de Periodismo Investigativo, and Fundación Nueva people and the disregard of the world community to Foundation Escuela para Puerto Rico, among others. More than their plight,” she recalls. “I vowed that I would never, 50 nonprofits have received the distinction over ever be indifferent to human suffering.” Museo de Arte de Puerto Rico the past 11 years. Looking towards the future for the growing ranks Miranda sees her foundation’s awards program of mainland Hispanics, Miranda says she sees “a viNational Association of and partnerships as indicative of a movement in brant, financially stable, well-educated, cultured popuWomen Business philanthropy toward strategic giving, with the aim lation [whose members] value and cultivate their dual Owners of transforming societies. As part of a collaboration identities as Americans and as Latinos, who feel part of National to organize Puerto Rico’s philanthropic sector, she a greater whole, the Americas, who are leaders in the Conference of Puerto Rican helped to found a network of Puerto Rican grant entire spectrum of US and international life … who, not Women makers, named La Red de Fundaciones. The network forgetting their origins, support their communities successfully lobbied the island’s government to and other Latinos, and never speak ill of immigrants.” 48


PHOTO: INGRID TORRES

“I VOWED THAT I WOULD NEVER, EVER BE INDIFFERENT TO HUMAN SUFFERING.”

49


“LATINOS MUST ASSUME LEADERSHIP IN SHAPING OUR COMMUNITY AND OUR COUNTRY.” 50


RONALD E. MONTOYA B U S I N E S S LE AD E R AN D D E N V E R P H I LAN T H R O P I S T

R

RONALD E. MONTOYA REMEMBERS HIS EPIPHANY. It was in the

of Aging in the United States.” (The Colorado Age Wave Iniearly 1960s, and he was a 19-year-old US soldier in the Far East tiative now operates in the Denver Metro area, as a result of a HIP Funders’ Collaborative for Strong Latino Communities before the start of the Vietnam War. “As a young soldier, I realized that my life was blessed, and I should be grateful for all I partnership with the Rose Foundation and the Latino Comhave and all I can give,” says Montoya, who is now a business munity Foundation of Colorado, among others.) leader, philanthropist, and community leader. “My desire is to Montoya has chaired the US Hispanic Chamber of Commerce make life better for my family and my community.” board, and served on the board of US Bank. He is a ORGANIZATIONS Along the way, he built more than one successful former executive director of the Colorado Office of Colorado Office of business. Currently, he is the chairman of the Solera Minority Business. Minority Business National Bank, which he describes as “a community He credits his wife, his family, God, and a love for Innov8 Solutions bank that supports minority communities,” and ownpeople for instilling in him the importance of giving. USA er of Innov8 Solutions USA, a company that supplies “I believe that, when you can, you give of your time Latino Community copper cable and related services to energy providers and, when you can, you give of your treasures,” he Foundation of and other industries. His sons, Dan and RC, also work says. He knows well about giving not only his time and Colorado for Innov8 and live close to the home that Montoya energy, but also contacts, dollars, and commitment. Mexican Cultural shares with Naomi, his wife of 47 years. Montoya, who holds a Bachelor of Arts degree Center The Boulder, Colorado, native is a Rose Commufrom the University of Colorado and doctorate of Rose Community nity Foundation trustee, chair of the Mexican Cultural law from the University of Denver, believes that US Foundation Latinos must be better prepared and more engaged Center board of directors, and a founding member Solera National and board chair of the Latino Community Foundation in civic affairs as their proportion of the national Bank of Colorado. population increases. “Latinos must assume leaderUS Bank He was also a member of the Hispanics in Philanship in shaping our community and our country,” thropy Aging Program Advisory Committee that he says. “We must accept our role today to prepare US Hispanic Chamber of contributed to development of the 2011 national our youth to assume and carry out our destiny. We Commerce assessment and report, “The Latino Age Wave: What must give support, help, training, education, and Changing Ethnic Demographics Mean for the Future commitment now to succeed in the future.” 51


SISTER CONSUELO MORALES H U M AN R IG H T S ACTIV I ST

W

WHEN SISTER CONSUELO MORALES returned in early 1992 to

“Our main contribution over the years has been to put her home state of Nuevo Leon, in northeastern Mexico, she human rights, for all males and females, on the public agenda,” she says. “To have a civic organization that protects and already knew, as a Roman Catholic sister, that she wanted to help make the world a better place. But in Nuevo Leon, she defends the dignity of society’s most vulnerable people is our found her calling: the abuse of human rights was in plain view small contribution to Nuevo Leon, Mexico.” almost everywhere she looked. Police mistreated youngsters, Sister Morales says that the organization has also been people were kidnapped, murdered, or simply vanished, and successful in opening communication channels between the no one was caught, much less prosecuted. police and civic groups, a collaboration that would have been Sister Morales had no doubts about how wrong the abuses unimaginable in the old days. In addition, the organization were, even though they were often accepted as facts of life. has used the bully pulpit to help the most vulnerable people Now a St. Augustine canoness from the Congregation of Notre by spotlighting their perspectives and publicizing what the Dame, she had learned how to seek redress in studying social universal respect for human rights ought to look like on the streets, in the jails, and in public life. work at the National University of Mexico (UNAM) Vasco de Quiroga School of Social Work in Mexico City. She also earned Yet, there is still much to do. In 2012, Citizens for Human a master’s in human rights and democracy from the Latin Rights Support said it had tied 35 percent of the disappearances American Social Sciences Institute (FLACSO-México). in Nuevo Leon state to apprehensions by either the police or the military. “My vocation led me to reflect on how I might support my brothers and sisters,” she recalls, “and that is why I went For her part, Sister Morales has been recognized as both for human rights. Opening little paths for growth a religious leader and a human rights champion. ORGANIZATIONS to help them with their needs and empower them She has been president of the Monterey Archdiocese Congregation of to find the truth and get justice—that inspires me Mexican Religious Conference since 2010. Also in 2010, Notre Dame to carry on.” Sister Morales received the Equity and Non-DiscrimCitizens for She helped to start a human rights movement ination National Award from the National Council Human Rights among religious communities in Guadalupe, which to Prevent Discrimination in Mexico, and in 2011, Support is now a suburb of Monterrey, the northern Mexican she was honored by Human Rights Watch with its Monterey industrial hub that is Nuevo Leon’s capital. The moveAlice Des Forges Award. Archdiocese ment grew and caught the interest of the laity. By “Human rights are in the deep essence of spirMexican Religious Conference April 1993, Citizens for Human Rights Support (CADHAC) ituality,” she says. “We cannot separate them from was founded, and Sister Morales has led it ever since. people’s right to dignity.”

52


PHOTO: JUAN RODRIGO LLAGUNO

“HUMAN RIGHTS ARE IN THE DEEP ESSENCE OF SPIRITUALITY. WE CANNOT SEPARATE THEM FROM PEOPLE’S RIGHT TO DIGNITY.”


DR. MARTA MORENO VEGA A

P R E S I DE NT & F O U N D E R, CAR I B B E AN C U LTU R A L CE N T E R A F R I CA N D I A S P O R A I N S T I T U T E

AS AN AFRO-LATINA BORN TO PUERTO RICAN PARENTS who

a cultural anchor in East Harlem, unifying black and brown migrated to El Barrio in New York City, Dr. Marta Moreno communities in the face of shifting demographics. Vega’s family faced the challenges of racism and discrimiIn 1995, Vega received her PhD in Yoruba philosophy in the nation. Her parents insisted that their three children learn diaspora from Temple University. Her focus on Africana studies, and retain a cultural centeredness, and Dr. Vega considers it art, and education was a result of her previous work, collabo“an obligation that each of us does the same for our families rating in the creation of cultural arts organizations, such as and communities.” the Association of Hispanic Arts and El Museo del Barrio, which The educator, author, and cultural-diversity activist she led as the first executive director and formed as a registered recalls her earliest philanthropic inspiration: her parents’ nonprofit organization. Also an accomplished author, she wrote commitment to assist loved ones who came from Puerto The Altar of My Soul: The Living Traditions of Santería and When the Rico in adapting to the cultural environment of New York Spirits Dance Mambo, which was selected in 2007 for distribution City. “I was taught by my parents that, although we might be to New York City Public Schools as part of the New York Reads lacking in economic resources, our richness was our being Initiative. “My contribution is to share and contribute the skills of good character and helping others with no expectations that I have acquired to further enrich the community that has of returns,” she says. “The message was clear: in helping nurtured and supported me,” she says. others, we helped ourselves grow in character and Dr. Vega also co-founded the Global Afro Latino and ORGANIZATIONS personal value.” Caribbean Initiative (GALCI) in 2000 at Hunter College. Association of Most recently, Dr. Vega was appointed to incomGALCI has established an alliance of nongovernmenHispanic Arts ing New York Mayor Bill DeBlasio’s transition team tal, nonprofit organizations that are grounded in Caribbean Cultural as a member of the Arts & Culture committee. She African-descendant communities, and has organized Center African is also a member of the New York State Council for international conferences and youth international Diaspora Institute the Arts and works as an adjunct professor at New exchange programs. She was also among the first 10 Community Arts York University’s Tisch School of the Arts. In 1976, to be selected for the HBO documentary The Latino University she founded the Caribbean Cultural Center African List, highlighting notable Latinos who have made Without Walls Diaspora Institute (CCCADI), which is an international outstanding contributions to society. El Museo del nonprofit organization dedicated to researching, doc“It is us, as Latinos/as from the diaspora of [the Barrio umenting, and communicating the rich history and Americas], who must determine how we are to be Global Afro Latino traditions of African descendants in the Americas. perceived and [how we] want to engage in our comand Caribbean Initiative She is currently spearheading the development of munities and internationally,” she says. Community Arts University Without Walls with CCCADI Regarding the continual increase of Latinos’ demoNew York State Council for the and Inter American University this summer in San graphic representation in the United States, Dr. Vega Arts Juan, Puerto Rico, geared towards training the next says, “We reflect the tapestry of the world in our veins, New York generation of community-based arts and cultural and therefore reflect the imperative of assuring that University’s Tisch workers. Additionally, she is leading the transfer of cultural diversity, cultural equity, and equal access to School of the Arts CCCADI to a new location on 125th Street, creating opportunities … are instituted as policy and practice.”

54


“WE REFLECT THE TAPESTRY OF THE WORLD IN OUR VEINS, AND THEREFORE REFLECT THE IMPERATIVE OF ASSURING THAT CULTURAL DIVERSITY, CULTURAL EQUITY, AND EQUAL ACCESS TO OPPORTUNITIES ... ARE INSTITUTED AS POLICY AND PRACTICE.”


56


PHILANTHROPY 2.0 A look at three tech innovations that are propelling nonprofits to new levels BY MICHELLE MARKELZ

IT’S NO SECRET THAT TECHNOLOGY HAS MADE the act of giving easier and faster than

ever before. From dial-to-donate to text-to-pledge, advancements in information technology have only shortened the distance between givers and their beneficiaries. The methodology of philanthropy has stood the test of time. It’s the reason why there are thousands of sites like Kickstarter and Razoo crowdsourcing funds for a cause. These platforms take the old drop-in-bucket approach practiced for years by bell ringers and move them from the street to the Internet. Breaking down the plethora of tech advances, there arise three specific innovations that are taking philanthropy to another level. 57


The Social-Media Misconception AT FIRST GLANCE, social media can seem

like the great equalizer for fundraising organizations. But anyone who’s tried to build a Facebook following from the ground up—let alone raise money—can tell you results are neither free of charge nor won by intuition alone. The guise of free advertising on social-media platforms is perpetuated by success stories of viral campaigns, such as the Dove “Evolution” ad. But the story of the marketing firm hired to produce just such phenomena is rarely what tops people’s news feeds. That’s not to say grassroots shops and small nonprofits can’t use channels like Facebook and Twitter to their advantage. As platforms for connecting people, those sites and others still serve an important purpose, so long as expectations match intentions, says Amy Sample Ward, CEO of The Nonprofit Technology Enterprise Network (NTEN). “We have to be clear we’re using social media to connect with our community,” she says. Time after time, NTEN has seen evidence prove the success of fundraising’s oldest strategies, and social media 58

is the 21st century’s complement to them. Health-based organizations made an important distinction when they began realizing the power of a hyper-local presence. Take a cause like cancer research. Someone who sees a commercial asking for a donation is much less likely to give, or give repeatedly, than the friend of a team captain raising money for a 5K. Put those captains online, and give them the freedom to promote your cause to 100 of their closest friends and family, and now the world of potential donors is amplified with a compelling reason to give.

Social media is the 21st century’s complement to fundraising’s oldest and most successful strategies.


Making the Most of Mobility THE TECHNOLOGY WITH THE MOST poten-

tial to change the game for fundraising is in the palm of almost everyone’s hand. Mobile phones, with their ability to pinpoint users’ locations, are ripe with information about donors. In the same way social-media platforms open the door for organizations to their donors’ networks, mobile phones clue them into donor behaviors. Mobile donations and interactions come with a packet of information. The time the donation is made and where in the world (or, more importantly, what kinds of things are nearby) tell a lot about a donor. They can indicate where that person shops, what subway wall they’re looking at each morning on their way to work—but the most valuable information they provide is a link to talk back. Beyond browsers, mobile phones can also host apps, putting fundraisers in the best position to use the technology’s capabilities. Organizations with the resources to customize an app can, for example, send text alerts to funders when they’re close to an event, Sample Ward says. Perhaps capitalizing more on digital culture than its platforms, some apps turn the Instagram-ers and compulsive status-updaters of the world into givers by simply giving them more of what they want. Feedie is an application that contributes to the Lunchbox Fund, a nonprofit that feeds children in South Africa. Feedie users who attend participating restaurants can upload a picture of their

The time and place the donation is made tell a lot about a donor...and provide a link to talk back.

meal and, in exchange, the restaurant makes a donation to the Lunchbox Fund. Feedie photos—which can be shared to Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Pinterest, and Tumblr—allow a restaurant’s best customers to advertise their experience to a huge network, with a side of social responsibility. As the app Check-in For Good touts on its website, when patrons do the work of connecting a business to a few hundred of their friends, you “turn cause supporters into your customers.” 59


The Dichotomy of Big Data ON BOTH SIDES of the philanthropic

process, data promises the capability to improve efficiency and results reporting. Much like mobile technology, big data is in many ways unchartered territory for nonprofits and foundations, but some groups, like the Technology Affinity Group (TAG) are helping shepherd its early adopters. Set to launch this spring, TAG’s solution for the grant-making process, called Simplify, is a new data standard and a common database where nonprofits can enter basic information accessible by foundations. With the average grant application taking hours of valuable time and employee resources, TAG’s executive director, Lisa Pool, hopes Simplify will streamline that process for grant seekers. There are some common grant applications, but, “Simplify is the first common database in our sector, and we hope it becomes much broader than application data,” she says. “We envision it including evaluation reporting data and evaluation metrics, as well.” With the instantaneous, digital nature of giving, data has added yet another audience to the crowd that is watching philanthropy unfold. A foundation may be concerned with the number of wells its grant was able to tap in a third-world country, and that is one metric for a nonprofit to track. But internally, the groups carrying out philanthropic endeavors will only know how effective they are by measuring the people impacted by 60

With the instantaneous, digital nature of giving, data has added yet another audience to the crowd that is watching philanthropy unfold.

their efforts. Individual givers may want a little of both, explaining what their money bought and who benefitted. Separately, the technology is there to deliver each piece in a sleek package. The caveat, however, says Sample Ward, is that most tech solutions force a trade-off. “There’s an internal struggle around how to collect, report, and translate granular data points into impact,” she explains. Most organizations choose one or the other— qualitative or quantitative data—because they don’t have the time or resources to obtain both. One promising compromise, for those who have the skills to use it, is geographic information systems (GIS) mapping. “You don’t read a report for impact,” Sample Ward says. “You want to see it and hear it.” The beauty of GIS is that it uses something visual to represent something quantitative. A map might use changing topography or color to represent numbers and figures, and if it’s interactive, it may even provide opportunities for embedded multimedia, such as live streaming video or photos. Sharing in the share culture has definitely been expanded by emerging technologies. And the trend towards open IT solutions is opening doors for nonprofits. Although there is still much to understand about the digital arena, nonprofits and foundations alike can be excited that it’s a space increasing access for all.


61


“MORE THAN ANYTHING, WHAT I FOUGHT FOR WAS TO GIVE LATINOS A VOICE.”


SONIA NAZARIO P U LI T Z E R P R I Z E - W I N N I N G J O U R N A LI S T

P

PULITZER PRIZE-WINNING JOURNALIST Sonia Nazario describes

She started writing about the realities in Latino communities, regardless of whether they were cast in a good or bad herself as a “reluctant activist.” As an adolescent, the lethal silencing of journalists during the Dirty War in her family’s light. “More than anything, what I fought for was to give LatiArgentine homeland outraged her and made her resolve to nos a voice,” she says. become a journalist. But, as a journalist, she was trained not Her Pulitzer Prize-winning 2002 Los Angeles Times series to take a stand, to let the facts speak for themselves. And so “Enrique’s Journey: The Story of a Boy’s Dangerous Odyssey it went until she reported and wrote a newspaper series that to Reunite With His Mother” tells the story of a Honduran propelled her from national journalism to international adyoungster who rode atop trains and snuck across the US-Mexico vocacy on behalf of unaccompanied child migrants. border to reunite with his mother. In various book editions, the story is being read by US schoolchildren in 11 cities and Today, approximately six years after she left daily journalfreshmen in 66 colleges and universities. ism, Nazario is an advocate and educator on behalf of Latino immigrants, particularly children. She spends much of her The series started a national dialogue about attitudes time crisscrossing the country giving speeches about immitoward migrants in the United States, which persist even togrants, sometimes as an unpaid volunteer for nonprofits that day. Nazario is on the frontline of the debate as she travels help children and seek to counter economic out-migration. around the country talking about migrants. One part of the Nazario remembers when, as a 14-year-old, she returned immigration-reform measures currently stalled in Congress home from errands with her mother to find bloodstains on a would allow children to have legal representation when apsidewalk in their neighborhood where journalists had been pearing in US Immigration Court, she says—a right children currently don’t have. killed. It was during a period of violent repression that lasted from the mid-1970s until the military dictatorship was forced Last August, she argued a somewhat contrarian case as a out in 1983. She asked her mom what had happened. “I saw keynote speaker during the first of two UN General Assembly that people didn’t understand how bad it was because they sessions on international migration, which is generally viewed didn’t have information,” she says. “You needed people who as a healthy development in international terms. Nazario could hold [abusers of authority] accountable.” instead argued that too often migrants, particularly women, Even at that young age, Nazario knew that she wanted are spurred to leave their children and homes to cross interto write about issues in Latin America. She had a 16-year-old national borders in search of work, leading to devastating friend who was tortured to death; one of her relatives outcomes for the families and their societies. She ORGANIZATIONS was severely tortured, as well. Her family moved to advocated instead for job creation targeting out-miLos Angeles Times the United States, and Nazario became, at 21, the gration communities. Nazario expects that the rapidly expanding US youngest reporter hired by The Wall Street Journal. By Random House the time she was 24 or 25, she was “the backup Latin Latino community will benefit by changing hostile The Wall Street American correspondent, living out of a suitcase,” she perceptions many people have of Latinos and miJournal recalls, “and I realized that there were many issues grants. She says, “As people know Latinos personally, affecting Latinos in the United States.” the negative perception of Latinos is no longer there.” 63


“MANY DON’T KNOW WHAT TO MAKE OF OUR DRIVE, OUR AMBITION, OUR CULTURE, AND OUR VERY REAL DESIRE TO BE BOTH AMERICAN AND HISPANIC.”

64


MIRTA OJITO P U LITZ E R P R I Z E - W I N N I N G J O U R N A LI S T

V

VETERAN NEWSPAPER JOURNALIST Mirta Ojito has served as

US newspapers have always inspired her. “I hope I’ve done the same for those who’ve come after me,” she says. a bridge, expertly interpreting the rainbow of cultures of US Latinos and Latin Americans for the rest of the American pubOjito’s commitment to giving back also stems from her collic, and sometimes helping Hispanics understand US systems lege experience. As a Cuban refugee in Miami, she had limited and processes. She thinks there is still a lot of work to do to college options. Still, Ojito earned good grades as a student at promote understanding. “Much education is needed to get Miami-Dade College and became a member of Phi Theta Kappa, people to see Latinos as the multidimensional and multihued an international honors fraternity of community colleges. The group it really is,” she says. organization went on to award Ojito a scholarship that allowed A newspaper reporter since 1987, Ojito has worked for the her to transfer to a four-year state university. After graduating Miami Herald, El Nuevo Herald, and The New York Times. Her from Florida Atlantic University, she earned a master’s in jourmany honors include a 1999 best foreign reporting award nalism from Columbia University in New York City. from the American Society of Newspaper Editors for her seToday, Ojito gives back by serving as a trustee for Phi Theta ries of articles about life in Cuba, and in 2001, Ojito earned Kappa. “We help pave the way for others who, from their perch a shared Pulitzer for national reporting for a New York Times in community colleges, dream bigger dreams, ” she says. series about race in America. She is currently an assistant professor at the Graduate School In addition to her own writing, Ojito is a mentor to young of Journalism at Columbia University and contributes to several journalists. She is dedicated to teaching them “to be publications, in both English and Spanish, including ORGANIZATIONS better, inclusive reporters who recognize news and a column she writes for the Miami Herald. Ojito is also Columbia stories in sometimes marginalized communities,” she a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. University explains, adding that she encourages her mentees Though progress has been made, she emphasizCouncil on to understand the value of reporting stories that es that too much of the narrative about Latinos in Foreign Relations others overlook. the United States “is centered around what we take El Nuevo Herald “I find that Hispanics have fascinating lives and from the US—from food stamps to citizenship—but great stories to tell,” she says. “If my telling of their not enough is said about what we give, from money Miami Herald to worthy causes to our labor, our vote, and even our stories helps them navigate their sometimes difficult The New York lives in the military.” lives in the US, that’s terrific.” Times Ojito is quick to pay tribute to the brave journalShe adds, “Many don’t know what to make of our Phi Theta Kappa ists who came before her. Reporters who had to fight drive, our ambition, our culture, and our very real with editors to get the first stories about Latinos in desire to be both American and Hispanic.” 65


DOUGLAS X. PATIÑO, PHD D TR U ST E E, M ARG U E R ITE CAS E Y FOU N DATION

DOUGLAS X. PATIÑO, PHD, REMEMBERS HIS ROOTS, having grown

for the growth of organized philanthropy along the US-Mexiup in Calexico, California, and Mexicali, Sonora, Mexico. “Major co border. In 1991, he created the New Partnerships Foundation, influences in my personal giving developed from seeing verya Patiño family foundation focusing on Mixteca women and low-income people in neighborhoods helping each other, on children and undocumented immigrants, a result of “seeing both sides of the border, including sharing a remaining piece the great talent and leadership in three generations of women, of bread,” says Dr. Patiño, now vice-chancellor emeritus of the who had little opportunity for formal education.” And in 2001, California State University (CSU) system and a C.S. Mott he created The Patiño Group, dedicated to strengthenORGANIZATIONS Foundation trustee. He particularly credits his roots ing or creating carefully selected not-for-profit groups Arizona and his mother’s generosity toward others for having providing pro-bono coaching and consulting, as well Department of as small amounts of funding. inspired him to dedicate his life to public service and Economic Security helping the Latino community. Dr. Patiño resolved to His family formed yet another organization, as well. California help Latinos by influencing public policy, creating or “With my two siblings, we developed a concept, the Employment changing organizations, and finding other ways to Patiño Corporation, committed to getting all 10 nieces Development Department strengthen the Latino community. His lifetime dedicaand nephews to graduate from a university, and so tion developed at three levels: through his willingness it happened,” recalls Dr, Patiño, who earned a bachCalifornia Health and Welfare to volunteer in the nonprofit sector, his professional elor’s degree in political science and master’s degree Agency arc, and his dedication to his own extended family. in education, both from San Diego State University, California State Along the way, the former chairman of the board of before obtaining his doctorate in human behavior (urUniversity Hispanics in Philanthropy contributed to the philanthropban development) from United States International C.S. Mott ic sector by also serving, among other positions, on the University in San Diego. “From my biological family Foundation board of the Marguerite Casey Foundation since 2001 grew stronger commitments to our community at Hispanics in and as the founding president of the Marin (California) large,” he explains. Philanthropy Community Foundation and CSU founding vice president However, he believes there will be a need for a Marguerite Casey for advancement. By 2000, the 23 universities had raised much broader societal commitment in the future, as Foundation $811 million for that year in voluntary gifts, grants, and the growth of the Latino population in the leading Marin (California) contracts. He has served as secretary of the California industrial states fills labor-force needs and the ranks Community Health and Welfare Agency and the California Employment of university students. “Government and the business Foundation Development Department under Gov. Edmund G. Brown, sector must invest in the Latino population to ensure New Partnerships and as director of the Arizona Department of Economic a productive labor force and a strong US economy,” he Foundation Security under Gov. Bruce Babbitt. says. “As the Latino numbers and purchasing power Patiño Dr. Patiño left one of his state government jobs in increase, so will the knowledge of how much Latinos Corporation 1967 to help start a Latino multiservice center in the contribute to the country. Latinos also have a leadership The Patiño Group Sacramento area, and spent much of his time between role in sharing the Latino-immigrant history and its 1991 and 1993 volunteering to lay the groundwork enormous contributions to the United States.” 66


“FROM MY BIOLOGICAL FAMILY GREW STRONGER COMMITMENTS TO OUR COMMUNITY AT LARGE.”

67


“I SHOW UP IN MY LIFE WITH ALL OF MY IDENTITIES BRAIDED TOGETHER AND [I DO] SO FROM A PLACE OF VALUE—AN ADDED VALUE TO THIS COUNTRY AND TO MY COMMUNITIES.”


CHARLES RICE-GONZÁLEZ G C O - F OU N DE R & E X E C U TIV E D I R E CTOR, TH E B R O N X ACA D E M Y O F A R T S A N D DA N CE

PHOTO: JOE MEDINA

GROWING UP IN THE 1970s, CHARLES RICE-GONZÁLEZ had firsthand

festivals featuring cutting-edge works that empower women, experience of what the media meant when it used the Bronx people of color, and the LGBT communities. It has won several as a symbol of urban poverty and plight. The Puerto Rico-born awards and has been recognized as one of the seven cultural writer and community and LGBT activist recalls the foundation pillars of the Bronx by the Bronx Council on the Arts. that was built for him to give to communities throughout his Rice-González is the executive director at BAAD! and a distinlife. “I grew up in a poor, working-class household in the Soundguished lecturer in the English department at Hostos Community view Projects in the Bronx with my mom and aunts working College–CUNY, and also volunteers his time and resources to and my grandmother holding ground as the matriarch,” he serve on the boards of The Bronx Council on the Arts and the says. “I remember being a small child and my grandmother National Association of Latino Arts and Cultures. saying, ‘Negrito, a nadie se le niega un plato de comida. Comparte de A defining moment in his life was in 1991, when a new lo que tengas.’ It was such a simple and profound idea of sharing group, Gay Men of the Bronx, formed to increase gay visibiliwhatever you had to help another.” ty and activism in that borough. “We needed to do our first Rice-González started organizing in that housing project mailing and, as a grassroots organization, we had no money,” in the late 1980s. In the 1990s, as AIDS was ripping through Rice-González recalls. “I remember reaching into my pocket the community, he shifted his efforts toward LGBT and AIDS and pulling out a $20 bill. Then another person did the same, efforts. He continues to use what he considers his greatest asand another and another, and soon 15 men had contributed sets—“being Latino, black, and queer,” as he puts it—to give to and we had a little over $200. It was a defining moment bethe community. cause we had all contributed our time to get the organization “I show up in my life with all of my identities braided tostarted, but it was the first time that the connection between gether and [I do] so from a place of value—an added value to this money and how it would further the work we were doing was country and to my communities,” he says. “Another made tangible.” ORGANIZATIONS part of my ‘give’ to the community is my time, ideas, As the US Latino population continues to grow BAAD! The Bronx energy, and my writing.” toward a significant portion of the population, RiceAcademy of Arts & His debut novel, Chulito (Magnus, 2011), has reGonzález says, “I’m excited by that prospect because Dance ceived awards and recognitions from the American there will be an inevitable shift, and I’m more interThe Bronx Council Library Association (ALA) and the National Book Critics ested in how we will perceive ourselves. on the Arts “One of the main reasons Latinos have advanced Circle. He also coedited the anthology From Macho to Gay Men of the Mariposa: New Gay Latino Fiction (Tincture, 2011), which in this country is that we have created systems to Bronx features 29 gay Latino writers, many published for support ourselves,” he adds. “As we continue to grow Hostos Community the first time. in numbers, in power, in education, in wealth, we will College–CUNY In 1998, Rice-González co-founded BAAD! (The Bronx continue to lead in that change, which will make our National Assn. Academy of Arts and Dance) with award-winning chorecommunities—and all the diversity within the Latino of Latino Arts & ographer/dancer Arthur Aviles. BAAD! is a workshop community—stronger, and have the potential to make Cultures and performance space that presents four annual America a greater country.” 69


DOUGLAS RODRIGUEZ AWAR D - W I N N I NG C H E F

F

FOR NUEVO LATINO CUISINE GURU Douglas Rodri-

His interest in cooking started early. By the guez, cultural heritage is very important. In fact, age of 13, he owned a collection of pots, pans, and it’s palpable. “No matter where we are, somos Laticookbooks. At 14, he became a summer apprennos, and we need to remind our kids every day of tice in the kitchen of the Fontainebleau Hilton the importance of feeling proud of our Hispanic Hotel on Miami Beach. Believing in the power of a heritage,” says the chef, author, and businessman, good education to secure one’s future, he studied who is proud to be a role model and bring Latin culinary arts at Johnson & Wales University in cuisine to the forefront. Providence, Rhode Island, which later awarded Born in New York to Cuban parents then raised him with an honorary doctorate. in Miami, Rodriguez delivers his message through Among other prizes, Rodriguez received a James Beard Foundation Rising Chef of the the pan-Latin American cuisine that has become his Year Award in 1996, and in 2010 he hallmark. He started his first restaurant, ORGANIZATIONS YUCA, in Coral Gables in 1989, sparking won the Lifetime Achievement Award Alma de Cuba the Nuevo Cubano cooking craze. He then from Flavors of Passion Awards, which whipped up the enduring Nuevo Latino honors chefs of Latin American cuisine De Rodriguez Cuba trend as co-owner of Patria in New York in the United States. In 2013, he was listed in the peer-reviewed Best Chefs City. His restaurant interests now include: Deseo De Rodriguez Cuba in The Hilton Bentley America book. Ola Hotel and Ola in the Sanctuary Hotel, both Rodriguez is the author of Nuevo LatiPatria on Miami Beach; Deseo in The Westin Kierno (1995), Latin Ladles (1997), Latin Flavors land Resort & Spa in Scottsdale, Arizona; on the Grill (2000), and The Great Ceviche YUCA and Alma de Cuba in Philadelphia. Book (2003). 70


“NO MATTER WHERE WE ARE, SOMOS LATINOS, AND WE NEED TO REMIND OUR KIDS EVERY DAY OF THE IMPORTANCE OF FEELING PROUD OF OUR HISPANIC HERITAGE.”

71


MARIO ERNESTO SÁNCHEZ M ACTOR, DI R ECTOR, AN D FOU N D E R, TE ATRO AVA N T E

MARIO ERNESTO SÁNCHEZ REMEMBERS what Spanish-language

Peru, the United States, Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mextheatre was like in Miami in 1978: comedies, political satires, ico, Spain, and Uruguay, as well as a performance by the Teatro and vaudeville-style shows. Amusing, but not challenging. Prometeo’s student troupe at its Miami-Dade College home. “So in 1978, we opened with Electra Garrigó by Virgilio Piñera, Beyond the Hispanic artistic community, Sánchez also adds considered the best Cuban playwright of the 20th century. And other cultures and ethnicities in the festival mix. “In the past, we took it from there,” recalls the Cuban-born actor/director in we have presented a group from Kiev who did Lorca, one from the transcript of an interview last year for NEA Arts magazine. Slovenia who did an Argentine work, and a group from Japan By May 1979, his Teatro Avante theatre company was registered who did Don Quixote, among others ” he recalls. as a Florida nonprofit. The NEA Arts magazine article also noted that Teatro Avante His pet projects, Teatro Avante and the International Hispanic has performed globally, with support from the Mid-Atlantic Arts Theatre Festival of Miami—which is heading into its 29th season Foundation through its US Artists International program. The in the summer of 2014—have proven their staying power and grants, for instance, covered a 2009 residency at Spain’s Festival Sánchez’s acumen at the theatre business. It has also allowed de Teatro de Villa de Molina. Support from the Miami-Dade Sánchez, who serves on the board of the Miami-Dade County County Department of Cultural Affairs’ International CulAdrienne Arsht Center Trust, to tour with productions earning tural Exchange (ICE) program have also been instrumental in national and international acclaim and honors. Avante’s tours through Latin America, Spain, Portugal, France, Sánchez, who is Teatro Avante’s producing artistic director Japan, and Slovenia. and a veteran actor in American television and movies, did some Whether on tour or through the theatre festival that he early touring on his own, having come to the United States heads in South Florida, Sánchez says that part of the magic he when he was 15 on the early 1960s airlift of Cuban children sees comes from the diversity of artistic contributions. “The known as Operation Pedro Pan. After arriving in Miami, he festival brings together so many companies from so many was sent to Montana and later rejoined his parents in countries that we are able to welcome everyone toORGANIZATIONS Texas before the family settled permanently in Miami. gether—the Spanish, Brazilians, Mexicans, ColombiInternational “Modestly speaking, [what I] give [is my] pride in ans … all nationalities residing in Miami,” he says. Hispanic Theatre preserving our Hispanic cultural heritage in Miami “And I mention this because it’s inspiring. It inspires Festival of Miami and the US—while perhaps inspiring others to do me to keep on going because we have been able to Miami-Dade the same—by opening theatre companies and trying arouse emotion, explore history, expand horizons, County Adrienne to really work on Hispanic culture and language,” denounce abuse, ward off poverty, inspire love, or Arsht Center Trust he says. “Because we’re not only trying to preserve simply entertain on a stage, and when you achieve Teatro Avante the language, but most importantly, our culture.” all of these, you know you are presenting something Last year’s festival offerings included works from valuable to the community.” 72


“MODESTLY SPEAKING, [WHAT I] GIVE [IS MY] PRIDE IN PRESERVING OUR HISPANIC CULTURAL HERITAGE IN MIAMI AND THE US.” 73


HE AND HIS STAFF DEFEND THE MIGRANTS FROM DRUG AND HUMAN TRAFFICKERS, GANG MEMBERS, AND CORRUPT COPS—ALL OF WHOM PREY ON THEIR LACK OF MIGRATORY STATUS IN MEXICO. 74


FATHER ALEJANDRO SOLALINDE F D I R E CTOR, H E R MAN OS E N E L CA M I N O M I G R A N T S H E LT E R

FATHER ALEJANDRO SOLALINDE literally stands at a

chapel, dining hall, kitchen, and a shady palapa area crossroad, on a mission to shelter homeless migrants for receiving visitors. who make their way north through Mexico from The 68-year-old priest has spent more than seven Central America. Much more than offering a place years helping migrants, but he came to his current to sleep, eat, and pray, he and his staff defend the path in a roundabout way. The son of a schoolteacher migrants from drug and human traffickers, gang and a housewife, he was born in Texcoco, Mexico members, and corrupt cops—all of whom prey on state. He received a degree in history from the Mexico their lack of migratory status in Mexico. State Autonomous University before switching to psyOver a period of five years, the priest and his chology and earning a master’s in family therapy at team have filed more than 200 complaints of homithe Atemajac Valley University (UNIVA) in Jalisco state. cides, robberies, kidnappings, extortions, assaults, Father Solalinde considered studying to become and rapes with the Office of the Attorney General a Jesuit priest, but switched to studying classic litof Mexico and state prosecutors. Those complaints erature for two years at a Carmelite seminary in have also aided investigations by the Mexico National Guadalajara. He recalls being rejected at the end Commission for Human Rights. of his novitiate over philosophical differences. He But the protector has, on occasion, also become moved on to what he considers a much more proa target. A series of threats forced Father Solalinde gressive seminary and, when the Second Vatican to leave Mexico for a time in early 2012. Due to those Council stirred up the winds of change, he helped start a regional union of seminarians. risks, both the Mexican human rights commission and the Inter-American Commission on Human After being ordained in 1974 by the bishop of Rights have taken special notice of the Hermanos Toluca, Father Solalinde spent 30 years as a parish en el Camino shelter for “transmigrants” that he priest in Mexico City, Toluca and Oaxaca. He worked founded and directs for the Diocese of Tehuantepec. in wealthy communities and with male and female Founded in February 2007, the shelter is located prison inmates. In 1982, he received permission to in Ixtepec City, Oaxaca state, at the narrowest part go as a missionary to Oaxaca state, where he worked of Mexico, through which thousands of Central and for many years with highly marginalized indigenous South American migrants are funneled as they make communities and founded a home for abandoned their way on top of trains or on foot toward the boys and girls. In 2005, his request to work on behalf United States. “The shelter started as a cardof migrants was granted. ORGANIZATIONS He has more recently pressed the case board house,” Father Solalinde describes, Diocese of noting that today, it has two dormitories: against migrant kidnappings in Mexico Tehuantepec the men’s with 54 cots and the women’s before the Inter-American human rights Hermanos en el with 15, each with a respective bathroom panel. Father Solalinde has received many Camino and an area for the care of sick migrants. awards and honors for his dedication to The shelter also has an administrative area, human rights work. 75


“HAVING MY OWN LIFE TRANSFORMED BY EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY, I KNOW THAT COMMITTED INDIVIDUALS, WHETHER IN THE PUBLIC OR PRIVATE SECTOR, CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN THE LIVES OF PEOPLE AND SOCIETIES.”

76


LUIS ANTONIO UBIÑAS NON P ROF IT A N D TE C H N OLO GY C ON S U LTA N T, I N N OVATO R , A N D LE A D E R

L

LAST FALL, LUIS ANTONIO UBIÑAS COMPLETED HIS six-year tenure at the helm of the Ford Foundation, the second-largest

Harvard College as an undergraduate and then at Harvard Business School, where he graduated with highest honors foundation in the United States with $12 billion in assets as a Baker Scholar. He then worked for 20 years at McKinsey and offices across the globe. His leadership transformed the & Co., where he advised media companies to focus on the foundation, guiding it through a tough economic crisis and opportunities and growth that new wireless and broadband technologies could offer. leading a strategic, economic, and operational restructuring. Ubiñas’s life has also been transformed, from a childhood For Ubiñas, success is a constant reminder of those who of economic hardship to the pursuit of a good education invested in him and the integral importance of giving back and, ultimately, burgeoning success in both the nonprofit to others to inspire change and opportunity. “I lead my life, and for-profit sectors. In this transformation, he has gained whether I am working in the private or nonprofit sector, in a way that honors their collective investment in me, ensuring a true understanding of the power that giving can have on one’s opportunities. that— through institutional leadership, personal financial Growing up in New York City’s South Bronx area, Ubiñas giving, or personal intervention—I am making a difference was raised by Puerto Rican parents, with few resources and in communities of need,” Ubiñas says. through difficult times. “I have personally experienced the “I give in every way I can,” he adds. “I give my time and I give core struggles of poverty in our country—homelessness and financially, focusing on educational access. Most importantly, hunger,” he says. For his ability to overcome these obstacles, I give through one-on-one interaction, trying to make a differUbiñas credits those who took time out of their lives to provide ence in the lives of individuals through direct mentorship.” him with high-level education and care. Aside from his personal giving, Ubiñas has spent the past “The reason I have had the opportunities I have had is that six years honing the giving priorities to global communities for one of the biggest foundations in philanthropy, focusing others paused in their own careers, during their own days, to the Ford Foundation on its core mission of social justice. invest in me and to make a difference in my life,” he explains. “Teachers—with such names as Breimer, Maglioni, Trower, Ubiñas is a prime example of the connected nature of and Kaplan—invested in me when surely they had giving, and the importance of doing so: one person’s ORGANIZATIONS other things to do. As a result, [they] changed the giving inspires others to do the same. “Having my Ford Foundation trajectory of my life.” own life transformed by educational opportunity, I Change the trajectory they undoubtedly did. After know that committed individuals, whether in the McKinsey & Co. receiving scholarships to study at private elementary public or private sector, can make a difference in the and secondary schools, Ubiñas went on to study at lives of people and societies.” 77


LEONILA VÁSQUEZ ALVÍZAR C HAM P ION OF M IG RAN TS ON A P E R I LOU S JO U R N E Y

T

THE JOURNEY ATOP FREIGHT TRAINS from Central America

through Mexico to the US border is fraught with ever-present and deadly hazards. Migrants, often children who have not eaten for days, fall prey to gangs, corrupt authorities, or human traffickers. If they survive these perils, as they jostle precariously amid the rumbling cars with only the sky for cover, and a tree branch hanging above the rails can sweep them to their death. One such freight line passes through La Patrona, a poor neighborhood on the edge of an industrial area in Cordoba, Veracruz. But there, the neighborhood women have banded together. Many are mothers themselves, so they help however they can. Leonila Vásquez Alvízar was an early leader. Her daughter, Norma Romero Vásquez, helps to coordinate the women’s labor of love. In Enrique’s Journey: The Story of a Boy’s Dangerous Odyssey to Reunite with His Mother, author Sonia Nazario memorably depicted how women who have nothing to spare take to heart the biblical admonition of showing kindness to strangers. In the case of Vásquez Alvízar and her neighbors, they rise before dawn, prepare what they can, and go to meet the trains. They fling bottles of 78

water, tortillas they’ve carefully folded, and other food high up to those riding atop the boxcars, most of whom they will never see again. Vásquez Alvízar remembers an event in the distant past that inspired her to help—she might say it was a divine inspiration. Although the local authorities had warned of serious consequences for helping migrants, she recalls the case that solidified her resolve to follow her faith. “In 1995, it was the most beautiful vision that the other women and I experienced,” she recalls. “We saw the black Christ in the person of a migrant: a young man who was shot for defending his wife. The train stopped here in La Patrona. It was around 11:30 at night. A colleague brought the wife to me to ask for my help. She went to where the train had come to a halt. “I said to God, ‘If you put me here, it’s for a reason,’” she continues, recalling that she then experienced an overwhelming, unusual sensation. “It was like I was covered from head to toe. I would not be able to explain what it was,” she says. “But it held me like that and later, I said, ‘I’m here to serve you.’” Vásquez Alvízar and others helped move the wounded man to the nearest clinic,


PHOTOS: HANS-MAXIMO MUSIELIK

THEY FLING BOTTLES OF WATER, TORTILLAS THEY’VE CAREFULLY FOLDED, AND OTHER FOOD HIGH UP TO THOSE RIDING ATOP THE BOXCARS, MOST OF WHOM THEY WILL NEVER SEE AGAIN.

which declined to help the migrant. So they took him to a physician, who also refused to help. “In the end, we had to do what we could, and thank God, he survived,” she says. “For us, that was the test that God gave us to find out whether we were ready to serve.” Vásquez Alvízar and her neighbors not only welcome migrants but other special guests, as well. A caravan of Central American mothers, who were driving down roads near the tracks in hopes of determining their children’s fate, was planning to stop by their neighborhood soon. “They are looking around the country for their missing children,” her daughter, Norma, says. 79


LUZ VEGA-MARQUIS P R E S I DE NT & CEO , MARG U E R ITE CAS E Y FOU N DAT I O N ; C O - F O U N D E R , H I S PA N I CS I N P H I L A N T H R O PY

G

GIVING BACK TO HER COMMUNITY IS a deeply engrained personal

Reynoso and Latino civil rights leader Herman Gallegos—Vevalue and daily practice for Luz Vega-Marquis, who, as president ga-Marquis and Elisa Arévalo, now a Wells Fargo vice president, and CEO of the Marguerite Casey Foundation, oversees a $600 decided to organize a group to address the lack of resources for Latinos in the philanthropic community, which she calls million endowment and a $30 million grantmaking budget. “a travesty.” Vega-Marquis grew up in a large household. Her parents, who fled from their native Nicaragua with their children to But Vega-Marquis, who also advocates on behalf of underavoid political turmoil in the 1960s, always took in family who served families and promotes unity between “black and brown needed help. At any one time, there were up to 18 children communities,” now laughs at what she took on in advancing in the house. “I always had to share,” she recalls. “I lived in the cause of US Latinos in the civil sector. “I never saw myself an environment where sharing was a practice.” Her parents, as a leader,” she says. “I was just trying to raise my family and who, regardless of their situation, always fed, clothed, and gave work to support them. [Organizing Latinos in philanthropy] health care to relatives and friends, inspired Vega-Marquis. wasn’t even my obligation; it wasn’t part of my job duties. But Throughout her life and career, one of the biggest ways I felt compelled to do something, and I really had to call on Vega-Marquis has given back is by consistently bringing atsome inner courage to speak up and do that.” Vega-Marquis is proud of Hispanics in Philanthropy, seetention and resources to issues facing the Latino community. She has not wavered in urging grant makers to dedicate more ing it as a powerful institution because it is one of the few resources to the Latino community. places where Latino leaders are really nurtured, and because Vega-Marquis, a co-founder of Hispanics in Philanthropy, it has pushed to put Latinos on the agenda of more powerful institutions in philanthropy. Latinos have an important role recalls the early days of her philanthropic career, when, as a young program officer, she attended her first Council on Founto play, she explains, in setting future agendas for the indedations (COF) conference in Seattle. She was deeply impacted pendent sector, protecting democratic values, and bringing by the lack of other Latinos at the conference and the up issues that the private and government sectors ORGANIZATIONS dearth of any issues facing the Latino community can’t adequately address. Hispanics in According to Vega-Marquis, it is time for Latino on the conference’s agenda. Philanthropy “That moment really pushed me to act. I was leaders in the independent sector, including the Marguerite Casey aware, but that pushed me to take action,” she says. many leaders that HIP has nurtured throughout its Foundation With the support of other Latino leaders—including 30 years, to take ownership in setting the sector’s the future California Supreme Court Justice Cruz future direction and nurturing innovation. 80


“I ALWAYS HAD TO SHARE. I LIVED IN AN ENVIRONMENT WHERE SHARING WAS A PRACTICE.”


THIS ISSUE WOULDN’T HAVE BEEN POSSIBLE WITHOUT THE GENEROUS SUPPORT OF OUR NATIONAL HOST COMMITTEE. A BIG GRACIAS TO THOSE WHO HAVE SUPPORTED US OVER THE PAST 30 YEARS!

Esther Aguilera, Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute Frank Alvarez, Philanthropic Consultant Elisa Arevalo, Wells Fargo Bank Arnoldo Avalos, Avalos Foundation Carmen Barroso, IPPF of America Andrea Bazan, United Way of Metropolitan Chicago Aixa Beauchamp, Philanthropic Consultant Maria Bechily, Chicago Community Trust Elmy Bermejo, United States Department of Labor Patricia Boero, International Media Consultant Diana Bontá, Trustee, Annie E. Casey Foundation Sarita Brown, Excelencia in Education Miguel Bustos, Wells Fargo Maria Cadenas, Driscoll’s Jim Canales, The James Irvine Foundation Evette Cardona, The Polk Bros. Foundation Emmett Carson, Silicon Valley Community Foundation Carmen Castellano, Castellano Family Foundation Marta Cerda, J.D., Marta Cerda and Associates Cynthia Chavez, Leaderspring Ann Christen, Telecare Corporation Henry Cisneros, City View Nelson I. Colón, Fundación Comunitaria de Puerto Rico Rafael Cortés Dapena, Fundación Angel Ramos Ligia Cravo, The William Randolph Hearst Foundations Alfredo Cruz, Foundation for Louisiana Yanira Cruz, National Hispanic Council on Aging Helen Cunningham, Samuel S. Fels Fund Margo De Ley, De Ley and Associates Anjanette Delgado, The Idea Shop Productions Gloria DeNecochea, Philanthropic Consultant Raquel Donoso, Latino Community Foundation Helen Dorado Alessi, The Early Years Institute Roger Doughty, Horizons Foundation Robert Dunn, Synergos Maria Echaveste, New Vista Group, LLC Luisa Echevarría, Telefutura Chicago - Univision

Cristina Eguizabal, Philanthropist Marcus Escobedo, The John A. Hartford Foundation Leobardo Estrada, The California Endowment Ricardo Estrada, Metropolitan Family Services Dr. David Fike, Marygrove College Sylvia Rosales-Fike, Consultant Herman Gallegos, Hispanics in Philanthropy (HIP) Ronald Gallo, Santa Barbara Foundation Cristina Garcia, Erie Neighborhood House Jane Garcia, Clinica de la Raza Jesus G. Garcia, Cook County Government Patricia Garza, The Allstate Corporation Ana Gloria Rivas-Vázquez, Philanthropic Consultant Danielle Gonzales, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Ron Gonzales, Hispanic Foundation of Silicon Valley Sonia Gonzales, California Bar Foundation Nellie Gorbea, HousingWorks RI John Govea, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Rudy Guglielmo, Youthprise Felix Gutierrez, University of Southern California Jose Luis Gutierrez, NALACC Luis Gutierrez, Latinos Progresando Lisa Hamilton, Annie E. Casey Foundation Phillip Henderson, Surdna Foundation Antonia Hernandez, California Community Foundation Elsa Holguin, Rose Community Foundation Arcelia Hurtado, National Center for Lesbian Rights Alejandra Ibanez, Oak Park River Forest Community Foundation Alberto Ibargüen, Knight Foundation Juanita Irizarry, Chicago Community Trust Phillip Jimenez, San Miguel School Kate Kendell, National Center for Lesbian Rights Thomas Layton, Philanthropic Consultant Joyce Lee, Marguerite Casey Foundation Lisa Lee, Jane Addams Hull-House Museum Maria Lemus, Visión y Compromiso Beatriz Levya-Cutler, BAHIA, Inc.


Sandra Licón, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Claudia Lucero-Mead, University of Illinois at Chicago Antonio Maciel, Philanthropic Consultant Julio Marcial, The California Wellness Foundation Ed Martinez, UPS Foundation Karen May, The May Foundation Terry Mazany, Chicago Community Trust B. Kathlyn Mead, The California Endowment Elizabeth Mendez Berry, Surdna Foundation Ricardo Millet, ABFE Dan Moore, North Carolina Gives (formally NC Gives) Anne Mosle, Aspen Institute Sonia Nazario, Writer Steve Oliver, Oliver & Company Ana Oliveira, New York Women’s Foundation Cristina O’Naghten, Laureate Education, Inc. Luis Orozco, Consultant Eduardo Padrón, Miami Dade College Damian Pardo, Morgan Stanley Smith Barney Douglas Patiño, C.S. Mott Foundation Judy Patrick, Women’s Foundation of California Leticia Peguero, Andrus Family Fund Chris Pena, NBCLatino Cesar Perales, Latino Justice, PRLDEF David Pesquiera, Robert R. McCormick Foundation Matt Piers, Hughes Socol Piers Resnick & Dym. Ltd. Hilda Polanco, Fiscal Management Associates, LLC Sylvia Puente, Latino Policy Forum Henry Ramos, Mauer Kunst Consulting Elspeth Revere, MacArthur Foundation Teresa Rivero, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Aida Rodriguez, New School Arelis Rodríguez, Fundación Falcondo Benigno Rodríguez-Cubeñas, Rockefeller Brothers Fund Paul Roldan, Hispanic Housing Development Dolores Roybal, Con Alma Health Foundation Gloria Rubio-Cortés, National Civic League

Albert Ruesga, Greater New Orleans Foundation Thomas Saenz, MALDEF Doris Salomon, Cook County Government Diane Sanchez, East Bay Community Foundation Tara Sandercock, Community Foundation of Greater Greensboro Miguel Satut, Philanthropic Consultant Nan Silva, Community Memorial Foundation Javier Soto, The Miami Foundation, Inc. Sterling Speirn, W. K. Kellogg Foundation Paul Spivey, Phillips Oppenheimer Gary D. Schwartz, Tides Olga Talamante, Chicana/Latina Foundation Tony Tapia, The Arsenault Family Foundation Barbara Taveras, New Visions for Public Schools Marta Tellado, Ford Foundation Maria de los Angeles (Nena) Torres, University of Illinois at Chicago Fernando Torres-Gil, PhD, The California Endowment John Trasviña, University of San Francisco School of Law Luis Ubiñas, The Ford Foundation Arturo Vargas, NALEO Educational Fund Sandra Vargas, The Minneapolis Foundation Luz Vega-Marquis, Marguerite Casey Foundation Elsa Vega-Pérez, Philanthropic Consultant Kevin Walker, Northwest Area Foundation Phillippe Wallace, College Access Foundation Colburn Wilbur, The David and Lucile Packard Foundation Leslie Winner, Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation Sylvia Zaldivar-Sykes, The Lake County Community Foundation


C R E AT E D I N PA R T N E R S H I P BY:

30 Portraits of Latino Giving & Leadership  

Hispanics in Philanthropy celebrates its 30th anniversary by honoring 30 amazing Latino leaders who give back.

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