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John Vazquez shares how his people-first office design helps transform Verizon's culture (p.56)


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contents

JAN/ FEB 2018

7

GOODLUCKSTEF PRODUCTIONS LLC (NODAL), PATRICK STRATTNER (PEPSICO), GILLIAN FRY (VERIZON & MCKESSON)

COVER: GILLIAN FRY

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23

38

On the Pulse

PepsiCo's Lupe De La Cruz III shares the value of education and hard work through a teaching garden

Industry

Myshel Guillory on how she achieved her dream of becoming a CFO at Nodal Exchange

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44

55

56

Worldview

Michael Huaco drives McKesson Corporation's shift toward sustainability and progressive workplaces

Talent

When John Vazquez is creating new workplaces at Verizon, employees are top of mind

NOVEMBER JANUARY || DECEMBER FEBURARY 2018 2017 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

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events

2017 #Next G e n Lí de res San Franc i s co Re cap September 14, 2017 photos by Gillian Fry

In partnership with Northwestern Mutual, Hispanic Executive was thrilled to host the third and final installment of the 2017 #NextGenLíderes national tour in San Francisco on Thursday, September 14, 2017. Sergio Fernández, chief strategist for Guerrero Howe, parent company of Hispanic Executive magazine, kicked off the evening at One Kearny Club. “At 79 million strong, the millennial generation is now the largest, most diverse generation in the United States,” he said. “Now with the #NextGenLíderes tour, we feel we are initiating something quite powerful: bringing together talented, multicultural young professionals who are setting themselves up to be the líderes of tomorrow.” Rocio Tapia, financial advisor at Northwestern Mutual, welcomed guests, shared insights on the importance of financial planning for millennials, and introduced the guest speaker for the evening.

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HISPANIC EXECUTIVE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018

"We believe that young Hispanic professionals have the potential to become the success stories that will inspire the future workforce of this country,” Tapia continued. One such success story, Tapia pointed out, is Marisela Garcia, who founded Iberus in 2015 to focus on cross-border investments in tech startups between Silicon Vall ey and international markets. She is the first Latina millennial leading cross-border investments. During the #NextGenLíderes San Francisco program, Garcia shared some of the tips that have helped catapult her into unprecedented success. Most recently, she co-led a delegation of Silicon Valley Latinos in Tech to Guadalajara, and she continues to promote delegations to emerging startup ecosystems around the world.


events

JAN/ FEB 2018

Marisela Garcia, founder and CEO of Iberus, was the keynote speaker at the #NextGenLíderes event.

Attendees socialized with their peers during the night's cocktail hour.

From left: Oxford York Sunderland's Ralph Magana, Northwestern Mutual's Rocio Tapia, WhatsApp's Romina Perez, and Salesforce's Carlos Torres.

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index PEOPLE + COMPANIES A B C

P Q R

Avalos, Jose Alvaro

78

Pardo, Jon Michael

BBVA Compass

24

PepsiCo 8

68

Biogen 51

Perez, Juan Carlos

BNP Paribas

34

Pfizer 53

Cardenas, Alan

72

Piksel 28

Castro-Quirino, Sonya

14

Rivas, Maria

78

Rodriguez, Arturo

28

CH2M 66 Cueto, Andres

53

24 S T U

D E F

Siemens 72

De La Cruz III, Lupe

8

Creative

Publishing

VP of Creative Kathy Kantorski

CEO Pedro Guerrero

Editorial Director Cyndi Fecher

Events Director Vianni Busquets

Senior Editor Geoff George

Membership and Event Coordinator Mary Kellogg

Editors Beth Hyland Frannie Sprouls

Content Marketing Director Sean Conner

Correspondents David Baez Russ Klettke Valerie Menard Cristina Merrill Bridgett Novak Jeff Silver Paul Snyder Arianna Stern Tina Vasquez Alison Ver Halen

Director of Recruiting Elyse Schultz Recruiter Wes Phillips Director of Finance Nikki Roiland Executive Assistant Jaclyn Gaughan

Soto, Andrea

17

Dragados 68

Sueiro, Hugo F.

34

Filtration Group

Design & Photo Director Caleb Fox

Office Administrator Megan Thorp

Texas Tech University Health 14

Designer Caroline Chriss

Sales & Account Management

Photo Editor/ Staff Photograher Gillian Fry

EVP of Sales Katie Else

20

Sciences Center

Tronc 31

G H I

Guillory, Myshel

38

Harris Associates

75

Huaco, Michael

44

Vazquez, John

Inacay, Gracie

75

Verizon 56

Freelance Photo Editor Cassandra Davis

VWXYZ

56

Intel 78

J K L

Printed in Canada Hispanic ExecutiveÂŽ is a registered trademark of Guerrero Howe, LLC Office

Jimenez, Terry

31

Latino Corporate Directors Association 78 Lopez, Domingo

825 W. Chicago Ave. Chicago, IL 60642

Director of Strategic Partnerships Krista Lane Horbenko Director of Sales Operations Philip Taylor Content & Advertising Managers Ellen Aleksa Cristina Ali Allyssa Bujdoso Capri Cutchin Katie Hartnett Executive Success Director Anna Jensen

Client Services Director Cheyenne Eiswald Senior Client Services Manager Rebekah Pappas

Mastercard 17

Client Services Managers Katie Richards Skylar Garfield

McKesson 44 Merck 78 Muela, Art

20

Nodal Exchange

38

Orozco, Gerard

66

Reprinting of articles is prohibited without permission of Guerrero Howe LLC guerrerohowe.com For a free subscription hispanicexecutive.com/sub Hispanic Executive is proud to be an official media partner of the USHCC and HACR

UP NEXT

VP of Sales Kyle Evangelista

Execuitve Relationship Manager Jenny Vetokhin

51

M N O

6

Reprints & Circulation Director Stacy Kraft

MARCH / APRIL 2018 InGenesis CEO Veronica Edwards shares the importance of education and the impact it has had throughout her career.

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018

For reprint information, contact Stacy Kraft stacy@guerrerohowe.com 312.256.8460


P

On the Pulse

Tackling today's issues facing the Hispanic community

NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2017 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

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on the pulse

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Cultivating Leaders In a garden in Los Angeles, PepsiCo’s Lupe De La Cruz III is helping teach kids not only the contributions of Mexican Americans to the city’s founding but also the importance of fruits and vegetables by Alison Ver Halen, photos by Patrick Strattner

A

lthough it may seem unlikely for the son of former migrant farmworkers to grow up to work at a Fortune 100 company, Lupe De La Cruz III was instilled with a passion for politics at an early age, when his father started taking him to political events and rallies. Those rallies inspired De La Cruz to study political science at UCL A while serving as a reserve deputy with the County of Los Angeles Juvenile Probation Department. His passion for public policy was cemented while he worked as the senior field deputy in the office of Congressman Esteban Torres, before he went on to become the legislative director and manager of advocacy for AARP. When telling the story of how he got to be the senior director of government

affairs for PepsiCo, De La Cruz likes to highlight the importance of networking. De La Cruz met Jose Langoria more than twenty years before Langoria recruited him to work for PepsiCo. They kept in touch over the years—without the help of email or social media—and eventually Langoria asked De La Cruz (who was still working for AARP at the time) for a favor. When De La Cruz completed the favor, it made other executives at the company take notice. So, when Langoria was promoted to a position with the FritoLay division, he recruited De La Cruz to take his place in government affairs. “When I share that with fellows, I express the importance of taking that business card and following up,” De La Cruz says. “I definitely credit that to, two decades later, getting a job at one of America’s leading companies.”

LUPE DE LA CRUZ III Senior Director of Government Affairs PepsiCo

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on the pulse

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HISPANIC EXECUTIVE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


Since getting that job, one of De La Cruz’s proudest accomplishments has been helping to create an edible teaching garden at LA Plaza de Cultura y Artes, in Los Angeles. The garden teaches children about the nutritional importance of vegetables and how to work them into their diets in delicious ways—while also talking about the history of Los Angeles. “Of all the great stories that are told of Los Angeles and Hollywood, there was a hole in the storybook about the importance of the Mexican a n d Me x ic a n -A m er ic a n contributions to the founding of the city and the county of Los Angeles,” De La Cruz says. The teaching garden has been a place to rectify that omission. With the help of Torres and Gloria Molina—his other mentors—De La Cruz has been able to spread the word about LA’s history, and the garden itself has become a central hub of the community. “It has become a literal placita where people gather and we have every kind of celebration you can think of,” De La Cruz says. “It’s become a destination for people who want to have a press conference, a community rally, or a wedding reception. Everything happens there, in addition to the teaching that goes on.”

fyi

Developing Future Hispanic Leaders

Lupe De La Cruz III’s other favorite project he is working on at PepsiCo is the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute (CHCI), which runs leadership development programs for future Latino leaders. As a member of the board, De La Cruz gets to meet a new group of students every year, and their stories continue to strike him as being very similar to his own. “It refuels me to be able to interact with and support the young people who want to improve their lives—not just for themselves and their families, but there’s this overwhelming sense of responsibility to do it for the greater community,” De La Cruz says. “Being able to direct PepsiCo’s resources and help channel funding for worthy programs like La Plaza and CHCI, where we’re truly helping to shape tomorrow’s leaders—that’s really rewarding to me.”

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on the pulse

Lupe De La Cruz III and his fellow organizers expanded the program to include a mobile unit that will reach students who are unable to make it downtown to the garden on their own.

That said, the teaching might be the most rewarding aspect of De La Cruz’s work on the project. Every year, about five thousand kids come through the program from underserved communities and the LA Unified School District to learn about where fruits and vegetables come from. Prior to coming to the garden, many of the kids haven’t had an opportunity

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to see a radish or a strawberry, much less learn about how and where they grow. “It’s an amazing, beautiful garden, and the kids come in, they get to see the fruit, they get to participate and get their hands dirty, and they get to make a seedball they can take home and put in a pot or a plot of dirt at home,” De La Cruz says. “It’s an opportunity for them to continue to learn and

share what they learn with their families.” The other aspect of the teaching garden is teaching kids about nutrition and how to put healthy spins on traditional foods they already know and love. De La Cruz says he and his colleagues regularly receive notes from parents about how their kids taught them how to make a lettuce wrap.


Prime Strategies LLC “The best is when the kid didn’t want to touch a vegetable, but now they want to go home and tell their parents how great they are and use them in a dish,” he says. Although bringing in five thousand kids every year is great, De La Cruz and his fellow orga nizers on the project know they can do more, so they recently made the project mobile. B efor e , t he pr o g r a m was limited to schools that had scholarships or could provide transportation to the garden. Now, the mobile unit will take the program to schools, parks, and libraries that are unable to make it to the garden on their own. As a child of farmworkers who always stressed the impor tance of education and hard work, De La Cruz considers the teaching garden an extremely important tool to pass on such values. “They’re learning about the value of education, of their culture, of great leaders of the past such as Chavez and how they influence our community,” De La Cruz says. “They learn about the importance of education and being in school, and having the opportunity to impart that has been very rewarding to me.”

At Prime Strategies of California, we are idea generators, government-relations specialists, strategic thinkers, business consultants, reputation enhancers, and problem solvers with a reach that spans across states, the country, and the globe. Our expertise is working on complex issues in big states and on international issues with global implications.

is proud to support

Hispanic Executive and congratulates our friend

Lupe de la Cruz on his

accomplishments and dedication to the community. Mignon McGarry & Associates is one of Austin’s premier legislative consulting firms, providing effective strategy and exceptional service.

We look forward to our continued partnership.

Mignon McGarry and Associates is widely regarded as one of the most reputable and savvy legislative consulting firms working at the Texas Capitol today. Mignon and her experienced team represent an ever-growing set of influential clients based in Texas and beyond.

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Prime-Strategies.com (213) 608-0774 JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

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on the pulse

SONYA CASTRO-QUIRINO Assistant VP for Compliance Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center

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There and Back Again Sonya Castro-Quirino has returned to Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center after earning her bachelor’s degree there years ago. Now, she has the compliance experience to take the university to the next level. by Cristina Merrill

S

onya Castro-Quirino knew she wanted to be involved in the health field from a young age. Raised by a single mother who worked her way through nursing school at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center (TTUHSC), Castro-Quirino says her mom would take classes and read to her from her textbooks. “These were my bedtime stories,” she says. Today, Castro-Quirino is the assistant vice president for compliance at TTUHSC. There, she leads a team of nine people and oversees compliance efforts for the institution’s Lubbock, Amarillo, MidlandOdessa, Abilene, and Dallas campuses, which serve 108 counties. It also happens to be where she went to school, and between her studies and her job there, she picked up significant compliance experience that she’s now bringing to bear on her current position. Castro-Quirino’s career could have gone in a vastly different direction. She graduated from TTUHSC with her bachelor’s degree in clinical laboratory science and worked in a lab after graduation.

She knew she wanted to either move up in a lab or work in healthcare administration, and ultimately she decided to get her MBA at TTUHSC, with a concentration in health organization management. It was during this time that she first immersed herself in the world of compliance. W hile in graduate school, Castro-Quirino interned for the hospital’s chief financial officer and was tasked with the responsibility of figuring out what the office should do from a compliance perspective. Compliance was still a relatively new field and the resources were scarce, but Castro-Quirino immersed herself and did everything she could to learn about the field. The work paid off when she was hired by the hospital after graduation. She eventually landed a job as an analyst with the Office of Inspector General (OIG) in Washington, DC. Before then, she had always lived close to her family and worked in clinical settings, so the move prompted some serious professional and personal growth. “I did see that as a turning point,” she says.

During that time, Castro-Quirino focused on monitoring various healthcare providers that had entered into corporate integrity agreements with the OIG. “I had to learn about different areas of the healthcare industry from the bottom up to be able to give them guidance on what they should be doing,” she says. “So, although that was challenging, it was actually really rewarding because we were on the forefront of what was happening in the field and helping to create and shape some of that guidance.” Her government work has proved to be an invaluable resource in her career. “I know how they think and how they conduct investigations, so that opened up a lot of doors for me,” she says. The next door it opened for her was another major opportunity, one that coincided with her personal life. She moved with her then fiancé—and now husband— to Arkansas, and around that time, the OIG was entering into an agreement with Wal-Mart’s pharmacy division. WalMart’s general counsel gave her a call. The company’s audit department didn’t

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on the pulse

W W W.T T U H S C . E D U

“I want to bring yet another layer of perspective to our compliance program. I think that will make us a more robust office.” SONYA CASTRO-QUIRINO

Tex as Tech Univ ersity Health Sciences Center’s unique mission empowers students to become insightful pioneers for healthier communities, from research to patient care, dev eloping enhanced methods of prev ention, treatment, management and cure.

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have anyone with healthcare compliance experience, and Castro-Quirino fit the bill perfectly. She was brought in to lead the healthcare audit group, and under her guidance, the department started developing audits to make sure Wal-Mart was complying with the OIG’s agreement. Castro-Quirino and her team traveled extensively to audit compliance practices in Wal-Mart pharmacies throughout the United States and Puerto Rico. After a year, she became the compliance officer for Wal-Mart’s pharmacy division. Wal-Mart and TTUHSC are two vastly different institutions, but when CastroQuirino arrived at the latter, she found a lot of similarities, at least when it came to compliance. “The compliance issues, the training we provide, and the reception that we get to what we have to do and what the right thing is to do are very similar,” she says. A major project she and her team recently completed was working with TTUHSC’s IT department to implement compliance controls around the security of its information. “The healthcare system is particularly vulnerable to hacks and breaches of patient and student information,” she says. “This past year, we worked closely with our IT department to implement some of those compliance safeguards to protect our confidential and sensitive information.” Castro-Quirino also notes that compliance efforts are not just the work of

one office. While her compliance team provides guidance and training, she sees it as everyone’s responsibility, and she and her team encourage everyone at TTUHSC to speak up and report issues when something isn’t right. “That’s the only way you can have an effective compliance program,” she says. When it comes to her leadership style, Castro-Quirino believes in letting individuals do what they do best and pursue their specific interests. “There are certainly people in the department who have niches and expertise in certain areas, whether it’s coding or privacy or security, and I really rely on them to be our subjectmatter experts and let them grow in that way,” she says. Looking ahead, Castro-Quirino wants to help her alma mater fulfill its mission as a healthcare provider and institution of higher education, and she will continue to develop her team to proactively monitor its compliance activities and make sure it’s prepared to respond in a timely manner, should issues arise. Castro-Quirino is also focused on her own professional development. She’s currently working toward a second master’s degree, this time in bioethics, from Loyola University, and she will then pursue a PhD in the same field. “I want to bring yet another layer of perspective to our compliance program,” she says. “I think that will make us a more robust office.”


A Phenomenal Connection Andrea Soto’s relationship with the Hispanic community has played a central role not only in her personal journey, but also in her career at Mastercard by David Baez

M

astercard vice president of customer intelligence and experience Andrea Soto grew up in St. Charles, Missouri, an unlikely place for a high school girl to find a way into the Hispanic community. Even today, after a significant amount of Hispanic migration to the area, only 3 percent of the population in the greater St. Louis area, of which St. Charles is a part, identifies as such. But, back in Soto’s school days, serendipity took over when she met her future husband, a Mexican national who was a classmate of hers. That relationship wound up leading to a lifelong

interest in Hispanic culture for Soto that continues to this day. “Prior to meeting my husband, I didn’t know anyone who was a native of another country,” she says. “But as soon as I met him, I began to meet other Hispanics and quickly got to know them. Because they were so warm and engaging, I wanted to know more about their culture. And when I saw the struggles they were going through in the community, I wanted to help.” Because her husband spoke little English then, Soto had to learn Spanish. Once she did, she began accompanying

some of the people she knew who didn’t speak much English to hospitals and doctor’s visits to act as a translator. The community didn’t have any Spanish language resources at the time, so she would give people her phone number to call her if they needed an interpreter. She would also help them find affordable healthcare options and other services they didn’t know about because of the language barrier. Soto credits this experience with helping her career at Mastercard, where her charge is to listen to customers, understand the journey they go through

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ANDREA SOTO VP of Customer Intelligence and Experience Mastercard

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with the company, and find ways to make the company easier to do business with. “My team serves as a bridge to ensure that tech executives connect w ith development teams,” she explains. “We also facilitate getting technology into the hands of our employees, who take it to the streets through trade shows or conferences. My team is focused on having that tech-to-tech conversation with our customers.” In addition to her ex perience immersing herself in another culture, Soto shares other details of her personal history, which hasn’t been all that easy, with employees who come to her seeking a mentor. She had her first child at nineteen years old, a change which brought with it a set of challenges that stick with her to this day. Rather than push this part of her life to the side, though, she chooses to be absolutely open with it in the hopes that it can help other women. “At the time, I had to learn to ask for help,” she says. “I’d have to rely on people for child care and other things. And in the rural Midwest, I was under a lot of judgment for being such a young parent, and I had to deal with that. But it taught me that it can be a tough world out there. You don’t know what somebody might have gone through in their past.” Before her pregnancy, Soto had hoped to go to law school and be an attorney, but she needed to work because of the financial responsibilities that go along with having a child. She joined Mastercard soon after that, working in the company’s call center, talking to Hispanic customers. One lesson she tries to impart to her mentees is that no matter what they think their careers will be, they have to be aware when doors open that might take them in a different direction. “Those doors that opened for me put me on a different path,” she says. “And what I try to relate to people is that that’s okay. When a door opens, there is a reason.

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Priceless possibilities

“When a door opens, there is a reason. You might have to walk through it to understand what that reason is, but walk through it and see what happens.” ANDREA SOTO

For more information about careers at Mastercard, visit www.mastercard.us w

You might have to walk through it to understand what that reason is, but walk through it and see what happens.” More t ha n t went y yea rs a f ter meeting her husband, Soto says, her identity is still informed in large part by Hispanic culture. Because of her fluency in Spanish, many people have a hard time believing she is not from Latin America. At home, she and her husband dance salsa. The culture is something she celebrates in part because of the central role it has played in her life as well as her career. “My story goes in a lot of different directions, but it all goes back to the connection I made with the Hispanic community,” she says. “When I look back, it really seems kind of phenomenal.”

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on the pulse

Drawn to Disruption Attorney Art Muela helps define new regulations in healthcare technology and the opportunities they create

he advancement of medical science is a story of researchers, phy sicia ns, scientists, advanced medical technologies, cloud computing, and lawyers. Art Muela is one of those lawyers, having worked for a number of years as legal director of healthcare solutions for Dell Inc. There, he traversed some tricky regulatory territory to bring advanced computer engineering to the important fields of medical research and treatment. He’s proud to have played a role in the ongoing fight to help children win the battle against aggressive forms of brain cancer.

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To be clear, Muela had no direct patient contact in his work. And he holds a degree in law, not anything technically related to medicine or even technology. But this is an attorney with a passion for business and how new technologies can affect the way we live. About five years ago, that meant learning how his then employer, Dell, was developing high-performance computing that used big data and the cloud to create new treatment plans for children suffering from brain cancer. Running through thirty terabytes of data, healthcare practitioners identified personalized medicine plans for pediatric

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018

ART MUELA Associate General Counsel Filtration Group

DANA CURR PHOTOGRAPHY

by Russ Klettke


patients with a relatively rare brain cancer, neuroblastoma, by aligning drug treatments with the genetics and disease state of the patient. “ Without personalized medicine, kids would typically get a watered-down treatment of what adults were given with the same cancer,” Muela says. “It’s not necessarily effective, and the medicines were really hard on kids.” Instead, the treatment derived by Dell’s hypercomputing solution was easier and more effective on young patients. The information technology used to process those thirty terabytes of data raised unique and challenging regulatory issues. Muela’s role was to navigate the intersection of medical-device regulations and new technology with company executives and governmentrelations people. “This truly was an exciting project that we had to get right because of what was at stake,” he says. That was in 2012 and 2013, when the FDA was working its way through defining whether the computation of massive amounts of patient data for the purposes of treatment would be regulated like a medical device. “The FDA had the tough task of balancing advancements in medicine brought about by new technologies while protecting patient safety,” Muela says. “It was our job to make sure we understood how existing regulations might apply to us and where the FDA was headed.” Muela likes to figure out how he can help businesses

succeed, possessing a clear can-do attitude. He approaches regulations the same way. “My advice to healthcare technology attorneys is, ‘Look for the opportunities in new regulations,’” he says. “Many regulations in healthcare are meant to encourage innovation and efficiency, and those areas present perfect opportunities for technology companies.” Good examples of opportunities created by new rules were the 2014 changes made to federal law that allowed hospitals to donate electronic health record (EHR) systems to its referring physicians. “The healthcare delivery system is under a lot of pressure to change, and regulators often make changes to the laws to accelerate change where it makes sense,” Muela says. Another disruptive project required Muela to help Dell set up a cloud-storage solution to hold eight billion medical images. More than simply establishing this as the world’s la rgest medica l imag ing database at the time, it had a positive effect on hospitals large and small. “This solution meant that individual hospitals, including the smaller ones, didn’t need their own on-site storage system for medical images,” Muela says. “It improved speed and ease of access to information, and it helped cut costs.” It’s this enthusiastic connection to end results that defines how Muela has approached much of his career. Before college at the University of Texas–El Paso, he was interested in law enforcement, but then he was drawn to law

Maynard Cooper & Gale Congratulates

ART MUELA

Art has been both a wonderful client and friend for many years. He is a great lawyer and we congratulate him on this significant recognition.

Tim Gregg Shareholder

ALABAMA CALIFORNIA NEW YORK

maynardcooper.com No representation is made that the quality of legal services to be performed is greater than the quality of legal services performed by other lawyers. JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

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“My advice to healthcare technology attorneys is, look for the opportunities in new regulations. Many regulations in healthcare are meant to encourage innovation and efficiency, and those areas present perfect opportunities for technology companies.” ART MUELA

school because he liked the development and interpretation of the law more. Muela spent a few years in commercia l litigation during the early 1990s, but his interest gravitated toward how businesses operate and grow. So he turned toward in-house work. The dot-com bust of the early 2000s didn’t deter him. “It was a temporary setback, but I was confident in my skills,” he says, which is why he made the move to working for Dell in 2001. Even though it’s a large company, Muela says, CEO and founder Michael Dell fostered an entrepreneurial culture that drew him in. “Dell is about solving very big problems,” he says. “It was

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a place where I could be part of disruption to healthcare.” A f t er fou r t e en ye a r s there, Muela was recruited to SourceMed, an entrepreneurial medical IT company led by former Dell executives, which was subsequently acqu i red . Recent ly, Muela joined the legal team at the Filtration Group, owned by Madison Industries. His career journey conforms to his favorite catchphrase: “Don’t get too comfortable in your role. There’s adventure and growth out there, and you need to be open to it.” Muela is an attorney who helps cure deadly diseases and cut healthcare costs. Here’s to hoping he stays in his preferred discomfort zone.


I

Industry

Top-level insight and updates on business in America


BILLY SMITH/BBVA COMPASS

industry

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Adaptable by Design Andres Cueto helps BBVA Compass leverage innovative technologies to address customer expectations by Jeff Silver

A

ndres Cueto didn’t plan on a career in the banking industry. But after moving to Houston from Mexico City with an architectural degree, a tight job market, along with visa and licensing complications, led to a master’s degree in real estate from Johns Hopkins Universit y ’s Carey Business School. After several years of working for The Hanover Company, which develops apartment buildings across the US, a friend of a friend referred him to BBVA Compass; the company was looking for an architect who was fluent in Spanish. He got the job the next day and is now a senior vice president and director of ATM channel and branch strategy & design. His first assignment was with the facilities team working on a major project to transform the traditional design of the company’s headquarters to an open floor plan. “Many people didn’t understand the reason behind the change, so there was

a lot of resistance,” Cueto says. “We did a couple of pilot projects that included redesigning the facilities team’s space so the corporate folks could see the benefits.” The success of that project led to his assignment as part of the newly formed Business Innovation team, which is responsible for creating a new format and distribution strategy for the bank’s branch network, among other things. As a leader in embracing the ongoing digital disruption of the industry, BBVA Compass was looking to transform its physical network in order to accommodate changing customer needs. “We believe that our digital transformation initiatives, combined with our branch network, have given us the tools to achieve excellence in customer experience and to better meet customer expectations,” Cueto says. One of his branch design strategies has been to develop a flexible template that can be adapted to specific markets. For example, in branches with light demand

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ANDRES CUETO SVP, Director of ATM Channel and Branch Strategy & Design BBVA Compass

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for traditional services like transfers, balance inquiries, and depositing checks, the area for tellers can be downsized, while space for personal services like mortgage, investment, and small business loans can be increased. Technology is also being incorporated into branch design. In some locations, tablets enable bankers to step out from behind what Cueto calls the “teller fortress” to provide personal customer assistance in conference rooms or more informal spaces. At the same time, customer experience managers can step in to help keep bank lines moving.

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018

“It’s about designing with flexibility and fluid branch roles in mind,” Cueto says. “It’s expensive to redesign real estate, but with the branch templates, we can adapt to changing priorities and create spaces designed around customer needs instead of around the role of the employees or constraints of the physical space.” This approach has helped Cueto introduce new dynamic business strategies in some branches. At the Texas Medical Center, medical professionals don’t have time to come into the branch. To accommodate their needs, the branch

was designed on a much smaller scale, and bank employees go directly to clients to assist them more efficiently. Cueto and his team have developed a central database with information about the entire branch network that includes geomapping and an automated dashboard for realtime insights. Now, real estate decisions that used to take two to three months because of the time required to gather information can be handled in a few days. Beyond the branch, ATM access is another channel that continues to be popular. One study by Visa showed

BILLY SMITH/BBVA COMPASS

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that 57 percent of customers actually choose their bank based on ATM locations and accessibility. As a result, another aspect of Cueto’s responsibilities is introducing innovations and upgrades to the machines. “Digital innovation and disr uptive solutions a re important, but maintaining resources like our ATMs are still important so that we can continue to give customers banking options through whatever channel they want,” Cueto says. In addition to keeping an eye on customers and their preferences, as a manager, Cueto is also responsible for the development of his team. He stresses how important it is for them to identify where they want to be several years down the road. “I can’t guarantee specific positions will be available, but my role is to help my team members prepare so that they’ll be ready to pursue what they’re passionate about when an opportunity arises,” Cueto says. As part of his own development, he has been a long-time volunteer for a number of different community, arts, and education organizations, and he’s currently president of the board of his children’s school. As proof of the networking and personal benefits that provides, after Cueto’s house flooded in Hurricane Harvey, half of the people who helped with the clean-up were friends from volunteer work he and his wife have done. “Volunteering to help others outside of work makes you happier and feel more fulfilled, and it’s the right thing to do for our community,” he says.

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Don’t Stop Arturo Rodriguez Now The former Piksel finance executive shares the story of his accelerated career and what’s next on the horizon

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o executive makes it to the C-suite without a bit of trial by fire, and no one can vouch for this quite like Arturo Rodriguez. He was only twenty-four when he went to work for Atari, a France-based video game publishing company. Such a gig seems like a dream job for anyone’s inner child, and in many ways it was for Rodriguez. But it also provided a foundation that has stayed with him throughout his career. Atari went through many changes during Rodriguez’s decade-long tenure, and this is what made his time there so exciting. The changes enabled him to develop and grow as a professional and gain valuable experience that most of his twentysomething peers lacked. Rodriguez’s first few years saw him through the company’s rebuilding phase. He’s especially proud of how North American finance operations became centralized into New York City during this period. “It was a really great time of building something that needed to be built, and

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assembling a great team with a good vibe and a hardworking culture. I was really proud of that,” he says. After helping the company reorganize and merge into its parent company in Europe, Rodriguez eventually joined the executive team and became the CFO for North America. This was no small feat, as the company had been going through some very hard times. During the last phase of his time at Atari, he lived and worked at the company’s headquarters in Paris. While business was conducted in English, there were still a few language-related barriers. Rodriguez laughs as he recalls how there was “a lot of picture drawing.” When his contract with Atari was up, Rodriguez, a New York City native, decided it was a good time to come home and take some time off. He had done everything he could from a finance perspective for the company. “It was a crazy ten years,” he says. “It was an amazing experience, but a

ARTURO RODRIGUEZ Former CFO Piksel

CHRIS L LIZARDO

by Cristina Merrill


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“It was a really great time of building something that needed to be built, assembling a great team with a good vibe, a good hardworking culture. I was really proud of that.” ARTURO RODRIGUEZ

tremendous amount of work, a tremendous amount of traveling. I just felt it was time to sort of say, ‘Hey, why don’t I take a break, refocus, and catch up with friends and family who I haven’t seen in a long time because I’ve always been working?’ And that’s why I decided it was a good time to move home and do that.” He wasn’t completely dormant when it came to business. Several of his friends were in the early stages of starting their own businesses and often came to him for advice. Rodriguez's former boss from Atari got in touch and recruited him to Piksel, then known as KIT Digital. Rodriguez joined in July 2012 as the senior vice president of finance and chief accounting officer. Rodriguez thought that he’d seen it all in finance by this point, but his horizons expanded in this new role. He and his boss realized that something did not make sense with the numbers at KIT Digital. An internal investigation was launched. Though Rodriguez was not part of the investigative team, he was able to assist investigators. Over time, it was discovered that the numbers were fraudulent, and the company’s then CFO and CEO were both ousted. KIT digital filed for bankruptcy and relaunched as Piksel in 2013. Rodriguez was with the organization throughout the process, and he is proud that he was part of a team that helped the company

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stay afloat—and save approximately eight hundred jobs worldwide. “Most companies don’t survive that,” he adds. His time at Piksel was fulfilling, but Rodriguez recently decided he needed a change of pace. He and his wife welcomed a new daughter to their family, so long days of travel were no longer for him. An old colleague heard through the grapevine that he was on his way out and recruited him. At press time, Rodriguez was unable to disclose the company he’ll be working for, but he says he’ll be the number-two finance person at a startup company in New York City. Rodriguez is thrilled that this new opportunity will keep him professionally fulfilled and close to home and family. He’s certainly earned it. When asked what advice he has for young professionals, he encourages them to have a positive attitude, be openminded, try to be like a sponge, and, of course, be prepared to work very hard. “I look for those types of skills in my interviewees and potential employees and I think if they can capture that, they’re going to have a successful career themselves,” he says. Rodriguez is also passionate about mentoring, both inside and outside of an organization. He believes strongly that companies are doomed to fail if they don’t

groom the next generation of executives. And he’s not a “sit there and preach” kind of mentor. Rather, he chooses to make interactions with his mentees very interactive, making sure to help them weigh all of their options in any situation. “I think the most important thing as a mentor is not to cross over the line and make sure that they feel it’s always their decision,” he explains. Looking to the future, Rodriguez sees himself as the CFO or COO of an organization. After that, he’s open to taking a more academic turn and teaching at the high school level, providing younger people with the kind of guidance he was fortunate to receive since he started working as a teenager. Right now, he is excited to start at a new organization—and face the very welcome challenge of finding more of a balance between work and family. “We’re still going to work hard and grow our careers,” he says of himself and his wife. “We just have to think about it a little bit differently.” HSBC, one of the world’s largest banking and financial services organizations, has been connecting Americans to global opportunities since 1865. It serves customers from offices and branches in cities across the United States including New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Atlanta, Houston, Seattle, Miami, San Francisco, and Washington, DC.


Back to the Windy City After traveling the world with IBM, Terry Jimenez returns to his hometown of Chicago to lead Tronc as its chief financial officer by Frannie Sprouls

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hen Terry Jimenez was in college during the early 1990s, he was told that the accounting field was one of the few with job opportunities. He rolled up his sleeves, focused on getting his grades up in accounting, took the CPA exam, and found himself an accounting job at McDonald’s Corporation. Since then, Jimenez has held finance positions at a variety of companies: Donato’s Pizzeria, the Chicago Tribune, Newsday (owned by Tribune and then Cablevision), and most recently IBM. He was part of the global deal team, which helped large, complex transactions get completed for potential new clients.

The role sent him around the world for nearly four years: Warsaw, Montreal, Sao Paulo, Sydney, London, Amsterdam, and Stockholm. “I worked hard, but I did see a lot of the world without having to pay for it,” he says with a smile. Now he’s back in Chicago as executive vice president and chief financial officer at Tronc, formerly Tribune Publishing. In his role, he not only oversees finance but also information technology, most recently the company’s manufacturing and distribution group. Jimenez sat down with Hispanic Executive at the Tribune Tower to share what it’s like to return to the media industry during such a transformational period.

Why did you decide to return to Tronc (formerly Tribune Publishing)? I was enjoying the IBM experience, without question. I wasn’t really looking to leave. I was somewhat intrigued by the offer at first, but I was also hesitant. I felt like I had been there, done that with the industry. I had been in the media industry for about ten years before that in a variety of different roles; I’d continue to grow and learn through the IBM side. When I had a couple of conversations, it became very clear that this is a great opportunity. Having a new management team, a great set of brands, and the fact that I was absent

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from the industry and the company for a number of years, I felt like I could actually come back with some fresher perspective—especially with a technology view—than if I would have just stayed in the industry. What were some of the biggest challenges during those first few months when you got back? [Tribune Publishing] had just spun out as an IPO back in 2014. They had some natural bumps through that transition. The first two years out of the spin, the company had disclosed material weaknesses in internal control over financial reporting, which is not great for a public company. That was one of my key focus areas, to make sure that, in the first year that I was here, that we didn’t have that repeat. We had it the previous two years, and we definitely didn’t wa nt a three-peat. Quick ly thereafter, we dealt w ith a hostile bid, really week two on the job. It was trying to figure out how we invest in the business, restructure the business, and focus the finance team, and at the same time going down a path of working with a potential bidder. It was an interesting transitional year, for sure.

TERRY JIMENEZ EVP and CFO Tronc

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I think the team was ready for a change, vision, and leadership. After I arrived, I rolled out a finance vision for us to be a best-in-class finance organization that’s driving change and not just reporting results but also being on the front end. I had to set that vision along with a number of goals by functional area. That format still exists; we’ve updated it again this year.

KEN CARL

Did you make any big changes with the finance team when you started?


“It’s definitely a long journey, and I think there’s a lot of things we need to accomplish to meet our objectives.” TERRY JIMENEZ

What is the most exciting aspect of this transformation? It’s definitely a long journey, and I think there’s a lot of things we need to accomplish to meet our objectives. The challenging part of it is, you can picture the destination being very positive and a place that you want to go to, but along the ride, there are a lot of bumps. I think keeping people focused and motivated during those bumpy periods is challenging. It does test out the internal strength of the people that work with you on the team. What are some ways you’ve helped lead the company from your seat as the CFO? What I try to instill in the team is being a best-in-class organization. It’s really not taking a backseat and just reporting the results. It’s bringing insights to the data and making it actionable so that the line

managers that are driving the business can make real-time, or near real-time, decisions that benefit the business. What are some of your big goals over the next couple of years? Organizationally, it’s about how we can evolve the company and dramatically change how we think about going to market and executing the business. The business is roughly about 80–85 percent on the print side, and then 15–20 percent on digital. We need to become 80–85 percent digitally focused and have the results reflect that. Over the next several years, the focus is on how we do that organically, with the assets on the teams that we have, and then how we also accelerate that through acquisitions and driving growth for the business. I think those are the key things that we are focused on; how we reshape the company to not just survive but also to thrive long term.

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How Hard Can It Be? Hugo F. Sueiro’s philosophy has given him a wide range of expertise, including the complexities of the Volcker Rule by Jeff Silver

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henever Hugo F. Sueiro gets involved in substantial u nder t a k i ng s, he a sk s himself one question: how hard can it be? It’s something he’s asked himself throughout his career, including as inhouse counsel at BNP Paribas (BNPP). “I like variety in my professional life, so when someone needs help on a project, I raise my hand,” explains Sueiro, who has been at BNPP for more than ten years. “I have been fortunate to have held positions that expose me to a lot of different practice areas while maintaining the stability of working for an employer for the long term.” Sueiro, who grew up in Miami, Florida, comes by his passion, commitment, and hands-on approach naturally. His father, a Cuban immigrant to the US, was a veteran of the failed Bay of Pigs invasion of 1961. After being released from prison in Cuba, he volunteered for the US Army and served in Vietnam. Sueiro was also inspired by

his mother who, along with her younger sister, immigrated from Cuba at the age of sixteen without their parents as part of Catholic refugee-resettlement program known as Pedro Pan. Growing up, Sueiro strongly identified with the experience of his father and his grandparents who had been poor in Cuba. His family’s experiences helped fuel his lifelong interest in service work. While in high school and college, he spent three summers in the Dominican Republic working on small-scale development projects. Prior to law school, he cofounded One Nation Inc., a nonprofit organization that assisted over ten thousand people with applying for citizenship. To this day, he still does pro bono work with immigrants. After graduating from the University of Michigan Law School, Sueiro spent six years at Cleary, Gottlieb, Steen, and Hamilton in New York before joining BNPP in 2006. He was originally brought

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HUGO F. SUEIRO In-House Counsel BNP Paribas

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in to support the bank’s US capital markets and mergers and acquisitions areas. Since then, with a number of detours on the way, he has become BNPP’s legal expert on the Volcker Rule. The Volcker Rule, passed in 2010 as part of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, restricts the ability of banks to engage in proprietary transactions and invest in or sponsor hedge funds and private equity funds. According to Sueiro, it’s a complicated regulation, not only because of the intricacies of the financial industry, but also because of how key terms are defined. Its technical wording can lead to its application to investments it was not intended to regulate and omitting some higher-risk investments that should be covered. A fair amount of Sueiro’s time is spent educating and advising various bank divisions about the rule. His goal is to help them understand the rule’s nuanced subtleties, when it applies, and how to recognize potential red flags that need to be brought to his attention. “A common misconception people have is assuming that because an activity is ‘business as usual’ that it is permissible from a regulatory standpoint,” he says. “Sometimes even small changes to an otherwise ‘plain vanilla’ structure can create issues for the bank. My job is to help interpret what the law says, decide if it applies, and clarify what procedures are required.” Sueiro’s “how hard can it be” spirit led to his role as lead counsel for BNPP’s Foreign Exchange Prime Brokerage (FXPB) business, a new type of business

TODD FRANCE PHOTOGRAPHY

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We are proud to work with

Hugo Sueiro “The pendulum has slowly begun to swing in the direction of unwinding some of the unintended effects of the Volcker Rule, making our compliance and educational efforts somewhat easier.”

and congratulate him on his outstanding accomplishments.

HUGO F. SUEIRO

that he knew very little about. He originally volunteered to work on the acquisition of the FXPB business from another financial institution in 2009. After the acquisition had closed, he stayed on to assist with the integration of the FXPB business into the bank. He created a suite of legal documents and helped design comprehensive policies and procedures. “I’m proud of my work on FXPB because it was like being an entrepreneur and creating something from scratch,” Sueiro says. “Without existing scripts to work from, we assessed the risks of the business, developed a series of procedures and documents that we felt were better than anything else in the market, and created tangible value for the bank.”

The Volcker Rule and Sueiro’s involvement with it are always evolving. Since the rule was adopted, the regulators have periodically issued interpretive guidance that, in certain cases, have had important effects on the financial industry. “The pendulum has slowly begun to swing in the direction of unwinding some of the unintended effects of the Volcker Rule, making our compliance and educational efforts somewhat easier,” he points out. Perhaps because of this, Sueiro has started looking into taking on a new project. How hard could that be? “Hugo is a skilled, versatile, and dedicated lawyer and a good friend of the firm. Cleary Gottlieb values our long-term relationship with him and looks forward to continuing our work together.” —Derek Bush, partner at Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP

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MYSHEL GUILLORY CFO Nodal Exchange

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GOODLUCKSTEF PRODUCTIONS LLC

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Follow the Numbers After setting her sights in high school on becoming a CFO, Myshel Guillory is living her dream at Nodal Exchange by Frannie Sprouls

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t Myshel Guillory’s high school, students were not expected to go to college. They were expected to become secretaries, phone representatives, or mechanics. But then, Guillory took an accounting class offered by her high school. “I was blown away by how numbers made sense and how numbers brought a story to life,” she says. After that class, Guillory knew she had to be an accountant and ultimately a chief financial officer. That was the dream job, the highest level in the accounting chain. Numbers were Guillory’s logical way of dealing with life. She grew up in La Puente, a suburb of Los Angeles that has close ties to Mexican gangs. She was bullied regularly in school, and her home life was not any better. In her teens, she finally decided to leave home, and after living on the streets of Compton, she reached out to her grandparents. “I didn’t want to become a statistic, repeating a vicious, abusive cycle,” she explains. Guillory moved in with her grandparents, graduated high

school, and enrolled in college full-time. “My grandparents constantly, no matter what I did, no matter how many mistakes I made, were always there for me.” Guillory knew she wanted to do something different, and she had to be something different. Accounting was her journey to that something. Today, Guillory is the chief financial officer and treasurer at Nodal Exchange, which provides price, credit, and liquidity risk management solutions in North American energy markets. Hispanic Executive spoke with Guillory about achieving her dream of being a CFO and her journey to get there. What were some of your biggest challenges those initial years, once you graduated from college? Maintaining a family and a career at the same time. When I was in my last year of college, I received a job offer from KPMG. By this time, I had two children, a four-year-old and a twoyear-old. Working at KPMG, in public

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“In a team-based approach, I am not just the CFO and treasurer. I am a mentor, I am a friend, sometimes I am even the person that does a common bank reconciliation. I feel I am whatever I need to be to ensure our team continues to run as smoothly and efficiently as possible.” MYSHEL GUILLORY

accounting, many times required me to work extremely long hours. Getting to parent orientations, school conferences, and doctor appointments while juggling working sometimes up to sixteen to seventeen hours a day felt next to impossible. My mother-in-law at the time was instrumental in helping me bring it all together. She would drive the kids to the event, and I could drive and meet her there, attend the event and then get back to work while she took the children home and cared for them. Without her help, I could not have successfully juggled those challenges. I would have lost my mind. You’ve been at Nodal Exchange for nine years. Why have you stayed? Everything about Nodal Exchange from the very beginning until now has always been exciting. I believe in everything we have done, and I have constantly felt over these past nine years that what I do, and what my team does, matters. Employees are one big team, and it’s the employees that have made Nodal Exchange successful.

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Since we've launched Nodal Exchange in 2009, our executive team has remained unchanged. I believe we all truly respect each other and what that person brings to the company. We have a strong executive presence. From the very beginning, every one of us has rolled up our sleeves and has done whatever was needed to ensure our success. Nodal Exchange is a very dynamic company. Every day we are all learning. This constant learning and change makes it fun, new, and exciting all the time. What were some of your challenges? I believe there have been three points in my life with significant challenges, and I was able to overcome with the love and support of my grandparents and my aunt. The first was running away from home prior to graduating from high school. The second was working full-time, raising two small children, and going to college at night while trying to maintain an exceptionally high GPA. The third and final challenge was simultaneously getting a divorce, losing everything, an imminent lay-off, and having three


children, with the youngest being three years old. Nodal Exchange presented a new, exciting, and perfect opportunity for me to have a fresh start and new beginning. I took the chance, moved from Dallas, Texas, to Northern Virginia with less than $1,000 in my bank account as a single mom and with a new purpose and vision for the future. I cannot stress enough, not only to my family but also to my team, that we have to always think outside of that box. I have a problem with the statement, “no, we cannot do that,” or “no, it is not possible.” I guess it may seem to those around me that I just have a problem with people telling me no. Maybe that stems from my background, because I will not accept doors closing in my face and I will not accept a blanket statement that something cannot be done. I say on a regular basis, “We are all smart people. If we put our minds together, we can figure something out. We can figure out a way, and I have faith in you.” Tell me about your leadership style. How do you get your team to believe in your vision? People need to feel like they are a part of the ultimate journey. They need to envision themselves and envision how they can play a role in that journey. I do not manage my team necessarily based on a restricted job description. While I realize at times that can be frustrating to my employees, I rally them by explaining where we need to be. This is usually a very high-level explanation of an expected output. Usually this initiates questions on a detailed level of the path they feel we need to take to get there. This is where you get your team to see themselves on the path to your vision of the ultimate jou r ney. T hei r bac k g r ou nd a nd experiences, especially in a team format,

leads to a cooperative path towards our end goal. When your team feels valuable, their opinion respected, they will want to personally succeed, which in turn makes everyone successful. This smooth integration enables an efficiency like no other. How did your role with the exchange evolved over the years? I was hired as a hands-on controller; there was no CFO at the time. Thus my goal was to grow and learn so that I could become the CFO. I needed to become stronger, learn more than just accounting, learn the business, learn about how an “exchange” and ultimately a clearinghouse operated. It’s hard to come out of your comfort zone to take chances. But I was able to do just that and was promoted to CFO and treasurer after so much hard work personally and professionally. In 2014, Nodal Exchange decided to launch a clearinghouse. My team and I had one year to learn everything about a clearinghouse. We were determined to not go with the flow, but to ask questions and not do something because everyone did it. We were going to learn the industry norm and we were going to make it better. We were going to use common sense, ask why over and over again until we understood the reason for a process. It was exciting for everyone at Nodal Exchange; we all worked hard together for a year and launched Nodal Clear true to our word that it would happen. I say all of this to explain that as the years have passed, my role has continued to evolve and not just in a title. In a teambased approach, I am not just the CFO and treasurer. I am a mentor, I am a friend, sometimes I am even the person that does a common bank reconciliation. I feel I am whatever I need to be to ensure our team continues to run as smoothly and efficiently as possible.

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McKesson’s New Real Estate Vision Michael Huaco leverages real estate to enable the company’s mission while driving down costs and unlocking long-term value by Arianna Stern, photos by Gillian Fry

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imply changing the design of an office can have a powerful effect on a business. Just ask Michael Huaco, senior vice president and global real estate head at McKesson Corporation, about how he helped drive the company’s transition toward sustainability and progressive workplace environments. Huaco built a leadingedge, diverse global team, and the team started advocating for sustainability and openness after they redefined the function of the real estate department. Huaco has led a transformational initiative to create a true sharedservices model for McKesson real estate. Adopting an end-to-end model focused on the total cost of ownership and sustainability of the company’s facilities

has driven greater value and lowered the cost structure. Partnering with other shared services, like HR and IT, has led to much better outcomes and strategies in the workplace function. Meet i ng L EED g reen-bu i ld i ng standards is a major component of McKesson’s sustainability program, Huaco says. For example, the company’s S a n F r a nci sc o he adqu a r t er s a r e certified LEED Platinum, and the Dallas campus is LEED Gold. “Any time we do something new, whether it’s an office building, warehouse, or medical facility, our goal is to at least design it to a LEED standard—with the benefit of lower energy costs and a nicer environment—but not all spaces will or need to be certified,” Huaco notes.

MICHAEL HUACO SVP and Global Real Estate Head McKesson Corporation

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“As a healthcare company, our facilities should promote health and well-being. We create an environment to be the employer of choice in a market where we attract and retain the best talent.” MICHAEL HUACO

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fyi

Mentoring for Change

In addition to his daily professional responsibilities, Michael Huaco mentors at least three interns every year. He learns as much from them as they learn from him. “It gives me a way to learn about new advents in social media or other areas that could be used in my dayto-day business,” Huaco explains. He also sees mentoring programs as an agent for positive change by helping young people start the next chapter of their lives. Huaco himself has benefited from mentoring in his career. For example, he cultivated a productive relationship with Dan Garcia, a board member and senior executive at Kaiser Permanente. “He taught me the value of patience, the value of sticking to your guns,” Huaco says. “He was somebody I really respected and aspired to be.” Huaco has also learned from Jorge Figueredo, the current head of HR at McKesson. In fact, Figueredo inspired Huaco to take the job in the first place. “He’s a very senior executive at the company, and seeing him as a role model was a positive experience that helped influence my decision to come to McKesson,” he says. Huaco believes that mentorship has a special significance for Hispanic people. “Any time you have access to folks that can influence you, help you get a job, or just talk to about a common experience you had growing up greatly helps,” he says. “I think it’s incumbent upon folks that are Hispanic to do that for their own community.”

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And McKesson’s sustainability effort isn’t limited to LEED. They’re also implementing a solar energy program and an energy-lighting retrofit program. Plus, the company uses a special dashboard to aggregate sustainability-related data, so they can share the data in their annual report. The real estate team not only lowers costs through its sustainability efforts, but also adds value by making its offices attractive to highquality employees. Huaco says that he and his team try to answer the question, “How can we create an environment to be the employer of choice in a market where we attract and retain the best talent?” One way of making the offices appealing is pursuing WELL Building certification, a standard that promotes employees’ health. WELL buildings mig ht include natural light and air, nutritious food in the cafeteria, and an onsite gym. “If we’re a healthcare company, we should have healthy employees,” Huaco reasons. McKesson’s Richmond, Virginia, office was the first to be WELL certified, and the Dallas office is presently applying for certification. Maintaining high standards for employee health improves McKesson’s bottom line, but that’s not their only motivation. “It improves everything, from your mental state to lowering your insurance premiums to productivity,” Huaco says. “But we also think it’s just the right thing to do.” Another feature of McKesson’s facilities that attracts top talent is open offices. While

conventional wisdom suggests that millennials are most drawn to open offices, Huaco believes that people of all ages can reap the benefits. He favors open designs because they lead to greater collaboration, which boosts employee engagement and ultimately produces more innovation. “Collaboration and engagement are a means to an end. That end is innovation,” he says. Open offices facilitate collaboration by allowing coworkers to gather anywhere. “If you want to work in the cafeteria, if you want to sit on the couch, if you want to work with your teams on different floors, you can basically pick up and move your laptop anywhere,” Huaco says. And it’s not just employee mobility that encourages collaboration— it’s also the common spaces that facilitate more casual interactions. Before openoffice plans were implemented, McKesson employees might work in the same office for fifteen years without meeting each other. Now, they can see each other in the cafeteria or the gym. “You’re much more inclined to have a nice conversation with somebody when it’s face to face in a casual environment than you are by firing off an email,” Huaco says. This relationship building among employees leads to unstructured conversations, professional collaboration, and, in turn, innovation. Huaco feels confident that McKesson’s office designs have contributed to a culture of innovation because of the positive comments he’s received from employees. His team collects surveys to evaluate the success of their office designs. “ We’ve had tremendous feedback,” Huaco says. He notes


McKesson’s San Francisco headquarters is certified LEED Platinum, and features open office workspaces.

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CBRE is the world’s largest commercial real estate services and investment firm (based on 2016 revenue).

It is headquartered in Los Angeles and employs 75,000 people across 450 offices worldwide. CBRE offers a range of integrated services, including facilities, transaction and project management and consulting.

TURNER CONSTRUCTION COMPANY www.turnerconstruction.com Dan R. Wheeler Vice President & General Manager McKesson Portfolio Manager

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that certain employees come to McKesson from substandard work environments w ith minimal parking, and that those employees in particular can reach greater heights at McKesson. Despite the many benefits, transitioning from traditional offices to open offices wasn’t always easy, Huaco says. Some of McKesson’s employees had worked for the company for up to thirty years, and they felt apprehensive about the change. “A lot of people who had offices no longer had offices, and had to work in an open environment. That’s really hard for a lot of folks. It would be hard for me,” Huaco says. He and his team helped ease employees’ anxiety by hosting town halls and encouraging employees to form councils on open-office etiquette. By communicating frequently, Huaco helped employees embrace the new design. “You come out on the other end, you look back, and you go, ‘I don’t miss [the traditional office] at all,” Huaco says. Today, most McKesson employees are thriving in the company’s facilities. “It creates an environment that’s just much more collegial and much more efficient,” Huaco says of his team’s various redesign efforts. “And those are the things that make people happier—giving them more than what they had.”

Turner Construction would like to congratulate Mike Huaco on his leadership achievements and instrumental forward thinking. Mr. Huaco is extremely influential in fostering a partnership that allows Turner to integrate with the business leads and stakeholder teams throughout North America. Turner Construction specializes in corporate office construction, interiors, medical office buildings, and industrial distribution facilities throughout North America.


Doing A Good Turn Daily Domingo Lopez on how the Boy Scouts’ values have changed his life—and his work in compliance at Biogen—for the better by Bridgett Novak

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s a compliance officer supporting Biogen’s operations in the US, Domingo Lopez helps the biotech company comply with complex government and industry regulations, but it is his lifelong involvement with scouting that highlights the reason for his work. “The slogan of the Boy Scouts of America is ‘Do a good turn daily.’ I have made that a focus of my life, and have instilled the same principles in my family,” he says. “Helping the business deliver therapies to patients who need them in a compliant manner is one way I’m able to do that.” After earning a degree in computer science, Lopez worked as a computer programmer with the Treasury Department in his native Puerto Rico. He then joined an IT consulting firm, working with major corporate accounts, including Shell Oil, Dow Chemical, and Amgen. The latter hired him as an IT specialist in 1992, and he has worked in the pharmaceutical industry ever since. Lopez worked at Amgen during the day and went to graduate business school and law school at night. “Early in my career, I was always involved with compliance topics. My MBA thesis was about computer

fraud and abuse,” he says. “The intersection of technology and law fascinated me, so I thought it would be helpful to learn more about the legal framework to enhance my background.” In 1996, he joined Rhône-Poulenc Rorer. Five years later, the company, which is now part of Sanofi, relocated him to Missouri to serve in a regional IT management role for North America. “That was a great developmental opportunity for me and my family which opened new doors to complex multi-site regional projects and a Midwestern lifestyle,” he explains. Lopez eventually took on a global leadership role, which added South America, western Europe, and Japan to his scope of work implementing global quality and industrial IT initiatives. In 2005, he took on a new opportunity as director of technical operating processes at AstraZeneca, so he moved to Delaware to support the North America organization. “It meant rebalancing a global versus a regional role, but I was attracted by the job’s combination of IT and regulatory work,” he says. Lopez’s expertise and enthusiasm caught management’s attention, and he was

soon promoted to senior director of global compliance systems. He was part of a global task force that launched the company’s first global e-learning program to roll out its Code of Conduct in ten languages. “We took the Code into ninety-six countries, training sixty-five thousand employees in six months,” he says. He also implemented a global helpline to receive confidential questions and reports, which was recognized as one of EthicsPoint’s Top 10 Ethics and Compliance Portals in 2009. In 2013, the company went through a major restructuring, and Lopez decided to move to the Greater Boston area with Biogen. Some of the areas he focuses on at Biogen include providing compliance advice to marketing and commercial operations teams, risk management, and monitoring the execution of promotional programs. He is responsible for programs that focus on addressing areas where there may be challenges in the pharmaceutical industry. These areas include off-label marketing, false claims, kickbacks, and bribery that can involve healthcare providers and organizations, employees, and contractors; for this reason, it’s helpful to provide a secure method for reporting questions and

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concerns to management in order to determine the appropriate remediation. “Having been raised and exposed to diverse languages and cultures helps me calibrate the appropriate response to ensure the remediation is effective,” Lopez explains. As skilled and successful as he is at managing and improving compliance programs, Lopez says his biggest professional thrill is to help colleagues do their jobs the right way with integrity, and then listen to the feedback from doctors and patients who have been prescribed a Biogen product: “That’s what makes my work meaningful and worthwhile.” This focus on service and doing the right thing aligns with his dedication to the Boy Scouts of America

Look forward. Evolve your approach. www.deloitte.com/us/ modernization Copyright © 2017 Deloitte Development LLC. All rights reserved.

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DOMINGO LOPEZ Compliance Officer, US Biogen

and his personal slogan of “family, school, scouts, and sports.” Lopez has been an Assistant Scoutmaster since 2006. His oldest son is an Eagle Scout and actively involved in scouting, and his younger son has just fulfilled the Eagle Scout requirements. “Scouting promotes values and skills that complement schoolwork and sports, and helps build stronger family ties,” he explains. “The outdoors is the classroom that allows you not only to enjoy nature, but enables you to lead and learn from others and practice citizenship through service to the community.” He says the Scouts have also provided him with opportunities to spend quality time with his sons. “I have backpacked over one hundred and twenty miles with my older son in northern New Mexico and went on a ‘castaway’ adventure in the Florida Keys with my younger son,” he says. When you go to remote places without cell phones, just carrying your basic needs in a backpack, it builds character. You have to rely on your skills and on others, and you have to talk, not text, to the person next to you. That’s extremely important for kids today.” But it’s the values the Boy Scouts impart that are the most far-reaching and life-changing. “Whether it’s opening the door for a stranger, collecting food for the needy, fixing a hiking trail as part of your son’s Eagle Scout project, or making sure colleagues understand the compliance framework,” Lopez explains, “it’s all about being an honorable person who contributes to your family, to your community, to the nation and to the world by helping others at all times.” This is the type of person he wants both of his sons to grow up to be.

OLGA MATURANA

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Leading Through Influence and Versatility Juan Carlos Perez encourages his team members to go beyond their daily routines to get a view of Pfizer’s bigger picture by Alison Ver Halen

andling procurement for Canada and Latin America for Pfizer, a leading research-based pharmaceutical company, means juggling many responsibilities and managing a team spread out across the continent. Over the years, Juan Carlos Perez, senior director of procurement for Canada and Latin America, has perfected his leadership style into something he describes as being both versatile and influential. “I am able to influence my team by asking them to be active participants in decisions or support initiatives where we are able to make an impact,” Perez says. As for versatility, there are so many things to focus on, but not all of them matter equally. “In being versatile, you differentiate between them and focus

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attention on what matters most,” he says. Perez says it helps that he has had the privilege of working with smart colleagues and outstanding leaders who have shown him different ways to discover his own leadership style. Working with a team that is spread out across different countries has also forced Perez to make sure they continue working as a team instead of breaking down into silos. “One of the key aspects is keeping good one-on-one contact with a relevant agenda, plus the opportunity to add rigor to online team sessions every other week, using video tools to complement our virtual presence,” Perez says. “I also maintain skip-level meetings with some members of the larger regional teams to eliminate communication barriers created by structured reporting lines.”

JUAN CARLOS PEREZ Senior Director of Procurement for Canada & Latin America Pfizer

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LEADERS IN MARKETING PROCUREMENT Adare International is a leading global marketing services provider delivering innovative, integrated marketing solutions to consumer businesses around the world. Our local experts work with their clients to develop and deliver local, regional and global marketing activations. In recent years, Adare has created a robust infrastructure across Latin America, with our first offices opening in Brazil and Mexico in 2012. Design and Adaption studios were soon established and successfully deliver a low cost, integrated artworking service to clients in the region. Regional contract awards from Pfizer along with other leading Pharma companies, led Adare to expand its operations further since 2014 by establishing local operations in seven new LATAM markets. By taking an innovative and collaborative approach with our forward-thinking clients, we have quickly established ourselves as a market leader in the provision of outsourced marketing services in Latin America.

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Beyond that, Perez sees his role as investing time into understanding what his team’s strengths and limitations are, both at the individual and collective level. He also considers what can be done to develop future capabilities so he can determine where they need to invest in training or create opportunities that are relevant for them to get to the next level in partnering with stakeholders. The versatile aspect of his leadership comes in handy here, because one solution will never fit all problems. “We try to balance our efforts through some formal training,” he says. “But the core of our development model is based on intraregional development opportunities in which we invest time where specific talents are created, or reinforced, that are in line with the colleague’s aspirations.” Knowing the strengths and weaknesses of his team members helps Perez keep the team from breaking down into silos. When he knows their capabilities, he can push them to participate in both regional and global initiatives. Once team members have worked on certain subject matter, they can expect Perez to come back to them later to ask them to participate in—or even lead— specific initiatives because they’ve had experience with that category or industry. It gives Perez’s team members a chance to get out of their daily routines and see the bigger picture of what the company is working toward. Moving his team members around to where they’ll be happiest and most productive is also part of Perez’s initiative to help his team members advance in their careers.

The natural turnover in certain countries creates open positions, and while that position should filled as quickly as possible, that opening to could create an opportunity for someone else in the company, at least on an interim basis. “And if that person is on our team, that creates a chain reaction,” Perez says. “So rather than asking for an additional budget for training or development, we use our own budget to self-fund those development opportunities.” As a result, Perez’s team might actually prefer to have a position open for two or three months so they can create an opportunity to fill a need, advance a talent, or create a transitional breach to bring more people around. “Of the people who report directly to me, I doubt any of them are doing today what they were doing three years ago,” Perez says. “They either have increased responsibilities or had a change in their professional tracks. They’re still in procurement, but if they were managing a country or group of countries, they could be managing a category for the region now. So that’s what you create when you work in that portal.” That said, it’s not as if Perez will endorse someone just because they’re on his team. “Pfizer is a company with rich cultural traits, and as part of that culture, each colleague understands that professional development starts in oneself,” Perez says. “My role as a leader is to understand my team members’ professional aspirations, match them to the needs of the company, and create opportunities where both can be met.”


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John Vazquez on transforming Verizon’s facilities—and transforming its culture in the process by David Baez, photos by Gillian Fry

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hen the brass at large companies sit down to figure out how much of their budget to allocate to new facilities, it can be tempting to concentrate purely on structural concerns and cut corners when it comes to how the employees who go to work every day in the building will experience it. At Verizon, though, senior vice president and global real estate head John Vazquez is ensuring that the latter is as much a consideration as the former. His philosophy, in a nutshell, is “we don’t build for the building; we build for the people.” “ My focus here is on the workplace, what people experience here, and how can I help enable them to do their best work and be more productive,” he says. “When people wake up every morning, they should feel good about coming into the office. People come first. Buildings don’t talk to you; people do.” Case in point is the corporate campus the company is developing in Las Colinas, Texas, outside Dallas. It’s currently a 135-acre property with two buildings, but 100 acres remain untouched, and as more corporations continue moving their operations to Texas, Verizon is taking advantage of the empty space. Most suburban campuses are isolated, but the idea behind Las Colinas is to make it both part of a larger community and a destination.

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Verizon is working with a developer to add retail, residential, hotel, and office space. “It ’s a live-workplay model,” Vazquez says. “Employees don’t have to make a choice between life and work because it’s blended.” Vazquez began his real estate career as an intern in the boiler room of IBM’s real estate group. The day the internship ended, he went to thank his boss, who immediately offered him a job. By that time, he had five other engineering job offers from major companies, but he loved his experience at IBM, and it was close to home, so he immediately accepted. He was recruited away in 1993, during the company’s downsizing phase, and his career began to take some interesting turns. He went to work for JP Morgan, with an office on Wall Street. The first vice president that the company had ever hired from outside (its culture was to promote from within), he was responsible for the firm’s global and domestic real estate portfolio outside of New York City. After eight years, he took a position as senior vice president of global facilities at Chase Manhattan, increasing the scope of his responsibilities. A year later, Chase acquired JP Morgan, and Vazquez found himself leading the same people he had worked with before.


JOHN VAZQUEZ SVP and Global Real Estate Head Verizon

He spent a year as a consultant, then was vice president of real estate at MetLife for eight years. In 2012, Verizon came calling, asking him to take on their global real estate operations. The company ’s portfolio comprised 120 million square feet across the globe—more than Chase and dwarfing what he had worked with at IBM and MetLife. “It’s an amazing blend of all the different types of portfolios I’ve worked with before,” he says. “I’m leading six hundred real estate professionals, and we’re transforming the way the company works. My focus has always been on transforming organizations and cultures to be more open and collaborative, and that’s what I get to do here.” As Verizon has moved from being a telecom company to a tech company, the public’s perception of it has changed, as has the culture within the company itself. When Vazquez interviewed for the position, he was dubious because he was still thinking of the old Verizon. But, once he sat down with leadership, he saw that big changes were on the horizon. “My boss is a tremendously dynamic leader,” he says. “We connected on the idea that corporate real estate is about providing a workplace for people. I saw that the company was moving into the future.”

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ARCHITECTURE I N T E R I O R S ENGINEERING P L A N N I N G

talent

Cushman & Wakefield Congratulates JOHN VAZQUEZ Senior Vice President Global Head of Real Estate Verizon

C O N S U LT I N G

John Vazquez’s commercial real estate expertise, vision and commitment to excellence are an inspiration to all those who work with him. Cushman & Wakefield is honored to call John Vazquez a friend and partner for over 20 years.

5 B r y a n t P a r k l N e w Yo r k , N Y 1 0 0 1 8 2 1 2 . 7 4 1 . 1 2 0 0 l h o k . c o m

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As a Latino, Vazquez has honed in on the diversity aspect of Verizon’s company culture. His father owned and worked at a garage as a mechanic, and Vazquez was the first in his family to go to college, so he knows well the challenges that Latinos face in entering the corporate world. He overcame those difficulties and wants to see the latest generation do the same. “Even given the difficulties for a Latino, my father always told me, ‘Nobody owes you anything; if you do the right things, then good things will happen for you,’” he says. “And at all the companies I’ve been with, I always felt I earned it, that it wasn’t simply because I had the right last name and met a quota.” At Verizon, Vazquez is part of a fund-raising committee that helps disadvantaged Latino high school students make it to college. He often serves as a mentor to give back and says he relishes shattering biases that people have about Latinos—that they aren’t educated enough, for example, or that they won’t do well in a particular industry because there isn’t a history of Latinos being successful in that industry. But Vazquez’s thoughts about diversity go deeper. “To


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“My focus has always been on transforming organizations and cultures to be more collaborative, and that’s what I get to do here.”

NELSON applauds

John Vazquez for his forward-thinking leadership that has maximized opportunities within Verizon’s Global Real Estate portfolio. We are honored to work with Verizon and excited about our continued partnership driving innovative and industry leading workplace solutions.

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JOHN VAZQUEZ

me, what I value is diversity of thought and experience,” he says. “I think that to limit it to a certain sector of the population, a certain race, is unhelpful. I have to be careful of my own biases. “ W hen I am formulating strategies or structures, I ask myself, am I being biased in an unconscious way? Because whether someone is ma le or fema le, or has two years of experience or thirty-five, you have to be open to everyone. If people close their minds to diversity, they’re limiting people’s potential and what they can bring to the organization.”

Clune Construction is proud to congratulate John M. Vazquez for his feature as an exceptional leader in Hispanic Executive. John’s diverse educational background, coupled with his determination and hardworking spirit, are values that Clune holds dear. As a national general contractor employing more than 450 professionals and managing $920 million in commercial interiors and mission-critical projects, we place an emphasis on honesty and integrity, and we truly value our national relationship with Verizon. Professionals like John inspire us to produce high-quality results on every build. JLL congratulates John Vazquez on this special recognition. As a member of Verizon’s global supplier team, JLL has supported John’s vision and accomplishments and observed his commitment to diversity, inclusion, and the development of human talent.  JLL is proud of its association with John and wish him continued success.


QUALITY AND INTEGRITY

ONE SQUARE FOOT AT A TIME For over 20 years, Clune Construction has placed an emphasis on honesty, integrity, and client satisfaction to produce high-quality results. John M. Vazquez, Senior Vice President & Global Head of Real Estate at Verizon, continuously radiates these qualities. Clune would like to congratulate John on his feature in this special edition of Hispanic Executive. With six regional ofďŹ ces across the United States, Clune combines local expertise with large-scale construction capabilities to meet and exceed the expectations of its clients. Clune Construction is proud to partner with Verizon.

CLUNEGC.COM | CHICAGO | LOS ANGELES | M C LE AN, VA | NE W YORK | SAN FR ANCISCO | WA SHINGTON, DC JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

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Constellation Congratulates John Vazquez, Senior Vice President Global Real Estate Head at Verizon. We are proud of our longstanding relationship with

YOU WANT BUDGET CERTAINTY, AND YOU’RE HOPING THAT YOU MADE THE BEST CHOICE FOR YOUR BUSINESS. BUT WITH ALL OF THE OPTIONS OUT THERE, HOW DO YOU KNOW FOR SURE? A CUSTOM ENERGY STRATEGY WITH CONSTELLATION CAN HELP YOU PLAN FOR THE FUTURE WITH CONFIDENCE.

John Vazquez and Verizon.

Congratulations on this well deserved recognition, from your friends at AECOM Tishman.

Interested in finding out how? Contact us by visiting constellation.com.

© 2017 Constellation Energy Resources, LLC. The offerings described herein are those of either Constellation NewEnergy-Gas Division, LLC, Constellation NewEnergy, Inc.,Constellation Energy Services - Natural Gas, LLC, Constellation Energy Services, Inc. or Constellation Energy Services of New York, Inc., affiliates of each other and ultimate subsidiaries of Exelon Corporation. Brand names and product names are trademarks or service marks of their respective holders. All rights reserved. Errors and omissions excepted.

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LEADERSHIP PROFESSIONALISM INTEGRITY

United Building Maintenance salutes John Vazquez, friend, valued customer and inspiration.

John, Congratulations on this well-earned award which is a true reflection of your leadership, and character. We at JLL are honored to celebrate this achievement with you! Cheers, Your JLL Partners

INTEGRITY. INVOLVEMENT. INNOVATION.

United Building Maintenance Corporation 237 West 35th St., Suite 400, New York, NY 10001

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The Importance of Reflecting the City You Serve Gerard Orozco on how assembling a diverse, talented team helps CH2M best serve the people of Los Angeles by Tina Vasquez

n any given day, Gerard Orozco is juggling any number of projects across the country. But he loves the adrenaline rush that goes along with being part of a corporation with twenty-five thousand people around the globe. For over ten years, Orozco has been at CH2M, a company currently in the process of being acquired by Jacobs Engineering. As a senior vice president and key account executive, he tackles everything from government infrastructure projects to private industry challenges.

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He is known in political circles as a connector and sophisticated deal maker; it is not unusual for Orozco to be called on by US representatives, governors and mayors for advice. In his native city of Los Angeles, he often works closely with Mayor Eric Garcetti and his team on complicated local projects. As a senior vice president, Orozco is also in charge of expanding the company’s team. “Growth is kind of who we are as a company, and the services we provide are at the highest level,” Orozco

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GERARD OROZCO SVP and Key Account Executive CH2M


Congratulations to our client and friend

says. “When our clients call us about a project, they want the best and the brightest. It’s incumbent on us to know every aspect of the project we are working on and put the most talented people on our team.” The SVP is particularly interested in hiring women a nd people of color— especially in Los Angeles. The city is more than 50 percent Latino and known for its vibrant diversity. Orozco says the workforce should reflect the city it serves. “For me, when I see an engineer who looks like me, it means something. We use whatever means we have at our disposal to help make sure that our workforce reflects the city we serve,” Orozco says. “We also use local businesses whenever we can. It just makes good business sense.” When the Los Angeles mayor calls on CH2M, he knows he’s going to get a diverse team that brings a lot to the table and Orozco knows he’s going to get the most accurate answers and solutions for the city’s most challenging issues. Make no mistake: while there is something glamorous about running to City Hall in downtown Los Angeles for a meeting, the work is challenging. “I can’t deny that there are times when we face great challenges, but solving problems is what my team thrives on,” Orozco says. While he’s not shy to make what he wants known, or to ask for what’s needed, his leadership style is relaxed. Orozco believes in hiring the right people for the job and simply trusting that they will meet all expectations once they are given a clear

direction and armed with the right information. “You can’t be in a role like this and micromanage. Not only is there no time for it, but it just won’t work,” Orozco says. “I know the people we hire are the best and they will get the job done. Things can be that simple when you’re in capable hands.” Moving forward, Orozco and his team are working on a number of high-profile projects, including reforming the trash hauling system in the City of Los Angeles. The system comes complete with aggressive recycling goals that will help create a more sustainable future for the city. Another major project that’s generating a lot of buzz in Los Angeles is the company’s i nvolvement i n helpi ng automate the city’s Hyperion Water Reclamation Plant. This will be the first time in history the plant is automated, and Orozco is proud that his team was behind the initiative. Orozco isn’t intimidated by such high-prof ile, demanding projects. He sees them as both a challenge and an adventure. “Working with LA’s great leadership, we are going to get every thing done,” the SVP says. “Sometimes we hit a little bump along the way, but when you’re working on such cutting-edge projects, it goes with the territory. I love the challenge. I love being a partner to the City of Los Angeles. None of this feels like work to us. We wouldn’t be satisfied doing the easy stuff. The project needs to be complex. We can solve anything.”

GERARD OROZCO Senior Vice President CH2M

For the recognition of his many accomplishments by Hispanic Executive

kirra Kirra specializes in advising and public policy issues bridging the gap between business and government.

Kirra Consulting, LLC Los Angeles, CA 310-893-0647 www.KirraConsulting.com JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

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JON MICHAEL PARDO SVP and CHRO Dragados USA

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VALERIA ALONZO

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Making HR the Cornerstone of Dragados USA Jon Michael Pardo assembles a workforce that allows the construction company’s employees to flourish by Valerie Menard

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he modern human resources department seeks to build a treasure trove of employees to achieve success. As a nine-year-old Cuban immigrant, Jon Michael Pardo may not have envisioned his professional path leading him to HR, but the work perfectly suits this self-described people person. “In college, I started taking courses in business and finance,” shares the senior vice president and chief human resources officer (CHRO) for Dragados USA. “One semester, I took a human resources management course. I liked it, I learned new things every day, and that’s what I like most about HR—it’s always changing and bringing new challenges. I knew this would be a good opportunity for me.” Over the past twenty-six years, he’s developed a passion for his work and is energized by the chance to match the right person to the right job and help that employee flourish. “I provide training and education to develop an employee’s abilities,” Pardo says. “I meet with them to see what I can do to make their job better and support them in the organization.”

The same holds true for contractors, who may also need guidance. “Anything you do in life, you have to like it. You have to have a passion for it,” he says. Pardo and his parents, Ramon and Miriam, left Cuba in 1968, initially landing in Puerto Rico before moving to New York when Pardo turned sixteen. He attended St. Peter’s University and then earned two master’s degrees in business administration, one from New York Institute of Technology and the other from Liberty University. Before entering the HR world, however, he enlisted in the US Army, where he served as a personnel administration specialist. While the job concentrated on paperwork, issuing orders to move troops, it exposed Pardo to the process of human resources and the workings of a personnel department. After the Army, he worked in other fields, including pharmaceutical, biotech, and healthcare. It was at Christ Hospital that Pardo met his greatest mentor, Robert Parker, vice president of HR at Christ Hospital in New Jersey. Pardo worked

at the hospital for ten years, starting in benefits and compensation before eventually moving to employee and labor relations. “Robert showed me what to do, the dos and don’ts in HR. He was a great mentor,” Pardo says. In 2016, he joined Dragados, one of the largest construction companies in the world, building bridges, tunnels, and nearly seventeen thousand miles of roads and highways. Based in Spain, Dragados opened offices in the US eleven years ago. Pardo shares that the company has grown 40–60 percent per year since then, with a workforce near two thousand employees further underscoring the value of HR. “If you don’t have significant reliance on HR as a foundation for growth, you will fail in becoming a leader in your industry,” he says. While he admits that the construction industry has been slow to change, the days of paper pushing in HR are quickly fading. “HR has seen a switch from a traditional personnel department, focused on payroll, hiring, and firing, to a business partnership with a seat at the executive level,”

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Dragados Reaches Out to Women

The construction industry may be perceived as a man’s world, but according to Jon Michael Pardo, that isn’t true outside of the US. At the company headquarters in Spain, for instance, many women are found in high-ranking positions. “Companies need to realize women can do the job as well as or better than men, but they have to be given the opportunity,” he says.

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Jon Michael Pardo strongly advocates for bringing more women into the construction industry. His human resources team, pictured here, is made up of mostly women.

Pardo explains. “We’ve been given a variety of tasks, serving as administrative officers and overseeing different functions within the organization through an HR realm bringing the enterprise to the next level of efficiency and effectiveness.” The root of this change, he adds, was the ability to meet the demand necessary for business to f lourish. Industries like construction, where there is a lot of turnover, had to find ways to retain employees and develop the workforce from within. Employee development is the current way that many companies are doing so; many companies are using benefits, compensation, and training to ensure that a job doesn’t last for only the length of a project, but can be extended to the next project and beyond. “When we first started working with Jon, he wanted us to find people that wanted to come to Dragados for a career, not just a job,” says Mike Anderson, CEO of MEA Strategic Solutions. “He wanted people that would invest in themselves.”

One tool at Pardo’s disposal is that the federal government requires companies to show that they’ve made an effort to cast a wide net for employees and contractors. He admits that achieving this goal has made his job more challenging—but in a positive way. “New laws require us to have small business opportunities to take advantage of contracts that before were not there. They have grown a lot of opportunities for minorities and women,” he says. A famous example is Linda Alvarado, owner of Alvarado Construction and co-owner of the Colorado Rockies major league baseball team. “Companies are realizing the value HR brings to the table,” Pardo says. “HR was just a necessary function, a requirement that companies were not fond of. It didn’t have value until it was brought in on planning to curtail turnover and improve retention. Senior management has recognized that they need to have the HR function as the cornerstone to build a company.”

VALERIA ALONZO

Pardo has led recruiting efforts like the engineering development program that recruits recent female engineering graduates, and he regularly speaks to high schools nationwide to encourage young girls to pursue engineering. He also served on a panel at the recent Engineering NewsRecord Symposium on Women in Construction. “I make the point that anybody can do it if they have the skills, education and ability,” he says. “Engineering is not defined as a gender-specific job, but as a career for all.”


Just finding talent is easy. Finding top talent is an art. MEA Strategic Solutions is an Executive Search, Staffing, and Consulting firm. MEA was started in 2011 by a former C-level executive that saw a niche in the market to provide top talent to companies without simply “shot gunning” resumes to hiring managers, hoping that one sticks. Wading through bad candidates to get to a rock star is a waste of your precious time, and what we do on your behalf. We are business people first, and understand our client’s needs. We take the time to understand your environment. And we take the time to get a feel for your culture.

1-866-867-0486 • www.meastrategicsolutions.com

construction (executive, professional, or trades) information technology information security digital eCommerce finance and accounting human resources talent acquisition


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Why Attorneys Must Prepare for Disruptive Technologies Siemens’ Alan Cardenas discusses how attorneys can benefit from the technological revolution

ew people k now t he ma ny a rea s attorneys practice w ithin. A single image tends to come to mind, whether it’s arguing a cour t case, negotiating a complex transaction, or sitting in an office buried under paper work f u ll of complicated legal jargon. A career in law wasn’t Alan Cardenas’ first choice until he found an aspect of law that intrigued him. After considering many different professions while working toward his undergraduate degree at Rutgers

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University, Cardenas finally decided upon law school after getting some advice from friends and professionals in the industry. Once at Rutger s L aw School, Cardenas had some trouble deciding what aspect of law was for him. It wasn’t until he discovered corporate law in his second year of law school that he knew he had found his path. “I realized it was a terrific blend of business and the law, a nd I never looked back,” Cardenas says. W hen he entered h is role at Siemens, a 170-year

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018

ALAN CARDENAS Lead Counsel – Central Functions Siemens

PICTURE PEOPLE

by Alison Ver Halen


old global manufacturing, engineering, and technology compa ny, Ca rden a s h ad plenty of opportunities to put his wide-ranging interests to good use. In the more than nine years he’s worked there, he’s led the legal side of everything from venture capital in the Americas to corporate communications, interna l reorganizations, and corporate supply-chain management in the US. “I’ve been very lucky to have had great opportunities throughout my career that have given me exposure to a number of different areas of the law,” Cardenas says. “Frankly, I’ve also just been very fortunate to be at a company like Siemens that has given me very diverse leadership opportunities.” Cardenas is grateful for the wonderful legal minds he’s had the opportunity to work with and manage throughout his career. He’s gotten to work with talented attorneys who are capable of handling the many swift changes that are coming to the legal industry on a daily basis. “I think, for years, the lega l industr y thought it was so unique, or the skills of its practitioners so hard to replicate, that it would be immune from some of the disruptive technologies that were impacting other industries,” Cardenas says. On the contrary, a recent McKinsey study found that as much as 23 percent of an attorney’s job could be automated. “And that’s only considering the technology that exists today,” Cardenas says. In-house legal departments not only can benefit

from some of the automation tools that are starting to revolutionize the industry, but also need to take advantage of them if they’re going to survive in today’s ever-changing world. Cardenas notes, for example, the rise of digital threats such as cyberattacks, which have resulted in software that aims to protect against such risks—a nd a subsequent rise in data-protection and data-security roles. For example, e-discovery tools have been extremely helpful in minimizing the largescale, highly expensive document-review process that was the norm only about a decade ago. “At this point, we’re just scratch i ng t he su r face,” Cardenas says. “And it’s not clear how new technologies w i l l u lt i m a t e l y i m p a c t our profession.” Ca rdena s t h i n k s t he administrative area of law will be particularly affected by advances in technology, at least to begin with. As the technology continues to develop, attorneys need to learn to use it to help them work smarter, rather than harder. “People need to keep in mind that the advent of new technolog ies w i ll create mor e opp or t u n it ie s for different types of legal work,” Cardenas says. “For that reason, I believe every lawyer, regardless of expertise or subject matter, must also be a technology lawyer.” While Cardenas admits it’s perfectly natural, and even healthy, for attorneys to be skeptical of new technologies, he also says they need to remain open to the possibility

We are thrilled to congratulate Alan Cardenas for his well-deserved recognition in Hispanic Executive. We celebrate the accomplishments of Alan and the entire Siemens in-house legal team.

Patterson Belknap Webb & Tyler LLP is a New York City based law firm with more than 200 lawyers. Patterson Belknap delivers a full range of services across approximately 20 practice groups in both litigation and commercial law. For more information, please visit www.pbwt.com.

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“People need to keep in mind that the advent of new technologies will create more opportunities for different types of legal work. For that reason, I believe every lawyer, regardless of expertise or subject matter, must also be a technology lawyer.” ALAN CARDENAS

of adopting new technological solutions that can help them do their jobs better. A question people frequently ask Cardenas is whether these new technologies for the legal industry are coming from the industry itself or from Silicon Valley. “It’s a critical and unique opportunity for the legal profession to dictate what we are looking for in new technologies and not let those technologies be dictated to us,” Cardenas says. “In the end, like any business, we need technology solutions that are usable, scalable, and affordable, and I’m certainly excited about what the new revolution in the law will bring.” When seeking out new legal talent, Cardenas is always on

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the lookout for those who are just as excited as he is about the changes the industry is currently going through. “I look for people who are not just open to change but individuals who will serve as agents and champions of that change,” Cardenas says. “I look for people who are comfortable in the chaos that is our day-to-day lives in the in-house legal department of one of the world’s largest companies.” That said, Cardenas does not want people who will talk up the benefits of new technology simply because it’s new. He needs critical thinkers who are able to analyze both the status quo and emerging technologies and take the best of both

worlds a nd merge them t o g e t h er. W h i le n e w technology can sometimes mitigate risks, other times it can increase risks, so Cardenas needs people who are able to tell the difference and act accordingly. “I look for people who are open to the technology revolution that is coming, and who are nimble enough to operate effectively within it,” Cardenas says.

Patterson Belknap congratulates Alan Cardenas on this well-deserved recognition. We value our partnership with Siemens and admire the company for its commitment to innovation. Patterson Belknap Webb & Tyler LLP is a New York City-based law firm with more than 200 lawyers. For more information, please visit www.pbwt.com.


The Search for the Perfect HR Software After realizing the company needed more than an applicant-tracking solution, Harris Associates’s Gracie Inacay led the implementation of a new program that would cover employees from recruitment to retirement by Frannie Sprouls

ILLUSTRATION: N.O.O.M.

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racie Inacay sat in the Harris Associates office at midnight on September 30, 2015, testing links and firing off emails to make sure everything was in place. The new human resources system, UltiPro, was set to go live on October 1. The implementation had been eight months in the making, not counting the previous months of narrowing down software options. “The team still teases me, ‘We lived in this conference room for an entire year,’” Inacay, project lead and director of human resources, says with a laugh. “It was this nonstop rollercoaster that touched on every thing in my wheelhouse and then some.” With all the moving parts this massive project involved, Inacay never got to the point where she thought Harris Associates needed to move back the go-live date.

Though there were some bumps along the road, the system went live on October 1, 2015. Serving as the project lead was the biggest undertaking of Inacay’s career, sixteen years of which have been with Harris Associates. When Hispanic Executive last spoke with Inacay in early 2013, the search for the new system hadn’t even begun. Harris Associates was only looking for applicanttracking software to replace its email and spreadsheet system. The conversation evolved into finding software that would be a one-stop shop for the human resources team and all employees from recruitment to retirement. Inacay and her team started with a spreadsheet of fifty potential vendors. Not knowing how to whittle the list down, the team partnered with the consulting firm ihouse in 2014. The first task was conducting a needs analysis, reviewing existing

processes, and figuring out what Harris Associates needed and wanted in the future. “I remember sitting in the conference room, and we had this schematic of our workflows,” Inacay says. “It was an octopus; it was a mess. We had a lot of redundancies, a lot of manual and paper-driven processes, a lot of inefficiencies.” Inacay, with ihouse’s help, was able to narrow down the initial list to a select few viable options. Through a detailed RFP and scripted demonstrations, Harris selected its new human capital management partner, Ultimate Software. Though the vendor was positioned to implement the program in sixteen weeks, Inacay built in cushion time—sixteen extra weeks—and the team used every minute of it. “For HR professionals, your day job doesn’t go away,” Inacay says. “You already have a full forty-hour work schedule. This

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GRACIE INACAY Director of Human Resources Harris Associates

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is going to be another forty hours, at least. You need to build in the cushion, build in the time, and have the right people with the right skill set on the project team.” This new system was a behemoth compared to what Harris Associates was previously using. So Inacay talked with ihouse about its consulting services. “It was the best decision and best money spent,” she says. “Having the consultant from kickoff to go-live was instrumental for us because ihouse knew the curves in the road before we’d even gotten on the road. That was really helpful for us.” The team met at least once a week (twice a week in the beginning) during those eight months to configure every single thing for the new system, from the color of the buttons to the content, the benefits, and how the modules would be structured. And don’t forget the training, which Inacay scheduled so that each step would transition smoothly. On O c t ob er 1 , 2 015 , the first three modules— core HR, payroll, and time management—went live. In September, the recruiter and generalist began working on the recruiting and onboarding modules, which went live the follow ing Januar y. Since then, additional modules and functionality have been rolled out successfully. Being project lead called on all parts of Inacay’s skill set: project planning, time management, communication, attention to detail, collaboration, and partnership. She calls herself

CALLIE LIPKIN

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a “resource book on the shelf” for her team. It’s important for Inacay to share her knowledge with others, whether it’s a team member or someone outside the organization. Because of her extensive work on the UltiPro implementation, Inacay does reference calls with potential ihouse and Ultimate Software clients. She’s part of a local HR roundtable, where she’s been able to help others in her network with vendor decisions and vice versa. In October 2016, a year after the go-live date, Inacay was part of a five-person panel hosted by the Human Resource Management Association of Chicago: “Influencing Technology at Every Level—Building Your Business Case.” “It’s important to me to be able to share my knowledge and experience with others—that’s been a big one for me,” Inacay says. “That ties back to what keeps me at Harris Associates because I’m still growing and I’m still learning.” Implementation is far from over. Inacay is currently looking at the talent-management module, which incorporates goals, 360-degree performance reviews, and more. And there’s still a compensation module and a learning module that could be added down the road. The goal is to eventually go paperless. “The system has all sorts of bells and whistles that we’re not even using at this point,” Inacay says. “We’ll get there; our goal is to get there. We’ve incorporated more enhancements and workflows, and then we’ll start moving away from paper.”

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Tips for Rolling Out Your New HR Software

Gracie Inacay, a self-described resource book, offers advice on how to best approach such a massive project. Have a well-thought-out project plan. Begin with a needs analysis. Why do you think you need a new system? What is your end goal? What are your pain points? Decide the efficiencies you want. How much automation do you want to build in? Think through how you will use a new system. Build yourself a cushion of time. You still have your day job on top of implementing new software. Manage your time and resources wisely. Take a phased approach. Decide what makes sense to roll out first. What is critical? Get the proper teams involved early. If you don’t have the talent in-house and you have the budget, use consultants.

Lockton Congratulates Gracie Inacay, Director of Human Resources at Harris Associates, for her excellence, innovation, and leadership in the financial services industry. Lockton is honored to be a part of the Harris Associates team helping serve its business.

Advocate for yourself. Talk to your vendors and your representatives. You don’t know what you don’t know. Don’t reinvent the wheel. Reach out to your resources because knowledge-sharing is huge. Incorporate change management. Develop a communication plan and an appropriate timeline.

FOCUSED ON CLIENTS. DEDICATED TO RESULTS. WE LIVE SERVICE!® Risk Management | Employee Benefits | Retirement Services 500 W. Monroe Street, Ste. 3400, Chicago, IL 60661 • 312.669.6900

© 2017 Lockton, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Becoming BoardReady Meet two participants—Jose Alvaro Avalos and Maria Rivas—in the Latino Corporate Directors Association’s first BoardReady Institute, a program designed to prepare executives ready to join a corporate board

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S Latino power at the marketplace is well documented. The purchasing power of these Latinos is comparable to the world’s eighth largest economy, according to LDC and IMF 2015 GDP estimates. In 2015, US Latinos pumped an estimated $2.13 trillion into the US economy, as reported in the 2017 Latino GDP Report. Despite this power and a strong Latino talent pool, only 2 percent of Fortune 1000 company board seats are held by US Latinos and 0.5 percent are held by US

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Latinas, according to a 2016 report by Korn Ferry. The Latino Corporate Directors Association (LCDA), in partnership with its Latino Corporate Directors Education Foundation (LCDEF), is hoping to change those metrics. In 2017, the LCDA announced its inaugural BoardReady Institute (BRI), which is an exclusive, invitation-only engagement for US Latino C-suite executives and top leaders interested in serving on corporate boards. The

BRI will prepare, network, and position high-caliber US Latino talent from a variety of industries and professions for corporate board service. Participants dove into the program with the LCDA Annual Board Leaders Convening on November 1-3, 2017. Hispanic Executive caught up with two participants—Intel’s Jose Alvaro Avalos and Merck’s Maria Rivas—to discuss their excitement for this new program and the importance of Latinos serving on corporate boards.

ILLUSTRATION: LANCE HANCOCK

by Frannie Sprouls


In 1978 , Jose A lv a ro Av a los immigrated to Chicago from La Barca, Jalisco, Mexico, at thirteen years old. His parents enrolled him in the bilingual program at Benito Juarez High School, where all of his classes were taught in Spanish. It was while he was working at a watermelon warehouse that it became clear to him that he needed to be highly proficient in English and attend college. It was the former assistant dean at the University of Illinois ChampaignUrbana, Paul E. Parker, who came to his rescue. The dean, who was director of the Minority Engineering Program at the university, believed in Avalos and helped him get scholarships and a job tutoring other students in math and engineering. “I struggled with the English language, so I picked electrical engineering because I found safety in numbers,” he says. Now, Avalos is the vice president of the Internet of Things Group (IOTG) and the general manager of the visual retail business. He also founded the digital signage business at Intel in 2009, and this business has since evolved into visual retail. Visual retail is an important IOTG growth business for Intel, and Avalos’s team helps define and create the future of visual solutions for customers.

MATT DE JESÚS

Who has inspired you throughout your career? My parents have been an amazing inspiration. They are in their fifty-fourth year of marriage, and they taught me the value of respect, integrity, honesty, education, and work ethic. My entire family continues to be a great source of support and inspiration. At Intel, I have been very blessed because I had the opportunity to work with and for excellent leaders and role models. For example, Intel’s fifth CEO, Paul S. Otellini, was my mentor for a few years. He encouraged me to attend the General Management Executive Program at Harvard Business School. Doug Davis, Intel’s senior vice president, was the first executive to believe in me. He promoted me to engineering supervisor and middle management

positions early in my career. Recently, he helped sponsor my vice president promotion. He also sponsored my master’s degree in electrical engineering from Arizona State University while I was working full time as an engineering manager. Finally, Joe Jensen, Intel’s vice president, sponsored my team and me as we established and developed the digital signage business at Intel.

JOSE ALVARO AVALOS VP of Internet of Things Group and General Manager of Visual Retail Intel

Why did you choose to accept the BRI invitation? First, just being invited to participate in the founding class of the BRI is a great honor. It is very humbling to be able to learn and work with the LCDA members. This amazing group of Latino leaders is

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positively impacting American business, government, culture, and society. Second, in my day-to-day business, I see millennials and young consumers wanting to not only have conversations with brands but also wanting to help shape the evolution of the brands. I think technology via analytics, artificial intelligence, and other capabilities can provide the connection that will allow brands to have that conversation with consumers. Additionally, I see young people focusing more on experiences. I also think technology can help businesses bring those experiences to consumers in efficient and effective ways. What do you hope to accomplish after the completion the program? I want to contribute and help corporate America tackle the big challenges we face in society today, such as feeding the hung r y, prov iding a f fordable healthcare, and efficiently utilizing our natural resources. I think people look at technology and ask, “What can we do with it?” Instead, I think we should ask, “What are the big problems in society that we can solve with technology?” Has being a board director always been a goal of yours?

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In your own words, why is it important to have more Latino board directors? To shape the future of technology, tech companies and their board of directors must be representative of that future. Demographically and economically, Hispanics are a growing force in the United States. Studies show that Hispanics will account for most of the country’s future growth for the next thirty-five years. By having a board with a wide range of perspectives, backgrounds, and experiences, we can better innovate and drive the future. To paraphrase Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., I look forward to an America where all people are judged only on their capabilities and are afforded access to opportunities at all levels of corporate leadership.

MARIA RIVAS SVP of Global Medical Affairs Merck/MSD

MICHAEL LUND

Yes, this has been my goal for the pa st t went y years. I’m currently representing Intel at the Digital PlaceBased Advertising Association (DPAA) Board of Directors. This association leads the Digital Place-Based and Digital Out of Home (DOOH) industry marketing to consumers outside the home. Additionally, I have represented Intel on various boards of directors and advisory boards including Mexico’s IT Industry Association, Hispanic Association of Corporate Responsibility Corporate Executive Forum, Arizona State University W.P. Carey School of Business Center for Services Leadership, Digital Signage Association, Arizona’s Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, and SEMATECH’s Known Good Die program.


When Maria Rivas was ten years old, her grandfather fell ill with a rare, neurological illness. He had seen many different experts in Puerto Rico, but no one could determine what ailed him. Rivas’s mother took him to a young doctor who had just finished his medical training in the US, on the other side of the island. He diagnosed her grandfather with Lou Gehrig’s disease, or ALS. Though nothing could be done, her grandfather and her family found peace in knowing what was ailing him. “Since then,” Rivas says, “I vowed I would work to help others afflicted with illness.” As senior vice president for global medical affairs at Merck, Rivas leads a large group of medical and clinical staff around the world who ensure that governments, healthcare systems, physicians, and patients understand how to properly use Merck’s medicinal products. Her team also ensures that the medical information on Merck’s products accurately reflects the potential benefits and risks. Who has inspired you throughout your career? I was first inspired by the wonderful faculty at Columbia University’s medical school. In particular, I was very influenced by the female faculty at Columbia’s teaching hospital, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital. As a young woman, it was very inspiring to see highly accomplished and smart women who managed to balance a prominent teaching career and family. Throughout my career in the pharmaceutical industry, I have been further inspired by various mentors, highly ethical physicians, scientists, and business leaders who always keep in mind what is at the core of our business: the patient. Why did you choose to accept the BRI invitation? The BRI program and networking opportunities will help me prepare for a position in a corporate boardroom. After nineteen years in the pharmaceutical industry, I feel intellectually and mentally

“Being a board director has become a goal of mine in the past few years as I have become adept at managing global and complex organizations in an highly regulated and ethical business.” MARIA RIVAS

ready to assume the responsibilities of a corporate board. What do you hope to learn during the course of the program? I hope to gain a deeper understanding of boa rd member duties. A n a rea of particular interest for me is risk management. I also look forward to connecting with fellow Institute alumni and LCDA members. Has being a board director always been a goal of yours? Being a board director has become a goal of mine in the past few years as I have become adept at managing global and complex organizations in a highly regulated and ethical business. In your own words, why is it important to have more Latino board directors? C or porate boa rd s benef it f rom a diversity of perspectives and experiences and the different thinking of board members from a variety of backgrounds. A company’s long-term performance depends on the compa ny ’s abilit y to deliver value to an increasingly diverse constituency.

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no lo sabíamos

[We didn’t know until this issue . . . ]

McKesson Corporation’s San Francisco headquarters are certified LEED Platinum and its Dallas campus is certified LEED Gold. p.44

Every year, about 5,000 children go through the LA Plaza de Cultura y Artes edible teaching garden program, which PepsiCo’s Lupe De La Cruz III helped create. p.8

%

Only 2 percent of Fortune 1000 company board seats are held by US Latinos and 0.5 percent are held by US Latinas.

During his time at IBM, Tronc’s Terry Jimenez lived in Warsaw, Montreal, Sao Paulo, Sydney, London, Amsterdam, and Stockholm p.31

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Domingo Lopez was part of a global task force that launched Biogen’s first global e-learning program to roll out its Code of Conduct in ten languages. p.51

ILLUSTRATIONS BY MADE BY MADE, GREGOR CRESNAR, THOMAS' DESIGNS

p.78


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“My focus here is on the workplace, what people experience here, and how can I help enable them to do their best work and be more productive.” JOHN VAZQUEZ SVP and Global Real Estate Head, Verizon

Profile for Guerrero

Hispanic Executive #49  

Hispanic Executive #49