Page 1

ELECTION 2016

|||

J AV I E R PA L O M A R E Z I S Y O U R G U I D E T O A M E R I C A' S P O L I T I C A L B O I L I N G P O I N T S E P T/O C T 2016 VO L 09 N O 41

J U S T WH AT THE DOCTOR ORDERED T HE UNS T OPPA BL E DR . YOGI HERN A NDE Z SUA RE Z D E C O D E S W H AT I T M E A N S F O R H E A LT H C A R E T O B E T R U LY PAT I E N T- C E N T E R E D



We’re building the data centers of tomorrow, today. www.lenovo.com/datacenter

Powered by Intel® Xeon® processors Lenovo and the Lenovo logo trademarks are registered trademarks of Lenovo. Intel, the Intel logo, Intel Xeon, and Xeon Inside are trademarks of Intel Corporation in the U.S. and/or other countries. Other product names mentioned herein are for identification purposes only and may be trademarks and/or registered trademarks of their respective companies. ©2016 Lenovo. All rights reserved.


AMAZING IS NEVER GIVING UP THE FIGHT. Daniel Jacobs was a rising star in boxing when his legs started to go numb. An MRI revealed the cause: a large tumor wrapped around Daniel’s spine. The surgical team at NewYork-Presbyterian used precise three-dimensional imaging to navigate the path to Daniel’s spine. They removed the tumor and rebuilt the damaged area of the spinal column. How well did the surgery work? Three years later, Daniel became the WBA Middleweight Champion of the World.

nyp.org/amazingthings


contents

SEPT/ OCT 2016

SPOTLIGHT ON HEALTHCARE

Patients Come First Across specialties within the healthcare industry, the executives featured in our Spotlight on Healthcare put forth strategies, solutions, and insurance options with one priority in mind: the patients. With the help of guest editor Dr. Yogi Hernandez Suarez, Hispanic Executive explores what it truly means to be patient-centered, even in the face of transformative change. P. 80

82

Yolangel Hernandez Suarez, Humana

86

John Ortiz, USMD Health System

90

Sandra Delgado, Humana TRICARE

98

Michael Lujan, Limelight Health

103

Ricardo NuĂąez, Vivex Biomedical

108

Juan Mejia, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital

Cover photo by Sheila Barabad

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

5


Listening is important. But it’s only part of the solution. Today’s digital marketers need more than a listening tool. They need an advanced data analytics solution. Whether it's a negative post gone viral or a fleeting sales opportunity, reacting quickly is imperative to keeping relationships alive. Knowing before things happen is even better. Only the Sysomos platform provides you with comprehensive data, intuitive dashboards and analytics that translate into meaningful, understandable insights that help you make smarter and faster decisions…before anyone else.

Step up your social game with Sysomos sysomos.com/hispanic-exec Recognized by 2016 Editors’ Choice in Social Listening and Influencer Identification

2016 Frost & Sullivan Product Line Strategy Leadership Award


contents

SEPT/ OCT 2016

ON THE PULSE 18 Juan Ontiveros isn’t afraid of taking risks to cut fuel costs and make the University of Texas–Austin greener

22

In the era of sharing, Timothy Torres pairs creativity with data mining at Sysomos to create a revolutionary marketing strategy

14

26 Richard Rosalez leads the litigation team for Samsung Electronics with a passion for protecting innovation

INDUSTRY

30

ON THE PULSE

Jesus Unzueta challenges his TrueBlue team to push further to provide the best talent for their clients

The USHCC’s Javier Palomarez voices why the 2016 presidential election matters so much to Hispanic-owned businesses

36 With a strategy centered on compliance, John Lopez keeps Farmers & Merchants Bank strong in an evolving environment 39 The legal industry is slowly adapting to e-discovery, and Edward Jones’s Patrick Chavez is leading the charge

48

PHOTOS: SHEILA BARABAD (PALOMAREZ), KEVIN MIELEC (ESTRADA)

Lydia Martinez fosters an inclusive and empowering environment at Long & Foster, attracting top candidates from across the nation 51 Leading Southwest Airline’s legal team, Juan Suarez promotes company culture and helps continue the airline’s success

42 INDUSTRY

Juan Estrada leads from the heart of Van Metre Companies: everything from risk management to community outreach

WORLD VIEW

60

Carnival’s Martha de Zayas helps make vacations come true across the seven seas, including the first US cruise from Miami to Cuba in over 50 years 68 Oscar Chavez-Arrieta brings in the skills and the talent necessary to help Sophos expand cybersecurity in Latin America

72

After a career in investment banking, Philippe Moggio returns to the court to roll out the NBA’s Latin America development program 76 Relationships are built on trust, a fact that Freudenberg IT’s Kevin Diaz infuses into all of his responsibilities as the company grows internationally

LIFE + STYLE 114 From self-starter to director of human resources at Four Seasons Hotel San Francisco, Jimmie Lopez applies the skills he’s acquired to make every guest feel like a celebrity

119

Steve Aguilar’s losses only made him stronger, which drives him both in his life and in his leadership at Pandora 122 Angel Uruchima and Diana Ortega share how HACR’s Young Hispanic Corporate Achievers program boosted their career potential 56 FROM OUR PARTNERS Dr. Nadya Nuñez and Dr. José Cadavedo discuss how to put quality family time first with their Northwestern Mutual financial advisor.

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

7


events THE ALUMNI SOCIETY 2016 SUMMIT June 23, 2016 | New York City Hispanic Executive media partner The Alumni Society is a networking platform focused on advancing Latino leadership in corporate America. In June of 2016, The Alumni Society held its annual Leadership Summit at the Hudson Mercantile in New York City. It was the society’s largest gathering in history and included top-level speakers, interactive small group and discussion panels, and countless opportunities for members to connect and network throughout the day. The Summit brought together Latino leaders from companies within the private and public sectors nationwide.

Summit co-chair Regina Montoya addressed the crowd during the closing remarks.

Anna Maria Chavez, former CEO of Girl Scouts USA, spoke about her career in the keynote speech of the Summit.

Heather von Zuben and Anilu Vasquez-Ubarri, both of Goldman Sachs, discussed leadership in a fireside chat during breakfast.

The Alumni Society members gathered for the final panel discussion on how to land seats on corporate boards.

8

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

Master of ceremonies Heather Conneely, of Facebook, shared her journey with members at the Summit.


events 2016 CALENDAR September 22 The Alumni Society Catalyst Dallas Presented by Capital One Dallas, TX

September 29 Multicultural Connect Presented by Coca-Cola Chicago, IL

October 9-11 Member Charles Garcia (center) stands with his breakout discussion table, which focused on authentic leadership and purpose.

2016 USHCC National Convention Miami, FL

October 26-28 HITEC Silicon Valley Leadership Summit & HITEC 100 Awards

November 2 2016 Top 10 Lideres Dinner Presented by Northwestern Mutual Chicago, IL HACR CEO Cid Wilson attended the Summit.

Panelists from left to right: Luis Nieto, Adela Cepeda, Aida Alvarez, Thomas Castro, and Victor Arias (moderator).

November 10 The Alumni Society Catalyst Los Angeles Presented by Time Warner

PHOTOS: SHEILA BARABAD

Los Angeles, CA

Members welcomed The Alumni Society executive director Sergio Fernandez with a toast on the rooftop.

The Alumni Society’s Executive Director Sergio Fernandez closed the event.

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

9


DIVERSE DESTINATIONS. DIVERSE LEADERSHIP. Our values on diversity and inclusion are reflected in our people, our brands, our ports of call, and our customers. It is who we are and part of our DNA. Diversity is a business imperative. With employees from more than 60 countries, their different backgrounds and cultural experiences help us remain united around a common objective— delivering memorable moments and exceeding our guests’ expectations around the world.

Pictured:

Adolfo M. Pérez, CTC Vice President, Sales and Trade Marketing Carnival Cruise Line On board since 1982

www.wlcl.com


events

NEXT GENERATION OF LÍDERES June 2, 2016 | San Francisco A new, talented group of professionals gathered for the second Next Generation of Líderes event in the Golden State as part of the 2016 Uniting Powerful Leaders dinner series. Presented by Northwestern Mutual, the intimate gathering was held at Hotel Zelos in the heart of San Francisco, kicking off with a cocktail reception on the lively patio, followed by a private dinner. L to R: Peyton Nisson, Garrett Gomez, Nelly Montoya, Maria Gianotti, Ariel Anaya

Miguel A Gamiño Jr., CIO of San Francisco, addressed attendees.

Northwestern Mutual executives used the selfie stick for photos.

The group was made of up-and-coming Latino professionals making strides in the tech, financial, and marketing worlds. Hispanic Executive also had the distinct pleasure of unveiling the July/August issue by recognizing its next cover star and guest of honor, Miguel Gamiño, chief information officer for the city and county of San Francisco, who shared his inspirational story with the audience. The evening was also centered around important discussions surrounding financial empowerment and leadership. Northwestern Mutual’s Rocio Tapia and Francisco Contreras Jr., financial advisors for the organization, addressed the group of aspiring young leaders on wealth building and financial stability. Find more coverage on Twitter by following #NextGenLideres. The upcoming Hispanic Executive event presented by Northwestern Mutual will be held in Chicago on November 2, and will celebrate the 2016 Top 10 Líderes.

Rocio Tapia, financial advisor and millennial, represented Northwestern Mutual.

Attendees mostly represented the tech sector.

Presented by

PHOTOS: SHEILA BARABAD

Trending on Twitter @HispanicExecMag What an honor to make the July issue + chance to speak to our young leaders #nextgenlideres Miguel A. Gamiño Jr. @SFCityCIO

Above all, make sure to leave a mark. We have a contribution to make to this world. @SFCityCIO @HispanicExecMag Maria Gianotti @mariagianotti

Having dinner with some great Latinx in the Bay. #inspired #nextgenlideres @HispanicExecMag Carla Hernandez @carlaghernandez

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

11


letter from the editor Has 2016 been a crazy year? That seems to be the consensus. Nobody could have predicted the level of craze that is the country’s current political environment, but here we are this second half of the year, in a stream coursing toward unpredictable shores. One person who forges ahead in the middle of surging political rapids is Javier Palomarez, president and CEO of the United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (USHCC). For this issue, we were able to catch up with Palomarez about national politics focused on the election, of course, but also in broader and far-reaching perspectives affecting all of us. In doing so, his marvelous clarity cleared our heads, too. When it seems that the media focuses on only the most extreme points of view, Palomarez, representing an organization of 4.1 million contributors to the business economy, is refreshingly centered, rational, and grounded. At press time for this issue, the USHCC did something historic—it endorsed a candidate for the first time ever. “These are extraordinary times and we believe they call for extraordinary measures,” said Palomarez said in July 2016. “We believe Hillary Clinton is the right person for this job.” Regardless of political leaning, it is commendable to see a powerful organization take action when its members have compelling reasons for doing so. Another industry that has been majorly evolving for a few years, with this year being no exception, is healthcare. We had the pleasure of working with Dr. Yogi Hernandez Suarez, chief medical officer for Humana and all-around wonderful person. The entire Hispanic Executive team enjoyed working with her so much, we found not only our guest editor but also our cover person. She was able to decode what is meant by patient-centered care today, what best practices are for delivering that care, and how each and every leadership role within the industry—from legal, to pharmaceutical, to the IT department— is crucial for pushing the industry into the modern era in a way that will put patients first. She is a role model who transcends industry. Her story has something for all of us. Consider how your own lives—professional and personal—have changed since the start of this year. Has it been a year of transformation? I already have a jump on my New Year’s resolutions, taking a cue from Palomarez and the USHCC—to be open, honest, and unafraid to try new things.

Creative

Publishing

VP of Creative Kathy Kantorski

CEO Pedro Guerrero

Editorial Directors Megan Bungeroth Cyndi Fecher

Events Director Vianni Busquets

Managing Editor KC Caldwell Editor Frannie Sprouls Correspondents Matt Alderton David Baez Zach Baliva Teresa Dovalpage Joe Dyton Julie Edwards Amanda Garcia Russ Klettke Kelli Lawrence Keith Loria Urmila Ramakrishnan Jeff Silver Alexandra Talty Senior Designer Elena Bragg Designer Juliet Desnoyer Photo Director Caleb Fox Senior Photo Editor / Staff Photographer Sheila Barabad

Managing Director of Marketing Sean Conner Reprints & Circulation Director Stacy Kraft Director of Recruiting and Retention Elyse Glab Financial Analyst Mokena Trigueros Executive Assistant Jaclyn Tumberger Receptionist/Jr. Analyst Amanda Paul Sales & Account Management VP of Sales Kyle Evangelista Director of Strategic Partnerships Krista Lane Horbenko Director of Sales Operations Philip Taylor Managing Director of Sales Steven Zucker Content & Advertising Managers Sarah Bobus Kristina Doukas Daniel Lopez Ximena Duque

Office

Client Services Director Cheyenne Eiswald

825 W. Chicago Ave. Chicago, IL 60642

Senior Client Services Manager Rebekah Pappas Client Services Manager Katie Richards

Subscriptions + Reprints For a free subscription, visit hispanicexecutive.com/sub. guerrerohowe.com

For reprint information, contact Stacy Kraft at 312.256.8460 or stacy@guerrerohowe.com.

Hispanic Executive® is a registered trademark of Guerrero Howe, LLC

Reprinting of articles is prohibited without permission of Guerrero Howe, LLC.

KC Caldwell | Managing Editor

UP NEXT

12

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2016

We celebrate our annual Top Ten Líderes. This marks the fifth consecutive year of publishing a year-end feature section recognizing ten top executives who exemplify leadership and innovation in the business arena.

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

Hispanic Executive is proud to be an official media partner and member magazine of the USHCC and HACR

PHOTO: SHEILA BARABAD

Printed in the USA


on the pulse Tackling today’s issues facing the Hispanic community

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

13


on the pulse

POLITICS

ELECTING A STRONGER ECONOMY THE UNITED STATES HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE PRESIDENT AND CEO JAVIER PALOMAREZ REFLECTS ON THE 2016 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION—AND WHY IT MATTERS SO MUCH TO HISPANIC-OWNED BUSINESSES

T

he 2016 presidential election has been called many things by many people. Some have called it a choice and an oppor tunity. Others have called it a joke, a fiasco, and a farce. One newspaper columnist, Charles M. Blow of the New York Times, likened it to the “election from hell.” Perhaps its most common appellation has been that of circus. And in many respects, that makes Javier Palomarez a lion tamer. As president and CEO of the United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (USHCC), Palomarez represents one of America’s largest and most influential voting blocs: Hispanic business owners, who now constitute 4.1 million

14

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

Hispanic-owned enterprises contributing $661 billion to the US economy every year. That, plus the fact that a young Latino reaches voting age every 30 seconds in the United States, gives Palomarez a pivotal role in the greatest show on Earth. Like every good lion tamer, he’s leveraged his role to inform and influence the presidential candidates at every opportunity, using his vast knowledge of the economy as his whip and the importance of his constituency as the flaming hoop through which the political victor must jump on their way to the presidency. In advance of the November election, Hispanic Executive met with Palomarez to discuss the race so far, the USHCC’s role during the 2016 primary season, and the organization’s goals in the final lap of the general election.

PHOTO: ERIKA THERWANGER

by Matt Alderton


SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

15


on the pulse

HE: Which candidates did you disagree with? JP: Donald Trump famously backed out [of our Presidential Candidate Q&A Series] at the last minute, after having insisted that he be given an opportunity and whining over the fact that we were “ignoring him.” After meeting with him privately, as I had with all of the candidates who participated in our

16

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

From top: USHCC’s Javier Palomarez with Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton during the Presidental Candidate Q&A Series; with Sen. Bernie Sanders; with Sen. Ted Cruz; with Republican nominee Donald Trump in an off-the-record meeting; and with Ohio Gov. John Kasich during the Q&A Series.

series, he agreed to the terms of the Q&A. We set a date, and then 48 hours before the date, he wanted to have a say in what generalists would be allowed to participate, what questions would be asked, along with a few other demands. Of course, that wasn’t the format previously agreed upon. So, we agreed to disagree, but he backed out at the last minute. On the Democratic side, Sanders’s unwavering opinion was that we should break up all the big banks, even in light of the USHCC’s disapproval. This is something we respect and commend. It’s obviously something we can’t agree with—given the fact that the large banks he wants to break up are the institutions that provide 99 percent of the funding that our small businesses need to continue to grow, create jobs, and drive economic development—but the point is: I commend him for sticking to his convictions. HE: Who were the candidates that most impressed you? JP: Hillary made some great comments that were very telling. She literally said, “I will be America’s small business president,” which to me speaks volumes. She was the only one to phrase it that way and the only candidate to specifically call out small business as something that would be critical for the continued well-being of the nation. She reminded me, and everyone else in that room, that she is the daughter of an entrepreneur, and that her father’s small business

PHOTOS: ERIKA THERWANGER

Hispanic Executive: Last year, in advance of the presidential primaries, the USHCC hosted its Presidential Candidate Q&A Series, during which Republican and Democratic hopefuls had a chance to discuss issues of importance to Hispanic Americans. What were your most key takeaways from this series? Javier Palomarez: We had the privilege of sitting down with Bernie Sanders, Martin O’Malley, and Hillary Clinton on the Democratic side, and with Ted Cruz, John Kasich, and Jeb Bush on the Republican side. It really set the tone for an honest and candid dialogue with all of the campaigns moving forward. We stayed in close contact with all of them up to a point. It was eye-opening to see organizations, individuals, and candidates who were committed to their philosophy and committed to their viewpoint. We commend—and I continue to commend—all of them for sticking to their guns on the issues they believed were important, even when they didn’t agree [with our platform].


provided for her and her family and their well-being. That was a message that resonated. And though he is no longer a candidate, John Kasich is a politician I hold in very high regard. He comes from a state that doesn’t have a huge Hispanic community, but he did a great job for the small-business owner sector as governor in the state of Ohio. He grew the economy, created jobs, and supported the creation of literally tens of thousands of small businesses during his tenure. He started with a deficit that was in the billions, and he ended with a surplus that was in the billions. He serves as an example of an individual with a record that goes beyond the rhetoric; he has something substantive that he can point to and say: “This is what I’ve accomplished. I’ve been a proven leader; I’ve created jobs, I’ve removed barriers, I’ve lessened government intervention, and my leadership has led to a better economy and a better state of Ohio.” Those were the kinds of metrics that allowed us the opportunity to endorse on the Republican side John Kasich and on the Democratic side Hillary Clinton, who both have a proven track record of working with American small businesses, understanding the challenges of American small businesses, and being able to prove and point to specific things they have done to help our small businesses grow. HE: Now that the general election is underway,

what’s your impression of the primary season that unfolded after your Q&A Series, which ultimately put Clinton and Trump at the top of their parties’ tickets? JP: Looking back, I’m not sure at what point it turned into a circus, but it did. It turned into reality TV, with Trump continuing to double down on the hate-filled, divisive nature of his campaign. It’s disappointing, but it teaches us all a lesson. On both ends of the spectrum, a single truth emerges: many Americans feel disenfranchised. Many of them feel they have been left out of the political narrative and dialogue. On the left, we saw young people by the thousands gathering behind Sanders and coalescing. And on the right, you see Americans gathering and coalescing behind Donald Trump. Agree with them or not, this is illustrative of the fact that many Americans feel they have been left out of the conversation for too long. HE: How can organizations like USHCC help restore Americans’ faith in government? JP: It’s clear to us that we need to continue to find a path forward for our community and for all Americans. It’s also clear to us that economic opportunity is a way to solve some of the frustrations felt by those who feel left-out and disenfranchised. It’s amazing how much more content people are with the political system when the economy is growing and creating jobs that pay well and

are safe and secure. Therein lies our role. We remain resolute in the fact that we need to continue to drive local jobs and continue to drive local economies by pushing for the continued development of all small businesses in general, and Hispanic-owned small businesses in particular.

Policy Proposals

HE: Looking ahead to November, do the candidates share in your vision? JP: [Hispanic-owned small businesses] are part of the solution to economic woes, and as such, we insist on being part of the dialogue. Hillary has personally assured me that we will continue to be reached out to, that we will continue to have a seat at the table, and that she will continue to personally talk to me about what her thoughts are, what her policies might be, and who her advisors will be going forward. Likewise, we continue to hear from Trump’s team. It is rarely calm and it is rarely positive, but we continue to have discussions. Our goal is to shape the dialogue to ensure that our people are being considered. We must ensure that our needs and concerns are being heard by all policymakers, but certainly by the two people who are looking to be the next leader of the greatest economy in the free world.

1. Access to Capital: “The USHCC supports and encourages more capital investment in small businesses, reducing regulatory burdens for entrepreneurs, and facilitating the exchange of capital to invest in growth of American businesses.”

EDITOR’S NOTE: At press time, the USHCC officially endorsed Hillary Clinton for president in an historic announcement, breaking its 38-year streak of neutrality.

During the 2016 election season, the USHCC has been resolute in advocating for policy proposals in the following five subcategories of domestic policy:

2. International Trade and Commerce: “Small businesses are one of the primary drivers of job growth in the US, but too often trade barriers lock small businesses out of important foreign markets and export opportunities.” 3. Education and Workforce Development: “We must invest in job training and work readiness programs so our young people will be better prepared for their future entry into the workforce.” 4. Immigration: “USHCC believes immigration policy must be viewed as a major component of US economic growth.” 5. Energy: “The USHCC believes that most Americans share the goal of keeping energy affordable for businesses and families while creating jobs and remaining conscious of the environment.”

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

17


on the pulse

Taking Risks, ENERGY

Juan Ontiveros is the man responsible for heating, cooling, and powering what is in effect a small city: the University of Texas–Austin. By managing all the moving pieces of campus growth and modern energy technologies, he has actually cut the use of fuel—beyond expectation by Russ Klettke

J

18

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

JUAN ONTIVEROS Associate VP of Utilities, Energy and Facilities Management University of Texas–Austin

largest university campus in the United States, with a population of 50,000 students and 21,000 faculty and staff. More to the point, Ontiveros’s mission is to provide these services with reliability and efficiency—including in a few 100-year-old buildings that aren’t conducive to either of those things.

PORTRAIT: BIRZER PHOTO, INC.

ua n Ontiveros isn’t afraid of hiring people who are smarter than him. It’s a humble position for someone who is regularly handed multimillion-dollar infrastructure projects from his employer, the University of Texas–Austin. The university’s associate vice president of utilities, energy, and facilities management is a mechanical engineer by training and is known for taking a visionary, holistic approach to his projects—all of which have achieved energy efficiencies copied by other university campuses across the world. He didn’t accomplish any of these successes by himself, he notes. He manages people who manage other people and projects to deftly execute a clean-energy mission. That mission is to cool, heat, and power the fifth-


Saving Energy The University of Texas– Austin campus features the UT Tower, which opened in 1937 and stands at 307 feet.

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

19


on the pulse

Prime Controls is a Systems Integration and I&C Construction firm specifically structured to meet all of a client’s industrial automation and control needs. We have the size, expertise, and experience to take complete responsibility for total industrial automation and control solutions. Structured as a Main Automation Contractor, Prime Controls provides customers a sole source solution for Industrial Automation challenges.

CONTACT US. 1725 Lakepointe Drive Lewisville, TX 75057 (866) 99-SCADA | (972) 221-4849 www.prime-controls.com

TOTAL SOLUTIONS, TOTAL RESPONSIBILITY,

TOTAL EXCELLENCE

To manage all this—and to convince school administrators to spend tens of millions of dollars now to save money over time—Ontiveros has to trust cost-benefit projections, the people reporting to him, and his own instincts. “I’m a risk-taker,” he says. “My staff have to be comfortable with that, and they have to let their teams take some risks, too.” Pay Now, Save Later The UT-Austin campus has thirteen LEED-certified buildings, with five more certifications pending. Part of what Ontiveros’s team did was to bring the use of older buildings into an era of green-driven efficiency. In a state where fossil fuels define much of the economy, the work they’ve done to reduce the use of oil and gas is remarkable. There are solar arrays on three of the 150 buildings on the campus (with a capacity of 446 kilowatts, less than 5 percent of the total demand), so the legacy of the campus’ district energy system means the school’s buildings are fueled by natural gas. District energy essentially means the campus generates its own power with its

own on-site plant; UT–Austin has had a district system since 1929. But Ontiveros’s career started at UT–El Paso, a sister campus where he earned both his bachelor’s and master’s degrees, and where the buildings were on the local utility grid. That posed an initial challenge for Ontiveros. “We were at a point where we needed to replace or expand existing systems,” says Ontiveros, who served in a similar capacity as UT–Austin while at UT–El Paso in the early 1990s. “I saw that gas prices were low, yet utility electrical prices were high. So I looked at it on a higher level.” The solution at that time was to first talk to the utility about reducing their rates. The UT–El Paso campus was 10 percent of the utility’s customer market, so they eventually, with persuasion, were willing to talk. The negotiation effectively reduced the price by about 40 percent, saving the campus about $1.2 million. With those savings, Ontiveros was able to build a central plant at modern standards that accommodated the growing campus. Then, using an energy performance

First of Its PEERs Juan Ontiveros’s modernization achievements at the UT–Austin district heating plant go beyond energy efficiencies. Even while bringing natural gas use by volume back to 1976 levels, the total campus space grew 80 percent in square footage. But in thirsty Texas, which has been faced with epic droughts in recent years, the use of potable water was cut by 66 million gallons by using “auxiliary water,” a part of which is condensate harvested from air-cooling systems. UT–Austin’s system is the first university certified by the US Green Building Council’s Performance Excellence in Electricity Renewal (PEER) program.

20

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016


Make a difference.

contract, they financed the construction based on anticipated cost savings that were based on a ten-year return on investment for the facility. The plant outperformed expectations, delivering a return on investment within just six years. When Ontiveros was offered the job at the Austin campus in 1997, the flagship institution of the fourteen-campus UT system, he jumped at the opportunity. Austin is a bigger campus with budgets and responsibilities on a much larger scale, but Ontiveros is not one to shy away from a challenge. “I rarely say no to anything,” he says. Two years after Ontiveros arrived in the Texas capital, a large boiler erupted and resulted in an emergency $2 million expense. “It was a sign of problems to come,” he recalls. Concurrently, the Austin campus added several buildings—five million square feet—placing a higher demand for power and cooling. So, Ontiveros proposed capital improvements that would cost $48 million. He successfully sold those projects on the basis of how much money could be saved moving forward. Through a combination of upgrading and building a new substation, a cooling tower, steam and gas turbines, chilling stations, and a water-heating plant—in some cases, using waste heat from one process to power other components of the system— the UT–Austin campus now runs at about half the cost of comparable systems elsewhere. All told, he has overseen more than $240 million in projects.

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS HEADQUARTERED: Austin, Texas FOUNDED: 1883

What we do is about more than our design and construction. It’s about making the world a more amazing place. We do that every day by empowering and encouraging our engineers to change, shape and improve the future for generations to come.

EMPLOYEES: 21,000 ABOUT: The University of Texas (UT) is one of the largest public universities in the United States. UT–Austin is the flagship school of the University of Texas system. Offices Worldwide | burnsmcd.com

Knowledge Is Power Ontiveros has a reputation for being a “yes-man” in all areas of his life, including furthering his education. He completed his master’s thesis on solar energy systems in the 1970s. He has always had a keen interest in renewable fuels. Since then, he has had to continue his education to keep up with the ways in which traditional technologies have evolved considerably, even if the buildings and district systems are largely locked into place. Upgrades, retrofits, and new facilities have reduced overall consumption of traditional [natural gas] energy sources. Now, the mechanical engineer seems to know a lot about human psychology as well. By making academic departments and students aware of their cost on the university’s district grid, he’s working to motivate them to reduce energy consumption room by room, building by building. “Power plants on campus are invisible to most students,” he says. “But when students and faculty learn that the plants lower costs, which can affect tuition, they become a source of pride.”

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

21


on the pulse

oto/Video

Photo Album

Had the best time celebrating my birthday with my favorite people Photo/Video Public

Post

Photo Album

Had my Starbucks and am ready to start the day

Public

Photo/Video

Post

Photo Album

Many thanks to Linda, my backpacking companion, for taking the time to educate me on how to survive in the wilderness. Couldn’t have asked for a more scenic, beautiful landscape to trek through! Public

Photo/Video

Post

Photo Album

Happy first year anniversary to Emily Patel and Raj!

Public

Photo/Video

Post

Photo Album

Chris Johnson is going to an event near you today Photo/Video Post

Photo Album

‘Tis the season for sneezin’ I hope this cold goes away soon.

Public

Photo/Video

Photo Album

SO COOL to see one of my favorites Local Natives play new music at the studio where they wrote + recorded Hummingbird!

Public

22

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

Post

Post

PHOTO: BRANDON BOURDAGES, AUGUSTINO, RAWPIXEL.COM/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Public


Photo/Video

Photo Album

#TBT last month- adventuring through Medellin, Jardin, Tayrona and Cartagena. Stunning country and incredibly friendly people.

Public

Post

TECHNOLOGY Photo/Video

Photo Album

Gleaning Data From the Soapbox

Summer’s here, put on those shades #MondayMotivation #Summer

Public

Photo/Video

Post

Photo Album

Just got back to the US after ten days without service, and I have one question: what the heck is Pokemon go??

Public

Post

Social media analytics provider Sysomos taps into the intersection of technology and creativity to study what people are thinking like never before by Russ Klettke

I

n the days of the eight-inch floppy disk, early information technology developers were trying to figure out big math problems and how to get to the moon. Did they foresee the era of sharing—rides, rooms, ideas, personal information, and photos? Today, we can easily find out what people are buying and eating, what their political views are, and which rapper they absolutely detest because what they share on social media can be easily found, monitored, and analyzed. For some, there is significant value in all of that data. And who better to explain it than Timothy Torres, senior vice president of infrastructure at Sysomos, a social media analytics company?

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

23


on the pulse

HEADQUARTERED: Toronto, Canada FOUNDED: 2007 REACH: Sysomos has two offices in Canada, three across the US, and overseas in the UK, Singapore, and China. ABOUT: Sysomos is a social media analytics company that collects user-generated data to allow businesses to measure, understand, and engage with the fast-moving social media landscape.

24

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

“We work with companies, large and small, to help them figure out who their consumers are and what they are interested in,” says Torres, who works in Sysomos’ Sunnyvale, California, engineering office. The Sysomos headquarters is located in Toronto. An example he provides is of a recognized soda brand that hired Sysomos to use image recognition technology to find their product in smartphone pictures shared by users of Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and other platforms. Surprisingly, it was seen very often with higher-end fashion accessories instead of the predictable backyard barbecues. “There was a bigger association with luxury products than thought,” he explains. That kind of information helps marketers identify markets in ways that no other forms of research can. Similarly, the company is able to monitor and analyze political discussions. The 2016 presidential election, with so many contentious primaries earlier in the year, provided a rich trove of data. And it’s not just about what is being said but it is by whom [in demographic metadata], where, and with how much intensity. And social media chatter can affect businesses in unexpected ways. When Sysomos picks up on outbreaks of colds and flus through real-time analysis of social data, it can advise an antibacterial consumer products firm where to reshuffle its distribution to reach regions

where those infections are most pronounced. When an athletic shoe marketer starts using a celebrity spokesperson, consumer reaction can be identified within hours, not months as was the case in the old analog world. It’s all testimony to the powerful information technologies that have come into existence. It’s also about how people apply these tools in very human ways.

TIMOTHY TORRES SVP of Infrastructure Sysomos

“Technology isn’t interesting until people use it.” He qualifies that in Sysomos’s case, the technology used is just a product of human ingenuity. Just as important, is that it starts with people looking at a problem or a question, after which they create the algorithm that helps mine through the data to find what they want to know. “Even people who are not technology-focused are very interested in how to

PHOTO: CHIP HOLLEY

SYSOMOS


A New Kind of Marketing For decades, marketers have wished to capture the most effective tool: word of mouth advertising. When 1950s homemakers talked about their laundry detergent over backyard fences, it could secure brand loyalty for life. But who knew who was saying what to whom? Today, Sysomos’s Influence product does. It identifies influential people discussing brands in social media conversations. Correlating the product with publicly available biographical information, marketers can see who the influences are. Better yet, they can connect with individuals in those groups in relevant and meaningful ways. The tools of traditional marketing research lose by comparison in cost and efficacy—except with diminishing groups of people who are not (yet) plugged into social media.

deploy software that yields something useful,” he says. It’s this interplay of technology and people that fascinates Torres. “The stereotype of the technology worker is someone who is dry and numbers-oriented,” Torres says. “I’ll admit that in a lot of ways, that can be true.” And the creatives—the client-facing product managers who help work through those issues—tend to be the younger, more socially aware with larger personalities. So how do these two types work together? “At Sysomos, we bridge this,” Torres says. “We keep communications active between these two types of people. Both sides have to understand each other.” As a very engaged tech person whose career started on a help desk, Torres successfully served as a bridge between both worlds even before he started working for Sysomos. He encourages techies and creatives around the globe to learn as much about each other, the tools available, and their business objectives as possible as a means for producing better results—for their companies and their careers. Another challenge that Sysomos and many other companies face is the sheer volume of data available. Torres says Sysomos reads and indexes about four terabytes of new public information every day. While information is power, it’s daunting to see how that much data can be collected, analyzed, and used. A big part of what adds to this is the Internet of Things,

“In every situation, we are committed to making data approachable and useful. It boils down to the smart application of math and science.” Timothy Torres

where devices, mechanical and digital machinery, buildings, highways, bridges, and even animals transmit data without human interaction. This is an opportunity for Sysomos to apply its data analytics capabilities to help make sense of things beyond human-centric social media. “In every situation, we are committed to making data approachable and useful,” he says. “It boils down to the smart application of math and science.” This leads to the exciting prospect of predictive analytics, using data wherever possible to know what might happen in the future. “We are working to get to rapidly applied predictive technologies on an affordable level,”

he says. “This will help us get ahead of issues before they happen.” Of course, a lot of this raises the specter of privacy—how much do we want our own thoughts known, much less our futures predicted, by entities outside ourselves? Torres explains that what Sysomos does is not about individuals but rather metadata. And that the company strictly adheres to privacy laws and contracts. Most importantly, the information used is freely shared by all. “When they share on social media, people are basically standing on a soapbox in the public square,” he says. And companies like Sysomos have the tools to use their proclamations to glean useful information about our society.

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

25


on the pulse

LAW

Where Litigation Meets Innovation Richard Rosalez merges his love of technology with a passion for protecting Samsung Electronics in the courtroom by Julie Edwards

S

RICHARD ROSALEZ VP of Litigation Samsung Electronics

26

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

HE: Tell us about your background and what sparked your interest in the law. RR: I was born and raised in Ohio. I attended MIT for college and then Columbia University School of Law. As a child, I had wide-ranging interests, including science, technology, history, sports, and politics. I always admired lawyers for their ability to effect change, from Jefferson and Lincoln to Thurgood Marshall and

PHOTO: JOHN BRENDE

a msung Electronics has been deeply involved in some groundbreaking moments in history when it comes to patent litigation. Though the challenges are surprising every day, Samsung’s vice president of litigation, Richard Rosalez, is absolutely thrilled to be a part of it all. Rosalez takes the time to sit down with Hispanic Executive to discuss why he feels has found his dream job, and the lessons he has learned along the way.


other civil rights lawyers. My interest in science and technology led me to MIT. When I thought that I might pursue a career in government and politics, I decided to pursue law school. After law school, I worked for two international law firms until 2011, when I became director of litigation at Samsung Telecommunications America. In 2014, I was promoted to senior director. In 2015, Samsung Telecommunications America merged with Samsung Electronics America, and I became responsible for the combined company’s litigation docket and related activities. Earlier this year, I was promoted to vice president, litigation. HE: From working for a law firm, what led you to go in-house at Samsung? RR: I have always enjoyed science and technology, and describe myself as a bit of a nerd and a technophile. I jumped at the chance to join an organization like Samsung, to take on a leadership role in the legal department, and to be around groundbreaking ideas. A market leader in categories ranging from mobile to TVs to semiconductors, we are also pushing the limits of what is possible in areas like mobile payments, virtual reality, and the Internet of Things. HE: What is your scope of responsibility like at Samsung? RR: I am responsible for all litigation and related

“We face everything from small claims to class actions and lawsuits that are competitive threats.” Richard Rosalez

activities, including investigations and regulatory matters for Samsung Electronics America. This encompasses everything from pre-suit investigations, to discovery, to trials and appeals. I am also actively involved in significant strategic issues and public relations matters—I protect Samsung’s interests in litigation and related matters and advise management and business leaders accordingly. The legal issues we see are generally what you would expect for a large company like Samsung, offering a wide range of products and market leadership. We face everything from small claims to class actions and lawsuits that are competitive threats. The subject matter varies from commercial disputes to intellectual property issues. HE: What about working in litigation for Samsung has surprised you most? RR: Samsung’s quick rise in brand recognition and brand value has pleasantly

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

27


on the pulse

SAMSUNG ELECTRONICS AMERICA HEADQUARTERED: Ridgefield Park, NJ FOUNDED: 1969 EMPLOYEES: 14,000 in the US ABOUT: Samsung Electronics is the flagship company of South Korea-based Samsung, and leads the global market in high-tech electronics manufacturing and digital media.

surprised me. I had been familiar with Samsung for decades. But seeing some of the breakthroughs, and witnessing the execution around strategic decisions from inside the company has been extremely exciting. HE: What challenges have you faced? RR: As many lawyers would say, there is so much to do and so little time. I think I have always done a good job prioritizing competing demands. But a heavy work and travel schedule have forced me to improve my time management skills. You have to put in the work that is necessary but also know when to call it a day. Maintaining a good work/life balance is key. HE: What has been most rewarding about working for Samsung? RR: First of all, I have found it exciting and professionally rewarding to work on legal matters of such significance. It is rewarding to know that efforts go toward fighting to protect innovation and competition, which will benefit consumers at large. Secondly, the extent to which Samsung gives back is rewarding. Samsung is a big believer in the power of technology and what it can enable. The company significantly invests in the next generation of innovators by stimulating STEM education and support in schools. Through “Samsung Gives,” all employees get two days off each year to volunteer in their local communities. HE: Can you discuss the ongoing Samsung/Apple

28

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

“It is rewarding to know that my efforts go toward fighting to protect innovation and competition, which will benefit consumers at large.” Richard Rosalez

litigation over patents? RR: Samsung looks forward to presenting this important case to the Supreme Court. We believe we have strong arguments, which is why we have enjoyed support from so many third parties to overturn the ruling in favor of Apple, including support from leading patent experts, numerous concerned companies, and the US government. We believe the matter is extremely important to preserve innovation and competition. HE: What are some of your interests outside of work? RR: I love traveling with my family. I coach my daughter and son in various sports and lead an Adventure Guides group. I volunteer at my kids’ school and in the community, including serving as an advisor to a leading area charter school. Beyond that, I try to work out to keep up with my

kids and stay focused. Lastly, I am an avid professional sports, sci-fi, and comic book fan, so I watch and read when I can. Thankfully, my family enjoys these interests as well. HE: Who has been the most influential person in your life? RR: My paternal grandfather. He moved throughout Texas, the South, and the Midwest with a large family in tow as migrant workers. I appreciate how hard he worked and am eternally grateful that he looked for better opportunities. I grew up a few blocks from him and spent a lot of time with him in my formative years, including driving him to chemotherapy after he was diagnosed with cancer. We shared some great times together in his last days and I took every opportunity to learn from him. He helped instill in me a great work ethic and motivated me to work hard and make a difference.


industry Top-level insight and updates on business in America

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

29


industry

TRENDS | TRAJECTORY

TrueBlue’s Commitment to Connection Jesus Unzueta pushes his TrueBlue team to create innovative ways to keep the growing staffing company nimble, profitable, and ahead of its customers’ needs

A

t the start of his career, Jesus Unzueta was challenged by a mentor to dream bigger. Now, as the head of IT for TrueBlue, he challenges his company to consolidate and provide the best and most comprehensive platform in the industry, even after a series of mergers and acquisitions. Unzueta, TrueBlue’s senior vice president and global chief information officer, is currently charged with the task of moving the company from several different internal systems used by several brands TrueBlue has acquired over the years, and replacing them with a single customer- and employee-friendly platform. The ultimate goal is to support operations as TrueBlue moves from a company with about $3 billion in annual revenue to one exceeding $5 billion by 2020.

30

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

Unzueta says it’s unlikely he would be the leader he is today without the guidance of a friend and mentor who not only saw but also challenged him to realize his potential. After serving as an IT specialist in the US Marine Corps in 1993, his first job out of high school, Unzueta met Robert Urwiler at Peregrine Systems in San Diego. Urwiler encouraged Unzueta to consider a two-year program for IT managers at the California Institute of Technology and a bachelor of science from the University of Phoenix. In the meantime, Urwiler put him to work in almost every area of IT to learn how to both manage systems and lead teams of people. “He mentored and coached me, and almost fired me a couple of times,” Unzueta says with a chuckle. “But he never stopped pushing me. When I called to tell him I had gotten into the MBA

PHOTO: MATT HAGEN

by Amanda Garcia


TRENDS

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

31


industry

TRENDS | TRAJECTORY

“It was the first time since being out of the Marines that I felt I was carrying out strong values and an important mission every day.” Jesus Unzueta

TOMORROW starts here.

32

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

program at USC’s Marshall School of Business, he said, ‘Good. Now let’s see if they let you out,’” Unzueta recalls. Being challenged in such a way set Unzueta up for success. “Because of him, I’m still reminded that it’s not what I start but rather what I finish,” he says. “I believe I have been a role model to all of my teams in demonstrating the power of combining formal education, business acumen, and technology experience. I’m proud to have motivated others to go back and complete an education instead of only been relying on technical skill sets.” Over the course of his career, Unzueta has held several senior leadership positions in tech companies, including Peregrine and Macromedia, and has managed more than thirty acquisitions or divestitures. The combination of experience in domestic and international divisions of companies—even operating his own firm for a while—and integrating newly acquired companies made him a perfect fit for TrueBlue. When Unzueta came on board, the company was conducting a series of significant acquisitions that have greatly expanded its global presence.

With Unzueta at the helm of its IT department, TrueBlue was poised to make major changes in technology, as well as transform its IT team into an integrated organization by including the talent gained through acquisitions. “The company needed vision and execution to take the IT team from where it was to where it needed to be,” he says. TrueBlue’s core purpose is to connect work and supply companies to talent with a goal of creating the best possible workforce. The company was built on supplying specialized on-demand labor—something that resonated with Unzueta. His father had been a blue-collar worker, but always encouraged him to earn his living with his head instead of his hands. Needless to say, he followed his father’s advice and taking a leadership role at TrueBlue allowed Unzueta the opportunity to lend a hand to hard-working people who—like his father—just want to support their families. “I felt an instant connection with [TrueBlue CEO] Steve Cooper when he explained the company’s mission, vision, and values,” Unzueta says. “He spoke about the value we provide to our customers and workers,


and what it means to them as they return safely to their families. It was the first time since being out of the Marines that I felt I was carrying out strong values and an important mission every day.” When Unzueta took on the role of CIO in January 2015, he knew that merging TrueBlue’s nine brands would be a major part of his work. Just six months later, he and the executive team were ready to dive into an ambitious plan to consolidate TrueBlue’s numerous business units—most of which had operated relatively independently—into just three, and then to integrate those three into one cohesive organization supported by innovative technology. Unzueta and TrueBlue were faced with combining its flagship brand, Labor Ready—which specialized in staffing across the US, Canada, and Puerto Rico—with acquired brands CLP and Spartan Staffing into one entity, debuting as People Ready. In addition, operations in Canada, Australia, Poland, India, and elsewhere in the world came under the company’s PeopleScout brand, which fills permanent positions for some of the world’s best-known companies and places more US military veterans in full-time employment than any other recruitment firm in the world. The third step for Unzueta and his team will be to bring four more brands that offer on-site workforce management together—a process slated to be completed next year. A major benefit to integrating so many companies into just a few is the ease of sharing data across platforms, Unzueta explains. That’s especially important at TrueBlue, which has a talent pool of hundreds of thousands of workers, but a structure that has made it difficult for all of its brands to access data

TRUEBLUE INC. HQ

Tacoma, WA

FOUNDED

1987

REACH

698 Branches across all 50 States, Canada, and Puerto Rico

ANNUAL REVENUE

$2.7 billion (2015)

TrueBlue provides specialized workforce solutions including staffing, large-volume on-site workforce management, and recruitment process outsourcing for full-time positions.

20,000 staffing and recruiting companies operate in the United States

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

33


industry

TRENDS | TRAJECTORY

COMPLEX

TrueBlue by the Numbers

698

branches

Simplified The best value in enterprise-class converged systems is here. You can have it all with Hitachi Unified Compute Platform (UCP). • Simplified management and deployment

206

On-premise sites

840,000

people connected to work each year

• Continuous availability • Private cloud capability

130,000 customers served annually

Learn more at hds.com 34

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

Source: www.trueblue.com

on those workers. Now, when workers register with one company, it’s easier for them to also go into the pool of workers for other TrueBlue companies. Merging systems also allows for significantly less licensing, compliance, and coding maintenance, as well as making the process more efficient for customers, workers, and staff. Improving the customer and employee experience is another significant goal that Unzueta and his IT team are prioritizing, including the creation of online tools for customers and workers. “Higher Insight,” one example that was piloted in 2015 through PeopleScout, is a business intelligence tool that allows customers to see their recruitment progress in real time via a customized dashboard. Another tool is a mobile app that allows workers to view, apply, and accept jobs—even get paid—right from their phone. The same app will allow customers to post job specs, select workers, and rate employees. “We are engaging our customers and workers through a device that has become second-nature to them and integrated into all areas of their lives,” he explains. “Customers will be able to place orders at the moment they realize a need, and workers will be able to review and commit to a job whenever and wherever they are.” “This efficiency and ease-of-use makes finding work easier and more predictable—knowing we have everything else handled.” Unzueta is proud to be TrueBlue’s first Hispanic executive, and he says diversity is something TrueBlue takes very seriously in every part of its operations. The company sponsors a diversity and inclusion council made up of thirty people from different levels of the company with a variety of backgrounds, who make sure all voices are heard and respected. “Diversity makes our work better,” he


P

says. “Everybody brings different experiences to the table, which improves the work process and the final product.” Unzueta says that because the way people work will continue to change, so will TrueBlue’s technology and processes. The company is growing at a global level, continuing to make acquisitions and working to stay ahead of an increasingly young workforce that doesn’t always embrace the trade skills of their parents. “We are moving at such a rapid pace on all fronts to get ahead, and stay ahead, of our customers’ needs, that now is a very exciting time. From a technology standpoint, we’re building and delivering our future in an environment in which new opportunities for our customers and workers present themselves every week,” Unzueta says.

A

R

T

N

E

R

S

A POTENT NETWORK OF TECHNOLOGY EXPERTS AND LEADERS A diverse collection of technology industry veterans whose aim is to better both strategy and process of select enterprise clients. With decades of technology competence and leadership mastery Maxsam Partners offers expert analysis, strategy, and direction to complex enterprise technology scenarios. Boasting an enviable pedigree and chorus of delighted clients Maxsam’s unique model is recognized as humble, thorough, and transformational.

SPECIALTIES

During the course of a year, America’s staffing companies hire nearly 16 million temporary and contract employees.

• Enterprise Technology Process Transformation • Highly Specialized Custom Enterprise Software Development • Interim Technology Leadership Placement • Specialized Technology Staffing SERVICES

• Organizational Technology Transformation • Custom Software Development

“We can’t stand still because we know there are other companies focused on similar ideas and models. Our goal is to be the leader.”

• Technology Leadership Placement • Technology Staffing

www.maxsampartners.com SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

35


industry

TRENDS | TRAJECTORY

Compliance as a Pillar of Financial Strength How John Lopez is helping California’s strongest and oldest bank thrive in an ever-changing regulatory environment

W

JOHN LOPEZ SVP and Compliance Manager Farmers & Merchants Bank

36

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

hen John Lopez entered the world of compliance during the savings and loan crisis of the 1980s, many friends and colleagues advised him to take a different path. While they interpreted the move as a step back for a business administration professional, Lopez saw a unique opportunity. “Compliance was a new and unexplored field,” Lopez recalls. “I recognized the chance to become a subject-matter expert and develop a new career.” Lopez was right. In 1991, after six years as a federal regulator, he took his first position as compliance officer. A quarter-century later, he’s applying his wealth of knowledge to help Farmers & Merchants Bank—one of California’s oldest and strongest banks—follow the ever-changing letter of the law. Throughout his career, Lopez has watched what started as a fledgling service grow into a critical aspect of any competitive bank. As a regulator, he watched executives stand outside their banks as agencies took over and transferred them to the FDIC. Now, he

empowers and guides banks by helping them understand laws, regulations, and rules so they can operate as good corporate citizens and better serve their clients and communities. It has been an evolution. Compliance, Lopez says, was once seen as a technical obstacle. “Teams would come to me to approve major promotional materials at 4:30p.m. on a Friday, and even if I spotted several red flags, they wanted to push ahead,” he laments. “You can’t have a strong consultant that’s not a true partner.” Now, he has a seat right at the table. The compliance officer at Farmers & Merchants (F&M) Bank is involved in product decisions, marketing campaign meetings, and implementation committees, “which is consistent with F&M’s bedrock values of honesty and integrity,” says Lopez, who has now been with the bank for thirteen years. Regulators expect compliance to be fully involved in and aware of all banking activities. “There’s a greater demand for a compliance officer’s services than ever before,” says Lopez, adding that

PHOTO: STEVE POLLOCK

by Zach Baliva


TRENDS

FARMERS & MERCHANTS HQ

Long Beach, CA

FOUNDED

1907

REACH

24 branches across the Los Angeles region

MARKET VALUE ($M)

792

TOTAL ASSETS (2015)

$6,153,600

Farmers & Merchants Bank offers commercial and small business banking and loans, home loans, and a suite of consumer banking products.

The compliance department of Farmers & Merchants Bank of Long Beach, from left to right: Kevin Bosetti, Angela Oganezova, Andrea Parker, John Lopez, Stephanie Buonopane, Kristine De Leon-Soliven, and Cheryl Ryman.

he recently attended an industry conference with 1,800 other compliance professionals. “Just a few years ago, the same conference attracted half as many people.” Lopez attributes the industry’s fast growth to its changing nature. “The velocity of change in compliance attracts people who enjoy a challenge,” he says. “Compliance professionals must always be on the lookout, scouring various sources before analyzing, reviewing, adopting, and implementing new laws and acts.” At Farmers & Merchants, his team is responsible for protecting the institution by overseeing a system of checks and balances. “My team has to make

sure we are in compliance with current, and even pending, legislation when material goes out the door,” Lopez says. Farmers & Merchants—like all other financial organizations—is under increased scrutiny from federal and state regulators. Lopez meets with the officials at least three times a year to provide updates and answer questions regarding his bank’s plans, activities, and even community contributions. Lopez acts as an interpreter as he manages the bank’s relationship with examiners and demonstrates how his bank is in alignment with their expectations. As a former regulator, Lopez meets with all of Farmers & Merchants’ new hires to explain his role as it relates to

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

37


industry

TRENDS | TRAJECTORY

We congratulate JOHN LOPEZ for his outstanding achievements and this well-deserved recognition. We are proud to call John our friend

“The velocity of change in compliance attracts people who enjoy a challenge. Compliance professionals must always be on the lookout, scouring various sources before analyzing, reviewing, adopting, and implementing new laws and acts.” John Lopez

and colleague.

The Banking and Business Law Firm

www.ablawyers.com 949.474.1944 38

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

their duties. “Historically, industry people used to view us as a cost-center and not a profit-center. As a mitigator against risk, I prefer to think of the compliance department as a ‘profit protection center,’” he says. Compliance has one simple job— to help ensure Farmers & Merchants Bank will follow banking laws. They align compliance behaviors and business practices to drive profits safely. Now, as banks move more quickly into the world of e-banking and mobile applications, compliance is more important than ever before. Banks that use smartphones, portals, and the Internet to make loans and accept deposits must continue to adhere to regulatory oversight. And, given the changing trends in consumer behavior, one misstep could be costly. “As money gets

transferred from baby boomers to millennials, only banks that can compete under the rules in the digital realm will thrive,” Lopez says. That’s why he’s still passionate about his role as compliance manager. Even after all his years in the business, Lopez is still learning and adapting. Above all, he enjoys being in charge of understanding and interpreting regulatory implications to help Farmers & Merchants capitalize on new opportunities.

Since 1985, Aldrich & Bonnefin has been meeting the legal needs of California’s financial institutions. Our attorneys are proud to offer the expertise needed to assist banks, credit unions, savings associations, and money services businesses, as well as other financial services providers, in achieving their business goals. www.ablawyers.com 949.474.1944


TRENDS

Tradition Upgraded E-discovery thought leader Patrick Chavez discusses the impact and evolution of technology in the legal sector by David Baez

M PATRICK CHAVEZ Chief Privacy Officer

PHOTO: SANDY MORIARTY

Edward Jones

ore than any other, the judicial sector is steeped in tradition. Court decisions made 100 years ago still influence cases today. Precedent could indeed be considered the heart of the profession. While technology has not changed how the law proceeds and reaches judgments, it has transformed how information is exchanged in profound ways. And that’s something legal professionals have to reckon with. Patrick Chavez, chief privacy officer at financial services firm Edward Jones, has set up shop at the intersection of technology and the law. He is on the vanguard of electronic discovery, or e-discovery, which is the application of the legal discovery process to electronic communications. In addition to leading an e-discovery team at Edward Jones, he has written about and frequently speaks on the subject. Chavez hopes to help other attorneys and companies become more aware of the ins and outs of e-discovery and teach them how to reduce associated costs.

“The law is going to stay consistent, but technology compresses the time frame.” Chavez says. “At this point and in general, I don’t think we have dealt with technology very well in the legal realm.” Chavez was born in Texas, where his family had lived for generations—since it was Mexican territory. As a child, he had a natural affinity for technology. He devoured science fiction books, built computers, and even had aspirations of becoming an astronaut. It wasn’t until high school, participating in debate and mock-trial competitions that his ambitions became more earthbound. Then, years into his legal career, when electronic communications began to play a larger role in legal proceedings, Chavez discovered a way to marry his original passion for technology with his career. Chavez had an interest in e-discovery even before the subject was incorporated into the rules of federal procedure in 2006. As an associate, and eventually a partner, with Williams Venker & Sanders LLC, he handled cyber issues and

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

39


industry

TRENDS | TRAJECTORY

EDWARD JONES HQ

St. Louis, MO

FOUNDED

1922

REACH

12,000 branch network locations serving 7 million investors in the US and Canada

ANNUAL REVENUE

$6.3 billion (2014)

Edward Jones is a privately owned investment firm serving clients in the areas of wealth management, stocks and bonds, insurance and annuities, business ownership, and cash and credit.

“The law is going to stay consistent, but technology compresses the time frame. At this point and in general, I don’t think we have dealt with technology very well in the legal realm.” Patrick Chavez

sharpened his practice with theories regarding e-discovery. In 2014, there was an opportunity to go in-house with Edward Jones to help the investment firm create an e-discovery center. He jumped at the opportunity. Chavez has since held several roles at Edward Jones, all revolving around data and information protection. He has held the titles of chief privacy officer (setting policies and protecting data), director of records and information (determining how long data is kept), and has been leader of the company’s discovery center, which is now an integral part of the legal department. He says that the key to managing e-discovery is recognizing that while communication has not changed, its

40

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

volumes and its forms have—thus, requiring evolving strategies. “The challenge you have with an electronic piece of communication is the volume of metadata that is behind the scenes,” he says. “In a paper world, you had the document that was signed and the envelope and the postmark— that was the data around the communication. With the electronic version, now we have the actual communication, the date and time it was sent, who sent it, IP addresses, how it was routed, and a whole host of other metadata.” Because lawyers are still accustomed to dealing with paper records, Chavez has found it helpful to look at electronic records metaphorically: an e-mail is a record, attachments are enclosures,


E-Discovery Explained WHAT IS E-DISCOVERY? Electronic discovery is the electronic aspect of identifying, collecting, and producing electronically stored information (ESI) in response to a request for production in a law suit or investigation. WHAT IS ESI? Electronically stored information (ESI) includes, but is not limited to:

e-mail

documents

audio files

video files

presentations

social media/ websites

WHY IS E-DISCOVERY IMPORTANT? E-discovery reduces the number of documents that need to be reviewed, which cuts hours and therefore costs.

=

$

etc. A further adaptation lawyers have to make in this new world is dealing with the amount of raw data available. Financial services is a heavily regulated industry, which means that Edward Jones has to keep a lot of information to satisfy its regulatory responsibilities. The more information held, the greater the risk. Requests for information, which Chavez handles, come from regulators, litigants, and vendors. His role is to preserve, search, collect, and get requested data out the door. The process basically follows a flow chart that begins with information governance and ends with production. In fielding requests from any of these entities, Chavez works to protect the company, its employees, and its clients by making sure that only information that should leave the firm does. Even with the technological evolution, Chavez maintains that law remains structurally the same as it was in the paper era. The important thing for business leaders is to recognize the differences in electronic communication and data, and adapt accordingly. “Discovery really has not changed,” he writes in his book on e-discovery. “Discovery is still the searching, collection, and review of relevant information or documents. Unfortunately, if you attempt to deal with the discovery of electronically stored information (ESI) the same way as paper, you will be in for a long struggle and very high bills.”

Our people make the difference. Precision Discovery combines the very best people and technology for an end-to-end discovery solution. We combine a consultative approach and proprietary technology to deliver an exceptional client experience, reduced costs, and defensible results.

EDISCOVERY COMPUTER FORENSIC INVESTIGATIONS MANAGED REVIEW info@precisiondiscovery.com 877-987-4545 precisiondiscovery.com SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

41


industry

TRENDS | TRAJECTORY

JUAN ESTRADA General Counsel Van Metre Companies

42

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016


TRAJECTORY

Hands in the Dirt From risk management to community outreach, Van Metre general counsel Juan Estrada gets involved in every aspect of real-estate development business, leading the legal department by example by David Baez

PHOTO: KEVIN MIELEC

J

uan Estrada found his niche through process of elimination. The attorney came to understand what he wanted out of a career by ruling out what he didn’t want. While studying at George Washington University Law School, Estrada interned with the US Department of Justice. He was impressed with the lawyers he got to work with, but ultimately decided that adversarial litigation work wasn’t for him. After graduating, he joined the law firm of Covington & Burling, where he got his first exposure to commercial real estate. “You advocate for your client, but both sides are working toward the same goal: get the deal done,” he says. “And real estate is tangible—you can see what you’re working on. That was big difference for me as compared to other practice areas.”

As he developed an expertise in real estate law, Estrada also decided that he didn’t want to stay with a big firm, but would prefer to go in-house. After five years of learning the ropes, he found an opportunity with local real estate developer Van Metre. As he describes it, everything had fallen into place and Estrada had found a home. “When I first started at Van Metre, I visited a number of our project sites and saw in action the businesses and projects that I would be working on. That made a big impact on me. It’s pretty amazing to walk a site and see raw land turned into a community of homes, amenities, schools. It’s something you can touch and feel. In my practice here, I get to learn more about the business considerations for transactions,” he says. “I’m not just writing contracts or involved for

VAN METRE HQ

Stone Ridge, VA

FOUNDED

1955

REACH

Constructed over 16,000 houses and several thousand apartments, as well commercial properties in Northern Virginia, Washington DC area, and Florida

NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES

450+

Van Metre is a private real estate developer dedicated to providing top quality homes, investment properties, and services.

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

43


industry

TRENDS | TRAJECTORY

a matter at one stage. I understand the why and am more invested in the work because of it.” Two years ago, Van Metre’s ownership presented a challenge to the legal department. The company recognized that the legal department was the only group that collaborated with every other department. “They said, ‘you can be one of the key idea centers for the company,’” Estrada explains. That directive put Estrada’s hands just where he had always wanted them: in the dirt. After eight years with Van Metre, Estrada was promoted to general counsel in 2014. Estrada’s role is equally divided between the area of risk management and compliance and a second area focusing on transactions. Risk management and compliance includes litigation management, insurance, educating the business departments about legal requirements and trends, and implementing standard processes and forms. In terms of transactions, Estrada says the in-house legal team handles the bulk of the work and is assisted by exceptional outside counsel who are specialists that have served the company for many years. Estrada says that this double-pronged approach is great for the company because the business and legal teams are both involved early on in any transaction, can better manage risk, and shape outcomes. Van Metre’s bread and butter is planned communities in the DC area,

Van Metre’s Broadlands in Loudon County, Virginia, is a census-designated, homeowner-controlled, planned community. It encompasses over 1,700 acres of land, is home to over 3,500 families, and has a population of over 12,000. Broadlands includes both apartment complexes and single-family homes, three public schools, one private school, a church, a day-care center, three pools, three clubhouses, two shopping centers, restaurants, and miles of walking trails and parks. The community is located 32.8 miles from Washington, DC, and 9.3 miles from Washington Dulles International Airport.

but the company has also sought growth by diversifying into investment properties. Since 2008, the company made a big push to grow its apartment holdings, especially in DC. Most recently, the company has expanded into third-party property management. “We’ve owned our own investment properties for 60 years and have been really good at managing them, so it was a natural step to bring that experience

to managing for other owners,” Estrada says. “The investment properties group came out of the gate sprinting, and we are now managing a commercial portfolio for a third party that is equal in size to our own and continue to add apartment communities in the DC area.” Estrada says Van Metre has been able to stay ahead of the pack in real estate in part because of its size and ownership.

“It’s pretty amazing to walk a site and see raw land turned into a community of homes, amenities, schools. It’s something you can touch and feel.” Juan Estrada

44

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016


Van Metre Portfolio Planned communities: Van Metre acquires land to plan and build communities. Van Metre communities include Broadlands, Stone Ridge, and Lansdowne in Virginia. New homes: Van Metre Homes offers homebuilding services in the Washington, DC, metropolitan area.

Kelley Drye congratulates our good friend and colleague, Juan Estrada, Vice President and General Counsel, Van Metre Companies, as we recognize his leadership and accomplishments.

Apartments: Communities range from garden-style designs to mid-rise buildings in the Washington, DC, metropolitan area and in Orlando, FL.

Best wishes for continued success.

Commercial properties: Grocery-anchored neighborhood shopping centers, office buildings, mixed-use buildings, and flex-industrial buildings in Loudoun and Fairfax counties in Virginia.

The Kelley Drye Team

Athletic facilities: Van Metre has owned and operated Mount Vernon Athletic Club since 1972. Golf courses: Van Metre-developed golf courses in Virginia include the Raspberry Falls Golf & Hunt Club in Leesburg, VA, and a few other world-class courses.

New York

Washington, D.C.

Los Angeles

Chicago

Stamford Parsippany Brussels www.kelleydrye.com

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

45


industry

TRENDS | TRAJECTORY | TECH

Winning is Our Business.

CAMERON/MCEVOY PLLC

Experience at your side. Efficient, predictable, reliable solutions for every client. Every time. Since 1972.

Congratulates

“The Van Metre owners have always placed a high importance on philanthropy and encouraging employees to get involved.” Juan Estrada

Juan Manuel Estrada General Counsel The Van Metre Companies

On his deserving profile in Hispanic Executive. We celebrate his success with The Van Metre Companies and his passion for community involvement.

708-218-2100

www.ofplaw.com

www.cameronmcevoy.com 46

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

“We’re big enough to be a public company, and we benefit from the resources that come with that size. But we’re a private, family-owned company, which means we can be nimble and move quickly. Our owners are always focused on long-term value and long-term growth. A public company might be thinking about the next quarter or two. We are way past that, and our decisions aren’t made based on a short-term horizon.” As a family-owned company with deep roots in Northern Virginia, Van Metre has a history of philanthropy and supporting employees’ volunteer efforts. “This comes from the top,” Estrada says of the charitable initiatives. “The Van Metre owners have always valued and placed a high importance on philanthropy and encouraging employees to get involved.” The company provides each employee with paid volunteer days every year that can be used for the employee’s volunteer


activity of choice. Estrada has been able to donate his time to charities that Van Metre has supported for years: Children’s Hospital, HomeAid Northern Virginia, and Women Giving Back. The company also supports CentroNía!, a charity that Estrada introduced. The nonprofit, which focuses on bilingual early childhood education and social services, is a close neighbor to two of Van Metre’s apartment communities in Washington, DC. Estrada and other Van Metre employees have participated in volunteer impact days for CentroNía! and Estrada recently joined the organization’s board of directors. As Van Metre continues to grow—more than 450 employees now—Estrada has been tasked with helping to develop a mentorship program that will increase a sense of community and partnership in the company. After an initial test group, the goal is for every employee in the company to have a designated mentor, who they will meet with once a quarter. “The company takes company culture and finding a healthy work/life balance very seriously,” Estrada says. “Our leaders believe in the complete individual, and that is evident in their support of the mentor program.”

Congratulations to Juan Estrada at Van Metre Companies, from your friends at M&T Realty Capital Corporation.

When you’re facing a complicated multifamily financing situation, it’s crucial to have a dependable lender on your side. M&T Realty Capital Corporation has the experience and expertise to understand your business, and our relationshipfocused approach ensures the terms we recommend are right for you. These are just some of the reasons 75% of our business comes from repeat borrowers, like the Van Metre Companies. Get started at learnmore.mandtrcc.com or call 1-800-737-2344.

“When working with the Van Metre organization, decisions are always based on doing the right thing. Juan has exemplified this straightforward approach in every aspect of our work together,” says Paula Quigley, FHA/HUD program manager for M&T Realty Capital Corporation. Paula has worked closely with Van Metre Companies for over 20 years, originating $250,000,000+ of construction loans for the completion of 1,795 multifamily units and $120,000,000+ of agency permanent loans for the company’s stabilized properties.

Equal Housing Lender. Based on internal customer data. All loans and all terms referenced herein are subject to receipt of a complete application, credit approval and other conditions. ©2016 M&T Realty Capital Corporation. Member FDIC. SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

47


industry

TRENDS | TRAJECTORY

The Laws of Human Resource With a background in both psychology and law, Lydia Martinez positions Long & Foster as employer of choice for top candidates seeking an inclusive and empowering environment by David Baez

LYDIA MARTINEZ Chief HR Officer Long & Foster Companies

48

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

PHOTO: WWW.BOSCHSTUDIOS.COM

S

ense of direction has always been one of Lydia Martinez’s strengths. Martinez, chief human resources officer for real estate firm Long & Foster Companies, was always fascinated by how humans behave and why. So, she sought a career in which she could make real connections with other people. As she pursued a degree in psychology at the University of Puerto Rico, she realized that while the field held its charms for her, talk therapy in an office didn’t deliver the diversity of environments and experiences she hungered for. Once she began looking into industrial and organizational psychology, which is the study of how humans behave within organizations, she realized she could have everything she wanted in a profession. Engagement in the field would allow her to apply psychology to increase motivation and improve workplace performance. The final educational piece to put in place for her ideal career was law school: Martinez was enrolled simultaneously in master’s programs in criminal justice and industrial psychology. After earning those degrees, she got her JD at American University. Heading into the rigors of law school, she knew exactly where she wanted the degree to take her. “Law school gave me an insight into what I really liked about working with


TRAJECTORY

people and what kind of career I wanted,” she recalls. “I realized I could do a direct tie-in with employment law and regulatory compliance by working in human resources.” Most HR leaders come up through the ranks of the company from kindred areas like compensation and benefits. It’s rare that someone ends up in HR from the Martinez’s angle, but her background pays huge dividends in the work she does. “All of the risk and all the dangers that are involved in making decisions related to HR are either about impacting behavior or experiencing a legal pitfall, ” she explains. Because HR decisions directly affect not only employees but also their families, it is imperative that possible impacts of all decisions are weighed carefully. Having knowledge of the behavioral responses and legal impact that may follow such decisions creates efficiencies that allow for an agile decision-making process. Everyone Is Important In 2012, Martinez joined Long & Foster, which owns companies in real estate, mortgage, insurance, property management, and resource rentals. She encountered a workplace just coming out of some tough financial years. Adjustment to that reality had forced the company to make some tough decisions. As a result, some employees had the perception that all the focus was on the sales force, dividing the organization into two camps. She immediately took it upon herself to change that and foster a sense of unity and common purpose.

“One of the turning points was ensuring that there were professional advancement opportunities for everyone at every level, at any cost,” she says. “We offered technology training, computer applications, full-day courses. That started giving people more of a sense that the organization was not just there for the sales force, but was willing to invest in their future.” The result was a more receptive environment in which to promote all the benefits available to employees during their tenure with the company. Martinez says that one of her core philosophies as an HR leader is to consider each employee in every decision that is made. “I want to make sure that any initiative or strategy I bring to the table is inclusive,” she says. “I’m very mindful of not pursuing strategies that will carve out or alienate anyone in the organization. Whenever I come up with an initiative, I measure how it is going to impact everyone.” Something that makes Long & Foster a bit different among real estate companies is that the sales agents—nearly 12,000—are not franchises. The company owns all of its sales offices, and provides administrative, managerial, marketing, finance, and technology support to the agents affiliated with the company. This fosters a sense of family that has been important to the company since its founding over forty-five years ago, Martinez says. “The sole owner of the company still comes to work every day and reaches out to our agents,” she says. “Whenever an

LONG & FOSTER HQ

Fairfax, VA

FOUNDED

1968

REACH

More than 10,000 agents in more than 170 sales offices in the Mid-Atlantic region

Long & Foster Companies is one of the largest privately owned real estate companies. Long & Foster offers residential and commercial real estate, mortgage, settlement, insurance, property management, corporate relocation, and vacation rental services.

“I want to make sure that any initiative or strategy I bring to the table is inclusive. I’m very mindful of not pursuing strategies that will carve out or alienate anyone in the organization.” Lydia Martinez

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

49


industry

TRENDS | TRAJECTORY

agent joins, they get a call from him. The company puts a lot of effort into ensuring the sense of family remains, and that no matter how we structure our sales groups, and across all our companies, there exists that connectivity to the family-owned part of the house.” Becoming a Destination Company As a Hispanic executive, Martinez thinks a lot about how she can increase diversity in the company. While sales agents are a diverse group of individuals, she notes that the financial services department is not incredibly varied in terms of race, gender, and age. Her approach to remedying this is manifold: To attract more women who might not find an extremely time-demanding job appealing during childbearing years, the company presents a better work/life balance. Martinez also plans to attract millennials by promoting a professional environment that will allow them to pursue interests beyond the office. To that end, opportunities to get involved in the community are very attractive. “Millennials tend to be very concrete in what they want,” she says. “Our approach has to be real: ‘In two years, this is a skill set you will have, and these are the three places you can go with it.’” Because the company is very entrepreneurial and involved in community outreach, Martinez envisions the company becoming a destination employer for this group. Outside of the sales force, Martinez says it has been a challenge to find Hispanics, especially young Hispanics, who want to work in financial services. That’s why the team goes to universities, and even high schools, to speak to about the benefits of careers in these areas. Martinez says seeds of interest need to be introduced early on, and it is imperative for the industry to change its traditional image and convey a more forward-looking image.

50

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

16,000+ Students have taken real estate courses with Long & Foster “The industry was very tight-lipped for a long time, and other than Wall Street, it hasn’t been a destination. In our three-year plan, the idea is to target and promote the types of careers we offer as early as high school,” she says. “When they think about college, our hope is that they will look into the financial field. We’re out looking and talking and letting the younger generation know what’s great about the industry and how much it has changed.” As she enters her fourth year with the company and embarks on unrolling a three-year plan, Martinez is hoping to influence the company in ways that will endure even after she retires one day. “I’d like to look back and know I built a culture that embraces change without losing its identity or sense of family,” she says. “I enjoy seeing Long & Foster continue to look for new opportunities and ways of doing things, because that’s what will make us better.” “And if I see them stagnant,” she adds, half-joking, “I will come back to haunt them.”

Cigna is a global health service company dedicated to helping people improve their health, well-being, and sense of security. The company offers an integrated suite of health services, such as medical, dental, behavioral health, pharmacy, vision and supplemental benefits, and other related products including group life, accident and disability insurance. With more than 88 million customer relationships throughout the world, we understand our customers’ needs and work together to help them achieve healthier, more secure lives through innovative programs and services focused on personalization and affordability. www.Cigna.com


TRAJECTORY

Take Off and Soar Juan Suarez outlines how Southwest’s unique culture and customer-centered philosophy have positioned the airline for unprecedented success

PHOTO: ASHLEE DUNCAN/SOUTHWEST AIRLINES

as told to Julie Edwards

JUAN SUAREZ Associate General Counsel Southwest Airlines

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

51


industry

TRENDS | TRAJECTORY

SOUTHWEST AIRLINES HQ

Dallas, TX

FOUNDED

1967

NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES

Over 50,000

NUMBER OF CUSTOMERS

Over 100 million annually

NUMBER OF DAILY FLIGHTS

Over 3,900 in peak travel season

GLOBAL REACH

97 US destinations and 7 international destinations

ANNUAL REVENUE

$19.82 billion (2015)

Southwest Airlines is a major US airline and the world’s largest low-cost carrier. As of 2014, it carries the most domestic passengers of any US airline.

I grew up a Hispanic kid in Oklahoma. After high school, I attended the University of Oklahoma. During my sophomore year, I was thinking of transferring to American University in Washington, DC, to pursue my interest in government. This would have required taking out significant school loans. I was going to do it, until I realized that all of the classes I wanted to take were law-related. So, I started thinking about law school instead. I completed my undergraduate degree the University of Oklahoma, graduating with a bachelor’s degree in public administration. I went on to attend Cornell University Law School. After graduating, I moved to Dallas and joined the Dallas County District Attorney’s office as a prosecutor. Next, I worked as a lobbyist for a heavy steel manufacturing company, focusing on employment issues. After that, I joined a law firm, where I focused on employment law. In 2000, I joined Southwest Airlines, where I am now associate general counsel. What attracted me to Southwest

was not a love of aviation—I hadn’t really flown all that much before joining the company. No, it was the people and the environment. As a lawyer you don’t necessarily feel comfortable everywhere you go, but even lawyers are accepted and included at Southwest. You can tell that people really love being here. I remember on one of my interviews, I was walking down a hallway and the walls were covered with framed photos of Southwest employees and their pets—cats, dogs, parrots. There’s also a wall of photos of couples who met at Southwest. Both Southwest’s cofounder, Herb Kelleher, and our current CEO, Gary Kelly, appreciate the importance of our culture and help maintain it by leading with empathy and humility. I find these leadership traits most admirable. In the beg inning , Southwest launched a low-fare revolution. The goal was to combine affordable fares with excellent customer service—and it worked. The US Department of Transportation refers to it as the ‘Southwest Effect.’ It’s what happens when we enter a market— the fares begin to go down and passenger

“My goal is to be a reliable resource and to use my talents for the benefit of the company.” Juan Suarez

52

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016


© 2016 Southwest Airlines Co.

demand goes up. Southwest has experienced over forty-three consecutive years of profitability. We carry more passengers in the US than any other domestic airline, in terms of originating domestic passengers boarded. What has kept me at Southwest so long is that I enjoy being part of a cause. Our cause is to connect people to what’s important in their lives while keeping fares low. In my role, I’m responsible for the labor, employment, and litigation sections for our legal department. A number of teams report to me. The labor and employment team provides counsel and guidance to our leaders on employment issues. My team’s responsibilities include presenting arbitration, responding to government charges, supporting collective bargaining, leading investigations under our harassment policy, and managing employment litigation. The litigation team partners with all departments on any litigation matters other than employment. That includes commercial litigation, insured/uninsured litigation, intellectual property issues, e-discovery, small claims matters, and third-party subpoenas. Personally, I enjoy meditating on matters and resolving issues. I know how to navigate through opposing views and positions to reach a reasonable outcome. My goal is to be a reliable resource and to use my talents for the benefit of the company. My teams are constantly working to ensure that Southwest is compliant with changing laws or new laws in destinations we serve. For example, if Southwest begins service to another country, we analyze applicable laws and partner with our business and operation folks

994 miles average passenger trip length in 2015

Cheers! Juan, you are a valued member of the Southwest Airlines family. We are thrilled to celebrate you, your career, and your continued success. Congratulations!

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

53


industry

TRENDS | TRAJECTORY

Southwest Airlines By the Numbers In 2015, Southwest served more than 106 million peanuts and more than 45 million pretzels. The shortest daily Southwest flight is between Austin, TX, and Houston Hobby at 148 miles. The longest daily flight is between BaltimoreWashington and Oakland at 2,447 miles. Southwest Airlines has had 43 consecutive years of annual profitability. In 2015, average passenger airfare was $154.85 one way. Southwest employees volunteered more than 130,000 hours to national and nonprofit organizations last year. Source: www.swamedia.com

54

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

“Southwest has always said, ‘We are in the customer service business and just happen to fly planes,’ and I think that’s one of the reasons we’ve been so successful.” Juan Suarez

to ensure we are following those laws. When you serve as many markets as we do, that’s challenging, but my teams do a great job. We like to be proactive to ensure we are compliant. Southwest has always said, ‘We are in the customer service business and just happen to fly planes,’ and I think that’s one of the reasons we’ve been so successful. Our goal is to treat customers like family, and we think that’s why they keep coming back. We’re different from other airlines. For one, we don’t nickel-and-dime our customers. We are the only major airline in the US that does not charge a fee for the first two pieces of checked luggage (with some size and weight restrictions, of course), for example. We also don’t charge change fees. Values like these resonate with our customers. Beyond its customers, Southwest is dedicated to its employees. Our guiding principle is to show the same care, concern, and respect to each other as we do to our customers. For example, in 2015, our employees enjoyed $620 million in profit sharing—that equates to eight

weeks of pay. We have also been on Fortune’s Most Admired Companies list for twenty-two years, which says a lot about our work environment. To be a part of the Southwest family has been personally very rewarding. Looking to the future, Southwest will continue to seek ways to enhance the customer experience—whether it’s through improvements in technology for customer convenience or expanding routes. Currently, we serve ninety-seven destinations in addition to Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean. As we continue to expand our service, our two main focuses are on maintaining our customer experience and preserving the family-feel of our internal culture.”

Southwest Airlines continues to differentiate itself from other air carriers with exemplary customer service delivered by more than 49,000 employees to more than 100 million customers annually. Southwest proudly operates a network of 97 destinations across the United States and seven additional countries with more than 3,900 departures a day.


MOST FINANCIAL COMPANIES ARE INTERESTED IN YOUR MONEY. WE’RE INTERESTED IN YOUR FUTURE.

Northwestern Mutual realizes that money matters, but what matters more is you and your family. Your goals. Your interests. And the things you’re passionate about most in life. So we’ll be right there with you every step of the way, helping you discover what’s possible and guiding you with a long-term financial plan that turns your biggest goals into your biggest achievements. You and Northwestern Mutual—stronger together.

Northwestern Mutual is the marketing name for The Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company (NM), Milwaukee, WI, and its subsidiaries.


from our partners

THE NORTHWESTERN MUTUAL FINANCIAL CORNER

Family First: Putting Quality Time at the Top of Their List by Northwestern Mutual

56

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

PHOTO: ROSE REID PHOTOGRAPHY

F

amily has always been the most important thing for Florida chiropractors, Doctor Nayda Nuñez and Doctor José Cadavedo. It’s why they chose to open their own practice in 2008 and why they return to Puerto Rico, where they both grew up, several times per year. They were each just launching their careers and working in other practitioners’ chiropractic offices when they realized they wanted to start their own business to accommodate their changing lifestyle and allow for more flexible hours. The married couple has three children ranging in age from 3 to 19. “Family time is vital for us to manage. One of us works, and the other takes care of the kids. If one kid gets sick, one of us can stay home; if there is a soccer game or a school event, we can be there with our kids,” said Cadavedo. “The time management is priceless.” They both grew up in strong families. Cadavedo has two sisters and worked in his father’s deli as a young man, doing everything from washing dishes to tending bar. Nuñez, the oldest of five sisters, absorbed lessons from her parents’ woodworking business. She wound up being the first in her family to graduate from college. Both reflected back to their roots when opening their practice, Integrated Chiropractic. “We come from family-owned businesses, and we knew we had to work hard through the process,” said Nuñez. “At the same time, we knew the importance of spending quality time with our family and not to get involved in the craziness of working all the time.” The couple met as college students at Universidad de Puerto Rico in Ponce and


moved to New York to obtain their doctorate degrees in chiropractic medicine (they both also became certified acupuncturists there). Leaning on their small savings, getting help from family members and even going into debt for a bit, they were able to open their doors in 2008, working tirelessly to build up a clientele. “We started handing out cards and talking to everybody,” said Cadavedo. “Being involved in the community, in sports and church, we were building relationships.” The pair has relied on their financial advisor to help them make sound decisions about their finances since they first opened their business. “Saving is very important. It has been very helpful in giving us some discipline, organizing ourselves for events like purchasing our first home, our first business property and for the rainy days or emergencies,” said Nuñez. “Even though we are professionals, we needed to get financially smarter; and our financial advisor definitely guided us through the process and still does. If you don’t know how to manage money

work in their chiropractic office to keep up with the demand, and they might be looking to add more staff or to expand to a second location as the children get older. They each reflect back on their shared journey thus far with joy. “I’m proud and blessed,” says Nuñez. “My parents always taught us that we had to work hard for what we want and to be honest, foremost. We really want to be pioneers in the health field as well as in the Hispanic community.” Adds Cadavedo: “I’m very happy and content.” As for their relationship as both husband-wife and business partners, Nuñez and Cadavedo would not have it any other way. “When something happens, I’m always looking to get her opinion or vice-versa. Of course, we have little disagreements; but if we agreed on everything, it would be boring. We’re good together, and I’m super grateful for what we have,” said Cadavedo. “People always ask us how we can stand each other when we see each other at work and at the house,” laughed Nuñez. “For us, it’s a no-brainer. We have our work space and then we go

“My parents always taught us that we had to work hard for what we want and to be honest, foremost. We really want to be pioneers in the health field as well as in the Hispanic community.” the smart way, you need to get educated and trained in how to do so. You have to learn about investments and invest your money the right way.” Learning about investments has made the couple passionate about financial planning. In fact, their 19-year-old son has already met with their advisor to get a jump start on his future. Their other top advice to young people: “Don’t forget your roots,” “Educate yourself” and “Don’t let pride stop you from seeking out the help of other professionals.” Business continues to boom. The couple added another practitioner to

home, and we make every decision as a team.” The couple’s hard work is paying off as they’re building a better life both now and for the future, always with the most critical component in mind: family. Northwestern Mutual is the marketing name for The Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company (NM), Milwaukee, WI (life and disability insurance, annuities, and life insurance with long-term care benefits) and its subsidiaries. Northwestern Mutual Investment Services, LLC (NMIS) (securities), subsidiary of NM, registered investment adviser, broker-dealer, member FINRA and SIPC. Sindy Canizales Walters is a District Agent of NM and a Registered Representative of NMIS.

SINDY CANIZALES Doctor Nuñez and Doctor Cadavedo work with Northwestern Mutual Financial Advisor Sindy Canizales. When Sindy helps clients plan their finances, she typically recommends the following: Set goals: When you know where you want to go, it’s easier to figure out how to get there. Build a financial plan that protects and grows your wealth: Investing your way to wealth is only one part of the equation. If you aren’t protecting your income with life insurance and disability income insurance, your family is at risk if something happens that prevents you from earning the income that will fund your financial plan. Review your plan regularly: Financial planning isn’t something you get set and forget. Your life will change, and your financial plan should change with it. It’s important to meet regularly with your advisor in order to update your plan as needed.

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

57


industry

TRENDS | TRAJECTORY

MOST FINANCIAL COMPANIES WANT YOU TO INVEST IN THEM. WE’D RATHER INVEST IN YOU.

Northwestern Mutual knows what it takes to succeed both on your balance sheet and in your life. It takes the right financial partner who understands how much you care about your future and your family, encouraging you to do the little things that add up over time, protect what you’ve earned and truly achieve long-term financial security. You and Northwestern Mutual—stronger together.

58

Northwestern Mutual is the marketing name for The Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company (NM), Milwaukee, WI, and its subsidiaries. HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016


worldview Cruzando fronteras: a look at the strategies driving business across borders

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

59


worldview

S A ILING IN TO Carnival Corp.’s Martha de Zayas shares her passion for making vacation dreams come true as Carnival celebrates global expansion and the first US cruise ship to dock in Havana in over fifty years

PHOTO: FILIPPO VINARDI

by Teresa Dovalpage

60

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016


T HE FU T URE

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

61


worldview

CARNIVAL HEADQUARTERED Miami FOUNDED 1972 ANNUAL REVENUE $15.7 billion (2015) COMPANY SUMMARY Carnival Corp. is a global cruise company and one of the world’s largest vacation companies. The cruise brands, such as Carnival Cruise Lines and Princess Cruises, are the most recognized brands in North America, the United Kingdom, Germany, and Italy. Carnival’s vacation companies attract 10 million guests annually.

62

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

C

arnival Corp., the world’s largest cruise company, is known for fostering thoughtful and culturally rich itineraries in Asia, Europe, and the Caribbean. Now, it is offering an historic voyage from Miami to Cuba. Among the people who make it happen is the lady behind the legal wheel, Martha de Zayas, the assistant general counsel for the cruise giant. De Zayas was born in New Jersey to Cuban parents, but considers Miami her true home.

“My parents and I moved there in 1969,” she says. “It was in Miami where I grew up, went to undergrad, graduate school. I am a Miami girl.” Though she is now a successful corporate attorney, De Zayas admits that getting into law was never her childhood dream. “I wanted to be a doctor until I took organic chemistry in college,” she says. “I began to consider law school after I got an opportunity to volunteer for a federal judge during the Noriega trial. I spent an entire summer following the trial and began to think that pursuing a legal career might be fascinating.” She worked for several law firms


until the opportunity to become part of the in-house Carnival team arose. “And I am still here,” she says enthusiastically. “It all started when I responded to a newspaper ad. Arnaldo Perez had just been made general counsel and was creating new positions at Carnival. A colleague at the firm where I was working at the time and I applied at the same time. Both of us were hired, and more than twenty years later, we are still with the company.” There are various reasons for this loyalty, MARTHA De Zayas says. DE ZAYAS “It is great to work for a comAssistant General pany that helps people to create Counsel Carnival Corp.

AROUND THE WORLD WITH CARNIVAL Carnival Corp.’s portfolio includes the world’s most widely recognized cruise lines—10 brands to serve every segment globally.

CARNIVAL CORP. BRANDS Carnival Cruise Line, 25 ships Princess Cruises, 18 ships Holland America Line, 14 ships Seabourn, 5 ships

PHOTO: EDUARDO SIVORI

Cunard, 3 ships AIDA cruises ,11 ships Costa Cruises, 15 ships P&O Cruises (UK), 8 ships P&O Cruises (Australia), 5 ships Fathom

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

63


worldview

Congratulations

The Vista, which is one of Carnival’s largest brands, sails to Montenegro.

Akerman is proud to congratulate Martha de Zayas for being recognized as an industry leader and innovator. We applaud Martha on her many achievements and are honored to partner with her and Carnival Corporation.

James S. Bramnick Miami, FL 305.982.5505 james.bramnick@akerman.com Akerman LLP | 600+ lawyers | 20 locations | akerman.com ©2016 Akerman LLP. All rights reserved.

64

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

lifetime memories,” she said. “People dream of a vacation, plan it, save for it, and we make that dream come true. In addition to that, Carnival offers a supportive environment to all of us. It’s a great place to work.” Arnaldo Perez, known as “Arnie” around the office, is still Carnival’s general counsel and has been a role model to De Zayas and many others in the company. “Arnie came to the United States from Cuba when he was very young,” De Zayas says. “He is one of the most intelligent human beings I’ve ever met: a very kind, ethical, and honorable man. He has played a key role in almost every new development in Carnival for the last twenty years.” A Sea of Opportunity The cruise industry is one that is steadily growing, and De Zayas sees it as a largely untapped market, both domestically and internationally. “It has the potential to become huge,” she said. “Right now, there is significant growth potential in Asia, particularly in the Chinese market. We have several ships operating under two

brands in China at the moment—Costa and Princess— plus two additional ones, Carnival and AIDA, our German cruise line, scheduled to begin cruises there in the coming few years.” De Zayas’s responsibilities include dealing with international law, US law, maritime laws, hotel and casino operations, finances, acquisitions, and much more. It’s never boring, she says, and it gets even more exciting when she has the chance to experience “the end product.” “I am going on a cruise this year on Carnival Vista with my kids, and it will be amazing to tell them, ‘Look, I had a role in negotiating the contract for this, I helped make this happen.’ It is a very tangible result,” she says. The Carnival Vista—which is part of the Carnival Cruise Line fleet, the largest of Carnival’s brands—sailed its maiden voyage on May 1, 2016. A number of additional ships for several of the company’s brands are currently being built, De Zayas says. “During my tenure here, I have seen the company expand immensely,” she says. “I look forward to many more years of growth and satisfaction.”


Congratulations,

Martha! A TRAVÉS DE LOS AÑOS

Martha de Zayas, who has been with Carnival Corp. for over two decades, provides an overview of Carnival milestones during her tenure

1998 Acquisition of Cunard Line. “This is a legendary cruise line, known for great ships like the Queen Elizabeth and the Queen Victoria. Its operations were based in Miami for several years, though they have now moved primarily to the United Kingdom.”

2003 Acquisition of Princess Cruises. “It was exciting to close that deal. Our team worked hard for it.”

2004 Building of the Queen Mary II. “It was the first ocean liner to be built for Cunard since 1969. It was christened by Queen Elizabeth II and at that point was the world’s largest cruise ship.”

2011

Boies, Schiller & Flexner, along with Hispanic Executive magazine, is delighted to honor and recognize Martha de Zayas for her professional and personal accomplishments in the local Hispanic community and worldwide. Our firm appreciates and respects your hard work and dedication for Carnival Corporation & PLC and the legal community.

Carnival reached its 100th ship milestone. “It was achieved both through the acquisition of other companies and Carnival’s own ship-building projects.”

2015 Carnival entered into an agreement with the US Department of Justice related to shipboard accessibility for guests with disabilities.

May 2016 The MV Adonia docked in Havana. It was the first US cruise ship to arrive in Cuba in fifty years. “Arnaldo Perez, Carnival’s general counsel, was chosen to be the first passenger to disembark.”

CUBA

w ww.bsf l l p.c om

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

65


worldview

The Fathom Adonia sails to three Cuban cities: Havana, Cienfuegos, and Santiago de Cuba.

As your trusted advisor, we help you anticipate and understand emerging legal issues to achieve your business goals. For more than 40 years, we have been providing legal counsel in health care and life sciences, employment, labor & workforce management and litigation. Our industry focus in health care, financial services, hospitality, retail, and technology, among others, enables us to respond to your needs promptly, allowing you to rest easy.

ebglaw.com

Attorney advertising. © 2016 Epstein Becker & Green, P.C. All rights reserved.

66

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

“[Fathom] is not your typical cruise itinerary to look at the architecture or go to the beaches, but rather, shoreside activities are focused on cultural exchange.” MARTHA DE ZAYAS

Casting Off for Cuba Among these new expansions is the recent cruise to Cuba in May 2016. Carnival’s Fathom brand is the first US cruise ship company to sail from Miami to Havana in more than fifty years. The itinerary includes visits to the cities of Cienfuegos and Santiago de Cuba as well. Fathom is allowed to sail to Cuba under current people-to-people travel guidelines, De Zayas explains. “[Fathom] is not your typical cruise itinerary to look at the architecture or go to the beaches, but rather, shoreside activities are focused on cultural exchange,” she says. Fathom operates social impact travel journeys, including cruises to the Dominican Republic where passengers

participate in humanitarian projects. The legal team was also able to put the company on equal footing with the airlines in regard to the rights of Cuban-born passengers to sail to Cuba. “We were very active in this issue, which resulted in Cuba changing its policies about allowing Cubans to return to the island by ship,” she says. Fathom’s might just be the next itinerary on De Zayas’s list. “I would love to go and explore my parents’ country and see all these places I’ve heard about all my life,” she says. Epstein Becker Green joins Hispanic Executive in recognizing the leadership and accomplishments of Martha de Zayas. We are pleased to work with Martha and Carnival Corporation.


WHERE LEADERS IN CORPORATE LAW SHARE THEIR STORIES. For editorial consideration, contact info@modern-counsel.com

MODERN-COUNSEL.COM


worldview

Oscar Chavez-Arrieta leads Sophos’s cybersecurity expansion in Latin America by doing what he does best: building teams by Teresa Dovalpage

68

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

PHOTO: THE ART OF PHOTOGRAPHY

“The Only Place Success Comes Before Work is in the Dictionary”


OSCAR CHAVEZ-ARRIETA VP of Sales, Latin America Sophos

W

hen Oscar Chavez-Arrieta was appointed as Sophos’s vice president of sales for Latin America in 2016, the Peruvian-born executive brought to the company more than twenty-two years of experience in sales and marketing, and more importantly, what he considers his best skill—team building. “Employees are any company’s best asset,” he says. “That’s why I am focused on recruiting the very best— people with a wealth of experience, a solid reputation, a proven-channels orientation, and a passion for what they do. Together, we’ll take Sophos to a new level.” Chavez-Arrieta has a proven track record of starting new investments and driving high-growth businesses, and now, he leads the security software company’s expansion in the Latin American market. In January 2016, he started almost from scratch. Now, there are twenty-six offices; by next year, the number will double. “In Sophos Latin America, we are building a mix of new and seasoned talented leaders who were successful in their former roles, and perhaps didn’t have the opportunity to continue growing in their former companies,” Chavez-Arrieta says. “There is a line of people who currently work for our competitors but would like to become part of this new project and leadership style.”

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

69


worldview

Among the new talent that he has brought in as part of his new Latin America leadership team are Denise Pascual from Dell as marketing manager, Maria Claudia Ardila from Symantec as program manager, Claudia Vizcarra from Symantec as sales director for multicountries Latin Americas region, Hugo Avendaño from KSPY as general manager in Mexico, and Marcos Tabajara from Intel as general manager in Brazil. When Chavez-Arrieta thinks about team, thinks in terms of partnerships and alliances. He just signed two key distribution regional contracts—one with Ingram Micro, the largest global technology distributor of IT products and services, and another with Nexsys, the most important distributor of software solutions in Latin America—as part of his strategy of simplify, focus, and build relevance in the Latin America industry. His main goal is to make Sophos the number one firm delivering complete IT security to both small and large enterprises in Latin America. He wants Sophos to be the go-to channel for growing business, and he plans for Sophos to be one of the top three biggest security vendors in Latin America in the next three years. “I’m convinced that we will make it happen, because security excellence is at our core. Sophos is the only market leader in both endpoint protection and unified threat management. Plus, it’s simple to use,” he explains. “We are the only security vendor in the entire market that integrates everything from endpoint security, to mobile, networking, wireless, email encryption, etc., and the only player delivering a single cloudbased management console for its entire product portfolio.” Channeling a Strategy Chavez-Arrieta buys in to the company’s channel strategy to achieve his goal. “The channel model is the best; actually, and the only one I believe in,” he says. Sophos sells to the distributors, who sell to the local channels and resellers in the respective regions, he explains. These local channels, in turn, sell

70

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

7 DEADLY CYBER SINS Sophos has identified the biggest cybersecurity threats in our digital world today.

1

2

Mac Malice Mobile Negligence Macs can be Your phone is not infected just like protected! Hackers increasingly steal PCs, and the threat is growing data via mobile

3

4

Unsecure Wi-Fi Wi-Fi hotspots can provide full access to your corporate network

Faulty Firewall If it can’t keep up or is too complex, you’re not getting full protection

5

6

7

Un-encrypted E-mail Anyone can access e-mail to steal sensitive data, facilitate identity theft

Un-encrypted Files Customers will flee if you’re not securing sensitive company data

Delinquent Web Filtering Hackers compromise legitimate websites that escape web filtering

Source: www.sophos.com

Sophos’s products to the final client. “We trust in the engine of our distributors and channels to cover the territories from a sales perspective and a first-level support perspective,” Chavez-Arrieta says. “Our local and regional teams support 100 percent of our channels and alliances ecosystem with demand generation, enablement, and customer engagement where needed.” He adds that Sophos’s mission and commitment to its partners is based on three pillars: Channel Simplification, Channel Profitability, and Channel Excellence. Chavez-Arrieta points out that the company doesn’t sell through channels but rather with channels. Sophos is based on synchronized security software, which is driven by channels.

Channels serve as security integrators, he explains. “What attracted me to Sophos in the first place was the fact that it allows channels to offer their own security services to the end-customer through only one platform: our company,” he says. “We are truly respectful of the services our partners are offering, their knowledge, and their investments. It is our goal to influence them to use our synchronized solutions as part of their own service portfolios. Consequently, our success as a company is congruent with the success of our partners and channels.” Combating Cybercrime Cybercrime is a global problem, according to Chavez-Arrieta. It has become a big


business that has transitioned from simple individual “hackers” to very well-organized criminal organizations with profit-and-loss management, business goals, and structure strategies. These “businesses” can sell criminal services to anyone. Some of the more traditional security companies—starving for results in stock growth—are not focusing on developing the right products to counter this fast-growing criminal industry. “We saw in the last few months, important IT names selling [their] security areas to independent and unexperienced capital groups,” he says. “Others were getting rid of ‘nonprofitable’ lines of products inside their security portfolio and one specifically—which from my perspective is the most dangerous one—was not updating its products, allowing the customer think that they are protected when they are not.” From Chavez-Arrieta’s point of view, this type of behavior on the part of some security vendors is irresponsible and shows a lack of respect in their channel ecosystems. He sees the stubborn orientation of these enterprises as a fantastic opportunity for Sophos. As these are getting exposed, now is the company’s chance to be recognized in Latin America as the one security company who attacks cybercrime the right way—a company who empowers its partners to deliver local services to buy and sell security options in an inclusive way, he says. “Sophos just launched a topicalized ‘Partner Program’ and a revolutionary ‘Managed Service Provider [MSP] Program,’ where our MSP partners will be able to sell on-premise or on-demand— renting the product and administrating the security solution jointly with Sophos,” Chavez-Arrieta explains. According to him, this new model will allow any company of any size to access the best possible security options according their current needs. “How many small and medium companies do not have, can’t afford, or don’t need a [chief information security officer]?” Chavez-Arrieta asks. “Why do

they not buy a simple, price-accessible, and ad hoc protection service from our MSPs to be 100 percent protected. They’ll only have to pay by what they are using every month. Why not allow big system integrators to buy and sell exactly what their customer needs on a monthly basis? “It’s a simple response: everyone can sell in monthly rates—but it’s something that our competitors do not want to go for.” He believes that security will be an on-demand service in the future, but it will obligate Sophos competitors to migrate their capital to a monthly billing model such as OPEX that won’t let them arrive to their quarterly financial goals. “Sophos Latin America’s focus is to attack the cybercrime in any flavor the customer needs,” he says. “Our business is driven by a long-term vision and local investments that will ensure our longterm presence and future success here.”

SOPHOS HEADQUARTERED Abingdon, England FOUNDED 1985 ANNUAL SALES $446.7 million (2015) COMPANY SUMMARY Sophos is a security software and hardware company. It offers a full range of endpoint, encryption, e-mail, web, mobile, network security, and UTM products, and some free tools for home uses. Currently, more than 100 million users in 150 countries rely on Sophos’s products.

Advice to Young Executives Chavez-Arrieta is enthusiastic to share his father’s words of wisdom to young executives just starting their careers. “My dad used to say, el único lugar donde el éxito viene antes que el trabajo es el diccionario—the only place success comes before work is in the dictionary,” he says. “So I learned to work hard. There is no way around it.” “Here is another piece of good advice that I got from my viejo,” he said. “He would tell me, ‘Mira, if you have a very high position in the company, remember that there are several hundred professionals with better degrees and more experience than you, ready to take the same position for less money. So, just be humble and always do your best.’” Chavez-Arrieta recommends building a family where you work, and doing what you enjoy. He also says that change is good—“when you feel that you are in your comfort zone, it is time to change, escape from the bad bosses because they exist. Never choose company names, choose proven leaders that will help you growth, learn from them, and always have fun.”

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

71


worldview

MOVING THE COURT Philippe Moggio goes back to his roots to build the NBA’s Latin America development program by Adam Kivel

DOWN THE GLOBE

72

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

B

asketball wasn’t Philippe Moggio’s first love, but he quickly got a first-hand education on the passion the sport engenders, one that stuck with him all the way to a position as the senior vice president, Latin America at the NBA. As a star tennis player at Duke University, Moggio would need to walk through “Krzyzewskiville,” the village of tents occupied by students hoping to get into a Duke Blue Devils basketball game. “I quickly understood the passion behind basketball and what that can drive,” Moggio chuckles. Rather than jump immediately to working for a professional sports organization after graduation, Moggio first stepped into professional sports, moving back to his home country of Colombia and playing in the South American tennis circuit. His skill was such that he represented Colombia in multiple Davis Cup competitions. “The discipline and the work ethic that sports teaches any individual is a great skill,” he explains. “A lot of that transcends into the corporate world. Someone who has dedicated a lot of their life to a sport will bring that level of passion, discipline, and work ethic.” Moggio brought those skills to bear on investment banking, following an MBA at the University of Western Sydney in Australia. Over five years in New York between Dutch banks ING Barings and ABN AMRO Bank, N.A., Moggio developed a strong focus in the media and telecom industry within investment banking.


PHOTO: NBAE/GETTY IMAGES

From there, he was able to leverage the ability to analyze an industry, a business, and growth into a role that returned to his roots—both in sports and in Latin America. “The idea that I was getting away from Latin America in my banking career was something that was in the back of my mind,” he notes. “The opportunity to work in sports again, to make a transition into the world of sports from a business perspective, was something that was very enticing.” Moggio’s history in professional sports, business acumen, and understanding of Latin America made him the perfect candidate to lead the NBA’s Latin America development program. Upon taking the position, his first focus was to centralize the team’s efforts out of a New York office and open up operations in local activity in Mexico and Brazil. He and his team were focused on raising the visibility of the sport in the region and promoting growth, from driving more fans to watch the game to actually getting a basketball in a child’s hands. “We’ve learned that if a young boy or girl bounces a basketball that they’re more highly likely to be a fan when they grow up,” Moggio says. While the team’s centralized office allows them to think about the Latin American region holistically, they also undertake operations personalized to individual countries and areas. The former focus allows the NBA to honor and expand marketing partnerships with organizations like Adidas and Kellogg’s across the entire region; the latter allows them to have local dialogues in target markets to carry out NBA activities.

PHILIPPE MOGGIO SVP of Latin America National Basketball Association

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

73


worldview

A major piece of that effort has been bringing the actual NBA game to the region. Since Moggio took the role, the NBA has held preseason games in Mexico and Brazil, as well as two regular season games in Mexico City Arena. Another major achievement was a 2015 game between the NBA’s Orlando Magic and Brazilian professional team Flamengo, a game that saw nearly fifteen thousand basketball fans pack Rio De Janeiro’s HSBC Arena. However, Moggio’s outreach and growth efforts range much wider than bringing NBA games to Latin America. “We also increased our media distribution and how our content can reach new fans across the region, across multiple platforms,” he notes. That has a lot to do with major partnerships the NBA has undertaken, including Globo in Brazil, the largest media entity in that market, a sponsorship partnership with América Móvil, the largest mobile player in Mexico, and the Caribbean market’s largest mobile operator, Digicel. Another major focus is expanding the sport in a grassroots way through programs like Basketball Without Borders, which focuses on getting more people in Latin America to play the sport and developing elite talent. “We’ve worked on that program since 2001, hand in hand with FIBA and Nike,” Moggio explains. “We’ve held camps in Brazil, Argentina, Mexico, Puerto Rico, and the Dominican Republic, and it demonstrates the impact of our sport, but also it sends some of our kids the message that reaching the NBA is possible. In general, across all the camps that we’ve held, we’ve seen thrity-seven campers drafted into the NBA. That in itself is a great result.” The team’s efforts aim to improve basketball’s growth in schools and amateur programs as well, including programs like NBA 3X and Jr. NBA. “It can really help bring people together across communities through teamwork,” Moggio says. “We utilize it as a way to address social issues such as education,

74

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

“We utilize [youth programs] as a way to address social issues such as education, youth and family development, and health and wellness, and we do that across the entire region. The social responsibility is something that’s very exciting to be a part of.” PHILIPPE MOGGIO

youth and family development, and health and wellness, and we do that across the entire region. The social responsibility is something that’s very exciting to be a part of.” To an outsider, Latin America might be seen as primarily a football-focused region. However, a dedicated fan could list the NBA players that have come from Brazil, Puerto Rico, Mexico, and more, including players making key contributions to teams in the 2016 playoffs. “I’m watching as a fan,” Moggio laughs, excitedly detailing the region’s representatives. “This season we had seventeen NBA players from the Latin American region on NBA rosters, and they are tremendous ambassadors for the sport. They’re very involved in our programs, and we’re always looking at ways that we can support their activity.” Looking to the future, Moggio sees a lot of potential for basketball growth surrounding the Rio Olympics. The NBA hopes to use the excitement of having so many NBA players in Brazil by hosting an “NBA House,” which will allow fans and partners to experience the excitement on

offer at an NBA event in the United States, a major goal of the organization’s entire effort in Latin America. “NBA House will be a celebration of the NBA’s growth and commitment to Latin America,” Moggio says. Beyond that, the growth potential is immense, as he hopes to help the NBA make basketball the second largest sport in Latin America. When asked whether there will be expansion teams in places like Mexico City in the near future, Moggio cautions that it’s not a plan anytime soon, but is cautiously optimistic. “We certainly always look to how we can have an impact,” he says. “Mexico City is a market we’re particularly focused on because it’s not difficult to get there, it’s the same time zone, and getting to Mexico City might be shorter than some of the travel than our teams have to do within the US.” By looking for ways to break down barriers between the United States and Latin America, Moggio and his team continues to bring the joy, passion, and excitement of basketball to more and more people.

Editor’s Note: At time of press, Moggio has moved onto a new position as general secretary of North and Central American and Caribbean soccer governance body CONCACAF.


OFFICIAL NBA´S PARTNER IN MEXICO NBA HEADQUARTERED New York, NY FOUNDED 1946 COMPANY SUMMARY The National Basketball Association is the preeminent men’s professional basketball league in North America. The association has 30 teams—29 in the United States and one in Canada— and is one of the four major professional sports leagues in the United States and Canada.

MAGIC VS HORNETS ORLANDO NEW ORLEANS OCTOBER 12, 2012 PRESEASON

TIMBERWOLVES

MINNESOTA

VS

SPURS SAN ANTONIO

DECEMBER 4, 2013 REGULAR SEASON

ROCKETS VS TIMBERWOLVES HOUSTON

MINNESOTA

NOVEMBER 12, 2014 REGULAR SEASON

KINGS

SACRAMENTO

VS

CELTICS BOSTON

DECEMBER 3, 2015 REGULAR SEASON

www.arenaciudaddemexico.com

GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS VS NUGGETS OAKLAND

OCTOBER 14, 2006 PRESEASON

SUNS PHOENIX

VS

DENVER

76ERS

PHILADELPHIA

OCTOBER 18, 2009 PRESEASON

www.arenamonterrey.com

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

75


KEVIN DIAZ Chief Customer Officer Freudenberg IT

76

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

PHOTO: BRYAN REGAN

worldview


RELATIONSHIPS BUILT ON TRUST As he delivers global growth for Freudenberg IT, Kevin Diaz centers his strategy on building meaningful relationships by Jeff Silver

A

lthough his official title is chief customer officer with Freudenberg IT (FIT), Kevin Diaz might as well be called chief trust evangelist. That’s because to hear him describe it, trust is key to every aspect of his responsibilities—everything from nurturing and maintaining professional relationships with customers and colleagues to developing and delivering customized, mission-critical IT solutions to organizations around the world. His belief in that approach was reinforced by one of his mentors, Lynn Claussen, in a previous position with SAP. When Diaz had been customer manager for just six weeks, Claussen informed him

that he would be leading the opening of a new Latin American practice based in Mexico. When asked what the strategy was going to be, he told Diaz there wasn’t one. “He had enough trust in me to let me go to Mexico and figure out the best approach. There’s a distinct difference between management and leadership at the tactical level. So, if you’ve hired the best people, you lead by giving them the vision and then empowering them to navigate to the ultimate objectives on their own,” Diaz says. He has maintained that perspective at FIT. In a company that is entrusted with developing and supporting customers’ critical software solutions and infrastructure, he believes the spirit of open communication and interdepartmental collaboration is

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

77


worldview

FREUDENBERG IT HEADQUARTERED Weinheim, Germany FOUNDED 1995 ANNUAL SALES $8 billion (2015) COMPANY SUMMARY A global managed IT services company that specializes in SAP and Microsoft consulting, outsourcing, mobility solutions, and cloud services. The company serves clients in industries ranging from life sciences, consumer products, and automotive and mechanical engineering to medical technology and retail.

part of its cultural DNA. Demonstrated from the top down by CEO Michael Heuberger, Diaz points out, “in an industry where escalation calls come in at 2:00 a.m., I have to know that the person I reach out to for support is just as committed as I am to follow through and make things right as quickly as possible.” He goes on to explain that the team orientation eliminates silos that typically occur between departments. For example, because his division focuses on sales, marketing, and developing business alliances, it’s the delivery organization—which he characterizes as “the unsung heroes”—who ultimately manage installations, customer expectations, and on-site interactions. “Some elements of a deal may negatively impact workloads and schedules in the other department, so it’s important to have strong, transparent, ongoing relationships to accommodate those circumstances. Those kinds of authentic bonds and friendships are part of a genuine team culture here,” Diaz says. Building Relationships Diaz learned a great deal about building customer relationships when he began focusing on business in Mexico. He recounts one episode that was unsuccessful, even though his company presented a superior solution at a better price than his competitors. A colleague explained to him that they had not yet built the necessary relationship with the prospect to engender their trust and confidence. “I always keep that in mind now and do whatever is necessary to make time for customers, to understand their priorities and develop a real connection with them. We go the extra mile because

78

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

FREUDENBERG IT BY THE NUMBERS

83%

customer satisfaction (2015 TNS Survey)

400+ 100+ customers

SAP HANA worldwide installations

20+ industries

Source: www.freudenberg-it.com


anybody can sell technology, but you can’t always trust everyone selling it,” he points out. He benefited tremendously from that approach several years later when a prominent hotelier in Mexico requested a one-hour face-to-face meeting. Diaz was skeptical about flying in from the United States because the prospect already had an existing relationship with another company. However, the meeting stretched out to more than three hours, Diaz won the business, as well as a relationship with the customer’s chief information officer that has lasted to this day. “It’s about simple things like really listening to clients and keeping your word on everything you’ve promised. In IT, we’re not dealing with tangible products but with diagrams and descriptions about how our services will optimize mission-critical solutions. It’s all predicated on trust,” he says. Strategy for Global Growth FIT is pursuing plans for doubling its worldwide volume, so Diaz will need to adapt some of his trust-based business methods. For instance, as scope and scale increase, he wants to find ways to maintain the boutique approach of spending “quality time” with customers to understand their drivers and then customize deliverables appropriately. He describes it by saying, “If you’re genuinely listening, not selling or talking about yourself, you’ll ask the right questions. Customers sense that you know their business through those questions. Doing it right requires humility and real attentiveness no matter how large you are.” Diaz and an executive team are also working on developing a single,

“Even though growth is one of our corporate objectives, customer managers will still be hands-on to deliver the highest levels of customer satisfaction. That’s how we gauge our success.” KEVIN DIAZ

standardized global website that will highlight FIT’s core competencies and capabilities in a simple, straightforward manner. Their challenge is distilling all the key elements needed to showcase the company’s strengths while crafting language that addresses local nuances of international markets that stretch from North America, to Europe, and China. As the growth strategy is implemented, Diaz says it will be vitally important not to lose sight of the consistency and reliability that has made the company successful for decades. So as expansion occurs, he will focus on ensuring that existing customers and prospects don’t lose the personalized time and attention they have come to expect. “Even though growth is one of our corporate objectives, customer managers

will still be hands-on to deliver the highest levels of customer satisfaction. That’s how we gauge our success, not just by volume of business,” he explains. That isn’t a surprising answer from someone who describes his greatest professional achievements as the relationships he has established with customers over the years. To illustrate, he recounts numerous episodes when they have agreed to call in as references during presentations to new prospects often, with just a five-minute notice. He says proudly, “The quality of our brand and our image is a byproduct of the people in our organization. The fact that we’ve been able to develop such strong client relationships is a great testament that we’re not just a vendor to our customers. We’re their partners.”

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

79


feature

80

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016


A Spotlight on Healthcare

Healthcare is an industry that has been going through a revolution for nearly a decade, with changes and challenges only multiplying year over year. The healthcare sector is working constantly and quickly to adapt to demands for mobile apps, Affordable Care Act deadlines, company mergers, rising costs, telemedicine, and much more. But one thing matters most of all: the patients. In this section, we explore how top healthcare companies and executives stay true to what made them passionate about the industry in the first place—and put patient-centered care at the heart of what they do. Illustrations by Juliet Desnoyer

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

81


feature

Yolangel Hernandez Suarez Chief Medical Officer Humana

82

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016


Guest Editor: Dr. Yolangel “Yogi” Hernandez Suarez

Emboldened

Dr. Hernandez Suarez has worked at the leadership level in nearly every facet of the healthcare industry, but what’s more amazing is that no one ever told her that she couldn’t by Amanda Garcia, photos by Sheila Barabad

“We don’t steal here,” warned the Episcopalian nun. It was Yolangel “Yogi” Hernandez Suarez’s first day of fourth grade at St. Hilda’s & St. Hugh’s school in New York City. It was the ’70s, and the nun had pulled her Latina mother aside. “Good,” said her mother. “Because we don’t either.” Hernandez Suarez was born in New York the year after her two young parents emigrated from Cuba. Her mother was an early feminist who instilled in her daughter an intrinsic appreciation for women’s empowerment and human rights. Both parents raised her to work hard, be honest, and never let others determine her limitations. They also held her education as a top priority—hence her attendance at St. Hilda’s. While the nuns may have initially made an incorrect assumption about Hernandez Suarez, they turned out to be brilliant teachers. As highly educated and dedicated instructors, the nuns were early examples of strong female leaders in Hernandez Suarez’s life and

demonstrated the importance of both learning and of serving those less fortunate. They also taught Hernandez Suarez the powerful impact that mentors can have on young minds. Hernandez Suarez went on to attended Swarthmore College, an institution with Quaker roots that she credits with solidifying many of her foundational values—her inclusive mind-set and passion for social justice. She planned to finish her bachelor’s degree in biochemistry and jump right into a PhD, but during an internship at a hospital, another important female mentor made a life-changing suggestion: “You’re so good with people,” she said. “You should be a doctor.” So, Hernandez Suarez applied to Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. At the time, the university was putting heavy emphasis on developing industry leaders—people who would challenge the status quo in healthcare at the highest level. During Hernandez Suarez’s interview, the associate dean expressed concern that, as a Latina, she

would use her Johns Hopkins education simply to help struggling Hispanic communities. “What would you do if given this opportunity?” he asked. “I want your job someday,” she answered. After the interview, Hernandez Suarez was worried she had blown it by being too forward, but her gumption had actually made a positive impression. She was accepted and awarded a generous scholarship. At Johns Hopkins, Hernandez Suarez met her husband, Dr. Jeff Simmons, and they were married between their second and third years of school. When Simmons was given the opportunity to train in cardiology at the Jackson Health System a few years later, they moved to Miami where Hernandez Suarez went into private practice as an ob-gyn and served the women of Miami Beach for more than ten years. But academia came calling again when Hernandez Suarez was recruited to a faculty position at the University of Miami. She fell in love with the nonprofit sector and soon became vice president of

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

83


feature

“It’s my job to ensure that we are investing in the right resources—healthcare professionals, technology, social services, policy advocacy— that improve their health for the long haul.” Yogi Hernandez Suarez

ambulatory services for Jackson Health, where she oversaw a network of primary and specialty services for Miami-Dade County. “I owe a lot of what I understand about healthcare to the time I spent at UM and the Jackson Health System,” she says. She also earned her MBA at UM during that time. Five years later, Hernandez Suarez was recruited again, this time to be associate dean for graduate medical education at the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine at Florida International University. “It was an opportunity to design curriculum for a new medical school whose mission was to train doctors to care for the community,” she says. “I couldn’t say no.” But when the cold call came about a chief medical officer position at Humana, Hernandez Suarez was surprised. “Have you seen my résumé?” she asked the senior recruiter. “I’ve spent my entire career in the public sector and I have no earnings per share—except in heaven for serving the community!” They had, indeed, seen her résumé and believed she was exactly right for Humana. Today, Hernandez Suarez is VP and chief medical officer for Humana’s Care Delivery Organization and is responsible for all of Humana’s wholly owned clinics across Florida, Texas, and South Carolina. These clinics have a special focus on seniors, are staffed by more than 250 doctors, and provide the highest-quality care to more than 100,000 patients. “Humana is a healthcare company—not just an insurance company,” Hernandez Suarez says. “We truly touch

84

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

patients on their journeys to wellness.” The Affordable Care Act created a paradigm shift to healthcare financing by mandating that 85 percent of all healthcare dollars be directly invested in patient care. Humana believes that the best way to do this is through value-based care—maximizing the total health of patients over their lifespans. Doctors must now be trained and empowered to improve quality of care, and rather than simply diagnosing illness and prescribing treatment, they are expected to suggest affordable options and total-body preventative action. “If you don’t have an understanding of the system in which healthcare functions,” Hernandez Suarez says, “you won’t be able to do right by your patients.” For Hernandez Suarez, achieving the best health for patients means regularly engaging a diverse group of experts to understand, interpret, and address these complexities. “Doctors, nurses, social workers, policy-makers, community representatives, nutritionists, civic planning, lawyers, and others are all at the table,” Hernandez Suarez says. “It’s that spirit of inclusion that allows all of our voices to be heard, and it’s my job to facilitate those voices to get to a solution.” Hernandez Suarez likens her work to that of an air traffic controller who must be able to pay attention to planes that are landing, as well as those flying in the air. She simultaneously considers patients who come to clinics seeking care, and those in their homes and communities. “I wake up every morning with 100,000 people to worry about,” she says. “It’s

my job to ensure that we are investing in the right resources—healthcare professionals, technology, social services, policy advocacy—that improve their health for the long haul.” To do that, Humana has established a company-wide bold goal. “We are committed to improving the health of the communities we serve by 20 percent by 2020,” Hernandez Suarez says. “It’s one of the things that drew me to Humana.” Special task forces have been assembled


Prescription From Dr. Yogi Hernandez Suarez: As you read this section, consider these takeaways:

1

Latinos are having a bold impact right now on healthcare: how it is designed, how it is practiced, how it is delivered, and how it is financed.

How can we leverage that even further?

2

Our leadership matters to the health and wellbeing of millions of Americans.

Consider how far we have come.

3 in communities to investigate and assess each population’s health and begin addressing needs. Whether it’s poverty, hunger, mental health, or physical health challenges, these groups are invested in understanding the total-body needs of constituents at every stage of life. At the heart of Hernandez Suarez’s leadership is authenticity. Wherever she goes she remains consistent, and her integrity, honesty, and work ethic precede her. She carries her mother’s heart for

empowerment, the nuns’ passion for justice, and her professors’ conviction for inclusion into her work every day, which has inspired a culture of trust and collaboration among her teams at Humana. “I am bold because I have been emboldened,” she says, following in the footsteps of the strong female leaders before her by standing up for patients, speaking up for the voiceless, and inspiring others to follow her lead.

We are at the cutting edge of creating innovative, equitable, and sustainable healthcare.

What comes next?

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

85


feature

The Man Behind the Strategy USMD’s John Ortiz opens up about creating a strategy to balance patient-centered care with staying financially strong by Keith Loria

John Ortiz Vice President of Strategic Planning USMD Health System

86

With more than four decades of experience as a healthcare strategy leader, when John Ortiz comes up with an idea for stronger financial solvency, you better believe people are listening. Especially given his success so far. For the past three years, Ortiz has served as vice president of strategic planning for USMD Heath System in Irving, Texas. Before that, he spent eleven years in hospital and physician operations management with a Catholic healthcare system and twenty-seven years in providing advisory services to hospitals, physician practices, health plans and governments in both the US and abroad. “The opportunities I’ve had have given me a level of experience and expertise that took time to develop, but have become part of my strategic thinking today,” he says. “My first experience was with Jefferson Health System, which was building a brand new hospital. My role was to help develop and implement the operational plan for the new hospital systems and designs that were not widely used in the healthcare industry at the time.” As the new hospital was taking form, developers realized they were scheduled to open up

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

in 1977, but the procedures or practices weren’t yet in place to open this brand new hospital. “They hired a group of engineers, and I was tasked with helping them redesign the procedures and processes to support the new hospital design,” Ortiz says. “It gave me the chance to design a healthcare process for surgery and nursing from the ground up that had not been done before but is now a standard of healthcare and what we see in a lot of organizations today.” Ortiz learned early on that you can accomplish a great deal without spending a whole lot of money—at least not as much as many in the health field seem to be doing today. “Money doesn’t necessarily result in a great outcome or results you want. My passion was to help the industry realize that,” he says. “You can be efficient for a low cost and provide a much higher level of care and quality if you move in a different direction—a smarter direction.” A New Strategic Direction USMD serves the Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area with more than 250 providers and associate practitioners, and provides healthcare services to patients in just under twenty different specialties at its two hospitals, several cancer treatment centers, and nearly sixty physician clinics. Ortiz’s philosophy was one of the reasons that USMD came calling in 2012 because USMD shared his vision. The health system was about to merge


SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

87


feature

WellMed: Building relationships for better health care

USMD Health System Headquartered Irving, TX Founded 1994 Reach 2 hospitals, 6 cancer treatment centers, nearly 70 physician clinics, and 29 primary-care clinics in the Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area Annual Revenue $325.2 million (2015) About USMD is a physicianled, integrated health system that provides healthcare services to patients in more than 20 different specialities.

WellMed is a physician-led patient-focused healthcare delivery system dedicated to helping patients live longer and healthier lives for more than 25 years. Doctors in the WellMed network focus on proactive, preventive, coordinated care using the latest advancements in medicine and technology. Today, WellMed’s network of more than 9,100 providers in Texas and Florida can put patient care first delivering safe, effective, personalized and thoughtful health care for their patients.

wellmedhealthcare.com AD_DFW_PARTNER_99_CO052316

88

This is an advertisement.

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

Med_DFW_Partnering AD_USMD_v8.indd 1

5/23/16 3:25 PM

with the Medical Clinic of North Texas, Urology Associates of North Texas, and IMPEL Management Services. Ortiz was brought in to help ensure the merger would go smoothly for all involved and to reorganize its structure to better empower physicians for patients. “The opportunity at USMD allowed me to demonstrate what I believed the industry needed to do: empower physicians to manage a patient’s health to achieve better outcomes,” he says. “Physicians, particularly primary care physicians, are critical to how we manage the health system. Yet when people think of healthcare, they more often think of hospitals or high-tech equipment like MRIs or PET Scans, but those are only the tools used by physicians to help cure disease. The challenge is that physicians to a certain extent have been put in a role where they do not have the ability to effectively manage health. When they are in that role or in charge and can practice medicine appropriately, the results are amazing.” Once Ortiz had the structure in place after the merger, he was able to demonstrate what could happen when physicians take control of the system, putting them in a position where they were getting premium dollars from Medicare. Managing the money and patients in a proactive manner under Ortiz was instrumental in developing the company’s strategic plan and its specific initiatives. “They recognized this was the right model,” he says. “We demonstrated that not only were we able to far exceed quality metrics that Medicare had outlined for physicians, but we were the second lowest cost-of-care organization in the state of Texas and forty-third lowest in the country.” A big part of Ortiz’s current plan is to keep the Dallas-Fort Worth area population healthy and proactive in their own lives so that fewer services need to be newly implemented. Ortiz helped build a population health management division, which is changing the way that physicians practice medicine by surrounding them with a mobile clinical team. “We proactively monitor all patients but pay particular attention to those with high risk by providing the support they would never get in a feefor-service environment,” Ortiz says. “For example, USMD stresses ensuring that its patients fill prescriptions. If they don’t take their medication, there is a high probability they will wind up ill and in the ER,” Ortiz explains. “We also have to assure our patients that it’s OK to call us if they don’t feel well. In the past, a call to their physician would end


up with going to the ER. That shouldn’t have to be the case anymore.” When a patient goes to a facility that doesn’t have any historical information about their health, it is inevitable that numerous tests and specialty consultations will occur. This is when the bill rises and outcomes can be devastating. Being proactive means reaching out to our patients while also providing access 24-7 all year, Ortiz says. Keeping the Community Healthy Ortiz’s parents are both from Puerto Rico; his father was a barber in Manhattan and his mom worked part-time. Both played an important role in their son’s path to healthcare. “Being Hispanic, the success that I have had in business has been the result of not only my passion to succeed, but also my parents’ sacrifice to ensure I could get a good education,” he says. “In order to succeed in an industry like healthcare, you must recognize that continuing your education is critical. I urge those in the Latino community to do everything they can to encourage their children and relatives to continue a path towards education and higher learning.” Ortiz grew up in New York City, surrounded by a melting pot of all cultures, and he’s passionate about reaching communities where they live. In the Dallas-Fort Worth area, he sees Hispanics from a variety of economic backgrounds. The truth, he says, is that so many don’t have access to proper healthcare. “Too many people being underinsured is a huge issue here in Texas,” Ortiz says. “And when the only care they can get is when they are admitted to an emergency room, that’s a problem. To get adequate care, you need a doctor who knows you, to act as your partner towards health.” The need for healthcare is a basic need for every person on the planet, but even in the US, the industry is not where it needs to be, according to Ortiz. “But we are doing what we can to make it better.” What makes USMD unique is that it’s publicly held, traded on the NASDAQ, and embraces Medicare. In fact, the organization has leaped full tilt into Medicare Advantage, unlike other physician groups around the country. Looking ahead, Ortiz notes, the goals of USMD are to increase the number of individuals the system cares for and to introduce its approach to more medical employers. Ultimately, the USMD system aims to be the standard for healthcare in the area.

Diagnosis with Dr. Hernandez Suarez “I am thrilled to see a fellow New York Latino catalyzed by his experiences to become a healthcare servant and leader. John Ortiz is someone who was reaching for the ‘Triple Aim’ (Better Health, Better Experiences, and Lower Costs) before it was defined by the Institute for Health Care Improvement. Ortiz is a strategic leader of a provider-led organization as well as an effective partner to physicians. And he has been throughout his whole career. He has a masterful ability to spot the hot-button issues for healthcare under the ACA: electronic records, patient compliance, and medication management. Basically, his strategy can deliver the right care in the right place. Ortiz is the type of leader that physicians want to partner with.”

—Dr. Yogi Hernandez Suarez

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

89


feature

Sandra Delgado Chief Medical Officer Humana TRICARE

90

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016


Commander in Care Humana TRICARE’s Dr. Sandra Delgado discusses the unique health needs of the military and why she’s passionate about population health by Julie Edwards, photos by Sheila Barabad

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

91


feature

Even as a child, Sandra Delgado had a curiosity about how a person’s health could affect their overall happiness and potential for achievement. Her interest in medicine sprang from a desire to help people be their best. Raising a Hispanic family in Texas, Delgado’s father made sure that his daughter knew that a woman with an education would have better options to care for herself and her family. His advice really stuck with her and Delgado focused on prioritizing education above all. She earned a degree in child development and family relationships from the University of Texas–Austin, followed by a medical degree from Texas A&M College of Medicine. During her residency in family medicine, she got a master’s degree in public health and completed a fellowship in preventative medicine in San Antonio that launched her career in population health. “In private practice, you have limited impact. You see fifteen or twenty patients a day—many of whom have preventable conditions or social ills,” she says. “I was more interested in improving the health of an entire population.” Today, Delgado serves as the chief medical officer for Humana’s TRICARE division, which is administered by the US Department of Defense and covers active and retired military and their dependents. But her career began in the public sector. During Delgado’s ten years working in Texas public health at the local, regional, and state levels, she handled everything from immunization services to communicable disease control. She treated Hurricane Katrina evacuees in San Antonio,

92

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

gaining experience as a first responder from a public health perspective. She pulled in various health systems and health providers to assist the evacuees. “I enjoyed being able to help people with their immediate health needs, while at the same time organizing an entire system to come to their aid,” she says. Delgado would go on to lead disaster relief for the state of Texas which, she notes, “gets more natural disasters than any other state. Floods, tornadoes, hurricanes, fires—you name it, and it happens in Texas.” Delgado then made an important transition to Humana and the private sector in 2012. At first, Delgado found it challenging to learn the culture of the private sector after spending so much time in the public sector. But, she says, “I had strong leaders who took me under their wing and provided me with vital learning opportunities.” Most rewarding for her has been the ability to focus on preventive health for a company that understands and has the resources to address an entire population. “Humana touches 500,000 lives in San Antonio on a daily basis—out of a population of a little more than a million,” she says. “We are profoundly interested in the overall health of the community.” As chief medical officer of TRICARE, Delgado oversees not only 350 associates, but also the population health services for more than 3 million TRICARE beneficiaries in ten states in the southeastern United States. She is responsible for referrals—matching the beneficiary with the best provider in the Humana network—as well as case management for those who have recently


SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

93


feature

“Focusing on population health motivates me. I feel like I’m in the right place at the right time with the right skill set.” Sandra Delgado

94

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016


` Headquartered Louisville, KY Founded 1961

Reach Nationwide

CLIENT: Deb Lawson LOB: Corporate or Brand

FILE ISSUE AND COLOR APPROVAL CONTACT:

Traffic/Bridgett Johnson/502.580.8585 ProdMgr/David Orosco/502.476.8836

COLOR: SIZE: TRIM: BLEED:

About Humana is a for-profit health insurance and well-being company that offers diverse lines of business to serve families, seniors, military members, and self-employed individuals and provide group health insurance and Medicare plans.

We salute Dr. Sandra Delgado for the care she provides America’s military families and for making healthcare easier for them. Nos enorgullece tenerla como parte de nuestra familia.

MAIL 10 PRINTED TEAR SHEETS TO:

THE HIVE/TRAFFIC 123 E. MAIN STREET, STE 2E LOUISVILLE, KY 40202

RUN DATE: 06/21/2016

4C PROCESS 2.45 in X 10.2

NO

PRINTER: TBD CONTACT: NAME

THE HIVE IS RESPONSIBLE FOR ALL COLOR APPROVALS - PLEASE CONTACT TRAFFIC OR PRODUCTION MANAGER

Email: thehive@humana.com

Annual Revenue $54.3 million (2015)

PUBLICATION: (Hispanic Executive)

Humana

FILE PREPARED BY HUMANA'S INTERNAL CREATIVE SERVICES | FINAL PRINT READY PDF X1-A FILE FOR JOB: 08951_hispanicAD_2.45X10.2_4C

THE HIVE - CREATIVE SERVICES

JOB: 08951_hispanicAD_2.45X10.2_4C

DATE: 06/08/2016

JOB ID: 08951

4C

experienced an acute health episode, such as surgery. Delgado has also taken on responsibility for disease management for those with chronic conditions, credentialing, and quality management. “Mine is a unique position,” Delgado explains. “The focus of the military health system is to maintain a top level of health and readiness to be deployed.” TRICARE’s priority is not only about maintaining a healthy military, but it’s also vitally important that a soldier’s family’s health be resilient enough to support the deployment of a loved one. Delgado actively takes on the particular challenges of the military population. Because of deployments, the military is a uniquely mobile population. There is a need for services to be transferable across large geographies, and a major challenge is to maintain care without interruption. In addition to physical health, the mental healthcare needs of this population are distinct. “We have to know how to manage when someone is deployed and when they come back from deployment,” Delgado explains. “Even if they don’t have PTSD, they have to adjust to getting back to normal life. And their physical health may be put on the back burner.” What has surprised Delgado the most during her medical career is the change in the way health is measured. In the past, it was measured by lab results, X-rays, and EKGs. “But now, thanks to technology, we don’t necessarily categorize all people with a condition—like diabetes, for example—as the same based on their lab results,” she says. Delgado describes a tool borrowed from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention called the Healthy Days Measure as something that has been particularly useful. “With Healthy Days, we ask people, ‘How many days out of the last thirty have you not felt healthy enough to do what you have wanted?’ How a person has felt correlates pretty closely with their lab results, X-rays, and other technical factors,” she says. “We’re starting to focus on what matters to patients.” What initially attracted Delgado to Humana was that the company has transitioned from a

Military, civilian, individuals or groups — every member matters to Humana.

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

95


feature

Humana TRICARE By the Numbers TRICARE is a major part of the Military Health System with:

9.4M beneficiaries

55

military hospitals

373

military medical clinics

Humana Military congratulates Dr. Delgado Humana Military is pleased to congratulate our very own Dr. Sandra Delgado, Chief Medical Officer – TRICARE, for being recognized as an Outstanding Executive by Hispanic Executive. Her tireless work ethic for our country’s military and dedication to their health and well-being is unmatched in the medical field. Dr. Delgado is exemplary in her commitment to Humana Military’s mission and we are incredibly fortunate to have her on our team.

245

dental facilities

In 2015, TRICARE saw:

20.5M

outpatient visits

1M

inpatient visits

119,000

babies born in the military health system

128M

prescriptions filled

96

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016


“Our enterprise goal is to improve the health of every community we serve by 20 percent by 2020.” Sandra Delgado

traditional health insurance company to a health and well-being company. “Over the last ten or twenty years, there’s been a perception in the community that health insurance is a barrier to people achieving their best health,” she explains. “Humana wants to be a facilitator of health. Our enterprise goal is to improve the health of every community we serve by 20 percent by 2020.” Humana is also committed to the health of its employees. “We want our associates to be as healthy as possible so our customers will find it easy to trust us with their health.” A fairly new approach in medicine today is the use of predictive analytics. Technology is used to personalize the healthcare that patients receive, the kind of messages and reminders they get, and the type of physician they are paired with. Predictive modeling can be used in a variety of health-related situations. “It can be used to tell which of two heart attack patients is more likely to be readmitted and which elderly patient is more likely to get a urinary tract infection or fall in the home—which can lead to hospitalization,” Delgado notes. “We know how to intervene before that happens and do everything possible to prevent hospitalization.” Delgado loves working with the military, especially through Humana’s perspective. “Focusing on population health motivates me. I feel like I’m in the right place at the right time with the right skill set,” she says. “I remember lamenting to my mother how all of my friends were starting their careers right after college, but I would be so old when I finished medical school. She said, ‘You might as well get old doing something you love.’ Looking back, I totally agree with her.”

Diagnosis with Dr. Hernandez Suarez “Dr. Sandra Delgado is actually one of the first people I met when I joined Humana. I consider her more than just a colleague—she is a friend. We formed an immediate kinship because we both started in the public sector and had similar experiences moving to the private sector. Now, Delgado’s work is mission-driven. The military personnel and their families have unique and unpredictable needs. Their health circumstances are what might be considered disruptive—even with multiple deployments, military staff are still in need of continuous care. Delgado must approach that type of environment holistically and with an integrated physical and behavioral health strategy. She must be more than just patient-centric, she has to be familycentric. By applying the principles of population health to Humana’s powerful data base, Delgado is optimally equipped to commit to quality healthcare for this special community. Her joy in service is authentic and infectious, and our military families are healthier because of her leadership.”

—Dr. Yogi Hernandez Suarez

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

97


feature

LIMELIGHT

98

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016


Insurtech in the Limelight Health insurance innovator Michael Lujan knows from personal experience what it’s like to go without coverage, and he’s dedicated to making health insurance more consumer-friendly for every patient by Jeff Silver

It was never Michael Lujan’s intention to work in health insurance. In fact, Lujan goes as far to contend that it is never anyone’s plan to get into the insurance side of healthcare. He simply accepted the job that was offered at the first of five interviews his college career counselor had set up for him. Fortuitously, that first job was the beginning of a career spanning three decades that has touched every facet of the industry and led to the launch of Limelight Health, the technology startup he co-founded in 2014. Limelight is a mobile, cloud-based health insurance quoting platform that enables enterprise companies to simplify employee health benefit information and streamline the proposal, decision, and renewal processes—all without ever touching a piece of paper. Lujan points out that a traditional insurance system is filled with waste and excess costs as a result of its reliance on manual processing. “The old system is simply inefficient with administrative and operating costs, making health insurance more expensive,” says Lujan, whose

official title at Limelight is chief strategy officer. “Consumers are demanding a better experience that can help them find affordable coverage with the right benefits.” Limelight, which is now available in five states with plans to expand to ten more by the end of 2017, is the first employee benefits quoting technology that provides instant cost and coverage information from a variety of carriers with connections for paperless enrollment processes. It is one of several fast-growing startups in the insurtech market sector, and was named Most Promising HealthTech Company at Silicon Valley’s “Insurance Disrupted” conference series in 2015. That recognition helped the company raise more than $5 million in venture capital from MassMutual Ventures, AXA Strategic Ventures, Launchpad

Michael Lujan Cofounder, Chief Strategy Officer Limelight Health

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

99


feature

Experience the

Limelight Headquartered San Francisco, CA Founded 2014 Reach Limelight Health is now available in five US states with plans to expand into ten more states by the end of 2017

Health Solutions Innovation that is Pinnacle Claims Management, Inc.™

Congratulations to Michael Lujan for his recognition in Hispanic Executive.”

PinnacleTPA.com 866.930.PCMI 100

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

About Limelight Health provides a new platform and solution for health insurance agents and other health insurance professionals that connects and integrates data with other benefits technologies like payroll, CRM, benefits administration, and compliance tools.

Digital Health, and other private seed investors. “We are starting out by focusing on the small group market segment, businesses with fewer than one hundred employees, and expanding slowly,” Lujan says. “Reception and adoption within the industry has been great, but we want to be smart about how we grow to make sure we execute every step along the way properly in the highly regulated insurance environment.” Beyond managing his startup, Lujan was selected to participate in the first cohort of Stanford University’s Latino Entrepreneur Initiative, a national campaign aimed at helping Hispanic business leaders scale their companies through an immersive program of education, networking and mentorship with access to capital. He now serves as a mentor for the second cohort. An Empathetic Approach Lujan knows what it’s like to live without medical coverage. When he was growing up, his father was self-employed and was at times unable to provide insurance or medical care for his family. As an adult, Lujan helped his mother navigate the healthcare system after a car accident and serious head injury when she discovered that her employer-provided coverage had lapsed because she had not worked the required minimum number of hours to maintain her coverage. Both experiences shaped him into becoming what he calls an “instant advocate” for the uninsured and the millions of Americans who struggle to maintain affordable health coverage. “Even many consumers who have coverage don’t completely understand how health insurance works, but technology can help. I take it as a personal responsibility to help people understand and access the care that’s available to them,” Lujan says. Lujan has been involved from the onset in California’s implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). He helped develop “Covered California,” the nation’s largest state public health


AHL Diagnosis with Dr. Hernandez Suarez “Michael Lujan is working at the edge of disruption. Along with his partners, he is rethinking how companies design benefits for their employees—benefits that are both financially sustainable and support population health. Limelight is a 2014 startup that provides a unique business solution to small businesses and harnesses the power of technology. Lujan, because of his life experiences, is familiar with the gap between having health insurance and understanding access, especially for patients who are newly insured. He has leveraged his knowledge, and the impact he has had on ACA adoption in California is remarkable.

Turning powerful ideas into practice

I am inspired by his dedication to fueling his daughter’s generation’s health over a lifetime. Rethought health insurance benefits, fueled by technology, promise a brighter future. Because of his advocacy and nontraditional thinking, I see a bright future for him as well.”

—Dr. Yogi Hernandez Suarez

Subscribe today ahlmagazine.com

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

101


feature

Predictions for Healthcare Disruption Michael Lujan’s predictions for changes that are imminent—and those he feels should be imminent—thanks to insurtech innovation trends in healthcare and medical insurance:

1

Health insurance, one of the last industries relying on hard copies and faxed signatures, will finally go paperless.

2

Transparency in healthcare costs will improve tremendously. Consumers will be able to research costs for surgeries and other procedures as easily as they can for cars or TVs.

3

Wearable “digital health” devices will become more integrated into healthcare and health insurance, possibly contributing data that leads to lower premiums for healthier individuals.

4

Telemedicine and electronic medical records will continue improving convenience, accuracy, efficiency, and patient outcomes.

102

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

“Even many consumers who have coverage don’t completely understand how health insurance works, but technology can help. I take it as a personal responsibility to help people understand and access the care that’s available to them.” Michael Lujan

exchange, and is president of the California Association of Health Underwriters (CAHU), the largest association of licensed health insurance agents and consumer advocates. CAHU accounts for nearly half of total enrollment in the exchange. According to Lujan, the ACA set the stage for many improvements, including cutting the number of California’s uninsured in half. Many of the newly insured, however, still have trouble managing copays, prescription costs, high deductibles, and finding care in a timely fashion. Lujan acknowledges there have also been growing pains to overcome, such as national marketing and awareness campaigns that targeted Latino communities as monolithic entities rather then recognizing the many different countries of origin those communities represent. There are also individual concerns that still must be overcome, such as fears that coverage might draw attention to mixed citizenship status within households that could prompt the loss of personal assets. “Communities that are accustomed to doing without need to work with people they trust and who intimately understand their concerns,” Lujan says. “That’s beginning to happen and is contributing to improved rates of coverage and care for Latinos with chronic diseases like diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease.”

He has seen positive differences for many previously uninsured populations who are now eligible for coverage. Lujan recalls a self-employed Bay Area man who was able to obtain coverage despite preexisting conditions and who credits the ACA with enabling him to detect a new cancer early enough to receive life-saving treatment. It is just one example of how the new health insurance reforms and technology bring better access and innovative tools to communities. Limelight’s millennial employees, who make up the majority of the staff, pose scrutinizing questions, find untraditional solutions, and display a huge intolerance for “doing things the old way.” Lujan says he enjoys reimagining the insurance industry with their creative talents and fresh perspectives. As he utilizes telemedicine, electronic records, medical cost transparency, and other capabilities that will soon be mobile-enabled, Lujan says, “My daughter is a college freshman. By the time she enters the workforce, she’ll be able to enjoy countless advantages that are long overdue in healthcare and insurance.” Pinnacle Claims Management, Inc. (PCMI), is an all-inclusive third party administrator offering competitive, cost-efficient benefits administration and claims processing in sync with the latest technology in the self-funded marketplace. Call 866.930. PCMI (7264) or visit PinnacleTPA.com for more information.


New Game, New Challenges Ricardo Nuñez is feeling energized as he leverages his legal skill set for startup Vivex Biomedical, a company whose products change and save lives by Jeff Silver

PHOTO: TOM BURKE

Ricardo Nuñez has worked in legal leadership positions for Fortune 500 companies like Exxon, GE, and Home Depot, and as general counsel for industrial distributor HD Supply. In April 2015, he shifted gears to the healthcare industry taking on the role of general counsel for startup Vivex Biomedical. Nuñez sits down with Hispanic Executive to discuss diving headfirst into a company and an industry he can be truly passionate about.

Ricardo Nuñez General Counsel Vivex Biomedical

Hispanic Executive: What prompted your move to Vivex? Ricardo Nuñez: First, when HD Supply had its initial public offering, I was provided with flexibility to really consider what I wanted to do professionally. Secondly, I’ve always been interested in the challenges startup companies face. I considered every sector from technology, to retail, to manufacturing, but Vivex offers more than just an entirely new set of invigorating challenges. Working in healthcare also presents the opportunity to be part of a team dedicated to enhancing patient care and improving people’s lives. That combination is exciting to me at this point in my career.

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

103


feature

104

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016


“I’m acutely aware that my actions, even as a lawyer, directly impact the quality of patient care and their lives on a daily basis.” Ricardo Nuñez

HE: Even though you have shifted industries, do you find there are common threads to how you approach your job? RN: My priorities are still the same: I strive to be a better attorney and to do the highest quality work zealously and effectively representing my clients. I spend a lot of time on updating my knowledge stay abreast of cutting-edge legal strategies and legislation. HE: What about the ways in which you go about addressing those priorities? RN: Because we’re a biotech startup, the approach to acting on those priorities is different. In larger companies, I had a full legal staff and with that came the luxury of being able to pick and choose the specific matters I got deeply involved with. Here I’m active in virtually every aspect of operations—everything from HR, IT, and raising funds to R&D, processing, facilities, and investor communications, as well as traditional legal work, of course. It all keeps me very sharp and tuned in, but also gives me a more intimate knowledge of the entire business. I still hope to build a full legal team, but the comprehensive perspective I get from this level of involvement is part of the entrepreneurial experience that I really enjoy.

HE: How different is operating within healthcare for you? RN: Interacting with physicians and hospitals, the FDA, and other regulatory bodies like the American Association of Tissue Banks, of course, is very different. But compliance has always been an important part of every industry I’ve ever worked in, whether related to accurate marketing materials or the safety of products for consumers. In fact, without a firm grasp on compliance issues in any industry, almost nothing else will matter in a legal role. The biggest difference for me now is that Vivex products literally become part of our consumers’ bodies. I’m acutely aware that my actions, even as a lawyer, directly impact the quality of patient care and their lives on a daily basis. That’s a huge consideration for me. The pace of innovation in healthcare is also incredibly exciting. As an attorney, that means I have to keep up with that evolution, not just because I want to help us do well and succeed, but also for the good of the patients. What motivates everyone who is part of the company is a passion that goes into the work we do and makes us extremely grateful to the families of our selfless donors. We have events throughout the year where we celebrate their lives and invite their families to honor the gifts of life they have made possible.

Vivex Biomedical Headquarters Marietta, GA Founded 2012 Reach To date, Vivex has supplied 2,000,000+ transplants to surgeons around the world About Vivex Biomedical is a leading processor of human tissue, synthetics, mimetic patterning technology, and biocelular products.

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

105


feature

Life-changing Products Vivex’s current products are comprosed of human tissue, synthetics, mimetic patterning technology, and biocellular products. These include allografts, which are donated tissues that are transplanted from one person to another. After the death of a promising Berklee College of Music student, for example, Vivex enabled her family to donate tissues that ultimately helped save the lives of eight patients who had suffered catastrophic burns. Through the generosity of another family’s donation, a 36-yearold patient received a tendon graft to repair a damaged anterior cruciate ligament in his knee. Fifteen years later, the recipient still enjoys playing ultimate frisbee and soccer. The following are examples of Vivex innovations that contribute to changing lives, every day.

Congratulations to Ricardo Nuñez of Vivex Biomedical for being featured in Hispanic Executive

Debevoise & Plimpton LLP is a premier law firm with market-leading practices, a global perspective and strong New York roots. We deliver effective solutions to our clients’ most important legal challenges, applying clear commercial judgment and a distinctively collaborative approach.

106

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

AlloGEN AlloGen is a multipurpose amniotic fluid therapy that can be easily applied directly at the site of the injury or inflammation. It’s commonly used in orthopedics, neurosurgery, spinal surgery and general surgery.

Via Graft Via Graft is a viable allogeneic bone scaffold derived from bone marrow and intended for use in bone remodeling.

Cygnus Cygnus offers mechanical protection while providing a regenerative tissue matrix. It has been used in spine and neurosurgery, reconstructive surgery, oral surgery, wound care, burn care, and dermatology.


HE: Does all of that mean you’ve had to develop a new set of skills in order to be effective? RN: The specifics of compliance that apply to us are certainly different. But because we’re a very R&D-driven company, I’ve also learned a heck of a lot more about healthcare regulation than I could have imagined a year ago. Furthermore, I’m continually amazed at how many new ideas and cutting-edge technologies there are in the market—and amazed at how they are completely separate from the many already-existing products that have the potential for new applications that people may have never have thought of before. The volume of innovation and the significance it has in helping improve lives is absolutely incredible. HE: What are your goals for the company and where do you think they will take you? RN: First, I want to help the company continue to grow. We’re well on our way with revenue growing in excess of 35 percent year-over-year. Second, I want to develop and implement more efficient legal processes. Our compliance levels are strong, and now it is about continuously improving process efficiency and effectiveness. We continue to garner attention from prominent industry players that are interested in partnering with us. That activity should continue driving performance that significantly outpaces our industry. HE: With your prior history, could you have predicted that your career would lead you to this point? RN: My mother and father emigrated from Cuba and served as great role models. Even through they started out penniless, through hard work they were able to provide great opportunities for my brothers and me. From watching them, I learned how to embrace challenges and to strive for success. It became part of my DNA. So being at Vivex makes perfect sense to me. I’m genuinely excited about all of our products and am embracing the exciting ways in which new treatments can affect so many people’s lives. I consider this career move another motivating challenge that I’m very excited about.

Diagnosis with Dr. Hernandez Suarez “As is evident from this article, there is a no more regulated industry than healthcare. Regulatory challenges and ethical tensions from emerging biosciences are real and ongoing. These must be managed by compliance experts if we are to see breakthroughs in medicine. Healthcare lawyers, like Ricardo Nuñez, are invaluable to this work. Nuñez, especially, has served in other sectors and brings a diversity of thought to this job. The alliances between lawyers and physicians to improve healthcare need to be considered the ‘new normal.’ Moving forward, we must look beyond tort reform and malpractice animosity.”

—Dr. Yogi Hernandez Suarez

Debevoise applauds Ricardo Nuñez for his vision and tremendous success as General Counsel and Corporate Secretary at Vivex Biomedical. We are proud to have worked closely with Ricardo over the course of his career and look forward to working with him for many years to come.

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

107


feature

Defining ‘Patient-Centered’ for the Community Juan Mejia wears many hats at NewYork–Presbyterian Hospital and in the diverse community of New York City, but providing patient-centered care is his top priority by Joe Dyton

People usually consider a few different options for a career before honing in one path. Juan Mejia, however, always considered a career in healthcare to be his destiny. Mejia, who is currently vice president of operations at NewYork–Presbyterian Hospital, never wavered from wanting to take care of people, even as a small child. His mother, who raised him as a single parent for most of his life, consistently instilled the importance of an education when he was growing up. The emphasis on education helped develop Mejia’s interest in healthcare almost from the get-go. He attended University of California Los Angeles as an undergraduate with the intention of going to medical school. After a couple of years on

108

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

that track, Mejia realized he found the policy and management aspect of healthcare more intriguing. “I was more interested in looking at the big picture of healthcare and became more intrigued in healthcare delivery models, policy, and the business side of healthcare,” Mejia says. “That’s what got me to focus on my next level of experience and education, and what brought me to New York City.” Mejia pursued his master’s degree in public health at Columbia University, and put his focus on healthcare policy and management. “I found myself interested in work that was either community-based, related to hospital administration or work that on a macro level could impact the way we deliver care to patients in the United States,” Mejia says.


SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

109


feature

NewYork–Presbyterian Hospital Headquarters New York, NY Founded 1998 Reach NYP serves the New York metro area and has over 2,500 beds, making it one of the country’s largest hospitals and one of the world’s busiest. About NewYork–Presbyterian Hospital is a world-class academic medical center and one of the largest and most comprehensive hospitals in the United States. It is a leading provider in inpatient, ambulatory, and preventive care in all areas of medicine. NewYork-Presbyterian collaborates with two renowned medical schools, Weill Cornell Medicine and Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.

Mejia’s initial plan was to get his master’s degree in New York and return to Los Angeles, but thirteen years later, he still finds himself in the Big Apple. After he graduated from Columbia, Mejia started working at NewYork–Presbyterian Hospital (NYP) as a revenue manager. He has since held numerous positions at the hospital, including the one he holds currently as vice president of operations for the NewYork–Presbyterian’s Weill Cornell Medical Center. He works closely with the hospital’s chief operating officer, and the rest of the NYP leadership team, on managing the daily operations of the hospital and leading strategic planning efforts. He also works with just about every department in the hospital—including nursing, quality, finance, and support services—to ensure that the hospital continues to deliver quality care and that patients’ needs are being met at the highest level. Shift in Focus In his thirteen years working at NewYork–Presbyterian, Mejia has seen his fair

share of major changes in the healthcare industry. As the market continues to evolve, NYP has had to evolve right along with it to maintain the highest level quality of care. One obvious change is the size of the hospital, as the number of campuses and size of its regional network have continued to grow. NewYork–Presbyterian’s expansion has been a big change for sure, but perhaps the biggest change Mejia’s witnessed during his tenure is a shift in focus on the patient experience. In the past ten years, there’s been a bigger focus on patient-centered care across the nation, says Mejia. “Hospitals across the nation are increasingly focusing on the patient experience as we balance the delivery of quality care,” he says. “Something that has definitely evolved over time and is today a top priority for NewYork–Presbyterian is really looking at care from the perspective of our patients, and their families, to make sure we deliver the best for each individual patient.” As the number of NYP facilities has grown, so have Mejia’s responsibilities.

Challenges and Responses Juan Mejia outlines NewYork–Presbyterian’s major challenges and how NYP responds to each Challenge: Staying ahead of the increasing volume of patients in need of care. Response: As we respond to expanding our hospitals to manage our growing population, we maintain our level of quality care as our top priority. Delivering care up to our highest standards is critical regardless of how busy we get.

110

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

Challenge: Engaging with the community to ensure NewYork–Presbyterian provides linguistically and culturally competent patient-centered care. Response: We have a model at the hospital called ‘The Culture of One,’ which is seeing every patient as an individual regardless of a patient’s race, gender, culture, religion, language, or sexual identity. It’s important to understand every patient as an individual so we can understand the needs of our patients and deliver top notch patient centered care.

Challenge: Providing care that will keep NewYork–Presbyterian performing well financially. Response: To support the growth of our organization, it’s of equal importance that we maintain a strong bottom line. To maintain our care standards, we must deliver the best technology, facilities, and staff to our patients. Keeping an eye on the bottom line allows us to be the best.


“Something that has definitely evolved over time and is today a top priority for NewYork–Presbyterian is really looking at care from the perspective of our patients and their families, to make sure we deliver the best for each individual patient.”

PHOTO: DANIEL VENEGAS

Juan Mejia

He’s led a number of capital construction projects such as opening an adult infusion center at the Columbia campus, a pediatric intensive care unit at the Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital, and an antepartum unit to help support the growth of the hospital’s obstetrics program. “Those are just examples of how our hospital continues to evolve,” Mejia says. “I have been fortunate to be part of a team that continues to expand the services that we deliver in New York City.” For Mejia, the ability to lead such projects was a learning process. Somewhere during that process, he transitioned from being a strong manager to a strong leader. Mejia credits the metamorphosis to the leaders he surrounded himself with and was able to emulate. He also picked up a lot of his leadership characteristics from his late mother, who still inspires him to work hard to this day. “She passed away at a very young age and when I think about that, I am reminded that tomorrow is never promised to any of us,” he says. “We have to keep our goals in mind and work hard for what we aspire to be tomorrow. My mother’s memory continues to fuel me to want to excel at my personal career, and I’m humbled to know that the care we deliver at the hospital has such a positive impact on the individuals that come through our doors.” Juan Mejia VP of Operations NewYork–Presbyterian Hospital

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

111


feature

Diagnosis with Dr. Hernandez Suarez “Learning about Juan Mejia’s success at Columbia Presbyterian Hospital strikes a personal chord with me. I was born at Columbia Presbyterian Hospital, where in 1962, a few Latinos held healthcare leadership positions. Columbia University’s footprint on the health of the New York metropolitan area is enormous in terms of direct patient care, research, and providing a teaching hospital. It is an integral part of New York’s health. Mejia’s leadership at NewYork–Presbyterian is patient-centered, culturally sensitive, and equitable. Hospital systems have become increasingly challenging to run, considering financial constraints and the rising complexity of care. However, by collaborating with community partners, creating new alliances with the public sector, and linking academic health centers with NGOs, these challenges can, and will, be met. Mejia’s leadership is proving just that.”

—Dr. Yogi Hernandez Suarez

112

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

Setting an Example Just as patient-centered care has become one of NewYork–Presbyterian’s top priorities, so has working hand-in-hand with the community. Mejia was recently named member of one of the local Manhattan community boards. “It’s truly fulfilling to work with our community partners,” Mejia says. “Not only in healthcare initiatives, but toward a lot of other initiatives to meet the needs of our community.” Mejia is also a cochair of the hospital’s LGBTQ task force. He works with a cross section of leaders across the organization who discuss how the hospital will continue to deliver care that’s equitable and inclusive for all of its patients.

“I have been fortunate to be part of a team that continues to expand the services that we deliver in New York City.” Juan Mejia

“It’s great to sit at the head of the table and have those discussions,” he says. “Leading a lot of the education, policy, and program changes is really inspiring.” Mejia and the team prioritize community engagement in an effort to understand the needs of community to develop the staff as programs grow. The hospital continues to expand its reach as more and more patients are coming in from the tristate area and even from across the United States and around the world. “It’s of top importance to understand the needs of our unique patient population so we can ensure that we are delivering the best patient-centered care in our community,” Mejia says. “As leaders, we have to make sure that we are not only driving the strategy and vision, but also setting the example of respectful behaviors with our staff and ultimately understand the impact that those behaviors will have on our patients, with each other as colleagues, and in the world around us.”


life+style A cultural resource for the contemporary Hispanic executive

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

113


SPACES | FACES

Four Seasons Hotel, San Francisco

114

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

PHOTO: FOUR SEASONS HOTEL SAN FRANCISCO

life+style


WHERE EVERY GUEST IS A CELEBRITY by Alexandra Talty

W

e don’t always know our calling, says Jimmie Lopez, director of human resources for Four Seasons Hotel San Francisco. After many years in the industry, he admits his start was somewhat accidental. When Lopez was nineteen, he and his mother moved to San Diego to live closer to her parents. Their former house had been foreclosed on, and Lopez needed a job. He applied to a temporary employment agency and found himself working as an administrator for a startup company. Showing up the first day of work in clothes that he had bought the day before, Lopez admits he might not have had all the skills, but his enthusiasm and dedication impressed the company. “They sent me home with food every day so that my mom and I didn’t go hungry,” Lopez recalls. “A few weeks later, I was hired full-time and I eventually spent five years with them.” From his first days at the company, Lopez took his role to heart. By paying attention to the inner workings of the company, he learned quickly what it takes to start a company from scratch. “I had this amazing exposure to what it’s like to be a jack-of-all-trades,” Lopez

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

115


life+style

SPACES | FACES

JIMMIE LOPEZ DIRECTOR OF HUMAN RESOURCES FOUR SEASONS HOTEL SAN FRANCISCO

says. The self-starter used the opportunity to “absorb every piece of information that I could. I was basically scanning what I could into my mind.” He credits his ability to learn on the job to the company’s culture that included recent college graduates as well as long-time employees at tenured functions. After five years, he joined a luxury apartment company in Southern California, where he got his first taste of working with a “higher-end product.” Using those skills, he eventually relocated to San Francisco, working for a luxury property company where he was inside an office cubicle for most of the day. Realizing that the corporate environment wasn’t for him, he looked for a new position where he could interact with people every day, eventually landing at a hotel. Now, as the director of human resources at Four Seasons, every day is

116

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

“I need my team to be able to stay in the moment and think on their feet.” Jimmie Lopez

different for Lopez. From working on focus groups that support women in leadership initiatives to talking with labor representatives from local unions, Lopez values the oneon-one connections he has with his colleagues. When it comes to giving clients the best possible experience, Lopez simply supports the concierge team. Over the years, they have successfully fielded some impressive demands. The most impressive was when guests asked for a helicopter to take them to dinner in the Bay Area. “That was a ‘wow’ moment for me, when our concierge team was able to pull it off,” Lopez admits. Lopez enjoys a few perks as a Four Seasons employee, including earning complimentary nights at other properties. “I’ve been able to explore some parts of the world and stay at resorts that I probably wouldn’t be able to stay at otherwise if I wasn’t part of the organization,” says Lopez, who calls it his favorite benefit. The hotel often hosts VIP groups like major league sports teams or Fortune 100 business groups. What sets it apart is personal service, like remembering a frequent guest’s favorite drink and having it on-hand when the guest arrives. At the same time, the hotel takes measures to remain team-agnostic when the city is hosting events like the World Series or the Super Bowl. “You have all these different teams in the city and your guests will be rooting for different teams, so you fly a variety of flags to make sure everyone is represented,” Lopez says. Because the labor market in San Francisco is competitive, Lopez spends a lot of his time recruiting new talent and making sure he has a full roster of potential employees.


PHOTOS: FOUR SEASONS HOTEL SAN FRANCISCO

Deluxe one-bedroom suites at Four Seasons San Francisco offer panoramic views of the city by the bay through floor-to-ceiling windows.

The Four Seasons is located on Market Street in downtown San Francisco within walking distance of Union Square, the financial district, the Moscone Center, and much more in the heart of the city.

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

117


life+style

YOU’VE CLIMBED THE RANKS BUILT A NETWORK IMPRESSED YOUR CLIENTS LED YOUR TEAM FILLED A NICHE REDEFINED THE ROLE

SPACES | FACES

TOP ATTRACTIONS WITHIN WALKING DISTANCE OF FOUR SEASONS SAN FRANCISCO

Maiden Lane 4-minute walk

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art 5-minute walk

Yerba Buena Gardens 6-minute walk

Union Square 7-minute walk

Dragon’s Gate 7-minute walk

Isn’t it time you shared your story?

For editorial consideration, contact info@profilemagazine.com profilemagazine.com 118

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

Old St. Mary’s Cathedral 11-minute walk

Portsmouth Square 14-minute walk

FOUR SEASONS HOTELS Headquartered: Toronto, Canada Founded: 1961 Company summary: Four Seasons Hotels is an international luxury, five-star hospitality company. Four Seasons expanded into a dozen US cities in the 1980s, and opened its San Francisco location in 2001. Today, there are 99 hotels in 41 countries across the world.

The hotel boasts 400 regular employees, with 300-400 part-time workers on call for events like banquets—meaning Lopez is responsible for staffing a large labor force. “Sometimes you have to go a little outside what you would normally do to recruit,” Lopez admits. “Unemployment is low, so it is tough for employers to find the talent that they are looking for right now.” When recruiting, Lopez looks for people with a “passion for service.” A key aspect of the Four Seasons brand is treating every guest—no matter how big or small—like a celebrity. “While there might be minor things that might be different from a guest to a celebrity, like taking privacy measures, the service is going to be very similar if not the same,” Lopez says. “We think of every guest as high-profile.” To recruit the right kind of talent, Lopez places a lot of importance on the interview process. “I need my team to be able to stay in the moment and can think on their feet,” Lopez says. He looks for people with candid replies because it shows that they can, “take any question and apply their experience and say what they really believe.”


THE FIRE INSIDE >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Pandora’s Steve Aguilar on passion, leadership, and digital music by Zach Baliva

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

PHOTO: DAVID CUETTER

Y

ou can hear the fervor in his voice as Steve Aguilar delivers a series of short sentences that illustrate his approach to leadership. “Find an inner fire.” “Strive for greatness.” “Be better than you were yesterday.” But for Aguilar—Pandora’s senior director of compensation and benefits—the zeal is about more than motivational quotes and corporate buzzwords. It’s about something deeper, something personal. After his father’s sudden death when he was very young, Aguilar’s mother raised him and his two sisters on her own. Childhood in Southern California as part of a poor, bilingual family came with barriers and challenges. On top of that, one of his sisters died STEVE in a car accident, and then his mothAGUILAR er of cancer. SR. DIRECTOR OF Facing such tragedy, others COMPENSATION AND might have withdrawn from life, BENEFITS but Aguilar refused to give up. DePANDORA termined, he pressed into his studies and became the first in his family to

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

119


SPACES | FACES

STEVE AGUILAR ON MUSIC What are your favorite Pandora stations? Some of my favorite stations are Tool, Thrice, Al Green, CHVRCHES, and the NPR podcasts like Serial.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Have your music habits changed since working at Pandora? Oh, for sure. One of the great things about Pandora is that it encourages each user to discover music. You hear new songs and new artists. I’ve discovered that I really like electronic dance music. I didn’t know that before. Working here has opened my eyes to new artists and new genres.

120

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

Can you share any secret Pandora hacks or features? It’s not much of a hack but right now, I’m using Thumbprint Radio. Thumbprint takes everything that you’ve given a thumbs up to and builds a station off of that information. So, essentially, whatever you’ve liked becomes the foundation for your new playlist. Pandora adds new songs to it, and the list changes and grows every time you give a new track the thumbs up.

attend college. He completed two master’s programs and started a career that’s taken him to Texas Instruments, Disney, and now, Pandora. Losing the people closest to him has only made Aguilar stronger. “Life is short,” he says. “I know how important it is to spend my time doing work that matters, and the losses I’ve experienced motivate me to contribute to something larger.” Those beliefs drive Aguilar both in his life and as a leader at Pandora, where he creates, implements, and maintains a host of company-wide employee compensation and benefits programs. He joined the organization in 2013 for the chance to develop a team and set strategy at a rapidly growing company. Then, Pandora had 800 employees. Today, the Oakland, California-based Internet radio service has more than 2,200. To align his department with the business and meet the needs of a growing organization, Aguilar crafted and remained open to growing and evolving his original vision over time. He draws best practices from various industries including biotech, semiconductors, and entertainment. “Working in many industries has given me a broad view of what works in certain situations, and I’ve catered an approach specific to where Pandora is and where the company wants to go,” he explains. Aguilar’s biggest takeway is that compensation and benefits leaders must allow for flexibility. “We have to trust our managers and empower them to make decisions.” Unlike other leading companies, Pandora doesn’t use annual performance ratings to award merit-based salary increases. Aguilar spent his first few months at Pandora meeting with leaders and employees to uncover the unique company culture, and that culture has informed how the company has built

PHOTOS: CHRISTIAN BERTRAND/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM (TOP), SUZANNE TUCKER/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM (BOTTOM)

life+style


Willis Towers Watson is proud to congratulate compensation programs. What he discovered is that Pandora has a very unique DNA. “Pandora allows you to be who you are,” he says. “Wear what you want as long as you’re getting the job done. We want you to bring your whole self to work, and we want you to use all of who you are to contribute.” The company that provides personalized radio is dedicated to reaching a large audience and making a real difference. “There’s a lot of soul to what we do,” Aguilar says. Pandora was born in Oakland, remains housed in Oakland, and is dedicated to supporting the local community. Aguilar’s compensation and rewards programs reflect that value. Pandora doesn’t provide some of the flashy perks that other tech companies might provide—but for surprising reasons. “For example, we don’t have a cafeteria because we want our employees to go out and support local businesses and give back to the community,” he says. Pandora’s leaders want every teammate to establish strong relationships outside of the workplace in their communities. Founder and CEO Tim Westergren encourages Pandora employees to maintain a healthy work/life balance. The company sponsors an annual “Bring Your Kids to Work Day,” during which kids age seven and older are asked to design ads, record songs, and pitch ideas. In a LinkedIn blog entry, Westergren writes that leaders should build a company so that “someone can spend a large portion of their life working there and not feel that they have somehow missed out. The work/life experience should not be a source of regret.” Pandora attracts top talent by staying true to its principles, paying competitively, and offering unique opportunities. Engineers and others at the relatively small company have the chance to increase their skill sets and

“The perks are great, but we’re here to give you bigger roles and more ownership in an exciting, fast-paced workplace full of smart and dedicated people who are trying to achieve something great together.” Steve Aguilar

make meaningful and lasting contributions. And when it comes to honing his initiatives, Aguilar looks to level the field. “The perks are great, but we’re here to give you bigger roles and more ownership in an exciting, fast-paced workplace full of smart and dedicated people who are trying to achieve something great together.” In 2015, Aguilar’s team introduced a new leave-of-absence policy giving all leave categories the same benefit. Now, everyone facing a leave of any kind receives twelve weeks. They also added new LGBTQ benefits, like providing health and other benefits to employees’ domestic partners. As Pandora grows, Aguilar will make sure his team is built to support these activities. He’s surrounded himself with driven self-starters who share his passion—and the results are there. Together, Pandora’s small compensation and benefits team is outperforming its larger counterparts as they build the foundation for ongoing success.

Steve Aguilar on his great work to support the success of Pandora and the company’s employees.

Willis Towers Watson’s unique perspective allows us to see the critical intersections between talent, assets and ideas — the dynamic formula that drives business performance.

willistowerswatson.com

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

121


SPACES | FACES

PHOTO: MARCO RUBINO/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

life+style

122

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016


THE THE YHCA YHCA EFFECT EFFECT >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Two success-driven young executives share how participating in HACR’s Young Hispanic Corporate Achievers program boosted their career potential by Kelli Lawrence

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

123


life+style

SPACES | FACES

T

he Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility is an advocacy organization like none other. Washington, DC-based HACR strives to reflect the collective voice of more than 46.6 million Hispanics, but more specifically, sixteen national Hispanic organizations in the United States and Puerto Rico. By keeping its focus on the corporate social responsibility areas of employment, procurement, philanthropy, and governance, HACR serves Hispanic community-based groups through advocacy, education, public policy support, and resource development. One of HACR’s longest-running programs is the Young Hispanic Corporate Achievers (YHCA). Created to recognize outstanding young Hispanics in corporate America, with the overarching goal of bringing more Hispanics to corporate boards, YHCA unites a new group of Hispanic professionals each year via an intensive, three-anda-half day leadership conference. Hispanic Executive caught up with two recent YHCA recipients—one whose work has him living overseas, and the other who is rising through the ranks in her hometown. The two update HE on their careers, as well as the role YHCA continues to play in their lives.

Although he’s worked for the Chevron Corp. for more than a decade, Angel Uruchima still remembers the answer he gave, early in the initial job interviewing process, when asked what he was looking for in an employer: “I said I was looking for a company that had the tools available for anybody to use to develop themselves, and take their career to the next level,” he recalls. “This has been true with ANGEL URUCHIMA Chevron,” Uruchima adds. “The tools have been availPROJECT ENGINEERING LEAD able, not only to help me get my job done but for personal CHEVRON CORP. development as well.” It was a job he was eager to start before he was even chosen for it. A native of Ecuador who moved to the United States at age eighteen, Uruchima earned his electrical engineering degree from University

124

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

of Missouri–Rolla. He remembers traveling by helicopter to visit an offshore site during his interview at Chevron. He was excited enough about the travel possibilities alone— when the job offer was made, he accepted it on the spot. With a steady progression and enhancing his skills by working in a variety of facets, he moved toward more of the exploration and production work that set him on an international course—to Europe, Asia, and currently Australia. Yet for all his career successes thus far, Uruchima finds himself giving a lot of thought and respect to the delicate balance between work and personal life. “While in Australia, I have learned to fully utilize the available work hours to get the job done. This is necessary because the culture in this part of the world places a higher priority on work/ life balance, thus working outside office hours is not the norm. YHCA’s coaching to be more effective through improved communication and managing cultural differences has been a valuable lesson in this regard.” When Chevron became involved in HACR’s YHCA program in 2014— and nominated Uruchima to participate the same year—it set him on an important course for both personal and professional self-discovery. Uruchima emerged with specific goals designed to build his personal brand. More effective communication is a recurring theme; it starts with more phone calls and less e-mails, and progresses into the kind of strategic thinking that has him working harder to make the logistics work among international and


HACR Headquartered: Washington, DC Founded: 1986

PHOTO: HOWARD MITCHELL

Company summary: The Hispanic Association on Coporate Responsibility (HACR) is an advocacy organization that represents 16 national Hispanic organizations in the United States and Puerto Rico. HACR focuses on four areas of corporate social responsibilty: employment, procurement, philanthropy, and governance.

multidisciplinary team members. As a result, those members have more opportunities to speak to each other directly, better achieving common goals. Another important goal for Uruchima is building stronger relationships among those who work with him. This means improving listening skills and opening extended conversations about life outside of work. “It seems like a cultural thing,” he says. “You go to the US and all you talk about is work. By recognizing that I need people to engage with me on a more personal level, I have been able to improve my soft skills.” Learning to be a better listener, he discovered, is a challenge in itself. “For the first few weeks, I had to be more careful to allow others to finish, concentrating on what they were saying, rather than just waiting for my chance to interject,” he says. He values his post-YHCA journey enough to make it worth the effort. In fact, Uruchima committed himself to staying involved with YHCA happenings for five years—through Chevron if possible but on his own if necessary. “I saw it as a life-changing event, and I want to explore the full benefits of this program . . . and whatever else HACR has to offer,” he says.

DIANA ORTEGA QUALITY OPERATIONS GROUP LEADER & STRATEGIC PROJECTS GENERAL MOTORS

Constantly fascinated by where things came from and why they existed, was Diana Ortega from an early age. Her interests initially manifested as a desire to become an archaeologist because of her passion for solving problems. However, by high school, engineering had grabbed her attention. The fact that she is from Detroit—calling the community known as “Mexicantown” home—took care of the rest. “I was involved in a Saturday engineering exploration program with one of [GM’s] competitors,” says

“I saw it as a life-changing event, and I want to explore the full benefits of this program . . . and whatever else HACR has to offer.” Angel Uruchima

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

125


life+style

SPACES | FACES

THE HISPANIC ASSOCIATION ON CORPORATE RESPONSIBILITY (HACR) BY THE NUMBERS

Strives to reflect the voices of more than

46.6 MILLION

Hispanics living in the US and Puerto Rico

“[The YHCA Program] put me in a spotlight to demonstrate the commitment that GM has made toward developing diverse talent . . . now, it’s about providing that opportunity to others.” Diana Ortega

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Members work with more than 1,500 affiliate community-based organizations serving the Hispanic community including:

more than 450 institutions of higher learning

400 publications with combined circulation of more than 10 million

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

With 50 million consumers, the US Hispanic population represents 16% of the entire population

HACR is at the forefront in supporting corporations that make a commitment to total Hispanic inclusion, believing that a company should strive to employ Hispanics in roughly the same proportions as there are Hispanic consumers that support the company.

Source: http://www.hacr.org/about/

126

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

Ortega, who has been with General Motors since 1997. “They would open up their doors to some of their test facilities, and we’d do different projects with the engineers. It really sparked my interest.” As did the fact that, in the early 1990s, she never worked with any female engineers—let alone any minority women. Rather than be discouraged, she saw great opportunities ahead. “I’m very competitive and action-oriented, so I thought [becoming an engineer] would definitely provide me with a solid career path,” she explains. Three college internships later—one of which sent her to her mother’s homeland of Mexico—Ortega started in a rotational program in the manufacturing division of General Motors. Countless project launches later, she arrived at the role of quality launch manager of the 2017 Chevrolet Volt, where she has served since 2013. She delights in all that goes into the creation of a vehicle. “I’ve enjoyed the opportunity to work with all levels of the organization,” she says. “Having projects where chief engineers were in touch with me daily, and knew me by name . . . it’s something that really exposed me to unique career opportunities.” Ortega describes her 2014 YHCA experience as “amazing,” noting that her 30 fellow participants continue to stay closely connected—and are extremely supportive—via social media. “We build upon each other,” she says. “If someone’s going through a career crisis or a big change in their personal life . . . it’s really like an extended family to me.” Through summits and panel discussions, she continues her involvement with YHCA in an official capacity. “The YHCA program of HACR has really strengthened my leadership skills and ability to develop others,” Ortega says. “It put me in a spotlight to demonstrate the commitment that GM has made toward developing diverse talent . . . now, it’s about providing that opportunity to others.”


You’re more than an executive. We’re more than a magazine. Join the network connecting leaders of the fastest-growing market in America.

Visit HispanicExecutive.com For editorial consideration, contact daniel@hispanicexecutive.com


no lo sabíamos

[We didn’t know until this issue . . . ] The first case to impose sanctions for failure to produce electronic documents as part of the discovery process is William T. Thompson Co. v. General Nutrition Corp. in 1984.

p.39

This year, Humana made a bold promise:

“The communities we serve will be 20% healthier by 2020 because we make it easy for people to achieve their best health.”

As of 2014, Southwest Airlines carries the most passengers of an US airline. In peak season, Southwest flights take off over 3,900 times per day.

p.51

2 million

transplants to surgeons around the world.

p.103

128

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: VALZAN/, OLEGRO/, DWPHOTOS/, OLGA GAVRILOVA/, FINE ART/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

p.90

Since 2014, Vivex Biomedical has supplied more than


WHERE EXECUTIVES LEARN

In Q1 2016, Pandora had

79.4 million active listeners. p.119

Carnival Corp.’s brands combined have a fleet of 101 ships—15 more between 2016 and 2020—visiting more than 700 ports around the world.

p.60

The University of Texas– Austin has more than

2 million gross square feet of LEED projects either completed or in various stages of design and construction. p.18

JOIN THE CLUB WHERE EXECUTIVES CAN LEARN AND GET CONNECTED WITH OTHER EXECUTIVES BECOME A MEMBER TODAY WWW.EXECUTIVESCLUB.ORG (312) 263-3500

SEPT | OCT 2016 HISPANICEXECUTIVE.COM

129


index

PEOPLE + COMPANIES

ADVERTISERS

A B C

Aguilar, Steve

119

Cadavedo, José

56

Canizalez, Sindy

56

Carnival Corporation

60

Chavez-Arrieta, Oscar

68

Chavez, Patrick

39

Chevron Corp.

122

Northwestern Mutual

56

Nuñez, Nayda

56

Nuñez, Ricardo

103

Ontiveros, Juan

18

Ortega, Diana Ortiz, John

Pandora

De Zayas, Martha

60

Delgado, Sandra

90

Diaz, Kevin

76

Edward Jones

39

Estrada, Juan

42

Farmers & Merchants Bank

36

Four Seasons Hotel San Francisco Freudenberg IT

114 76

G H I

General Motors Hernandez Suarez, Yolangel Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility

122 82 122

Humana

82

Humana TRICARE

90

86

P Q R

Palomarez, Javier D E F

122

Rosalez, Richard

14

A B C

S T U

Akerman LLP

64

Sophos

Aldrich & Bonnefin

38

Southwest Airlines

Boies, Schiller & Flexner LLP

65

Sysomos

Burns & McDonnell

21

The Executives’ Club of Chicago

Cameron/McEvoy PLLC

46

Carnival Corporation & PLC

10

Cigna

50

Cisco

32

26

Willis Towers Watson Zignia Live

D E F

Debevoise & Plimpton LLP

Samsung Electronics

26

Sophos

68

Southwest Airlines

51

Suarez, Juan

51

Sysomos

22

The University of Texas–Austin

18

Torres, Timothy

22

Trueblue

30

United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce

14

Unzueta, Jesus

30

Uruchima, Angel USMD Health System

106

Epstein, Becker & Green, P.C.

S T U

122 86

66

First Republic Bank

132

FlexPrint, Inc.

33

G H I

Hitachi Data Systems

34

Humana

95

Humana Military

96

J K L

Kelly Drye

45

Lenovo

2

Lynn Pinker Cox & Hurst

27

VWXYZ J K L

Limelight Health Long & Foster Companies Lopez, Jimmie

Van Metre Companies 98 48 114

Lopez, John

36

Lujan, Michael

98

Vivex Biomedical

42 103

M N O

M&T Realty Capital Corporation

47

Maxsam Partners

35

McDermott Will & Emery

63

NewYork–Presbyterian Hospital Northwestern Mutual

4

55/58

Odin, Feldman & Pittleman, P.C.

46

M N O

Martinez, Lydia Mejia, Juan Moggio, Philippe

130

48 108 72

P Q R

Pinnacle Claims Management, Inc.

100

National Basketball Association 72

Precision Discovery

41

NewYork–Presbyterian Hospital 108

Prime Controls

20

HISPANIC EXECUTIVE SEPT | OCT 2016

53 6 129

VWXYZ

WellMed

119

131

88 121 75


Sophos Central. The new center of attention.

Network and endpoint protection managed all in one place. With Sophos Central you get a single Sophos-hosted platform that’s simple, intuitive, and always up-to-date. Now you can create policies that apply to an individual and not just their devices. And with all your device policies on a unified platform, you can correlate alerts to allow security decisions to be taken automatically. Synchronized security management. For stronger, simpler security.

To learn more visit sophos.com

Š Copyright 2016. Sophos Ltd. All rights reserved. Registered in England and Wales No. 2096520, The Pentagon, Abingdon Science Park, Abingdon, OX14 3YP, UK. Sophos is the registered trademark of Sophos Ltd. All other product and company names mentioned are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners.

2366-06DD


“At First Republic you’re a person with dreams and aspirations, not an account number. First Republic really cares about me.” R U T H G AV I R I A

Chief Marketing Officer Entercom Communications

(855) 886-4824 or visit www.firstrepublic.com New York Stock Exchange Symbol: FRC Member FDIC and Equal Housing Lender