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June 2013

Training courses 2013. Wordsearch. Page 4

Insect Stings Prevention: Bees and Wasps are known for having a sweet tooth so keep them at bay by covering sweet

Fancy a dip? Never be tempted to swim or plunge into cold water in an attempt to cool off in the hot weather. Last year 58 people did just this and died. Now you have prepared yourself for a range of potential minor mishaps, grab your hat and sunscreen and enjoy the sunshine while it lasts!

“Just because you’re not sick doesn’t mean you’re healthy.” Quote of the Month, Author Unknown

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Cures for common summer injuries.

G.

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Jellyfish Stings Prevention: Few sea creatures are as feared as jellyfish. If you are worried about jellyfish, ask the nearest lifeguard about the water conditions in the area before leaping into the sea. If you can see jellyfish in the water, steer clear. Cure: If you have been stung, soak the wound in sea water to ease the removal of the jellyfish tentacles. Scrape the tentacles away using a credit or debit card and gently rinse the area with salt water. Refrain from picking at the tentacles or rubbing them off with clothing as you may cause the release of more venom. If in any doubt seek medical attention.

IN

Who to contact in case of an emergency.

Heatstroke Prevention: Prolonged exposure to the sun’s rays can cause your body to overheat. To prevent heatstroke, stay in the shade, particularly between the hours of 10 AM and 3 PM, and keep yourself hydrated by sipping non-alcoholic fluids. Cure: Heatstroke can cause redness and flushing of the skin. As the condition worsens, disorientation and confusion may result. To treat heatstroke, remove as much clothing as possible and move into the shade. Sponge the skin with cold water and call 999 or 112 for medical assistance.

AD

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RE

Learn the difference between a heart attack and a cardiac arrest.

Swimmer’s Ear Prevention: If you are a regular swimmer, you may already be accustomed to swimmer’s ear. Before getting into the water, insert earplugs that mould to your ear to effectively prevent water from entering into your ear. If you are prone to developing swimmer’s ear, avoid underwater swimming. Cure: If your ear has turned red and itchy and feels painful when you pull on it, you have probably developed swimmer’s ear. The condition may resolve naturally if you keep the ear dry and away from water for a few days. However if your ear pain persists for 24 hours or you notice any form of discharge from the ear, consult with a doctor.

Sunburn Prevention: While a golden glow may look attractive, the same cannot be said of red, peeling skin. To prevent sunburn, avoid strong sunlight, cover yourself up with lightweight clothing and wear a wide-brimmed hat. Adults should apply sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of at least factor 15 (Factor 30 is recommended for children) at least 20 minutes before venturing out into the sun and reapply regularly throughout the day. Beware of using sun screen that you bought for your summer holiday last year because the SPF can reduce by up to 50% within 12 months. Cure: To treat sunburn, move into the shade and cool your skin down by sponging the affected areas with cold water.

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INSIDE THIS MONTH...

food and drink. Avoid wearing perfume and using perfumed soaps and shampoos before venturing outdoors. Cure: Use a blunt-edged object, such as a credit or debit card, to remove the sting from the skin. Clean the wound with soapy water and apply a cool compress to relieve pain and reduce swelling. Avoid scratching the wound to reduce your chances of developing an infection. If you are having trouble breathing, you may be suffering from an allergic reaction; seek emergency medical assistance.

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barbara@guardianfirstaid.co.uk

Tick Bites Prevention: If you are planning on trekking through tall grasses, you will be putting yourself at risk of tick bites. While insect repellents can protect you from ticks, they will only be effective if they contain at least 30% DEET or are permethin-based. Dress in longsleeved shirts and tuck your trousers into your socks for added protection against ticks. Cure: If you have found a tick, lightly grip its head with tweezers and pull it off without crushing it. Do not twist the body of the tick or you will risk removing only a small part of it. Once removed, clean the skin in soapy water. Keep a close eye on the bite mark – if it increases in size or turns into a bull’s-eye-shaped rash greater than three inches in diameter, consult with your doctor as this can be an indication of Lyme’s disease.

NT

Barbara

Summer is a great time to get outdoors and enjoy the sunshine but getting out and about increases your chances of requiring first aid. Whether you are planning to spend your summer at the beach or in your back garden, refresh your first aid knowledge so that you know what to do when exposed to common summer threats.

CO

Top Tips for a Safe Summer

FIRST AID MATTERS


Cardiac Arrest the sober truth Many people don’t know the difference between a heart attack and a cardiac arrest. Put at its most simple – a heart attack is analogous to a blockage in the pipes and therefore could be described as a plumbing problem and a cardiac arrest is analogous to an electrical issue – when the electrical system in the heart has gone haywire.

In this image you can see the damage caused by a heart attack

Blocked artery Damaged Heart Muscle

In this image you can see what is happening during a cardiac arrest

The blocked artery stops oxygenated blood getting to heart muscle and it becomes damaged. The damaged heart muscle can in some cases cause the electrical activity in the damaged heart muscle to become disrupted. This can then spread throughout the heart which can then lead to a cardiac arrest.

The electrical activity is disrupted and the heart then stops beating normally and can go into fibrillation (shaking). At this stage a defibrillator is required to attempt to convert the heart back in to a normal rhythm.

Here are the facts • 70% of cardiac arrests occur outside of the hospital environment and currently in the UK only 2-3% of these people survive • 12 people below the age of 35 die every WEEK due to sudden cardiac arrest in the UK

• Effective bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) - including rescue breaths - can double the casualty’s chance of survival. If a defibrillator is used quickly this can triple the chance of survival. • Annually about 270,000 people in the UK will suffer a heart attack. Approximately a third of them will die from a cardiac arrest before they reach hospital • 4 times more women die as a result of a heart attack than they do from breast cancer

So…what can we as individuals do about this? One positive action would be to become proficient in performing CPR. This would mean that if you were ever in the unfortunate position of witnessing a cardiac arrest you would be equipped to deal with it and ensure that the casualty is given the best chance of survival. I can’t think of anything worse than being faced with that situation and not knowing what to do.

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In Case of Emergency

Nowadays, the majority of us are contactable via our mobile phones 24/7

We store the contact information of friends, family and acquaintances in our devices, yet too few of us think of highlighting who to contact in case of an emergency. In Case of Emergency (also known as ICE) is a school of thinking which helps first responders, such as police officers, paramedics, firefighters or even passers by to identify accident accident victims and help contact their next of kin in order to obtain vital medical information. Research carried out by the telecoms firm Vodafone revealed that fewer than 25% of mobile phone users had any vital details regarding their health conditions or next of kin stored prominently on their devices. ICE was initially conceived during 2005 by Bob Brotchie, a British paramedic who recognised that developments in mobile phone technology had the potential to save people’s lives. Mr Brotchie conceptualised the idea in the aftermath of the 7/7 London bombings, where he found it difficult to contact friends and relatives of those he treated during the atrocity. The ICE programme encourages people to enter contact details in their phone address book/contacts list under the name ICE.

Some people will enter multiple contacts and name them ICE1, ICE2 et cetera. Various mobile phone manufacturers have been supportive of the campaign, with some going so far as to add an ‘ICE’ menu to the contact lists of new devices. Conceptually, ICE has proved popular, although has its roots in a similar method - where sufferers of illness would wear a bracelet or necklace featuring vital information regarding their illness as well their next of kin, to be contacted in the event of an emergency. ICE is catching on with many people due to the fact that so many of us carry mobile phones these days. Storing the details of a person to be contacted during an emergency couldn’t be easier, and allows first responders and trained medical staff to reach the right people in order to gain vital information which could save the life of a victim.

Need Rapid Emergency Assistance? The Advantages of Calling 112 Over 999 The 999 emergency telephone number was first introduced in the UK in 1936 and currently receives around 30 million calls a year.

While the number has become synonymous with access to the emergency services, you may not realise that there is an alternative number that you can call in an emergency. This number is the 112 number and it differs from the 999 number in that its use is not restricted to the UK. The 112 number is an international emergency number that you can use in all Member States of the European Union, as well as in Turkey, Russia and Israel. As such, it is a valuable number to know if you regularly travel through European countries. It will put you through to the emergency services in the same way as if you had dialled 999 for rapid emergency assistance from the police, ambulance or fire services. Similarly to the 999 number, calls to the 112 number are free on all mobile phones. This means that you can call 112 even when you lack credit on your phone and cannot make calls to anyone else. Furthermore, the 112 number works across networks, meaning that your phone will try to call 112 using another network at times when your usual network is down. You should not use 112 when you need to report a nonemergency situation, such as noisy neighbours, vandalism or antisocial behaviour in public places. Instead, you should visit a police station in the area where the crime has occurred.

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Butter & A Nice Juicy Steak Oooh, yes please sounds like two of our essentials for a great summer barbecue… But these ingredients are just two of the mythical “cures” for common Another first aid myth is to apply a piece of cold meat to a injuries sustained over the summer months! Here are our favourite swollen or black eye – not a great idea. Firstly, this could first aid myths and what the correct methods of treatment are. contaminate the eye with germs that could be present on the raw The most common first aid myth is applying butter to burned skin to meat including E. coli. Secondly, it is a real waste of good food! To treat a swollen or black eye, simply wrap some ice in a clean soothe the pain. Now let’s be blunt here – you are not a sausage, cloth or use an ice pack and hold on to the affected area. you are a person, and at best you are now basting yourself. At worst, the butter will hold the heat in making the burning sensation and the damage to your skin much more severe. Save the butter for your burger buns and instead, run the affected area under a cool tap for at least 10 minutes before applying cooling burn gel which will further ease the pain and prevent infection.

Guardian First Aid Training courses 2013

In any of these incidents if none of the suggested methods of treatment work or help please seek medical advice immediately. Save the meat and marinades for the barbecue, and stay safe this summer!

Month

Date

Course type

Jun 2013

4 June 2013 6+7 June 2013 20+21+24 June 2013

Emergency First Aid at Work 2 day re-qualification course 3 Day First Aid at Work course

Jul 2013

5 July 2013 8+9 July 2013 11+12 July 2013 15+16+17 July 2013

Emergency First Aid at Work 2 day re-qualification course 12 hour Paediatric course 3 Day First Aid at Work course

Sep 2013

5+6 September 2013 9 September 2013 12+13 September 2012 19+20+23 September 2013

2 day re-qualification course Emergency First Aid at Work 12 hour Paediatric course 3 Day First Aid at Work course

Oct 2013

8 October 2013 10+11 October 2013 17+18+21 October 2013

Emergency First Aid at Work 2 day re-qualification course 3 Day First Aid at Work course

Nov 2013

5 November 2013 7+8 November 2013 21+22+25 November 2013 27+28 November 2013

Emergency First Aid at Work 2 day re-qualification course 3 Day First Aid at Work course 12 hour Paediatric course

Dec 2013

3 December 2013 5+6 December 2013 12+13+16 December 2013

Emergency First Aid at Work 2 day re-qualification course 3 Day First Aid at Work course

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ARTERY BLOCKAGE CARDIAC ARREST CARDIOPULMONARY DAMAGED MUSCLE DEFIBRILLATOR ELECTRICITY HEART ATTACK HOSPITAL NORMAL RHYTHM PLUMBING RESUSCITATION

Guardian June 2013  

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