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2011-2012

Year in Review


College of Engineering Georgia Institute of Technology 225 North Avenue Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0360 www.coe.gatech.edu Gary S. May Dean Sue Ann Bidstrup Allen Associate Dean for Faculty Development and Scholarship Barbara D. Boyan Associate Dean for Research Laurence J. Jacobs Associate Dean for Academic Affairs John Leonard Associate Dean for Finance and Administration Jane Weyant Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Studies

Georgia Tech’s College of Engineering traces its roots to 1885, when Gov. Henry D. McDaniel signed a bill allocating $65,000 for a technical school. The Georgia School of Technology opened three years later, and its first (and, for a time, only) program was mechanical engineering. Today, the College of Engineering (CoE) is the largest of six colleges that comprise the Georgia Institute of Technology. It offers more than 50 degree programs at the bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral levels, and it has grown into the one of the biggest engineering colleges in the United States. All of CoE’s eight schools rank among the country’s top 10 of their areas, as judged by U.S. News & World Report. Thanks to CoE’s emphasis on hands-on experience and rigorous curricula, students leave the college prepared for both the workforce and graduate programs.


When I became the College of Engineering’s dean in 2011, I wasn’t exactly new to Georgia Tech. I earned my bachelor’s degree at Tech and, after graduate studies in California, I returned as an assistant professor and never left. But after spending just over a year as dean, I’m happy to report that our College and its students still find ways to astound me.

Gary S. May

Dean College of Engineering

Students excel in some of the most challenging coursework offered in engineering, and employers say Tech is their No. 1 choice for engineering graduates. Meanwhile, the College has again placed among U.S. News & World Report’s top five engineering programs for both graduates and undergraduates. Our capacity for change and innovation, demonstrated time and time again over the last 12 months, is what keeps us consistently at the top of the field. Over the past year, our professors have won prestigious awards and performed research that could change the way we work and live. College alumni, as well as generous individuals and organizations from around the world, are helping us remain at the cutting edge of technology. The College attracted over $34 million in philanthropic gifts over the year, and we’ve also received significant research funding: about $250 million in new awards. Our students, as usual, have made us proud with their drive and dedication, and you’ll read about some of their accomplishments in the coming pages. This report takes a broad look at the most recent year: statistics, rankings, achievements and more. It also sets a precedent for what’s ahead. The College is launching a strategic plan to guide us through the future, and this lens on our recent past illustrates that we’ve set a solid foundation. As you read on, you’ll find a lot to admire in our programs, and I hope you’ll join us as we reach ever higher over the coming months.

Gary S. May Dean, College of Engineering Georgia Institute of Technology

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Year in Review There’s no doubt that Georgia Tech’s College of Engineering is among the best in the country. Accomplished faculty members? Check. Rigorous academics? Check. Outstanding graduates? Check. What makes the College of Engineering (CoE) truly exemplary, however, is the stunningly wide range of fields in which it excels. In the latest rankings from U.S. News & World Report, all of CoE’s eight schools placed within the top 10 programs in their focus areas. (That goes for both graduate and undergraduate programs.) CoE itself, meanwhile, is ranked fourth overall for graduate study and fifth for undergraduate study. The College remains strong each year because of sustained innovation and investment. The past year was Dean Gary S. May’s first at CoE’s helm, and his accomplishments include appointing three new school chairs, launching a new master’s degree in electrical and computer engineering (ECE), and helping attract nearly $34 million in philanthropic gifts. Meanwhile, CoE’s student body is the largest and most diverse in the nation. In Fall 2011, more than 12,300 students were enrolled at the College. Of those students, more than 6,600 came to Tech from outside Georgia.

Academics

• Approved new flexible curricula in schools of ECE and mechanical engineering (ME) • Launched new master’s degree in ECE (tailored to high volume semiconductor manufacturing employees of Intel) • Approved new professional master’s program in Biomedical Innovation and Development • Initiated weekly Coffee Talks in partnership with the Women’s Resource Center • Started an ambassador program that sends female CoE students to local K-12 schools to recruit

Faculty and Staff

• Three new School chairs appointed: Reginald DesRoches at the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE), Steve McLaughlin (ECE), and Naresh Thadhani (MSE)

Reginald DesRoches Karen and John Huff Chair in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering

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• One new associate dean appointed: Sue Ann Bidstrup Allen (Faculty Development and Scholarship) • New senior staff positions in CoE Dean’s Office: Molly Croft (Development), LaJauna Ellis (Executive Assistant to the Dean), Kay Kinard (Communications), Wendy Newstetter (Educational Research and Innovation), and Brad Satterfield (Facilities) • Dean Gary May shepherded 30 promotion/tenure cases, 27 critical reviews, and 50 periodic peer review cases • CoE made 32 faculty offers of which 18 were accepted, with 3 still pending. The acceptances are comprised of: 14 male and 4 female faculty; 12 assistant professors, 2 associate professors, and 4 full professors. Three are in aerospace engineering (AE), 1 is in biomedical engineering (BME), 2 are in CEE, 3 are in ECE, 4 are in the Stewart School of Industrial and System Engineering (ISyE) and 5 are in ME.

Steve McLaughlin

Steve W. Chaddick Chair in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Research

• Approximately $250 million in new research awards across the College • Successfully competed for a Food and Drug Administration grant to establish a multi-institutional Atlanta Pediatric Device Consortium • Established the Center for Pediatric Nanomedicine • Established and supported existing research centers at the Varian Clinical Linear Accelerator Laboratory • Established the Georgia Transportation Institute/University Transportation Center

Philanthropy

• Raised $34 million toward a campaign goal of $480 million – on track to reach and hopefully exceed the goal. Examples of major gifts include: ○○ $15 million software commitment from Agilent ○○ $10 million from Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta

Naresh Thadhani

Chair in the School of Materials Science and Engineering


○○ Varian equipment donation for nuclear and radiological engineering (NRE) valued at $7.5 million ○○ $3 million gift to ISyE for unrestricted endowment ○○ $1.2 million planned gift for ECE ○○ $1 million commitment to ECE from Texas Instruments ○○ $500,000 endowment from IBB for undergraduate research scholars • Increased scholarship funding for women and underrepresented minorities • Identified new CoE Board chair (Richard Tucker)

Left to right: Charles Bolden, NASA administrator; Gary May, CoE Dean; and Paul Otellini, president and CEO of Intel, spoke to engineering students at the “Stay With It” campaign kick-off event.

Dean’s Activities

• Chair of the Deans Advisory Committee for the High Technology Education Working Group, which is part of the White House Council on Jobs and Competitiveness • Hosted kick-off of national “Stay With It” campaign to improve engineering retention; partnered with White House, Intel, Google, and Facebook • Initiated The Source, an electronic newsletter sent to approximately 42,000 GT engineering alumni every six weeks • Attended more than a dozen “Meet the Dean” and Campaign Roll Out events • Restructured and re-launched annual CoE Alumni Awards program • Developed social media strategy for the College, including the development of a Facebook page, Twitter feed, and YouTube channel

CEE major Melissa Allardyce and other Tech students used their engineering training to address the need for clean water in rural villages in Ghana through the non-profit organization Community Water Solutions.

Dean May with the Engineering Hall of Fame inductees during CoE’s annual Alumni Awards Induction Ceremony. Left to right: J. Daniel Stewart, Frank Williams Jr., Henry Pruitt, Dean May, Sherman Glass Jr., Thomas Muller Jr., Robert Wolfe, and Charles Hitchcock (seated).

Goals for the Upcoming Year

• Complete and roll out a CoE strategic plan • Continue to make progress toward target undergraduate student-faculty ratio of 18:1 • Major facilities renovation for CEE • Acquire space on ground floor of Evans administration building for recruitment and diversity activities • Establish a Dean’s Chair

Students with Personal Robot 2 (PR2), a robot designed for healthcare use and to assist disabled people. Professor Charlie Kemp (not pictured) assisted in the design of PR2 for a project called Robots for Humanity.

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Women in Engineering & Engineering Education Outreach Program Highlights CoE is one of the best such programs in the country, and it’s also among the most diverse. In Spring 2012, CoE boasted more than 2,700 women students in its undergraduate and graduate programs. Students of various races, nationalities, and socioeconomic backgrounds are also well-represented. Nearly half of CoE’s undergraduates identified as minorities in 2012, and 55 percent of graduate students are non-white. The College never rests on its laurels, though: It actively works to not only recruit women and minorities, but to retain them at Georgia Tech and ensure they stay on the right track. CoE’s Women in Engineering (WIE) program reaches hundreds of female students a year both in and outside the Institute, while the Diversity and Engineering Education Outreach (EEO) office works to increase enrollment of underrepresented minorities (URMs).

Women in Engineering

• In Fall 2011, 1,965 female undergraduates and 756 female graduate students were enrolled in CoE. • In CoE, 24 percent of the students are women, versus 17.8 percent of engineering students nationally. • During the 2011-2012 academic year, WIE awarded the most scholarship money in its history. Nearly 150 scholarships, totaling $165,500, were given to deserving undergraduates during the annual WIE banquet. • In the freshman class of 2011, 51 percent of the biomedical engineering majors were women, 45 percent of the chemical engineering majors

were women, and 40 percent of the industrial and systems engineering majors were women. • Two new programs were added to reach more female engineering majors: the Coffee Talk series & Ambassador Program. Coffee Talks give women in all Tech’s science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields a chance to get together over coffee, tea and desserts. Guest speakers and panels cover topics such as STEM women in the news and graduate school applications. Meanwhile, WIE ambassadors visit local schools to get K-12 girls excited about engineering.

U.S. capability by increasing the number of successful African American, American Indian, and Latino women and men in STEM education and careers.” Tech is one of the many institutions that partner with NACME to offer the NACME

Diversity/EEO

• Over 17 percent of CoE undergraduates are URMs (African-American, Hispanic/Latino, Native American/ Pacific Islander, multiracial). About 11 percent of graduate students identify as URMs. • URM students in engineering had numerous opportunities for financial support during the 2011-2012 academic year. Highlights included: ○○ Facilitating Academic Careers in Engineering & Science (FACES) is a collaboration between Tech, Emory University, Morehouse College, and Spelman College aimed at increasing the number of African-American students seeking doctorates in engineering. Sponsored by the National Science Foundation (NSF), FACES offers opportunities for undergraduate research as well as fellowships and grants to Ph.D. students. ○○The National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering (NACME) is a national organization whose mission is “to insure American resilience in a flat world by leading and supporting the national effort to expand

Scholars Program, which provides money to talented students enrolled in an engineering program. • Numerous pre-collegiate programs are also offered to get URM students interested in engineering early. They include the GT Summer Engineering Institute, a three-week summer engineering experience for rising 11th and 12th graders from across the country. During the 2011 program, participants’ average GPA was a 3.9. • Other outreach programs, such as the GT Engineering Design Challenge, are designed for middle school students.

Top: High school students plan, design, and research solutions to real-world engineering problems at EEO’s Summer Engineering Institute Left: In the WIE Ambassadors Program, female engineering students visit local schools to talk about engineering and their experiences.

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Aerospace

Engineering

When the world watched NASA’s Curiosity rover reach Mars, viewers got a firsthand peek at the work of aerospace engineering professor Robert Braun. He played a crucial role in developing the Mars entry, descent and landing system, one of the mission’s key parts. The 2012 academic year was also remarkable for other faculty members at the Guggenheim School of Aerospace Engineering (AE), who were selected for numerous awards and committees. Over the past year, AE underwent a successful Academic Program Review, refined its graduate and undergraduate programs, conducted a faculty retreat for the next five-year strategic plan, established the Loewy Library and Learning Center, and hired three new faculty members.

AE at a Glance

• In Fall 2011, about 750 undergraduates and 620 graduate students were enrolled. • Last year, U.S. News & World Report ranked AE as the country’s No. 2 undergraduate program and No. 4 graduate program. • Among the currently enrolled students, two hold Institute Fellowships, 25 hold Presidential Fellowships, and 2 hold the Goizueta Fellowship. There are 5 NSF Fellows, 6 NSDEG Fellows, 2 ARCS Fellows, and 1 SMART Fellow. Three international students are attending the program as Fulbright Scholars.

Faculty & Staff

•• Robert Braun was awarded the NASA Distinguished Service Medal and the 2012 Alvin Seiff Memorial Award. •• Brian German was selected for an NSF CAREER award and the Lockheed Dean’s Excellence in Teaching Award. •• Dewey Hodges was selected to serve on the Editorial Board of the Journal of Nonlinear Dynamics. •• New faculty include Marcus Holzinger, Mike Mello, and Min-Feng Yu. •• Daurette Joseph earned a master’s degree in Higher Education. •• The following employees received their 10-year service awards: Daurette Joseph, Scott Moseley, Massimo Ruzzene, and Dmitriy Shcherbik.

•• Dimitri Mavris was awarded Georgia Tech’s Inaugural Industry Collaboration Award and was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Council for Aeronautical Sciences. •• J.V.R. Prasad was elected Fellow of the AIAA and asked to join the advisory board for the International Journal of Unmanned Systems. •• Vivian Robinson O’Neal Professor Robert Braun (AE) with former Georgia Tech AE completed her associate’s students Ravi Prakash, David Way, and Devin Kipp and degree in Business a full-scale model of the Mars Curiosity rover at the Jet Administration. Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, CA. •• Massimo Ruzzene was elected Fellow of the ASME. Awards •• Joseph Saleh was invited to join • 36 students earned awards and the Editorial Board of Reliability scholarships Engineering and System Safety • 8 students won PURA research grants and won the Sigma Gamma Tau • 5 female students won Women in Outstanding Faculty Award. Engineering Scholarships •• Lakshmi Sankar was elected Technical Fellow of the American Helicopter Society. Distinguished Lecture Series •• Marilyn Smith won the Agusta • In 2011-2012, AE hosted seven Westland International Helicopter speakers in its Distinguished Lecture Fellowship Award from the American Series, including: Professor Charbel Helicopter Society. Farhat, Stanford University; Professor •• Rebecca Trout earned a master’s Robert J. Wood, Harvard University; degree in Teaching and Learning with Professor Alexander J. Smits, Princeton Technology. University; Professor Guruswami Ravichandran, California Institute of Technology; Professor Edward M. Teaching & Courses Greitzer, Massachusetts of Technology; • AE is working with the School Professor Paolo Ermanni, ETH of Computational Sciences and Zurich; and Professor Jaime Peraire, Engineering and other units on campus Massachusetts Institute of Technology. (ECE, CEE, ME, Math, Physics) to offer an interdisciplinary minor in scientific engineering and computing. Academic Program Review AE will offer the following electives in • AE received a five-year academic support of this minor, if it is approved program review, mandated by the by the Institute—AE 3090: Numerical Board of Regents, on Jan. 22-24. Methods for Aerospace Engineers, AE An External Visiting Committee, 4040: Computational Fluid Dynamics, comprised of the following members, and AE 4131: Introduction to Finite visited the School and conducted a Element Methods. thorough review for two days: Darryll • An interdisciplinary undergraduate Pines (chair), University of Maryland; minor on energy systems was approved J. Craig Dutton, University of Illinois by the Institute during this academic at Urbana-Champaign; Charbel Farhat, year. This minor is being offered by AE, Stanford University; Robert Liebeck, ECE, ME, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Boeing Co.; Elaine Oran, Naval EAS, Public Policy, and Economics. Research Laboratory

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Biomedical

Engineering

If a tumor is more visible and easier to distinguish from surrounding tissues, surgeons are more likely to be able to remove it completely. That’s the rationale behind a new $7 million, five-year “transformative” grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to a team of researchers from Emory, Georgia Tech, and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Shuming Nie, a professor at the Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering (BME), and his colleagues at the EmoryGeorgia Tech Nanotechnology Cancer Center have been developing fluorescent nanoparticle probes that hone in on cancer cells. The grant will support the team’s continuing work on the nanoparticles and instruments that visualize them for cancer detection during surgery. Meanwhile, other BME professors and students are working on research that could shape the way medicine is practiced.

BME at a Glance

• During the 2012 academic year, more than 1,150 undergraduates and about 220 graduate students were enrolled in the department. • U.S. News & World Report ranked BME as the country’s No. 2 undergraduate program and No. 2 graduate program. • Women account for 40 percent of the BME student body.

award from the National Science Foundation. The four-year, $450,000 award will support Lam’s research on the biomechanical properties of platelets, the cells responsible for blood clot formation. •• BME chairman Larry McIntire announced plans to retire in 2013. A search committee will seek the department’s next chairperson. •• Eberhard Voit was named an American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering Fellow

Curriculum

• Georgia Tech has announced a new Master of Biomedical Innovation and Development (BioID) degree. This intensive, 12-month master’s program focuses on education and clinical experience to transform unmet biomedical and clinical needs into practical, usable technologies and products for improving patient care. • The application process opened in September 2012 for the first class to matriculate in August 2013. Ideal candidates for the BioID master’s program include early-career professionals in medical device or biomedicine-related industries, engineers seeking medical device specialization, and high-performing graduates from engineering disciplines.

Research Faculty

•• Paul Benkeser was promoted to senior associate chair of the Coulter Department, assuming charge of all day-to-day operations of the department. •• New faculty to join the department include Ed Botchwey and Younan Xia. •• Barbara Boyan was named to the National Academy of Engineers •• Pediatric hematologist/oncologist Wilbur Lam has earned a Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER)

• Re-Hand, a software-assisted home-use hand assessment and rehabilitation device, won the 2012 InVenture Prize in front of a live television audience at the Ferst Center for the Arts. As the winner, Re-Hand received a cash prize of $15,000, a free U.S. patent filing by Tech’s Office of Technology Licensing (valued at approximately $20,000) and automatic acceptance to the 2012 class of Flashpoint, a Georgia Tech startup accelerator program. The team included

Top: Professor Manu Platt and his research team, along with collaborators in South Africa, are researching the connection between cardiovascular disease and HIV. Bottom: Re-Hand, winning team of the 2012 Inventure Prize. (Left to right) Alkindi Kibria, Daphne Vincent, Elizabeth LeMar, and Kunal Dean MacDonald.

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Daphne Vincent, a December 2011 BME grad, and three other BME majors: Alkindi Kibria, Elizabeth LeMar, and Kunal Dean MacDonald. • Scientists at Emory and Tech will develop a “therapeutic robot” to help rehabilitate and improve motor skills in people with mobility problems. The NSF has awarded the scientists a $2 million research grant over four years through its Division of Emerging Frontiers in Research and Innovation. • NIH has awarded nearly $2 million to researchers at Tech and Emory to develop a new class of therapeutics for treating traumatic injuries and degenerative diseases. The fiveyear project focuses on developing biomaterials capable of capturing certain molecules from embryonic stem cells and delivering them to wound sites to enhance tissue regeneration in adults.


Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering

Research in the School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering (ChBE) during the past year has ranged from new methodologies to remove greenhouse gases from power-plant emissions to further advances in microneedles, which now facilitate drug delivery to the back of the eye. In addition to some of the country’s most cutting-edge work in health fields, ChBE is playing a leading role in research addressing global energy needs. Among many advances being made by young ChBE faculty members, the Biomaterials Program at the National Science Foundation awarded Julie Champion a major research grant to investigate engineering effector protein nanoclusters for breast cancer therapy.

ChBE at a Glance

• In Fall 2011, about 800 undergraduates and 215 graduate students were enrolled. • In last year’s edition of U.S. News & World Report’s best colleges list, ChBE ranked as the country’s No. 9 undergraduate program and No. 10 graduate program.

Faculty

•• Sue Ann Bidstrup Allen was appointed Associate Dean for Faculty Development and Scholarship in CoE. •• Michael Filler received the National Science Foundation CAREER Award. •• Martha Grover received an Outstanding Young Researcher Award from the American Institute of

Chemical Engineers’ Computing and Systems Technology Division. •• William Koros was selected as the American Institute of Chemical Engineers’ 63rd Institute Lecturer. •• Hang Lu received CSB2 Prize in Systems Biology from the Council for Systems Biology. •• Athanasios Nenes received the Kenneth Whitby Award from the American Association for Aerosol Research. •• Sally Ng joined the department. •• Mark Prausnitz was appointed Regents’ Professor by Georgia Board of Regents. •• Elsa Reichmanis received a Distinguished Service Award from the Polymeric Materials Science and Engineering Division of the American Chemical Society. •• Ronald Rousseau received the Malcolm E. Pruitt Award from the Council for Chemical Research, and the ADVANCE Leadership Award in recognition of his commitment to the equity, diversity, excellence, and advancement of faculty. •• Arnold Stancell was appointed to National Science Board. •• Mark Styczynski received the Young Faculty Award from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

Students

•• Shannon Capps received a NASA Earth System Science Fellowship. •• Maria Elena Casas and Tel Rouse received an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship.

•• Brian Kraftschik received an Air Products Fellowship. •• Kendra Maxwell received a DuPont Fellowship from the National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers. •• Kelly Nicholson was named a Sam Nunn Fellow.

Research

• With a series of papers published in chemistry and chemical engineering journals, ChBE professors David Sholl and Christopher Jones helped advance the case for extracting carbon dioxide directly from the air using newly developed adsorbent materials. The technique might initially be used to supply carbon dioxide for such industrial applications as fuel production from algae or enhanced oil recovery. But the method could later be used to supplement the capture of CO2 from power plant flue gases as part of efforts to reduce concentrations of the atmospheric warming chemical. • Thanks to tiny microneedles, eye doctors may soon have a better way to treat diseases such as macular degeneration that affect tissues in the back of the eye. For the first time, researchers from Georgia Tech and Emory University have demonstrated that microneedles less than a millimeter in length can deliver drug molecules and particles to the eye in an animal model.

Left: Postdoctoral researcher Samirkumar Patel displays a prototype microneedle used to inject therapeutics into specific locations in the eye. Right: Dr. Julie Champion investigates engineering effector protein nanoclusters for breast cancer therapy. “Given that breast cancer is the most common cancer in U.S. women and the second leading cause of cancer death, many people could benefit from the development of effector nanoclusters,” Champion says.

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Civil & Environmental Engineering

With visits to a rainforest and the Panama Canal, this year’s school alumni weekend was unlike any other. In March, the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering hosted its alumni gathering in Panama, whose vice president, Juan Carlos Varela, is a Georgia Tech alumnus. The event included more than 100 participants from the U.S. and Latin America, and top Georgia Tech leaders, including the president and provost, also attended. CEE got a new leader of its own in 2012, when Reginald DesRoches was named the Karen and John Huff School Chair. DesRoches oversees a school that is consistently ranked as one of the nation’s most prominent programs of its kind in both graduate and undergraduate education.

CEE at a Glance

• In Fall 2011, about 825 undergraduates and 360 graduate students were enrolled. • U.S. News & World Report ranked both the undergraduate and graduate programs in civil engineering as No. 3. The undergraduate environmental engineering program came in at No. 3, while the graduate program placed at No. 6. • 29% of the undergraduate student body is female.

Faculty

•• Georgia Tech’s Center for Enhanced Teaching and Learning (CETL) named Adjo Amekudzi as one of its 2012 Hesburgh Teaching Fellows. Faculty members are nominated for this honor

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by their college and meet to discuss innovative ways to improve student learning. •• The National Graduate Education for Minorities Consortium honored Chair Reginald DesRoches as the 2011 Outstanding Alumnus of the Year. •• J. David Frost was selected to be a Fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers. •• Laurie Garrow has been elected Vice President of the Airline Group of the International Federation of Operational Research Societies. •• Barry Goodno was invited to join the inaugural class of Fellows within the Structural Engineering Institute of the American Society of Engineers. •• Kostas Konstantinidis was named the 2012 recipient of the Georgia Tech Sigma XI Young Faculty Award. •• Kimberly Kurtis was named as a Fellow of the American Ceramics Society, and was named as an ADVANCE Professor in the CoE. •• Spyros Pavlostathis was named as a Fellow of the Water Environment Federation. •• New faculty hires include Phanish Suryanarayana, Kari Watkins, and JingFeng Wang. •• Yang Wang was recently awarded a Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) award by the National Science Foundation. •• Kari Watkins was selected to receive the 2011 Charley V. Wootan Memorial Award, given annually by the Council of University Transportation Centers.

Renovations

The Jesse W. Mason Building is undergoing a $10.5 million renovation to provide improved space that will better serve the needs of CEE students, faculty, and staff. The Mason Building was constructed in the 1960s and houses CEE’s main office, administrative and faculty offices, classrooms, and instructional and research facilities. The anticipated completion date of the Mason Building’s renovation is summer 2013.

Transportation Research Center

• The Institute was awarded one of 10 Tier One University Transportation Centers by the U.S. Department of Transportation in 2012. The National Center for Transportation System Performance and Management is focused on the key interactions among transportation infrastructure/services, economic competitiveness, and safety. • The overall goal of the research, education and professional development activities within the Georgia Tech University Transportation Center is to increase the number, diversity and capabilities of transportation professionals in the nation. • Georgia Tech is the lead institute of a consortium of universities within the recently named Center. • The Center received $16 million in new research funding for FY 2012.

Top left: Dr. Kim Kurtis and students visit a cement plant outside of Kingston, Jamaica, as part of the Caribbean Hazard Assessment, Mitigation, and Preparedness Project (CHAMP), an initiative by Dr. Reginald DesRoches to deal with natural disasters in Caribbean nations. Top right: A rendering of the proposed student commons area in the Mason building renovation, which will give students a much-needed gathering space for project collaboration.


Electrical & Computer Engineering

•• Mitch Costley was selected to attend the 2012 Lindau Meeting of Nobel Laureates. •• Yu-Ting Hsueh was awarded an IEEE Photonics Society Graduate Student Fellowship. •• Peter Song was selected for the NASA Space Technology Research Fellowships Class of 2012.

It’s called a tongue drive, which is a funny name for a powerful device. The tongue drive enables people with high-level spinal cord injuries to operate a computer and maneuver a wheelchair simply by moving their tongues. Maysam Ghovanloo, (left) an associate professor in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE), and his research team are making it even better: They developed a prototype of the system to make it less conspicuous and more functional. Ghovanloo’s colleagues at ECE – as well as students – have been doing other exciting work this year as well, and their scholarship has earned plenty of prestigious awards.

ECE at a Glance

• ECE at Tech is the largest producer of electrical engineers and computer engineers in the United States. • In Fall 2011, around 1,300 undergraduates and over 1,150 graduate students were enrolled. • U.S. News & World Report ranked the computer engineering undergraduate program as No. 6 in the country, with the graduate program also ranking at No. 6. Meanwhile, the electrical engineering program for undergraduates ranked at No. 4, and the graduate program placed at No. 5. • The School is home to six recipients of the Presidential Early Career Award in Science and Engineering, five National Academy of Engineering members, six Optical Society of America Fellows, and 43 IEEE Fellows.

Faculty

•• Three ECE faculty members were elected to the rank of Fellow in the American Association for the Advancement of Science: Ali Adibi, Robert J. Butera, Jr. and Paul G. Steffes. •• Adibi was named as an OSA Fellow “for numerous contributions to the field of integrated nanophotonics, lab-on-chip sensing, and volume holography.” •• Ian F. Akyildiz received the 2011 TUBITAK Exclusive Award (the top academic award in the Republic of Turkey), for outstanding contributions

Teaching and Courses

to the advancement of scholarship/ research of a scholar with Turkish origin at an international level. •• Five ECE faculty members were elevated to the rank of IEEE Fellow: Yucel Altunbasak, Magnus Egerstedt, Mark A. Richards, Erik I. Verriest, and G. Tong Zhou. •• Muhannad Bakir was chosen for both a DARPA Young Faculty Award for his project “Radical Silicon Interconnection Platform for Ultimate Performance Electronics” and as a participant in the National Academy of Engineering’s 18th annual U.S. Frontiers of Engineering Symposium •• Chin-Hui Lee received the 2012 International Speech Communication Association Medal “for pioneering and seminal contributions to automatic speech and speaker recognition, including innovations in adaptive learning, discriminative training, and utterance verification.”

Students

•• Aritra Banerjee and Outmane Lemtiri Chlieh received top honors from the IEEE Microwave Theory and Techniques Society (MTT-S) during 2011-12. Chlieh received an IEEE MTT-S BS/MS Scholarship; Banerjee received an IEEE MTT-S Graduate Fellowship. •• Xin Chen received a one-year fellowship from the American Society of Nondestructive Testing.

• Starting summer 2012, the School began to roll out its changes to both the electrical engineering (EE) and computer engineering (CmpE) curricula. • In addition to updating content, the new curricula emphasize flexibility in course selection, hands-on experiences, and a greater differentiation between the two degree programs. • An electrical energy systems course and a choice of senior lab electives will be added to the EE curriculum. CmpE majors will now take foundational courses that focus on mathematical, physical, and design principles for computational systems.

Research

• Researchers have discovered a way to capture and harness energy transmitted by such sources as radio and television transmitters, cellphone networks, and satellite communications systems. By scavenging this ambient energy from the air around us, the technique could provide a new way to power networks of wireless sensors, microprocessors and communications chips. This project is led by ECE Professor Emmanouil (Manos) M. Tentzeris. • In August 2016, when NASA’s Juno Mission begins sending back information about the atmosphere of the planet Jupiter, research led by ECE Professor Paul Steffes using a 2,400-pound pressure vessel will help scientists understand what the data means. Among the key questions which will be answered using microwave radiometry are how much water exists there and how that water evolved from the hydrogen-rich early solar system.

9


Industrial & Systems Engineering

If there’s one constant at the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering (ISyE), it’s this: The school consistently ranks No. 1. In its 2012 edition, U.S. News & World Report ranked ISyE’s undergraduate program as the best of its kind. That was the 17th consecutive No. 1 ranking for the undergraduate offerings, while the graduate program ranked No. 1 for the 21st year in a row. How does ISyE do it time and time again? By grounding its curricula in real-world applications of engineering principles. In February, ISyE collaborated with the U.S. Council on Competitiveness to coordinate the "U.S. Manufacturing Competitiveness: Dialog on Next Generation Supply Networks and Logistics.” For the event, representatives from industry, labor, government, and academia gathered to share their perspectives on the current state of the U.S. manufacturing industry, the challenges it faces in global competition, and possible solutions to mitigate those obstacles. The resulting discussions, conclusions, and recommendations were incorporated into a joint Georgia Tech/Council on Competitiveness Report that was presented to Congress and the Office of the President of the United States.

ISyE at a Glance

• Around 1260 undergraduates were enrolled in Fall 2011, while 421 graduate students were enrolled. • U.S. News & World Report ranked ISyE as the country’s No. 1 undergraduate program and No. 1 graduate program. • 34 percent of the undergraduate student body is women, while 12 percent is African-American or Hispanic.

Faculty

•• Sigrún Andradóttir received the 2011 Harold W. Kuhn Award for her paper “Adaptive Random Search for Continuous Simulation Optimization.” •• Turgay Ayer received first place for the INFORMS Doing Good with Good OR Competition.

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•• Bill Cook was elected as a member of the National Academy of Engineering for his theoretical and computational contributions to discrete optimization. •• Santanu Dey received the National Science Foundation CAREER Award for his work on nontraditional cutting-plane algorithms for mixed-integer programs. •• Dave Goldsman was named a Fellow of the Institute of Industrial Engineers (IIE) for his leadership and significant contributions to the field of industrial engineering. •• Donald Ratliff was invited to become a member of the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Logistics & Supply Chain for the 2011-2012 term. •• Jianjun Shi received the 2011 IIE Albert G. Holzman Distinguished Educator Award. •• Joel Sokol and Steve Hackman took first place in IIEs Innovations in Curriculum Competition. •• Roshan Joseph Vengazhiyil was elected a Fellow of the American Statistical Association for his significant and definitive contributions to engineering statistics. •• Jeff Wu was awarded the Einstein Chair Professorship, the highest honor for visitors of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Wu was also the recipient of the 2011 Committee of Presidents of Statistical Societies Fisher Lecture Award.

Curriculum

• ISyE launched a new Predictive Health track to the Master of Science in Health Systems program. Partnering with the Emory/Georgia Tech Predictive Health Institute, this new field of study focuses on maintaining health rather than treating disease. • ISyE’s Health & Humanitarian Logistics Center created a new Humanitarian Logistics Professional Certificate Program for those seeking to build skills to improve decision making in preparedness, response, and system design.

Top: Professor Valerie Thomas studies energy efficiency in transportation, sustainability, and the use and environmental impacts of biofuels. Here, Thomas collaborates with Nader Rejad of Recycletronics, an Atlanta-based company that specializes in electronics, computers, and cell phone recycling. Bottom: Professor John Bartholdi and a team of ISyE students used GPS communnication and “self-equalizing” bus routes to help relieve congestion and “bus bunching” on Georgia Tech’s campus.


Materials Science

& Engineering

The School of Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) saw big changes over the past year. In 2010, the School of Polymer, Textile & Fiber Engineering merged with MSE to form the largest and one of the most diverse programs of its kind in the country. The school also got a new leader: Dr. Naresh Thadhani was appointed as the new chair effective Aug. 1, 2012. Thadhani was previously an associate chair in MSE.

MSE at a Glance

• In Fall 2011, MSE enrolled 265 undergraduates and 160 graduate students. • In last year’s edition of U.S. News & World Report’s best colleges list, MSE ranked as the country’s No. 6 undergraduate program and No. 7 graduate program. • MSE is the country’s largest program of its kind, with 57 faculty members and over $30 million in annual research expenditures. • The Chronicle of Higher Education ranked MSE as the country’s No. 1 Materials Science program.

Faculty

•• Haskell Beckham was named the Outstanding Alumnus (2011) by Auburn’s School of Polymer & Fiber Engineering. •• New faculty to join the department include Wenshan Cai (joint appointment in ECE), Zhiqun Lin, Chris Muhlstein, Dong Qin, John Reynolds, and Eric Vogel.

•• Sundaresan Jayaraman was appointed the Kolon Term Professor. •• Meilin Liu was awarded Regents’ Professor (2011). •• Valeria Milam was awarded the Nontenured Faculty Award (2011) by 3M. •• Mary Lynn Realff was awarded the Preparing Students for College & Careers Impact Award for the High School Enterprise Program (2011) with Benjamin E. Mays High School. •• John Reynolds received the Award in Applied Polymer Science (2012) from the American Chemical Society. •• Vladimir Tsukruk was elected Fellow of the American Physical Society and Fellow of the Materials Research Society, and he received the 2011 SAIC Advisor Award. •• Rao Tummala received the IEEE Field Award (2011) and the TechnoVisionary Award (2011). •• Z. L. Wang received the Edward Orton Memorial Lecture Award (2012) from the American Ceramic Society, was awarded the Materials Research Society Medal (2011), and was named the Hightower Chair in MSE.

Students

• Kara Evanoff won a Gold Award from the Materials Research Society. Winners were chosen on the merits of exceptional abilities and promise for significant future achievement in materials research.

• Parisa Pooyan's poster, “CelluloseBased Nanocomposites as a Potential Scaffold in Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering,” won first place at the Minerals, Metals & Materials Society’s 2012 meeting.

Outreach and Recruitment

• Each year, high school students and their parents are invited to Georgia Tech’s campus for the annual MSE Career Day. They hear presentations on materials, tour labs, are informed about current research initiatives, and interact with faculty and current students. • Each spring MSE sponsors a workshop on recycling carpet, textile, and polymer fibrous waste in Dalton, Ga. This well-received workshop has been taking place for nearly a decade and is attended by about 100 industry participants. • The Georgia High School Outreach for Science and Technology Program (GHOST) is designed to teach high school students about materials science and give them a new perspective on engineering. Through the GHOST program, graduate students in MSE at Tech visit high school classrooms in metro Atlanta, giving handson demonstrations about topics including metals, ceramics, polymers, biomaterials and nanotechnology.

Left: High school students observe a demonstration at MSE Career Day. Right: MSE Professor Gleb Yushin and other researchers have identified alginate (inset), a brown algae extract, as a potential binder material for lithium-ion batteries that can increase energy storage and reduce the use of toxic compounds.

11


Mechanical

Engineering

The Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers is the government’s highest accolade for engineering professionals in the early stages of their careers. This year, assistant professor Baratunde Cola of the Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering (ME) was one of 96 recipients, a major honor for both his school and college. Awardees are selected for their pursuit of innovative research at the frontiers of science and technology and their commitment to community service. “My interests and accomplishments are shaped by the ethos of my family, friends and all of those who have supported and encouraged me,” said Cola, who is the director of the NanoEngineered Systems and Transport Lab (NEST). “I am thrilled to have an opportunity to represent them on this national stage. I feel honored to be considered in this group and to be able to share our discoveries of new ways to improve the conversion of waste heat to electricity with a wider audience.” Cola’s award is emblematic of ME’s aspirations. As CoE’s largest school, ME offers a huge variety of specialties across multiple types of engineering. Over the past year, the school revised its curriculum to give greater flexibility, allowing students to pursue multidisciplinary work that touches on all their interests and prepares them for the workforce.

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ME at a Glance

• In Fall 2011, ME enrolled more than 1,900 undergraduates and 775 graduate students. • U.S. News & World Report ranked ME as the country’s No. 2 undergraduate program and No. 6 graduate program. • In early 2012, GT opened a new laboratory with state-of-the-art radiation therapy equipment dedicated solely to research and education, making it one of the only universities in the nation with this unique capability. The Radiation Science and Engineering Lab will provide hands-on training to students in the Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics programs (NRE/MP), as well as continuing education for medical physicists currently practicing in the field and research opportunities for faculty.

Faculty

•• Baratunde Cola was named a 2012 Class of 1969 Teaching Fellow. •• Alper Erturk was also named a 2012 Class of 1969 Teaching Fellow. •• Andrei Fedorov was awarded a Woodruff Professorship. •• Aldo Ferri was named a 2011 Hesburgh Award Teaching Fellow. •• Andres Garcia was named a Fellow of Biomaterials Science and Engineering by the International Union of Societies of Biomaterials Science and

Engineering, and was awarded a Woodruff Professorship. •• Srinivas Garimella was named the Hightower Chair. •• Steven Liang was elected Fellow of Society of Manufacturing Engineers. •• Tim Lieuwen was named a 2012 American Society of Mechanical Engineers Fellow. •• David McDowell was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Mechanics. •• Chris Paredis was named a Woodruff Faculty Fellow. •• Massimo Ruzzene was named a 2012 ASME Fellow. •• Zhuomin Zhang was named an American Physical Society Fellow. •• Ting Zhu was named a Woodruff Faculty Fellow.

New Curriculum

• Providing students with more course flexibility is at the heart of the recent faculty-approved change to the ME curriculum. The new curriculum was the result of a yearlong effort undertaken by the School’s Undergraduate Committee. • The new curriculum will allow students to choose a “breadth” or “depth” option. Although both options increase the total curriculum credit hours from 126 to 129, the benefits to the students are tremendous.

Top left: Assistant Professor Baratunde Cola was awarded the PECASE for his research on thermal-to-electric energy conversion and K-12 outreach efforts. Top center: The Radiological Science and Engineering Lab recently opened to support the NRE/MP programs in research and education. Top right: The newly expanded Invention Studio allows students to work and create in a hands-on, collaborative environment.


“The College of Engineering will develop the next generation of engineers who combine the highest level of technical competence with creativity, innovation, and leadership skills...�

Right: The Manufacturing Research Center (MARC) is a multidisciplinary research center focusing on nextgeneration manufacturing technologies.


Dean’s Office 225 North Ave Atlanta, GA 30332-0360

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Year in Review 2011-2012