Issuu on Google+

Contents  Overview of Agency ...................................................................................................................... 3  Managing Director’s Report ....................................................................................................... 3  Governing Council Chair’s Report ............................................................................................. 5  Governing Council ..................................................................................................................... 7  Operational Structure .............................................................................................................. 10  Legislation ............................................................................................................................... 10  Performance Management Framework ................................................................................... 12  Agency Performance .................................................................................................................. 14  Directorate Reports ................................................................................................................. 16  Corporate Services Directorate ............................................................................................... 16  Performance and Review ........................................................................................................ 17  Research and Planning ........................................................................................................... 19  Business Development ............................................................................................................ 22  Business and Creative Industries ............................................................................................ 24  Social Sciences Directorate .................................................................................................... 25  Primary Industries and Natural Resource Management ......................................................... 27  Trade and Industry Skills Directorate ...................................................................................... 28  Regional Services Directorate ................................................................................................. 29  Significant Issues Affecting the Agency ...................................................................................... 31  Financial Statements .................................................................................................................. 33  Certification of Performance Indicators ....................................................................................... 75  Other Financial Disclosures .................................................................................................... 85  Governance Disclosures ......................................................................................................... 86  Advertising............................................................................................................................... 86  Disability Access and Inclusion Plan Outcomes ...................................................................... 86  Compliance with Public Sector Standards and Ethical Codes ................................................ 87  Recordkeeping Plan ................................................................................................................ 88  Corruption Prevention ............................................................................................................. 90  Substantive Equality ................................................................................................................ 90  Sustainability ........................................................................................................................... 90  Occupational Safety and Health .............................................................................................. 91 


Principles of Public Sector Governance .................................................................................. 92  Authority for Directions ............................................................................................................ 92  Strategic and Business Plans .................................................................................................. 92  International Students ............................................................................................................. 92 

   

 


Overview of Agency  Managing Director’s Report  I am pleased to present my report on the performance of Great Southern TAFE in 2009 ‐ another  successful year of realising significant achievements by students and staff, building business  partnerships and promoting workforce development in the Great Southern region and across the State.  At the start of the year, Great Southern TAFE was faced with the widespread uncertainty caused by the  global economic crisis which was evident late in 2008. Business on a national, state and local level was  impacted and fewer apprentices found employment.  Despite this slowdown, existing contracts for  apprentices were largely maintained and there was an increase in traineeships, mainly because of the  excellent reputation of the College with local employers.  As the year progressed, confidence within the resources sector grew and the College was able to  maintain its growth in services, particularly to the mining industry.  Great Southern TAFE’s commitment to assisting people to gain qualifications and widen their options to  employment and promotion resulted in an extremely successful project to promote Recognition of Prior  Learning (RPL). The outcome of this initiative was an increase of 123% of applications – many by existing  workers seeking qualifications.   To expand training relationships with industry and small business, new positions of Business  Relationships Officer and Industry Training Consultant were created, and these are proving valuable to  the College’s promotion and expansion of service delivery. Our TAFE Business Centre enhanced existing  workforce development partnerships with local business, including the Forest Products Commission and  the City of Albany, boosting productivity and career pathways for their respective workforces.  Important partnerships were also strengthened with the Aboriginal community, schools and other  service providers to secure employment for the College’s Aboriginal students. More than 50 students  found work as a result of these specific initiatives.  Individual participation in training increased, with training delivery up by 10%. This included a 15% rise  for Aboriginal students and 8.5 per cent for students with a disability. The College developed the  Aboriginal Training Strategy 2010‐2013 aligned to the Western Australian Government’s plan ‘Training  WA’ to close the gap between Aboriginal and non‐Aboriginal students.  Great Southern TAFE continued to provide more flexible and accessible pathways to higher TAFE and  university qualifications and more than 750 school students were enrolled in VET programmes in 2009.  With campuses in Mount Barker, Denmark and Katanning, the College increased its profile‐funded  delivery into the hinterland from 18.6% to 19.2%. An e‐learning tender through the Australian Flexible  Learning Framework with West One was successful and funded the development of four units of  competence from the new Community Services Training Package and the Health Training Package in on‐ line capacity. E‐learning will be a focus for delivery strategies in 2010. 

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

3


The number of external students continued to rise and units are delivered all over Western Australia. In  2009, more than 600 students enrolled in external studies through Great Southern TAFE. The College’s  external studies model is an alternative to online learning, which is not always accessible in some  remote locations. A growing number of students enrol in this mode for its fast postal turnaround and  lecturer contact.  Delivery to international students increased by more than 100% during the year. Students from Asia, the  US, Africa and Europe took courses in various areas including horticulture, agriculture, nursing and  education. The TAFE Business Centre, in partnership with Landgate International and AgWest  International, conducted study tours for participants from Libya, Vietnam and Iraq.   Student satisfaction was another area with pleasing results. Overall, this was high, with 89% claiming to  be either satisfied or very satisfied. Surveys also show 92% of students achieved their main reason for  training, which is 5% above the state average.  Changes in the Vocational Education and Training (VET) Act and resulting strategies determined in 2009  will be implemented in 2010.  Investment in capital works has resulted in a state‐of‐the‐art automotive workshop which was ready in  time for use in the last term and building work progressed on a new Primary Industries and Natural  Resource Management administration building, which will open in 2010.  Staff commitment to excellence in the delivery of training and education has been a major influence in  the success the College enjoyed in 2009. I congratulate staff in all areas on their dedication in a  particularly challenging year.  I would also like to thank our Governing Council, all our industry partners, sponsors and key  stakeholders. Their valued support ensures a vibrant and prosperous future for our students and the  College.  Great Southern TAFE anticipates continued progress in 2010 and looks forward to new developments  and a new name – Great Southern Institute of Technology – which will be launched in April by the  Minister for Training and Workforce Development.  I take great pleasure in presenting this document to you. 

  LIDIA ROZLAPA  CEO/Managing Director  February 18, 2010   

 

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

4


Governing Council Chair’s Report  I would like to congratulate the staff of Great Southern TAFE on another successful year in which they  demonstrated their commitment to excellence in training and education.  The College’s prudent management of its financial resources and reserves has continued, and Great  Southern TAFE is one of the few Colleges regularly operating in surplus.  The high professional and academic standard has been upheld throughout the year, in which all Delivery  Performance Agreement and training targets have been met and in many cases, exceeded.  A strong learning culture is evident throughout the organisation, giving the Governing Council  confidence in the dedication and high professional standards of the College.  From the increase in enrolments and the growing number of apprentices and trainees, it is clear this  same confidence is evident within the community, with employers increasingly recruiting Great  Southern TAFE‐trained staff, as well as contracting the TAFE Business Centre to provide professional and  personal staff development in the workplace.   Faced with the uncertainty of the global economic situation early in the year, staff took a proactive  stance. Professional partnerships were strengthened and Great Southern TAFE answered growing needs  for workforce development to bolster businesses against the impact.  The College continued to boost pathways for young people, increase apprenticeships and traineeships  and facilitate and advocate training for Aboriginal students and people with a disability.  In a big year for the College, the achievements of several staff and students are worthy of mention.  • •

• • • • •

A Clothing and Textiles lecturer was nominated for an award for excellence in teaching for the  development of an innovative learning aid for students with special needs.  Two Mount Barker art students promoted Aboriginal art interstate. One attended a printmaking  workshop in Darwin and held a solo exhibition at Albany’s Vancouver Arts Centre. Another was  chosen to exhibit a painting in a national exhibition of Aboriginal paintings in Brisbane.  A former Denmark music student received a top‐five nomination in the WA Music Industry  Association (WAMIA) song contest and won the WA Song of the Year title.  Three Katanning Senior High School students, the first to complete the TAFELink course in the  town, received first‐round offers for their first degree preferences at Murdoch University.  A group of VETiS students received accolades in an audit by the Nursery Industry Association  Standards of Australia for their water containment and recycling activities.  Students with a disability enthusiastically joined in specially developed arts projects and held  their own exhibition using photographs and sculpture.  On winding up its operation, the Denmark Music Foundation chose Great Southern TAFE as the  recipient of $10,000 in scholarship funding for two students a year for 10 years. 

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

5


My thanks go to Managing Director Lidia Rozlapa, who has led the college through another difficult year  with determination and drive. Her staff have met all objectives while delivering excellence in education  and training throughout the region.   And thank you also to the members of the Governing Council for their commitment to Great Southern  TAFE and their interest in the welfare of not just the College, but also the communities it serves. 

Len Smith  Chair, Great Southern TAFE Governing Council  February 18, 2010     

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

6


Governing Council  The College Governing Council consists of a Chairperson, Deputy Chairperson, the Managing Director,  and 10 other members, who are appointed by the Minister for Education and Training for their expertise  in education and training, industry or community affairs and for their ability to contribute to the  strategic direction of the College.  Whilst the Managing Director has responsibility for the day to day operations, the Governing Council  overseas the strategic and overall direction of the College through the execution of its statutory  functions, within the Vocational Education and Training Act 1996,��the Public Sector Management Act  1994 and the Financial Management Act 2006.  Members of the Governing Council during 2009  Len Smith – Chair  Len is the owner and manager of the Comfort Inn in Albany and a long term and significant contributor  to the local community, particularly in his involvement with key tourism and training bodies.  He is  currently a board member of the Great Southern Development Commission.  Scott Leary – Deputy Chair  Scott is a Director of Albany City Motors which is a well established local motor dealer for Holden,  Nissan and Isuzu.  With 15 years’ experience in the motor trade and the previous 12 years in the finance  industry with Westpac, and now as Financial Controller, Scott offers a working knowledge of  management and processes.  Lidia Rozlapa – CEO/Managing Director  Lidia is the current Chief Executive Officer/Managing Director of the College and holds a Bachelor of  Education and several related teaching qualifications.  She is a member of the State Training Executive  and Client Management Council, as well as participating in the Managing Directors’ Network and  Regional Managing Directors’ Network.  She has seen the College grow from 250,000 student curriculum  hours (SCH) to 1.2 million SCH and has expanded the training reach throughout the 40,500               square kilometres of the Great Southern, with campuses in Albany, Katanning, Denmark and Mount  Barker.  Catherine Jenkins  Catherine is currently the National Forestry Management Accountant for Great Southern Limited, based  in Albany.  She has many years’ experience as a Management Accountant in Perth, and has held senior  positions in a diverse range of industries from motor vehicle dealerships to the manufacture and retail  of hand‐made chocolates.     

 

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

7


Jane Trethowan  Jane is the Deputy President for the Shire of Kojonup, initially elected to the local council in 2003, and  farms 3700 acres at Kojonup, with husband Nick.  Jane and Nick’s farming operation is sheep and grain‐ focused, with some innovative use of perennial plants in their grazing and cropping enterprise.  Jane is  the representative on the Governing Council from the Great Southern Zone of the Western Australian  Local Government Association.  Joan Cameron  Joan is a farmer at Rocky Gully and a proprietor of a retail business in Albany.  She has a number of  community and industry involvements at local and regional levels and formerly in a diverse range of  board memberships at state level.  Until October 2007, when she retired from the position, Joan was a  long‐serving councillor of the Shire of Plantagenet, served several terms as Deputy President and is a  Freeman of that municipality.  Graham Harvey  Graham is the Chief Executive Officer of the Albany Chamber of Commerce and Industry, the Great  Southern’s peak business organisation.  Graham is a bestselling author and a previous Western  Australian Professional Speaker of the Year.  His qualifications include a Bachelor of Commerce from  Curtin University majoring in Tourism Management.  Owen Starling  Owen is the Regional Manager Great Southern for Court and Tribunal Services, which covers the Albany,  Katanning and Narrogin Magisterial Districts, and is the Clerk of the Court at the Albany Magistrates  Court.  Owen has worked within regional courts for 24 years and has gained extensive experience within  the State public service.  He is also an active member of the Army Reserve with 11/28 RWAR and is a  senior umpire of Australian Rules football within the region.  Anthony Smith  Born and educated in England, Tony migrated under the assisted passage scheme in 1960, to work as a  jackeroo in NSW and then as an overseer at Forbes NSW, before buying a farm at Denbarker, WA.  He  founded Plantagenet Wines in 1974 and although retired still serves as Chairman of the company board.   He served on wine industry bodies at regional, state and federal levels, the board of the Great Southern  Development Commission and chaired the Great Southern Area Consultative Committee, and is  presently on the board of the Albany UWA Foundation (Vice Chairman), and Mount Barker Community  College Farm Committee. He runs an aquaculture venture at Denbarker.   

 

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

8


Suzanne Seeley  Suzanne is the Nurse Director for WA Country Health Service (WACHS) – Great Southern, moving to  Albany after working in Broome as the Director of Nursing for five years.  Suzanne has many years of  nursing and hospital management experience and has worked in both the public and private health  sectors as well as representing WACHS on the WA Palliative Care Advisory Committee.  Suzanne is  committed to strengthening the integration of the health services within the region and in building a  strong connection with the educational sector to build a strong local healthcare workforce.   Murray Howson  Murray is the Managing Director of Edenborn Pty Ltd, one of the region’s largest tree harvesting and  transport companies.   His background is in industrial design and he also holds qualifications in the field  of education (Diploma of Teaching).  He possesses vast industry experience and knowledge, his company  is a leader in innovation and systems management specific to commercial forestry.  A strong interest in  research and development has seen the company be instrumental in the development of blue gum  specific harvesting equipment and operation systems that have been adopted as industry best practice.  Anne Stafford  Anne held a senior executive position at Central TAFE in Perth for eight years before marrying an Albany  man in 2002, and taking early retirement to live in Albany.  Since then she has chaired the board at  Albany Worklink, been a member of the Board at Parklands School and been a volunteer tutor to an  Afghani immigrant and to students at Lockyer School.  Her qualifications are in anthropology and  teaching.  Suzanne Yewers  Suzanne is the Administration and Training Manager (since 1998) for Fletcher International WA which is  Australia’s largest sheep/lamb meat and textile processor.  The company exports its products to more  than 90 countries.  Suzanne is currently studying for a Diploma in Management and is a volunteer  involved with the Australian Red Cross, Emergency Response Service for the local Narrikup Unit and  Albany Community Radio.  Natalie Dimmock  Natalie Dimmock holds the position of Solicitor with an Albany firm and is heavily involved in the  community through running a legal clinic as well as raising funds for various charities. Her qualifications  are a Bachelor of Arts, a Bachelor of Psychology and a Law degree.    Retired during 2009:  Catherine Jenkins  Murray Howson  Joan Cameron   

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

9


Operational Structure   

 

  The College reports the Minister for Training and Workforce Development. 

Legislation  The following legislation applies to the operation of the College:  State  Auditor General Act, 2006   Building and Construction Industry Training Fund and Levy College Act, 1990   Corruption and Crime Commission Act, 2003   Curriculum Council Act, 1997   Disability Services Act, 1993   Education Service Providers (Full Fee Overseas Students) Registration Act, 1991   Electronic Transactions Act, 2003   Equal Opportunity Act, 1984   Financial Management Act, 2006   Freedom of Information Act, 1992   Industrial Relations Act, 1979   Industrial Training Act, 1975   Library Board of Western Australia Act, 1951  

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

10


Liquor Control Act, 1988   Minimum Conditions of Employment Act, 1993   Occupational Safety and Health Act, 1984   Public Interest Disclosure Act, 2003   Public Sector Management Act, 1994   School Education Act, 1999   State Records Act, 2000   State Superannuation Act, 2000   State Supply Commission Act, 1991   Vocational Education and Training Act, 1996   Workers Compensation and Injury Management Act, 1981   Working with Children (Criminal Record Checking) Act, 2004     Commonwealth  Copyright Act, 1968   Education Services for Overseas Students Act, 2000   Education Services for Overseas Students (Registration Charges) Act, 1997   Trade Practices Act, 1974   Training Guarantee (Administration) Act, 1990   Workplace Relations Act, 1996          

 

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

11


Performance Management Framework  The college has a strategic plan with strategies aligned to the Training WA outcomes below:  A skilled  workforce  

A contemporary  apprenticeship and  traineeship system  

Individual  participation in  training  

Support for  regional  communities  

A vibrant and  diverse training  market  

Training system  capability and  capacity  

  The college has developed and assessed strategic risk based on these outcomes and also linked to the  college business plan.  In  addition  the  college  analyses  monthly  performance  against  outcomes  specified  in  the  MD’s  performance agreement, delivery and performance agreement and college business plan.  These  indicators  are:  (legend:  DPA  =  Delivery  Performance  Agreement;  MD  =  MD’s  performance  Agreement and Assessment; OPM refers to operational performance measures) 

Item  Employment Based Training  Aboriginal training  Aboriginal Certificate III+  Disability  Certificate IV and above  Diploma and above  15‐19  20‐24  Recognition of Prior Learning  Responsiveness to training  initiatives (e.g. Skills Formation  Taskforce initiatives and flexible  and responsive delivery and  assessment)  Skill shortage delivery  Address  recommendations  of  the  Office  of  the  Auditor  General’s 2008 Report  Aboriginal  School  Based  traineeships  Continued  development  of  school,  TAFE  and  university  pathways, particularly at higher  qualification levels 

Measurement Type  TRS Commencements and SCH, numbers  in training  Course enrolments  Course enrolments  Course enrolments  Course enrolments  Increase in activity  Course enrolments  Course enrolments  SCH, unit enrolments  Lecturing  staff  trained  in  new  ways  of  working 

Source  DPA, MD   MD  DPA, OPM  DPA  DPA  MD  DPA  DPA  MD  MD 

SCH  Decrease attrition (SCH) 

MD, DPA  MD 

Student numbers 

MD 

SCH, student numbers 

MD 

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

12


Item  Measurement Type  Aboriginal  higher  completions  Module Load Completion Rate  at higher levels  % pre‐existing clients  Repeat Business  Proportion of Regional Delivery  % SCH  %15‐19  in  Cert  III+  % SCH  qualifications  % satisfaction from surveys  Delivery Satisfaction 

Source  MD  OPM  OPM  OPM  OPM 

Module Load Completion Rate 

OPM 

Module Load Completion Rates  Module Load Completion Rate  (ATSI)  Module Load Completion Rate  Module Load Completion  Rates(Tender)  Achievement of College Profile  % achieved  (separated for EBT, SSI, GI)  Invalid Module Enrolment rate  Invalid Enrolment rate 

OPM 

Module Load Completion  Rates(Profile) 

OPM  DPA, OPM  DPA, OPM 

International Activity 

SCH 

OPM 

Proportion of staff who have  completed the Certificate IV  Training and Assessment   

% of staff 

OPM 

In  addition  the  College  has  a  risk  management  system  which  ensures  that  critical  success  factors for key activities are defined and risk assessed accordingly.   

 

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

13


Agency Performance  Established in 1974, Great Southern TAFE is the region’s largest training provider, covering an area of  40,500 square kilometres. The College’s capacity for training stretches right across the region with more  than 10 sites, including four major campuses.    The primary campus is located in Albany, with additional campuses in Denmark, Mount Barker and  Katanning. All hinterland campuses offer a broad range of qualifications, as well as professional  and skills development courses to suit local community and business needs. Each year, over 300  nationally accredited qualifications are offered, from Certificate to Advanced Diploma level, and  university pathways. The College’s student population exceeds 6 000, with student numbers steadily  increasing over recent years.    Great Southern TAFE’s qualifications are structured within five key delivery areas:  • Business and Creative Industries  • Social Sciences  • Trade and Industry Skills  • Primary Production and Natural Resource Management  • TAFE Business Centre    Alternative study options are made available through external studies, delivery and assessment in the  workplace, Recognition of Prior Learning and through a blended delivery approach that offers  convenience and flexibility.    The College manages and delivers approximately 1.15 million Student Contact Hours (SCH)  throughout Western Australia. These hours are spread over programmes won under competitive  tendering arrangements, Western Australian Training  and Workforce Development “profile”  funded programmes, traineeships and apprenticeships, Vocational Education and Training (VET) in  schools, and auspicing programmes.    Great Southern TAFE provides vocational education and training products within the Australian  Qualification Framework (AQF), consisting of training packages and courses that are accredited with the  Training Accreditation Council (TAC). The College offers a range of qualifications from Certificate to  Advanced Diploma , University pathways and customised Fee for Service training.       

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

14


A Customer Service Centre operates at the Albany campus which amalgamates all student services  into one centralised and easily accessible facility. Student services include:  •  Well‐equipped, modern facilities  •  Accommodation services  •  Professional career guidance  •  External delivery centre  •  Skills recognition/Recognition of Prior  •  Free internet and email access  Learning  •  Career and employment services  •  Disability Liaison Officer  • Free counselling service  •  Library Resource Centre  • Literacy and numeracy support for  •  Student café  student success.  •  Student recreation area  Additional Services  Great Southern TAFE also offers a wide range of specialised services including:  •  Workforce Development  •  Risk Management  •  Workplace Training and assessment  •  Corporate Training  •  Apprenticeships and Traineeships  •  Industry Consultancy    Student Profile  2009    Total student numbers =  6044  47% female students    53% male students  8% of students are Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander origin  7% of students have reported a disability  Median Age = 33  Age  15‐24  25‐45  46 + 

%  40%  35%  25% 

Delivery Level  Certificate I  Certificate II  Certificate III  Certificate IV  Diploma and above 

%  14%  18%  40%  17%  10% 

 

  The use of the word 'Aboriginal ' throughout this document respectfully refers to   Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia  The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

Page | 15 15


Directorate Reports  Corporate Services Directorate  Role and Function  Corporate Services provides college‐wide support in the areas of Finance, Human Resources, Facilities  and Services, Information Technology and Records Management.  Challenges  The new lecturers’ agreement offering staff flexible hours was taken up by 36 per cent of lecturers.  Achievements  The $1.5 million workshop development was the biggest project signed off for the year. Stage one for  automotive trades was built by local firm Tectonics Construction Group and was completed at the end of  2009. Stage two consists of refurbishment to other trades workshops and is scheduled for completion by  the end of 2010.  Federal funding of $2.395 million was received through the Training Infrastructure Investment for  Tomorrow (TIIFT) programme towards a Primary Industry relocation project costed at nearly $3 million,  of which the college provided $600,000.  This will fund relocation of wool classing and aquaculture workshops, classrooms and offices to  consolidate Primary Industry delivery. Vacated buildings will be refurbished to meet sustained growth in  demand for training in personal services and commercial services.  The tender for stage one of the wool classing and aquaculture has closed. Stage two–the relocation of  offices and classrooms – is currently in the marketplace.  Both stages are deemed to be on track for completion at the end of June 2010. Stages three and four,  the refurbishment of C and B Blocks (Primary Industries and Trades) are presently being drawn up by  local architects Howard and Heaver.  Work was started on the core network upgrade project with funding through the State Government’s  Better TAFE Facilities (BTF) programme. This is a duplication of the network systems to enable disaster  recovery should the system at one site be damaged.  Other achievements of the Corporate Services directorate are detailed in the section dealing with  disclosures and legal compliance.  The Year Ahead  Relocation of other trades following the opening of the purpose‐built automotive workshop will  continue in 2010.  Other major projects continue under the BTF and TIIFT programmes.   Under the Better TAFE Facilities funding, the most significant project is an upgrade to Albany campus  roadways, car parks , concrete paths and a new car park construction in lower D Block. These works are  valued at approximately $400,000. In addition there is a re‐roofing project for D Block valued at  $200,000 as well as renovation to the storage areas of at the rear of the TAFE Café. There will be a new  accessible toilet built in B Block and new gas units installed in D Block to replace an ageing and energy  inefficient boiler. 

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

16


A new transportable building will be supplied to the Denmark campus (valued at $150,000)  and an  extension to the Mount Barker demountable for an external art work area ($40,000).  Trim Context, a new record management system, will be introduced throughout the College in 2010. 

Performance and Review  Role and function  Performance and Review provides academic support to delivery areas and is responsible for ensuring  compliance with various standards including the Australian Quality Training Framework (AQTF),  Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF), The VET Fees and Charges Policy and state and federal  legislation as is applies to student records management and privacy.  Challenges  In 2009, without major external events scheduled, Performance and Review largely had a year of  consolidation. Major system implementations were worked on but with an expected delivery of 2010.  A major challenge (and achievement) for the year was the centralised support for Recognition of Prior  Learning (RPL), with the appointment of a new administrative coordinator for the process.  Achievements  RPL delivery increased spectacularly across the college in 2009 thanks to a centralised coordinated  process in Performance and Review. The RPL leader provided a single point for process management  and provided professional development, revised processes and policies and resources for the  administration of RPL.  The directorate also made significant progress in the risk management processes for the college. In 2009  the College adopted a new approach based on RiskCover’s risk management model and guidelines.  Strategic risk was identified and assessed, and critical success factors identified for all key activities in  the College. There has been considerable assessment of operational risk in 2009 which is expected to be  completed in 2010.  Performance and Review continued to support sections in their compliance with the AQTF in 2009.  Although there was no external audit the section supported a growth in the scope of registration to 316  qualifications through advice and coaching to delivery teams on audit‐ready documentation, internal  audits, advice on moderation and validation processes, development of exemplars for key  documentation and participation in professional development around AQTF issues.  A new deliverable from Performance and Review in 2009 was the Sustainability (Green Skills) Policy and  Action Plan. The Sustainability policy developed by Great Southern TAFE was presented to other  regional TAFE colleges and accepted as policy for the seven regional colleges. Work will continue in 2010  to deploy a Diploma of Sustainability programme which will equip lecturing staff to include elements of  sustainability into their core unit delivery. 

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

17


The section also continued to support the College in the arrangement and management of key  community events including the college Awards Night and the Careers Expo. The expo was well attended  in 2009 with very positive feedback from both exhibitors and students. Eight hundred and fifty students  attended from 10 schools as far away as Katanning and Kojonup. This event has developed into a key  opportunity for providing secondary school students with information and introduction into a variety of  careers and job opportunities.  The College developed a new website in 2009 using new technology made available from the  Department of Education and Training. This system was released in 2009 and work in 2010 will ensure  seamless external electronic communications and customer relationships management.  The directorate is responsible for supporting external delivery in the college including correspondence‐ based delivery and training within Pardelup and Albany Regional Prison. In 2009, prisons activity  increased  aided by the delivery of new courses including a pre‐apprenticeship course in metals,  builder’s registration qualifications and WorkSafe ticketed courses in the work camps in the region. The  College also participated in a post‐release employment and training expo for the Ministry of Justice.  Through this event the college developed pre‐release programmes for prisoners, provided career advice  for post‐release and produced academic portfolios for prisoners who, within the Corrective Services  transfer system, had attained competencies from a number of colleges.  The Library Resource Centre continued to develop relevant digital resources, including the ClickView  video delivery software. The centre continues to improve the way in which it can accommodate  students, including planning for additional computer‐based study areas, particularly for group‐based  study. There was a significant increase in resource loans and patron numbers in 2009.  Performance and Review’s responsibility for the enhancement of delivery through professional  development of lecturing staff was acquitted through an improved approach to the delivery of  Certificate IV Training and Assessment; development and implementation of an induction and  mentoring process for staff; development of Recognition of Prior Learning assessor resources and the  development of a self‐paced programme for the Diploma of Training and Assessment.  Performance and Review completed a report on the Disability Action and Inclusion Plan Implementation  Plan 2008 – 2009 which was provided to the Disability Services Commission in July 2009.  Great Southern TAFE continues to work collaboratively with community agencies to support the  inclusion of people with disabilities through Second Click Computer Literacy classes and the Lifestyle +  programme.  The following sponsors of the Lifestyle+ programme provided invaluable support:  Alison  Armstrong; Indigo’s; Koster’s Steel Construction Pty Ltd and Smith Thornton Accountants.  Other achievements in the Disability support area are included later in the report under the heading  “Disability Access and Inclusion Plan Outcomes”. 

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

18


The Year Ahead  In 2010 Performance and Review will focus on continuing to provide high quality and relevant support to  the academic areas of the College.  A large number of lecturer‐focussed systems are due to be implemented including Lecturer Portal and a  new Delivery Planning System.  Internal audit will be a focus in 2010 as the College prepares to evaluate its processes against the AQTF  2010 Business Excellence Standards as well as the Office of Public Sector Standards good governance  principles.  Through end‐of‐year reporting in 2009, the section has already identified efficiencies that will make  external and internal performance management simpler and more transparent for responsible staff  within the organization.  A planned restructure of the college, specifically in the administrative areas will give Performance and  Review an opportunity to ensure that results are maximised in this area for sustainable effort and  outcomes. 

Research and Planning  Role and Function  Research and Planning is responsible for management of:  • • • •

VET in Schools delivery  Aboriginal Programs South  Duty of Care for Minors policy  UniLink articulation agreements between Great Southern TAFE and universities 

The Directorate provides advice to Corporate Executive on economic trends and policies impacting on  delivery of VET in the Great Southern region.  Achievements  VET in Schools  In 2009 Great Southern TAFE delivered VET to 15 schools across 28 qualifications. The College now  offers 10 distinct programme streams for students who elect to undertake VET qualifications while  continuing their participation in secondary schooling:  • • • • • •

Engagement programmes   TryTech (career development)  School Apprenticeship Link  School Based Traineeships  School Based Apprenticeships  Aboriginal School Based Traineeships 

• • • •

VET in Schools delivery  Auspiced delivery  TAFELink (higher level qualification  pathway)  Dual enrolment programmes 

The use of the word 'Aboriginal ' throughout this document respectfully refers to   Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia  The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

Page | 19 19


In 2009 more than 750 students were enrolled in VETiS programmes offered through Great Southern  TAFE.  Great Southern TAFE successfully lobbied the Curriculum Council to change the policy which previously  excluded dual‐enrolled students from counting a TAFE qualification towards their WACE. This policy  change took place on 1 April. As a consequence, more than 70 students are now studying at Great  Southern TAFE under a ‘dual enrolment’. These students were enrolled in qualifications ranging from  Certificate I to Certificate IV, attending TAFE from one to three days a week while also attending high  school on a part‐time arrangement.  The TryTech programme provides Year 10 students with exposure to the broad range of qualifications  available at TAFE. This has been an extremely popular programme with students, parents and schools.  Three TryTech programmes were offered in 2009. Try Tech explores a range of career options by using  training to expose students to the range of skills, tasks and expectations across a broad range of trade‐ related jobs. Delivery, while focusing on engaging aspects of the field of training undertaken, and being  primarily practical in nature, also includes relevant aspects of literacy and numeracy as required of  employees in the workplace or in training.    The TAFELink programme offers students the opportunity to undertake higher level VET qualifications as  part of their WACE and provides students with an alternative entry pathway to university. In 2009 Curtin  University signed a formal letter of understanding with Great Southern TAFE recognising the TAFELink  pathway as a regional equity strategy.  Aboriginal Programs  In consultation with the Aboriginal community, Great Southern TAFE has changed nomenclature from  ‘Indigenous’ to ‘Aboriginal’.  In 2009 Great Southern TAFE reviewed delivery to Aboriginal students. While the College continues to  meet government targets for Aboriginal participation in training, the region continues to experience low  levels of Aboriginal labour force participation and high levels of Aboriginal unemployment. A key  outcome of this review has been the development of an Aboriginal Training Strategy 2010 – 2013  Kadadjiny Noongar Moort (Learning Noongar People). This strategy is aligned to the West Australian  government’s plan ‘Training WA’.    To address the continuing gap between Aboriginal and non‐Aboriginal labour market engagement the  Aboriginal Training Strategy 2010 – 2013 Kadadjiny Noongar Moort sets aspirational targets for Great  Southern TAFE VET delivery to Aboriginal students. These targets reflect the broader COAG goals of  closing the gap between Aboriginal and non‐Aboriginal students.  In 2009 the Great Southern TAFE continued to work in partnership with the Aboriginal community,  schools and other service providers to secure employment outcomes for Aboriginal students enrolled 

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

20


with the College. During 2009 more than 50 students have successfully secured employment as a result  of initiatives that have included:  •

Partnering with the group training organisation Skill Hire to deliver the Building Foundations  Program.  Two programmes were delivered to 15 participants, with eight securing employment.  • Responding to opportunities for employment identified by Wanslea Child Care Services, and  delivering qualifications in early childhood studies and the Certificate of Teacher’s Assistant in  the Upper Great Southern. This has led to five Aboriginal people being employed.  • Supporting the Southern Aboriginal Corporation workforce development plan by delivering the  Certificate IV Community Services qualification to six employees. All training was delivered on  the job.  • Delivering short course training for WorkSafe tickets to more than 100 Aboriginal jobseekers by  securing funding through the DEEWR STEP‐ERS programme.   • The DEEWR STEP‐ERS programme has funded the delivery of a higher level of training and skill  development in the wool harvesting for Aboriginal students who had previously undertaken  shearing/shed hand training in 2008.  As a result, 10 students have been employed with local  shearing contractors.    Of the 19 Aboriginal students graduating from Year 12 in 2009, six also graduated with a full VET  qualification contributing to their WACE.  UniLink  In 2009 Great Southern TAFE continued to develop articulation agreements with universities. These  agreements provide graduates from higher‐level VET qualifications with a pathway into an  undergraduate degree programme.  All Great Southern TAFE qualifications at Diploma or Advanced Diploma are now complemented by a  formal agreement with one or more universities. These agreements specify the amount of advanced  standing a graduate of Great Southern TAFE can claim.  Both UniLink and TAFELink support the Great Southern TAFE strategies to increase the number of  students studying higher level qualifications, and are strategies that align to the recommendations of  the Bradley Review into Higher Education.  The Year Ahead  Western Australia is leading the recovery from the global financial crisis, and it is probable that the  regional labour market will come under increased pressure as major resource projects such as Gorgon  increase production. Early indications are that several projects in the Great Southern region which have  been on hold are also likely to be restarted; in particular the re‐opening of the Ravensthorpe nickel  operation is forecast to occur in late 2010.  The release of the Bradley Review into Higher Education has resulted in Commonwealth government  endorsement of the 40:20 targets – 40% of the population to have Bachelor degree qualifications and  20% of university enrolments to come from students with a lower socio‐economic index. Maintaining  the integrity of industry‐based qualifications while ensuring that articulation pathways are available to 

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

21


graduates of Great southern TAFE will need to accommodate policy developments resulting from the  Bradley review.   The Aboriginal Training Strategy 2010 – 2013 Kadadjiny Noongar Moort will provide Great Southern  TAFE with a clearer focus on training for employment and this is particularly timely given changes to  welfare arrangements which included the abolition of CDEP in 2009, and may in the future extend to  quarantining of welfare payments.   

Business Development   Role and Function  The Business Centre delivers an extensive range of short courses to individuals and the government and  corporate sectors.  Courses can be customised to meet specific needs or chosen from the existing product range.  In addition to these skills development programmes, the Business Centre provides lifestyle courses,  consultancy services, workforce development options and international student recruitment and  support services.  Challenges  The Business Centre faced significant challenges at the beginning of 2009 with the global economic crisis  impacting on organisations’ ability to fund training.  Two large clients – BHP Nickel at Ravensthorpe and Rio Tinto’s Argyle Diamonds division – suspended  training activity while they assessed the impact of the downturn.  These decisions led the Business Centre to quickly identify alternative markets in order to maintain  staffing levels and ensure market share was retained.  The Business Centre’s work on the Southdown magnetite project for Grange Resources had significant  potential but this project was put on hold while Grange took stock of its position in the global economy.  With the failure of some major companies in the plantation industry, the Business Centre found  solutions for people retrenched from the industry and those in related industries also impacted by these  retrenchments.  Achievements  As the year progressed and it became clear the downturn was not as severe as economic indicators had  predicted, the Business Centre moved into new markets while also focusing on positioning itself for  growth in 2010‐11.  The centre secured funding for Aboriginal training, allowing staff to develop creative programmes for  Aboriginal people.  Partnerships with government agencies Landgate International and AGWEST International were also  progressed. The Business Centre hosted the first study tour of Landgate International’s Vietnamese 

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

22


Fellowship programme and provided English language training for a group of Libyan students through  AGWEST International.  The Centre also started discussions with the City of Albany about assisting with the development and  implementation of workforce planning models.  Working with the timber industry, the Business Centre implemented a skills assessment programme to  help those affected by the closures.  While new business went some way towards making up for the loss of major projects, some former  business relationships were re‐established. Rio Tinto’s withdrawal from all but their core business at the  beginning of the year was relaxed once the impact of the global economy became clearer and the  Business Centre renegotiated a contract with the company’s Argyle Diamonds division.  The centre has also reinforced ties with Kalgoorlie, Pilbara and Kimberley TAFE centres to support their  ability to train in mining.  The Year Ahead  Recently revamped, the Great Southern TAFE website is critical for the centre to grow business and also  to develop an international presence. As the Business Centre plans new ways of working, the website is  an important marketing tool and is expected to pay significant dividends from 2010.  The Business Centre is identifying new local markets for high‐risk earthmoving training.   Recognising the benefits of forming solid relationships with larger companies, staff are also looking at  increasing training partnerships such as the centre already has with Argyle Diamonds.  The appointment of a Business Relationship Officer will facilitate promotion of the Business Solutions  Program for small business. This programme includes a ‘health check’ consultation with the client to  assess the expertise already present, identify areas for growth and development and negotiate training.  In turn, the client is better prepared to attract and retain new business.  Landgate International is poised to extend its association with the Business Centre and the first of four  proposed fellowship visits will be held in May. The group will comprise Vietnamese forestry workers.  Setbacks with Grange Resources’ Southdown magnetite mining project in 2009 have now been resolved  and the Business Centre continues to be represented on a committee convened by the Great Southern  Development Commission to assist the company to bring the project to fruition. 

 

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

23


Business and Creative Industries  Role and Function  To provide training for individuals and workforce development in the following areas    • Visual Art  • Financial Services  • Management  • Arts Administration  • Occupational Health and Safety  • Photo‐imaging Graphic Design  • Business/Office Administration  • Media  • Small Business Management  • Music  • Retail  • Information Technology   Challenges  The key challenges facing the Business and Creative Industries portfolio in 2009 fall into three areas:   flexibility/options, pathways and enterprise development.  The portfolio will expand its services to ensure segments of the market that cannot participate in  traditional class‐based delivery can be catered for.  In addition, the traditional services need to be very  adaptable to ensure pathways and choices are available, especially to some of the new arrangements  available now to upper school students seeking alternative pathways to achieve their WACE and  possible entrance to university.  With the training focus firmly now on training and workforce development, those enterprises seeking to  create a training culture need an effective and proactive partner to assist them.  Achievements  Business and Creative Industries realised some substantial achievements in 2009.  A major focus on skills  recognition as part of the “skilled workforce” TrainingWA strategy saw Business and Creative Industries  develop tools and resources and promote several qualifications.  In the financial services sector, taxation  legislation is changing to encompass the services of the bookkeeping industry.  Great Southern TAFE  positioned itself to provide recognition services of the many bookkeepers in the region and over twenty  clients progressed to their Certificate IV in Financial Services (Bookkeeping) qualification.  A recognised part of the capacity‐building process in regional communities is the promotion and delivery  of cultural activities.  In 2009, the portfolio developed several strategies to meet the TrainingWA  strategies of individual participation in training and support for regional communities, to provide  creative industries training in the hinterland of the Great Southern including visual arts delivery through  small communities surrounding the Mount Barker area, and the development of several new products in  the Denmark region.  One of these new products, the Diploma of Music (Song Writing) is a niche product  that will provide the final highlight to an exceptional pathway for students wishing to develop their  performance and musicianship skills and their creative talent.  Students at the Denmark campus are  being recognised at the WA Music Industry annual awards. 

The use of the word 'Aboriginal ' throughout this document respectfully refers to   Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia  The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

Page | 24 24


The section has developed two significant enterprise partnerships:  The City of Albany is integrating  management programmes across its workforce, and the Forest Products Commission is implementing  skills recognition and gap training in its administrative workforce.  Business and Creative Industries has  worked closely with these two agencies to develop customised programmes, learning resources and  skills recognition tools.  The services delivered so far have been very successful, with more than 20 staff  in the Forest Products Commission receiving qualifications from the Business Services training package.   In 2010, these relationships will be expanded to offer development and progression in management and  administration.  These activities are directly aligned to the “skilled workforce” strategies of TrainingWA.  The Year Ahead  2010 will see the Business and Creative Industries portfolio continue to develop enterprise‐focused  services with interest from two aged care service providers keen to look at management training.  The  relationship with the City of Albany will be expanded and include a variety of services and modes of  delivery including expansion of the successful trial to deliver computing training in situ in the City’s  computer training facility.    The creative industries will also be developing partnerships with high schools, the Vancouver Arts  Centre, regional art galleries and other organisations and agencies to capture as wide a market segment  as possible and promote the unique and diverse range of training options available to people for  creative development. 

Social Sciences Directorate  Role and Function  To provide training for individuals and workforce development in the following areas    • Aged Care  • Teacher’s Assistant  • Disability Work  • Courses for Women   • Youth Work  • Adult Education  • Nursing  • English as a Second Language   • Dental Assistant  • Literacy and Numeracy  • Nutrition and Dietetics  • Languages  • Remedial Massage Therapy  • Auslan  • First Aid  • Sport and Fitness  • Children’s Services  Challenges  A major challenge for the Social Sciences Directorate during 2010 was increased activity by  developing products to maintain competitiveness.  Achievements   An e‐learning tender through the Australian Flexible Learning Framework with WestOne was successful.  This allowed for funds for the development of four units of competence from the new Community  Services Training Package and the Health Training Package on line using Elluminate and other  technologies. Staff were upskilled and the product trialled on learners in Semester 2. This is the first step 

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

25


in making e‐learning a reality in the community services and health industries and will enable the college  to broaden its delivery into the hinterland.  The directorate worked on developing and strengthening its relationship with the Western Australian  Country Health Service Great Southern.  TryTech for Community Services and Health, a combined nursing and dental course for 13 local Year 10  girls was introduced. At the end of the course, two participants chose to follow a career in nursing.  Social Sciences delivered approximately 60,000 SCH more than planned at the start of the year.  Increases have been made in Skills Shortage Institutional delivery (in Community Services, Disability and  Aged Care). New courses such as Allied Health Assistant and Certificate III Nutrition have also  contributed to the growth.  The section has identified several new growth areas for 2010 including a qualification in Child Protection  and Community Development. This ongoing process of responding to the changing needs of the  community through extensive delivery networks allows the section to maintain growth and achieve  targets.  In line with community demand and government targets, the section increased RPL services with major  increases in the area of Children’s Services, Career Development, Aged Care and Allied Health. For  example, 10 students have completed the RPL process for the Certificate IV of Allied Health run on site  at Clarence Estate, the latest undertaking in the Clarence Estate/TAFE partnership. They will now  proceed with gap training with expected graduation to occur in 2010.   A campaign is planned to address the RPL needs of unqualified teacher assistants in the region.  In Katanning, 14 students graduated in Aged Care at Certificate III and IV level, and a similar number  graduated as teacher assistants. Students completing the Certificate IV Education Assistant in Katanning  are all employed. One Aboriginal graduate intends to continue on to teacher training. These teacher  assistant programmes have been successful in Katanning and continue to see strong interest in re‐ enrolments.  A regional lecturer is now trained, allowing for more cost‐effective delivery with less reliance on Albany  staff.  Seven Aboriginal students graduated from a work‐based project for workers at the Southern Aboriginal  Corporation. This completion assisted the college to meet targets for Aboriginal participation and also  provided the community with a well‐skilled team able to support Aboriginal people in the community  services area.  The course used a range of flexible and innovative methods to assist students to succeed, including the  customised design of assessments to match work tasks and ongoing mentoring to motivate and support  students achieve this higher level qualification.  Another seven Southern Aboriginal Corporation students went on to graduate at a higher level with  Certificate IV in Mental Health. 

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

26


The Year Ahead  English as a Second Language started with 80 students from diverse ethical backgrounds in Katanning,  and will be continued in 2010.  This delivery, in partnership with Polytechnic West and the local Migrant Resource Centre, is  strengthening training services to regional communities. However, hard ceilings on delivering Certificate  I are a challenge to continuing this delivery. 

Primary Industries and Natural Resource Management  Role and Function  To provide training for individuals and workforce development in the following areas    • Agriculture  • Winemaking  • Forestry  • Shearing  • Conservation and Land Management  • Shedhanding  • Horticulture  • Wool Classing  • Organic Horticulture  • Wool Handling   • Tourism  • Aquaculture  • Viticulture    Challenges  Implementation of the lecturers’ flexible agreement and the implementation of workplace training  presented their own set of challenges to the Primary Industries and NRM Directorate in 2009.  With the uncertainty caused by the global economic crisis early in the year, attention and energy were  directed to meeting the diverse needs of the meat processing industries in the Great Southern— WAMMCO in Katanning and Fletcher International in Albany.  The low availability of staff for regional delivery is an ongoing problem and the situation did not ease  during the year.   Achievements  In forestry, continuation of the relationship with the Forest Products Commission, including  implementation of higher level courses and Recognition of Prior Learning, has been a major  achievement of the Primary Industries Directorate in 2009.  Technicians at the Forest Products Commission’s large‐scale tree nurseries were assessed for  Recognition of Prior Learning.  Two joint submissions to the Department were successful in gaining funding for development under the  Department’s Workforce and Curriculum Development Grants.  The Directorate has been committed to continuation of the Department’s funding for shedhanding and  shearer training throughout the Great Southern and the South West, with grants totalling $330,000  being made available.  The use of the word 'Aboriginal ' throughout this document respectfully refers to   Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia  The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

Page | 27 27


Additionally, industry funding was secured from the Australian Wool Innovation for delivery of  proficiency workshops for shedhand and shearers throughout the lower half of Western Australia.  Horticulture apprentice training has been made available for industry throughout the Great Southern.  A highlight for the horticulture division was receiving industry support through the Nursery Industry  Association of WA’s quality endorsement of the facility.  The Directorate has continued its work with, and support of, local Noongar groups, including the  development of properties at Redmond, Bluff Creek and Mount Manypeaks. Support has included skills  development and business plan assistance for associated properties.  The Year Ahead  The priority for 2010 will be to formalise a partnership with the National Centre for Dairy Education  Authority (NCDEA) in Melbourne, including delivery of dairy traineeships throughout the South West of  Western Australia.  New courses, such as laboratory skills and Recognition of Prior Learning actions across all study groups,  will be introduced, as will a new tourism course in Events Management.  The Directorate will continue its support of the South West Trout Alliance and the Blackwood Basin  groups for aquaculture expansion.  Support in business development for the Gnowangerup Noongar community will be another priority,  particularly in the production and harvest of quandong nuts.  As part of the completion of a series of capital works projects for primary industries, the Primary  Industries Directorate administration will move from C Block in the main campus buildings to a purpose‐ built facility on the opposite side of Anson Road. 

Trade and Industry Skills Directorate  Role and Function  To provide training for individuals and workforce development in the following areas    • Cabinetmaking  • Electrotechnology  • Carpentry and Joinery  • Residential Drafting  • Metal Fabrication  • Clothing and Textiles  • Plumbing and Gasfitting  • Beauty Therapy and Hairdressing  • Automotive  • Hospitality  • Civil Construction  Challenges   With changes to the VET Act this directorate worked on meeting the requirements with increased  flexibility and responsiveness to industry demands.  

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

28


Industry took on fewer apprentices, so a decline in application numbers was another challenge and  Great Southern TAFE, like the rest of the training system, had its highest number of apprentices out of  contract and studying without employers.  Achievements  The biggest achievement was the completion of the new automotive workshop which was used for  delivery in the fourth term.  The vacant area now allows for the expansion of the Carpentry and Joinery workshop.  Clothing and Textiles lecturer Robyn Wills was nominated for an award for excellence in teaching for the  development of a radio frequency identification device (RFID), a revolutionary learning aid for students  with special needs.  Jodie Remaj developed a hairdressing workplace delivery project guide for employers. Other TAFE  colleges have welcomed and used this skill builder.   Also in hairdressing, the Fastrack project was disseminated to industry and has been useful in other  colleges. This was developed in collaboration with Challenger TAFE, which supplied data.  A greater number of apprentices were picked up from School Apprenticeship Link (SAL), which saw a  high transition to apprenticeships.   The first group of international students achieved the Diploma in Hospitality and 2010 will see an  increased intake of international students.  A Recognition of Prior Learning project was also completed for Certificate III in Roof Plumbing.  The Year Ahead  The creation of a position of Industry Training Consultant will facilitate the implementation of changes  to the VET Act in 2010.  Building projects will continue. The Building and Construction workshop will be extended and  renovations will be continued to improve staff facilities. The metals fabrication workshop and Carpentry  and Joinery areas will also be revamped in 2010.  Development tenders have been completed for two on‐line Moodle learning platforms—one in  automotive and one in plumbing.  

Regional Services Directorate  Role and Function  This Directorate is responsible for the management and administration of Great Southern TAFE’s three  regional campuses and other associated delivery locations outside these campuses.  In conjunction with the delivery directors at the Albany campus, the Directorate manages the relevant  regional profile and fee‐for‐service delivery, as well as Aboriginal programmes. 

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

29


The Director works with local industry, businesses, schools, government departments and communities  to identify and meet training opportunities.  Challenges  Increasing Recognition of Prior Learning at all campuses and boosting traineeships and apprenticeships,  particularly for Aboriginal people, were major challenges during the year.  Government requirements for visa holders to achieve a Certificate in Spoken and Written English (CSWE)  brought a sudden demand for English language delivery in Mount Barker and the multicultural  community of Katanning.  Recruiting lecturers is an on‐going problem in the regional offices.  Achievements  In Katanning, a strong partnership with Community First helped to fill courses and the campus’s  excellent rapport with the Katanning Senior High School continued with good numbers of students  involved in the Vocational Education and Training in Schools (VETiS) programme and TAFElink.  As a  result of these partnerships, opportunities for Aboriginal  people to enrol in higher‐level skills shortage  area courses increased and the number of Aboriginal school‐based traineeships also rose.  Several  TAFElink students received first‐round offers to attend university.  Mount Barker’s art students enjoyed success. Aboriginal Mount Barker artist Barbara Colbung attended  a printmaking workshop in Darwin and held a solo exhibition in Albany.  Faye Williams was chosen to  exhibit a painting in a national exhibition of Aboriginal paintings at the Brisbane Museum.    Mainstream art student Christine Baker, enrolled in the Certificate IV in Visual Arts and Contemporary  Crafts, won the coveted Open Prize in the Katanning Art Prize for her painting Bird Story.  Katanning Art  Prize judge Paul Trinidad said Christine's painting was a clear standout and both judges agreed that  overall, it was the most outstanding piece in the 2009 Katanning Art Prize.  Profile delivery increased to more than 60,000 SCH at the Denmark campus with significant growth in  music. A former Denmark music student, Kris Nelson, received a top‐five nomination in the Western  Australian Music Industry Association (WAMIA) song contest and won the WA song of the year with the  song Era Quondam.  This song was demonstrated at the Denmark campus (the dungeon studio) when  Kris was a student there.  Continued demand for music delivery will see the Diploma in Song Writing run  for the first time at the campus.  In 2009 18.9% of profile was delivered in the region. Big growth areas for enrolments in the regions  were in the Certificate of Spoken and Written English (CSWE), Aged Care, Horticulture and Music.  The  Katanning and Mount Barker campuses responded quickly and efficiently to meet the sudden demand  for delivery in CSWE created by the families of 457 and other visa holders employed at the WAMMCO  and Fletchers Abattoirs.  

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

30


Year Ahead  In Katanning, an application for funding for a trade training centre is being submitted by the Katanning  Senior High School.  If successful the trade training centre will be established on the Katanning campus  by extending the existing trades workshop and students from both the KSHS and TAFE will use the  facility.  A new purpose‐built transportable music room will be placed on the Denmark campus this year and is  expected to be available for use by the start of semester 2.  The Mount Barker Community College development will expand TAFE’s ability to deliver at this campus. 

Significant Issues Affecting the Agency  2009 started with concerns about the Global Financial Crisis (GFC) dominating assessments of demand  for regional VET delivery.   The potential for damage to the regional economy was highlighted by the closure of the BHP‐Billiton  Ravensthorpe Nickel Operation in January and as the year progressed both Great Southern Plantations  and Timbercorp went into administration/receivership.   Indirect effects of the GFC have included a slowdown in consumption as a result of losses experienced  by superannuation funds. This had an impact on employment for school leavers, both in reduced  availability of casual jobs and in a reduction in apprenticeship commencements.  Consistently low prices for wool this decade have reduced sheep stocking levels across the region, and in  2009 Fletcher’s International meat processors (the region’s largest employer) has reduced both  employee numbers and shifts worked. This situation is not expected to improve until 2011.  The Community Development Employment Program (CDEP) ended in July and this has contributed to  increased regional Aboriginal unemployment ‐ estimated at 41% in the last quarter of 2009.  The Children and Community Services Amendment (Reporting Sexual Abuse of Children) Act 2008 came  into effect in January 2009. The responsibility of the College lecturing staff under this Act has yet to be  clarified, and depends on whether VET lecturers are to be classified as teachers for the purpose of  reporting.  One immediate impact of the economic downturn was the reduction in apprenticeship commencements  (although the majority of in‐contract apprentices were retained by their employers). The College  maintained its numbers in employment based training with increased traineeship activity.  Additional funding was provided to the college in 2009 to establish streamlined processes for  Recognition of Prior Learning and to increase the number of competencies achieved via this assessment  only pathway. The processes developed were extremely successful and the College exceeded all targets  and expectations for RPL in 2009. 

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

31


With the introduction on increasing competition in the funding of training in WA, the Great Southern  TAFE has expanded partnerships with businesses and agencies locally and across the state. These  partnerships which provide highly contextualised delivery programmes and workforce development will  help to ensure that in a competitive environment the College will be seen as a provider of choice,  delivering a high quality, customised product.   

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

32


Financial Statements   

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

33


Great Southern TAFE STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2009

2009

2008

$

$

Notes COST OF SERVICES Expenses Employee benefits expense Supplies and services Depreciation and amortisation expense Grants and subsidies Cost of sales Loss on disposal of non-current assets Other expenses Total cost of services

7 8 9 10 15 19 11

13,609,206 4,805,024 758,627 8,058 396,992 19,672 949,600 20,547,179

12,435,727 5,039,261 780,696 41,027 405,632 34,339 898,465 19,635,147

12 13 14 15 16 17 18

1,408,897 1,454,105 255,057 547,149 2,511,419 250,121 196,951

1,033,294 1,286,891 233,565 551,222 262,908 389,031 160,776

Total revenue

6,623,699

3,917,687

Total income other than income from State Government

6,623,699

3,917,687

(13,923,480)

(15,717,460)

15,348,136 658,515 16,006,651

15,180,492 805,398 15,985,890

2,083,171

268,430

Income Revenue Fee for service Student fees and charges Ancillary trading Sales Commonwealth grants and contributions Interest revenue Other revenue

NET COST OF SERVICES INCOME FROM STATE GOVERNMENT Service Appropriation Resources received free of charge Royalties for Regions Fund Total income from State Government

20

SURPLUS/(DEFICIT) FOR THE PERIOD OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME Changes in asset revaluation surplus Gains/losses recognised directly in equity Total other comprehensive income TOTAL COMPREHENSIVE INCOME FOR THE PERIOD

(1,709,938) (1,709,938) 373,233

1,771,100 1,771,100 2,039,530

The Statement of Comprehensive Income should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

34


Great Southern TAFE STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION AS AT 31 DECEMBER 2009 Notes ASSETS Current Assets Cash and cash equivalents Restricted cash and cash equivalents Inventories Receivables Other current assets

Non-Current Liabilities Provisions Total Non-Current Liabilities

7,847,170

5,314,481

25,236,229 192,000 25,428,229

26,997,092 134,649 27,131,741

33,275,399

32,446,222

27 28 29

545,803 1,618,540 99,515 2,263,858

453,039 1,329,078 106,443 1,888,560

28

659,593 659,593

578,947 578,947

2,923,451

2,467,507

30,351,948

29,978,715

2,509,407 10,075,788 17,766,753

2,509,407 11,785,726 15,683,582

30,351,948

29,978,715

25 21

TOTAL LIABILITIES NET ASSETS EQUITY Contributed equity Reserves Accumulated surplus/(deficit)

$

317,960 1,725,247 50,426 463,554 2,757,294

TOTAL ASSETS LIABILITIES Current Liabilities Payables Provisions Other current liabilities Total Current Liabilities

2008

$

5,000,822 2,345,557 51,800 393,705 55,286

31 21,36 22 23 24

Total Current Assets Non-Current Assets Property, plant and equipment Restricted cash and cash equivalents Total Non-Current Assets

2009

30

TOTAL EQUITY

The Statement of Financial Position should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

35


Great Southern TAFE STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2009

2,009 Notes

$

2,008 $

CASH FLOWS FROM STATE GOVERNMENT Service Appropriation - Department of Education

14,268,405

14,182,791

Net cash provided by State Government

14,268,405

14,182,791

(12,099,054)

(11,173,122)

(4,121,310)

(4,197,882)

Utilised as follows: CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES Payments Employee benefits Supplies and services Grants and subsidies

(8,058)

(41,027)

GST payments on purchases

(494,806)

(473,135)

Cost of goods sold

(396,992)

(405,632)

Other payments

(948,348)

(898,010)

Receipts Fee for service

1,394,861

1,018,341

Student fees and charges

1,415,729

1,324,010

255,057

233,565

2,511,419

262,908

Interest received

382,683

258,336

GST receipts on sales

223,018

212,622

GST receipts from taxation authority

271,788

260,513

Sale of goods

545,776

546,652

Other receipts

178,471

Ancillary trading Commonwealth grants and contributions

Net cash provided by/(used in) operating activities

31

(10,889,766)

226,777 (12,845,084)

CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES Proceeds from sale of non-current physical assets

112,418

99,797

Purchase of non-current physical assets

(839,790)

(625,243)

Net cash provided by/(used in) investing activities

(727,372)

(525,446)

Net increase/(decrease) in cash and cash equivalents

2,651,267

812,261

Cash and cash equivalents at begining of period

4,887,112

4,074,851

7,538,379

4,887,112

CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS AT END OF PERIOD

31

The Statement of Cash Flows should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

36


Rows in blue need to be hidden on final print out

Great Southern TAFE STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2009

Contributed Equity

Accumulated Surplus (Deficit)

Reserves

Total Equity

Notes

Balance at 1 January 2008 Changes in accounting policy or correction of prior period errors Restated balance at 1 January 2008 Total comprehensive income for the year Transaction with owners in their capacity as owners Capital contribution Other contribution by owners Distribution to owners Total Balance at 31 December 2008 Changes in accounting policy Restated balance at 1 January 2009

2,415,898

10,014,626

15,415,152

27,845,676

-

-

-

-

2,415,898

10,014,626

15,415,152

27,845,676

-

1,771,100

268,430

2,039,530

93,509 93,509

-

-

93,509 93,509

2,509,407

11,785,726

15,683,582

29,978,715

-

-

-

-

2,509,407

11,785,726

15,683,582

29,978,715

(1,709,938)

2,083,171

373,233

Total comprehensive income for the year

-

Transaction with owners in their capacity as owners Capital contribution Other contribution by owners Distribution to owners Total

-

-

-

-

2,509,407

10,075,788

17,766,753

30,351,948

Balance at 31 December 2009 The Statement of Changes in Equity should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

37


GREAT SOUTHERN TAFE NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2009 1

Australian equivalents to International Financial Reporting Standards (a) General The College's financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2009 have been prepared in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards which include a Framework for the Preparation and Presentation of Financial Statements (the Framework) and the Australian Interpretations. The term Australian Accounting Standards' refers to Standards and Interpretations made by the AASB that apply to any reporting period beginning on or after 1 January 2005 In preparing these financial statements the College has adopted, where relevant to its operations, new and revised Australian Accounting Standards from their operative dates as issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) The Australian Accounting Interpretations are adopted through AASB 1048 'Interpretation and Application of Standards' and are classified into those corresponding to International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) Interpretations and those only applicable in Australia. The AASB has decided to maintain the Statements of Accounting Concepts (SAC 1 and SAC 2) and has continued to revise and maintain accounting standards and the interpretations that are of particular relevance to the Australian environment, especially those that deal more specifically with not-for-profit entity issues and/or do not have an equivalent IASB Standard or IFRIC Interpretation. (b) Early adoption of standards The College cannot early adopt an Australian Accounting Standard unless specifically permitted by Treasurer's Instruction (TI) 1101 'Application of Australian Accounting Standards and Other Pronouncements'. No Australian Accounting Standards that have been issued or amended but are not yet effective have been early adopted by the College for the annual reporting period ended 31 December 2009.

2

Summary of significant accounting policies The following accounting policies have been adopted in the preparation of these financial statements. Unless otherwise stated, these policies are consistent with those adopted in the previous year. (a) General statement The financial statements constitute a general purpose financial statement which has been prepared in accordance with the Australian Accounting Standards, the Framework, Statements of Accounting Concepts and other authoritative pronouncements of the AASB as applied by the TIs. Several of these are modified by the TIs to vary application, disclosure, format and wording. For example, AASB 116 requires land and buildings to be measured at cost or fair value; TI 954 mandates the fair value option. The Financial Management Act and the TIs are legislative provisions governing the preparation of financial statements and take precedence over the Accounting Standards, the Framework, Statements of Accounting Concepts and other authoritative pronouncements of the AASB. Where modification is required and has a material or significant financial effect upon the reported results, details of that modification and the resulting financial effect are disclosed in the notes to the financial statements. Modifications or clarifications to accounting standards through the TIs are to provide certainty and to ensure consistency and appropriate reporting across the public sector. (b) Basis of preparation The financial statements have been prepared on the accrual basis of accounting using the historical cost convention, modified by the revaluation of land, buildings and infrastructure which have been measured at fair value. The accounting policies adopted in the preparation of the financial statements have been consistently applied throughout all periods presented unless otherwise stated. The financial statements are presented in Australian dollars and all values are rounded to the nearest dollar ($). The judgements that have been made in the process of applying the College’s accounting policies that have the most significant effect on the amounts recognised in the financial statements are disclosed at note 4 ‘Judgements made by management in applying accounting policies’. The key assumptions made concerning the future, and other key sources of estimation uncertainty at the end of the reporting period that have a significant risk of causing a material adjustment to the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities within the next financial year, are disclosed at note 5 ‘Key sources of estimation uncertainty’. (c) Reporting entity The reporting entity comprises the College and entities listed at note 40 ‘Related bodies’. (d) Contributed equity AASB Interpretation 1038 ‘Contributions by Owners Made to Wholly-Owned Public Sector Entities’ requires transfers, other than as a result of a restructure of administrative arrangements, in the nature of equity contributions to be designated by the Government (the owner) as contributions by owners (at the time of, or prior to, transfer) before such transfers can be recognised as equity contributions. Capital contributions (appropriations) are designated as contributions by owners per TI 955 'Contributions by Owners Made to Wholly Owned Public Sector Entities' and have been credited directly to Contributed Equity. Transfer of net assets to/from other agencies, other than as a result of a restructure of administrative arrangements, are designated as contributions by/ distributions to owners to where the transfers are non-discretionary and non-reciprocal. See note 30 'Equity'. Repayable capital appropriations are recognised as liabilities. See Note 20 ‘Income from State Government’ for further commentary on the application of TI 955. Transfers of net assets to/from other agencies as a result of a restructure of administrative arrangements are to be accounted for as distributions to owners and contributions to owners respectively. Refer to Note 30 ‘Equity”

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

38


GREAT SOUTHERN TAFE NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2009 (e) Income Revenue recognition Revenue is measured at the fair value of consideration received or receivable. The majority of operating revenue of the College represents revenue earned from student fees and charges, fee for service, ancillary services, trading activities and Commonwealth grants and contributions. Sale of goods Revenue is recognised from the sale of goods and disposal of other assets when the significant risks and rewards of ownership control transfer to the purchaser and can be measured reliably. Rendering of services Revenue is recognised on delivery of the service to the client or by reference to the stage of completion of the transaction. Interest Revenue is recognised as the interest accrues. The effective interest method which is the rate that exactly discounts estimated future cash receipts through the expected life of the financial asset to the net carrying amount of the financial asset, is used where applicable. Grants, donations, gifts and other non-reciprocal contributions Revenue is recognised at fair value when the College obtains control over the assets comprising the contributions, usually upon their receipt. Other non-reciprocal contributions that are not contributions by owners are recognised at their fair value. Contributions of services are only recognised when a fair value can be reliably determined and the services would be purchased if not donated. Where contributions recognised as revenues during the reporting period were obtained on the condition that they be expended in a particular manner or used over a particular period, and those conditions were undischarged as at the end of the reporting period, the nature of, and amounts pertaining to, those undischarged conditions are disclosed in the notes. State funds The funds received from the Department of Education in respect of the delivery of services forming part of the Delivery Performance Agreement are included in State funds, disclosed under 'Income from State Government'. They are the result of training successfully tendered for under competitive tendering arrangements. This revenue is recognised at nominal value in the period in which the College meets the terms of the Agreement. See note 20 'Income from State Government'. Gains Gains may be realised or unrealised and are usually recognised on a net basis. These include gains arising on the disposal of non-current assets and some revaluations of non-current assets. (f) Property, plant and equipment Capitalisation/Expensing of assets Items of property, plant and equipment costing $5,000 or more are recognised as assets and the cost of utilising assets is expensed (depreciated) over their useful lives. Items of property, plant and equipment costing less than $5,000 are recognised as an expense in the Statement of Comprehensive Income (other than where they form part of a group of similar items which are significant in total). Initial recognition and measurement All items of property, plant and equipment and infrastructure are initially recognised at cost. For items of property, plant and equipment and infrastructure acquired at no cost or for nominal cost, the cost is their fair value at the date of acquisition. Subsequent measurement After recognition as an asset, the revaluation model is used for the measurement of land and buildings and the cost model for all other property, plant and equipment. Land and buildings are carried at fair value less accumulated depreciation on buildings and accumulated impairment losses. All other items of property, plant and equipment are stated at historical cost less accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses. Where market-based evidence is available, the fair value of land and buildings is determined on the basis of current market buying values determined by reference to recent market transactions . When buildings are revalued by reference to recent market transactions, the accumulated depreciation is eliminated against the gross carrying amount of the asset and the net amount restated to the revalued amount. Where market-based evidence is not available, the fair value of land and buildings is determined on the basis of existing use. This normally applies where buildings are specialised or where land use is restricted. Fair value for existing use assets is determined by reference to the cost of replacing the remaining future economic benefits embodied in the asset, i.e. the depreciated replacement cost. Where the fair value of buildings is dependent on using the depreciated replacement cost, the gross carrying amount and the accumulated depreciation are restated proportionately. Independent valuations of land and buildings are provided annually by the Western Australian Land Information Authority (Landgate) and recognised on 31 December, 2009 withsufficient regularity to ensure that the carrying amount does not differ materially from the asset's fair value at the end of the reporting period. The most significant assumptions in estimating fair value are made in assessing whether to apply the existing use basis to assets and in determining estimated useful life. Professional judgement by the valuer is required where the evidence does not provide a clear distinction between market type assets and existing use assets. Refer to note 25 'Property, plant and equipment' for further information on revaluations.

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

39


GREAT SOUTHERN TAFE NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2009 Depreciation All non-current assets having a limited useful life are systematically depreciated over their estimated useful lives in a manner which reflects the consumption of their future economic benefits. Land is not depreciated. Depreciation on other assets is calculated on the straight line method over its useful life, using rates which are reviewed annually. Estimated useful lives for each class of depreciable asset are: Buildings 40 to70 years Motor vehicles, caravans and trailers 4 to 15 years Plant, furniture and general equipment 5 to 15 years Computing, communications and software (a) 4 to 15 years (a)

Software that is integral to the operation of related hardware.

(g) Impairment of assets Property, plant and equipment, and intangible assets are tested for any indication of impairment at the end of each reporting period. Where there is an indication of impairment, the recoverable amount is estimated. Where the recoverable amount is less than the carrying amount, the asset is considered impaired and is written down to the recoverable amount and an impairment loss is recognised. As the College is a not-for-profit entity, unless an asset has been identified as a surplus asset, the recoverable amount is the higher of an asset’s fair value less costs to sell and depreciated replacement cost. The risk of impairment is generally limited to circumstances where an asset’s depreciation is materially understated, where the replacement cost is falling or where there is a significant change in useful life. Each relevant class of assets is reviewed annually to verify that the accumulated depreciation/amortisation reflects the level of consumption or expiration of assets' future economic benefits and to evaluate any impairment risk from falling replacement costs or a significant change in useful life. Intangible assets with an indefinate useful life and intangible assets not yet available for use are tested for impairment at the end of each reporting period irrespective of whether there is any indication of impairment. The recoverable amount of assets identified as surplus assets is the higher of fair value less costs to sell and the present value of future cash flows expected to be derived from the asset. Surplus assets carried at fair value have no risk of material impairment where fair value is determined by reference to market-based evidence. Where fair value is determined by reference to depreciated replacement cost, surplus assets are at risk of impairment and the recoverable amount is measured. Surplus assets at cost are tested for indications of impairment at the end of each reporting period. See note 26 ‘Impairment of assets’ for the outcome of impairment reviews and testing. See note 2(m) 'Receivables' and note 23 'Receivables' for impairment of receivables. receivables (h) Leases The College has entered into operating lease for printing and photcopying services and seven property leases through out Great Southern region for the delivery of training. For the photocopying and printing services lease the payments are expensed on a rate per copy and property leases are expensed on a straight line basis over the lease term as this represents the pattern of benefits derived from the leased properties. (i) Financial instruments In addition to cash and bank overdraft, the College has two categories of financial instruments: • Loans and receivables; and • Financial liabilities measured at amortised cost These have been disaggregated into the following classes: Financial assets • cash and cash equivalents (including restricted cash and cash equivalents) • receivables • amounts receivable for services • term deposits Financial liabilities • payables Initial recognition and measurement of financial instruments is at fair value. Usually the transaction cost or face value is equivalent to fair value and subsequent measurement is at amortised cost using the effective interest method. The fair value of short-term receivables and payables is the transaction cost or the face value because there is no interest rate applicable and subsequent measurement is not required as the effect of discounting is not material. (j) Cash and cash equivalents For the purpose of the Statement of Cash Flows, cash and cash equivalents include restricted cash and cash equivalents. These are comprised of cash on hand and short-term deposits with original maturities of 12 months or less that are readily convertible to a known amount of cash and which are subject to insignificant risk of changes in value, and bank overdrafts. (k) Accrued salaries The accrued salaries suspense account (see note 21 'Restricted cash and cash equivalents') consists of amounts paid annually into a suspense account over a period of ten financial years to largely meet the additional cash outlay in each eleventh year when 27 pay days occur instead of the normal 26. No interest is received on this account. Accrued salaries (see note 27 'Payables') represent the amount due to staff but unpaid at the end of the financial year, as the end of the last pay period for that financial year does not coincide with the end of the financial year. Accrued salaries are settled within a fortnight of the financial year end. The College considers the carrying amount of accrued salaries to be equivalent to its net fair value.

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

40


GREAT SOUTHERN TAFE NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2009 (l) Inventories Inventories are measured at the lower of cost and net realisable value. Costs are assigned by the method most appropriate to each particular class of inventory, with the majority being valued on a first in first out basis. Inventories not held for resale are valued at cost unless they are no longer required, in which case they are valued at net realisable value. See note 22 'Inventories'. (m) Receivables Receivables are recognised and carried at original invoice amount less an allowance for any uncollectible amounts (impairment). The collectability of receivables is reviewed on an ongoing basis and any receivables identified as uncollectible are written off against the allowance account. The provision for uncollectible amounts (doubtful debts) is raised when there is objective evidence that the College will not be able to collect the debts. The carrying amount is equivalent to fair value as it is due for settlement within 30 days. See note 2(i) ‘Financial instruments’ and note 23 ‘Receivables’. A provision for impairment of receivables can only be raised if there is objective evidence of impairment. (n) Payables Payables are recognised at the amounts payable when the College becomes obliged to make future payments as a result of a purchase of assets or services. The carrying amount is equivalent to fair value, as they are generally settled within 30 days. See note 2(i) ‘Financial instruments’ and note 27 'Payables'. (o) Provisions Provisions are liabilities of uncertain timing and/or amount and are recognised where there is a present legal, equitable or constructive obligation as a result of a past event and when the outflow of resources embodying economic benefits is probable and a reliable estimate can be made of the amount of the obligation. Provisions are reviewed at the end of each reporting period. See note 28 ‘Provisions’. (i) Provisions - employee benefits Annual leave and long service leave The liability for annual and long service leave expected to be settled within twelve months after the reporting period is recognised and measured at the undiscounted amounts expected to be paid when the liabilities are settled. Annual and long service leave expected to be settled more than twelve months after the reporting period is measured at the present value of amounts expected to be paid when the liabilities are settled. Leave liabilities are in respect of services provided by employees up to the end of the reporting period. When assessing expected future payments consideration is given to expected future wage and salary levels including non-salary components such as employer superannuation contributions. In addition, the long service leave liability also considers the experience of employee departures and periods of service. service The expected future payments are discounted using market yields at the end of the reporting period on national government bonds with terms to maturity that match, as closely as possible, the estimated future cash outflows. A liability for long service leave is recognised after an employee has completed four years of service. An actuarial assessment of long service leave undertaken by Price Waterhouse Actuaries at 2009 determined that the liability measured using the short hand method was not materially different from the liability measured using the present value of expected future payments. The shorthand method is compliant with AASB 119 'Employee Benefits'. All annual leave and unconditional long service leave provisions are classified as current liabilities as the College does not have an unconditional right to defer settlement of the liability for at least twelve months after the reporting period. Superannuation The Government Employees Superannuation Board (GESB) in accordance with legislative requirements administers public sector superannuation arrangements in WA. Employees may contribute to the Pension Scheme, a defined benefit pension scheme now closed to new members or the Gold State Superannuation (GSS) Scheme, a defined benefit lump sum scheme also closed to new members. Both schemes are administered by the Government Employees Superannuation Scheme (GESB). The College has no liabilities for superannuation charges under those schemes, as the liabilities for the unfunded Pension Scheme and the unfunded GSS Scheme transfer benefits due to members who transferred from the Pension Scheme, are assumed by the Treasurer. All other GSS Scheme obligations are funded by concurrent contributions made by the College to the GESB. The concurrently funded part of the GSS Scheme is a defined contribution scheme as these contributions extinguish all liabilities in respect of the concurrently funded GSS Scheme obligations. Employees commencing employment prior to 16 April 2007 who were not members of either the Pension or the GSS Schemes became non-contributory members of the West State Superannuation (WSS) Scheme. Employees commencing employment on or after 16 April 2007 became members of the GESB Super (GESBS) Scheme. Both of these schemes are accumulation schemes. The College makes concurrent contributions to GESB on behalf of employees in compliance with the Commonwealth Government’s Superannuation Guarantee (Administration) Act 1992. These contributions extinguish the liability for superannuation charges in respect of the WSS and GESBS Schemes. The GESB makes all benefit payments in respect of the Pension Scheme and the GSS Scheme transfer benefits and is recouped from the Treasurer for the employer's share. See also note 2(p) 'Superannuation expense'. (ii) Provisions - other Employment on-costs Employment on-costs, including workers’ compensation insurance, are not employee benefits and are recognised separately as expenses and liabilities when the employment, to which they relate, has occurred. Employment on-costs are included as part of 'Other expenses' and are not included as part of the College's 'Employee benefits expense’. The related liability is included in 'Employment on-costs provision'. (See note 11 'Other expenses' and note 28 'Provisions'.)

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

41


GREAT SOUTHERN TAFE NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2009 (p) Superannuation expense The superannuation expense in the Statement of Comprehensive Income comprises of employer contributions paid to the GSS (concurrent contributions), the West State Superannuation Scheme (WSS), and the GESB Super Scheme (GESBS). The GSS Scheme is a defined benefit scheme for the purposes of employees and whole-of-government reporting. However, apart from the transfer benefit, it is a defined contribution plan for agency purposes because the concurrent contributions (defined contributions) made by the College to GESB extinguish all of the College's obligations to the related superannuation liability. (q) Resources received free of charge or for nominal cost Resources received free of charge or for nominal cost that can be reliably measured are recognised as income and as assets or expenses, as appropriate, at fair value. (r) Comparative figures Comparative figures are, where appropriate, reclassified to be comparable with the figures presented in the current financial year. 3

Other policies not included in this Model The Model Annual Report for Commercial agencies provides guidance on the disclosure of accounting policies in respect of investments, foreign currency translation derivatives and hedge accounting, and investment property.

4

Judgements made by management in applying accounting policies No significant judgements have been made that would materially alter the current financial results of the College.

5

Key sources of estimation uncertainty The key estimates and assumptions made concerning the future, and other key sources of estimation uncertainty as at the statement of financial position date that have a significant risk of causing a material adjustment to the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities within the next financial year include: Student receivables under 60 days due are considered collectable and a provision is made for the full value for those receivables which are doubtful. General receivables from other government agencies are considered risk free, no provision, and all others are by individual assessment with a provision to the full value if required. I Inventory stocks k ( bookshop b k h and d canteen)) are ordered d d on a jjust in i time i basis b i to matchh current year requirements. i Obsolescence Ob l iis considered id d less than 5% of annual trading purchases and therefore no provision is made. The college has a policy of valuing land and buildings annually. The revaluations of the college's land and buildings is undertaken by Western Australian Land Information Authority (Landgate). Every year estimates of useful life of plant and equipment are provided to give guidance on depreciaton rates used in intervening years. No provision has been made for sick leave as the college's annual costs do not exceed the annual value of entitlements. Included in 'Current - other liabilities' is an Education Training Shared Services Centre (ETSSC) service charge for 2009.

6

Disclosure of changes in accounting policy and estimates Initial application of an Australian Accounting Standard The Authority has applied the following Australian Accounting Standards effective for annual reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2009 that impacted on the Authority: AASB 101 ‘Presentation of Financial Statements’ (September 2007). This Standard has been revised and introduces a number of terminology changes as well as changes to the structure of the Statement of Changes in Equity and the Statement of Comprehensive Income. It is now a requirement that owner changes in equity be presented separately from non-owner changes in equity. There is no financial impact from this application. Review of AAS 27 ‘Financial Reporting by Local Governments’, AAS 29 ‘Financial Reporting by Government Departments’ and AAS 31 ’Financial Reporting by Governments’. The AASB has made the following pronouncements from its short term review of AAS 27, AAS 29 and AAS 31: • • • •

AASB 1004 ‘Contributions’; AASB 1050 ‘Administered Items’; AASB 1051 ’Land Under Roads’; AASB 1052 ‘Disaggregated Disclosures’;

AASB 2007-9 ‘Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from the review of AASs 27, 29 and 31 [AASB 3, AASB 5, AASB 8, AASB 101, AASB 114, AASB 116, AASB 127 & AASB 137];and Interpretation 1038 ‘Contributions by Owners Made to Wholly-Owned Public Sector Entities’. The existing requirements in AAS 27, AAS 29 and AAS 31 have been transferred to the above new and revised topic-based Standards and Interpretation. These requirements remain substantively unchanged. AASB 1050, AASB 1051 and AASB 1052 do not apply to Statutory Authorities. The other Standards and Interpretation make some modifications to disclosures and provide additional guidance (for example, Australian Guidance to AASB 116 ‘Property, Plant and Equipment’ in relation to heritage and cultural assets has been introduced), otherwise there is no financial impact.

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

42


GREAT SOUTHERN TAFE NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2009 AASB 2009-2 ‘Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards – Improving Disclosures about Financial Instruments [AASB 4, AASB 7, AASB 1023 & AASB 1038]’. This Standard amends AASB 7 and will require enhanced disclosures about fair value measurements and liquidity risk with respect to financial instruments. There is no financial impact from this application. DTF considers the following Australian Accounting Standards as not being applicable to the public sector as they have no impact or do not apply to not for profit entities. However, agencies should assess the application of these Australian Accounting Standards according to their own individual circumstances. If the agency determines that any of these Australian Accounting Standards is clearly not applicable to the agency, they should not be included in the above note disclosure. AASB 8 AASB 123

AASB 1039 AASB 1048 AASB 1049 AASB 2007-3 AASB 2007-6 AASB 2007-8 AASB 2008-1 AASB 2008-2 AASB 2009-3 AASB 2008-5 AASB 2008-7 AASB 2008-9 2008 9 AASB 2008-10 AASB 2009-1 AASB 2009-6 Interpretation 13 Interpretation 15 Interpretation 16

‘Operating Segments’ ‘Borrowing Costs’ (June 2007). This Standard has been revised to mandate the capitalisation of all borrowing costs attributable to the acquisition, construction or production of qualifying assets. However, AASB 2009-1 ‘Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards – Borrowing Costs of Not-for-Profit Public Sector Entities [AASB 1, AASB 111 & AASB 123]’ issued in April 2009 and applicable to annual reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2009, amends revised AASB 123, which will allow not-for-profit public sector entities to continue to choose whether to expense or capitalise borrowing costs relating to qualifying assets. The Authority already capitalises borrowing costs directly attributable to buildings under construction, therefore this will not impact on the financial statements when these Standards are first applied. ‘Concise Financial Reports’ (August 2008) ‘Interpretation and Application of Standards’ (issued March 2009) ‘Whole of Government and General Government Sector Financial Reporting’ (revised – October 2007) ‘Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from AASB 8 [AASB 5, AASB 6, AASB 102, AASB 107, AASB 119, AASB 127, AASB 134, AASB 136, AASB 1023 & AASB 1038]’ ‘Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from AASB 123 [AASB 1, AASB 101, AASB 107, AASB 111, AASB 116 & AASB 138 and Interpretations 1 & 12]’ ‘Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from AASB 101’ ‘Amendments to Australian Accounting Standard - Share-based Payments: Vesting Conditions and Cancellations’ ‘Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards – Puttable Financial Instruments and Obligations arising on Liquidation [AASB 7, AASB 101, AASB 132, AASB 139 & Interpretation 2]’ Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards – Embedded Derivatives [AASB 139 & Interpretation 9] ‘Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from the Annual Improvements Project [AASB 5, 7, 101, 102, 107, 108, 110, 116, 118, 119, 120, 123, 127, 128, 129, 131, 132, 134, 136, 138, 139, 140, 141, 1023 &1038]’ ‘Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards – Cost of an Investment in a Subsidiary, Jointly Controlled Entity or Associate [AASB 1, AASB 118, AASB 121, AASB 127 & AASB 136]’ ‘Amendments to AASB 1049 for Consistency with AASB 101’ ‘Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards – Reclassification of Financial Assets [AASB 7 & AASB 139]’ ‘Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards – Borrowing Costs of Not-for-Profit Public Sector Entities [AASB 1, AASB 111 & AASB 123]’ ‘Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards’ and associated ‘Erratum: General Terminology Changes’ ‘Customer Loyalty Programmes’ ‘Agreements for the Construction of Real Estate’ ‘Hedges of a Net Investment in a Foreign Operation’

Voluntary changes in accounting policy There were no changes in accounting policy. Future impact of Australian Accounting Standards not yet operative The College cannot early adopt an Australian Accounting Standard unless specifically permitted by TI 1101 'Application of Australian Accounting Standards and Other Pronoucements'. Consequently, the College has not applied early the following Australian Accounting Standards that have been issued and which may impact the college but are not yet effective. Where applicable, the college plans to apply these Australian Accounting Standards from their application date: Title

Operative for reporting periods

AASB 2008-13 ‘Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from AASB Interpretation 17 – Distributions of Non-cash Assets to Owners [AASB 5 & AASB 110]’. This Standard amends AASB 5 ‘Non-current Assets Held for Sale and Discontinued Operations’ in respect of the classification, presentation and measurement of non-current assets held for distribution to owners in their capacity as owners. This may impact on the presentation and classification of Crown land held by the Authority where the Crown land is to be sold by the Department of Regional Development and Lands (formerly Department for Planning and Infrastructure). The Authority does not expect any financial impact when the Standard is first applied prospectively.

1-Jul-09

DTF considers the following Australian Accounting Standards as either not being applicable to the Authority or adoption of them in future periods will have no impact on the Authority or do not apply to not for profit entities. However, agencies should assess whether these Australian Accounting Standards apply to their own specific circumstances. If the agency considers any of these Australian Accounting Standards are clearly not applicable or will have no impact, they should not be included in the above Note disclosure.

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

43


GREAT SOUTHERN TAFE NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2009 Title

Operative for reporting periods

AASB 3 ‘Business Combinations’ (March 2008)

1-Jul-09

AASB 127 ‘Consolidated and Separate Financial Statements’ (March 2008)

1-Jul-09

AASB 2008-3 ‘Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from AASB 3 and AASB 127 [AASBs 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 101, 107, 112, 114, 116, 121, 128, 131, 132, 133, 134, 136, 137, 138, 139 and Interpretations 9 & 107]’

1-Jul-09

AASB 2008-6 ‘Further Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from the Annual Improvements Project AASB 1 & AASB 5]’

1-Jul-09

AASB 2008-8 ‘Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards – Eligible Hedged Items [AASB 139]’

1-Jul-09

AASB 2008-11 ‘Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards – Business Combinations Among Not-for-Profit Entities [AASB 3]’

1-Jul-09

AASB 2009-4 ‘Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from the Annual Improvements Project [AASB 2 and AASB 138 and AASB Interpretations 9 & 16]’

1-Jul-09

AASB 2009-5 ‘Further Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from the Annual Improvements Project [AASB 5, 8, 101, 107, 117, 118, 136 & 139]’. Under the amendments to AASB 117, leases involving land should be classified as either a finance or operating lease under the general lease guidance in AASB 117. This new requirement is to be applied retrospectively to existing leases unless the necessary information is not available, then it

1-Jan-10

shall be applied on the date of adopting the amendments. AASB 2009-7 ‘Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards [AASB 5, 7, 107, 112, 136 & 139 and Interpretation 17’]

1-Jul-09

AASB 2009-8 ‘Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards – Group Cash-settled Share-based Payment Transactions [AASB 2]’

1-Jan-10

AASB 2009-9 ‘Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards – Additional Exemptions for First- time Adopters

1-Jan-10

Interpretation 17 ‘Distributions of Non-cash Assets to Owners’

1-Jul-09

Interpretation 18 ‘Transfers of Assets from Customers’

1-Jul-09

Changes in Accounting Estimates There have been no changes in accounting estimates.

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

44


Great Southern TAFE NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2009

09GLACT

08GLACT

2009

2008

$ 7 Employee benefits expense Wages and salaries (a) Superannuation - defined contribution plans (b) Long service leave (c) Annual leave (c) Other

$

11,980,862 1,079,730 168,781 174,508 205,325 13,609,206

11,181,604 997,700 87,245 62,498 106,680 12,435,727

907,589 128,161 296,559 1,958,593 689,453 88,368 209,290 258,001 100,554 168,456 4,805,024

738,640 109,999 260,223 2,129,582 1,035,081 39,688 155,345 334,792 140,516 95,395 5,039,261

555,640 43,769 110,105 49,113 758,627

521,173 75,295 103,609 80,619 780,696

(a) Includes the value of the fringe benefit to the employee plus the fringe benefit tax component. (b) Defined contribution plans include West State, and Gold State and GESB Super Scheme (contributions paid). in 2008, the reporting of notional superannuation expense and equivalent notional income has been discontinued. (c) Includes a superannuation contribution component. Employment on-costs such as workers' compensation insurance are included at note 11 'Other expenses'. The employment on-costs liability is included at note 28 'Provisions'. 8

9

Supplies and services Consumables and minor equipment Communication expenses Utilities expenses Consultancies and contracted services Minor works Repairs and maintenance Operating lease and hire charges Travel and passenger transport Advertising and public relations Supplies and services - other

Depreciation and amortisation expense Depreciation Buildings Motor vehicles, caravans and trailers Plant, furniture and general equipment Computers and communication network Total depreciation

10

11

Grants and subsidies Adult and community education organisations Payments to non-TAFE providers for VET service delivery Other

Other expenses Building maintenance Doubtful debts expense Employment on-costs (a) Donations Student prizes and awards Losses and write-offs

109 7,949 8,058

179,098 (2,412) 751,438 1,812 16,001 3,663 949,600

(3,700) 44,727 41,027

188,467 (5,713) 689,111 3,103 17,331 6,166 898,465

(a) Includes workers' compensation insurance and other employment on-costs. The on-costs liability associated with the recognition of annual and long service leave liability is included at note 28 'Provisions'. Superannuation contributions accrued as part of the provision for leave are employee benefits and are not included in employment on-costs. 12

13

14

Fee for service Fee for service - general Fee for service - Department of Education Fee for service - Government (other than Department of Education) International division fees Fee for service - other

Student fees and charges Tuition fees Enrolment fees Resource fees Other college fees

Ancillary trading Live works (not a trading activity) Contracting and consulting Other ancillary revenue

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

547,233 619,250 97,569 133,879 10,966 1,408,897

767,605 206,694 3,145 55,850 1,033,294

868,161 358,216 227,728 1,454,105

759,809 17,637 313,538 195,907 1,286,891

157,457 72,165 25,435 255,057

85,524 130,540 17,501 233,565

45


Great Southern TAFE NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2009

09GLACT

08GLACT

2009

2008

$

$

15 Trading profit/(loss) (a) Bookshop: Sales

168,795

180,278

(44,122) (211,446) (255,569) (46,419) (209,150)

(40,088) (215,634) (255,722) (44,122) (211,600)

Trading profit/(loss) - Bookshop

(40,355)

(31,322)

(b) Cafeteria (non-training related) Sales

365,326

347,733

(6,304) (186,919) (193,223) (5,381) (187,842)

(5,921) (194,415) (200,336) (6,304) (194,032)

177,484

153,701

13,028

23,211

-

-

Cost of sales: Opening inventory Purchases Closing inventory Cost of goods sold

Cost of sales: Opening inventory Purchases Closing inventory Cost of goods sold Trading profit/(loss) - Cafeteria (c) Other trading Sales Cost of sales: Opening inventory Purchases Closing inventory Cost of goods sold

-

-

13,028

23,211

150,157

145,590

611,419 1,900,000 2,511,419

262,908 262,908

250,121

389,031

27,411 59,443 23,629 86,468 196,951

29,216 28,926 26,763 75,871 160,776

(132,090) (132,090)

(153,682) (153,682)

Proceeds from disposal of non-current assets Land Buildings Motor vehicles, caravans and trailers Plant, furniture and general equipment Computers and communication network Total proceeds from disposal of non-current assets

112,368 50 112,418

119,233 110 119,343

Net gain/(loss)

(19,672)

(34,339)

Trading profit/(loss) - Other trading

See note 2(l) 'Inventories' and note 22 'Inventories'. 16 Commonwealth grants and contributions Commonwealth specific purpose grants and contributions (a) Commonwealth capital grants and contributions (b) (a) Commonwealth recurrent grants Commonwealth specific purpose grant (ANTA) C Commonwealth l h specific ifi purpose grant ( non ANTA) (b) Better TAFE Faclities grant

17 Interest revenue Interest revenue (a) (a) Sources Cash at Bank Term Deposits 18 Other revenue Rental and facilities fees Other direct grants and subsidy revenue Sponsorship and donations revenue Miscellaneous revenue

19 Net gain/(loss) on disposal of non-current assets Costs of disposal of non-current assets Land Buildings Motor vehicles, caravans and trailers Plant, furniture and general equipment Computers and communication network Total cost of disposal of non-current assets

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

46


Great Southern TAFE NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2009

09GLACT

08GLACT

2009

2008

$

$

20 Income from State Government State funds (received from Department of Education): Delivery and Performance Agreement (DPA) Superannuation Other recurrent funds Total State funds The following liabilities have been assumed by the Treasurer during the financial year: Superannuation (a) Other Total liabilities assumed by the Treasurer

Resources received free of charge determined on the basis of the following estimates provided by agencies (b): Department of Education - Corporate systems support - Marketing and publications - Human resources, and industrial relations support - Other Total resources received free of charge Total income from State Government

14,079,832 1,079,730 188,574 15,348,136

-

12,201,513 997,700 1,981,279 15,180,492

-

571,466 14,361 55,646 17,042 658,515

643,706 49,121 30,307 82,264 805,398

16,006,651

15,985,890

2,345,557

1,725,247

192,000 192,000 2,537,557

134,649 134,649 1,859,896

46,419 5,381 51,800

44,122 6,304 50,426

204,223 2,871 124,215 (475) 62,871 393,705

157,550 3,280 204,535 (2,887) 101,076 463,554

(2,887) 2,412 (475)

(8,600) 5,713 (2,887)

(a) In 2008, the reporting of the notional superannuation expense and equivalent notional income has been discontinued. Where the Treasurer or other entity has assumed a liability, the Authority recognises revenues equivalent to the amount of the liability assumed and an expense relating to the nature of the event or events that initially gave rise to the liability. (b) Where assets or services have been received free of charge or for nominal cost, the Authority recognises revenues equivalent to the fair value of the assets and/or the fair value of those services that can be reliably measured and which would have been purchased if they were not donated, and those fair values shall be recognised as assets or expenses, as applicable. Where the contribution of assets or services are in the nature of contributions by owners, the Authority makes an adjustment direct to equity. 21 Restricted cash and cash equivalents Specific capital equipment and minor works (a),(b), ( c) Non-current 27th Pay (d) Total restricted cash and cash equivalents (a) DET Auto Workshop - $641,572 (b) Better TAFE Facilities - $1,681,985 ( c) DET Work Benches to be Built - $22,000 (d) Amount held for the purpose of meeting the 27th pay that occurs every 11 years in 2016 - $192,000

22 Inventories Inventories held for resale: Bookshop (at cost) Cafeteria (at cost) Total See also not 2(l) 'Inventories' and note 15 'Trading profit/(loss)'. 23 Receivables Current Receivables - trade Receivables - students Accrued income Allowance for impairment of receivables GST receivable Total current Reconciliation of changes in the allowance for impairment of receivables: Balance at start of year Doubtful debts expense recognised in the Statement of Comprehensive Income Balance at end of year Credit Risk (a) The College trades only with recognised, creditworthy third parties. The College has policies in place to ensure that sales of products and services are made to customers with an appropriate credit history. In addition, receivable balances are monitored on an ongoing basis with the result that the College's exposure to debt is minimal. There are no significant concentrations of credit risk. (b) In respect of amounts receiveable, the College holds no collateral as security or other credit enhancements.

Ageing of receivables past due but not impaired based on the information provided to senior management, as at the end of the reporting period: Not more than 3 months More than 3 months but less than 6 months More than 6 months but less than 1 year

Receivables individually determined as impaired as at the end of the reporting period: Carrying amount, before deducting any impairment loss Impairment loss

42,342 3,791 745 46,878

106,435 3,879 2,323 112,637

207,095 (475) 206,620

160,831 (2,887) 157,944

See also note 2(m) 'Receivables' and note 37 'Financial instruments'.

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

47


Great Southern TAFE NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2009

09GLACT

08GLACT

2009

2008

$

$

24 Other assets Current Prepayments

55,286

48,038

Total current

55,286

48,038

3,630,000 3,630,000

3,455,000 3,455,000

19,793,637 19,793,637

22,219,726 22,219,726

748,242 748,242

181,200 181,200

566,547 (189,974) 376,573

693,674 (265,235) 428,439

1,223,606 (708,458) 515,148

1,098,909 (599,438) 499,471

781,831 (609,202) 172,629 25,236,229

785,255 (571,999) 213,256 26,997,092

   25 Property, plant and equipment Land At fair value (a) Accumulated impairment losses Buildings At fair value (a) Accumulated depreciation Buildings under construction Construction costs Motor vehicles, caravans and trailers At cost Accumulated depreciation Plant, furniture and general equipment At cost Accumulated depreciation

Computer equipment, communication network At cost Accumulated depreciation

(a) Freehold land and buildings were revalued as at 31 December, 2009, by the Western Australian Land Information Authority (Landgate). The valuations were performed during the year ended 31 December, 2009 and recognised at 31 December, 2009.. The fair value of all l d and land d bbuildings ildi was ddetermined i d bby reference f to market k values. l See note 2(f) (f) 'Property, plant l and d equipment'. i

Reconciliations of the carrying amounts of property, plant and equipment at the beginning and end of the reporting period are set out below.

2009 Carrying amount at start of year Additions Transfers Disposals Revaluation increments Depreciation expense Carrying amount at end of year

2008 Carrying amount at start of year Additions Transfers Disposals Revaluation increments Depreciation expense Carrying amount at end of year

Land 3,455,000 175,000 3,630,000

Buildings 22,219,726 14,489 (1,884,938) (555,640) 19,793,637

Land

Buildings

3,531,111 (76,111) 3,455,000

20,775,063 118,625 1,847,211 (521,173) 22,219,726

Buildings under construction 181,200 567,042 748,242

Motor vehicles, caravans and trailers 428,439 123,993 (132,090) (43,769) 376,573

Plant, furniture and general equipment 499,471 125,782 (110,105) 515,148

Computer equipment, communication network 213,256 8,486 (49,113) 172,629

Buildings under construction

Motor vehicles, caravans and trailers

Plant, furniture and general equipment

Computer equipment, communication network

Total

485,257 172,158 (153,681) (75,295) 428,439

336,767 266,313 (103,609) 499,471

294,243 (368) (80,619) 213,256

25,422,441 557,096 181,200 (154,049) 1,771,100 (780,696) 26,997,092

181,200 181,200

Total 26,997,092 272,750 567,042 (132,090) (1,709,938) (758,627) 25,236,229

(a) Recognised in the Statement of Comperhensive Income. Where an asset measured at cost is written down to recoverable amount, an impairment loss is recognised in the Statement of Comperhensive Income. Where an asset measured at fair value is written down to recoverable amount, the loss is accounted for as a revaluation decrement.

26 Impairment of assets There were no indications of impairment of property plant, equipment and intangibles as at 31 December 2009. The College held no goodwill or intangible assets with indefinite useful lifes during the reporting period and at the end of the reporting period there were no intangible assets not yet available for use. All surplus assets as at 31 December 2009 have either been classified as assets held for sale or written off. 27 Payables Current Trade payables GST payable Accrued expenses Accrued salaries and related costs Total current

3,464 13,898 299,748 228,693 545,803

4,302 54,592 225,767 168,378 453,039

S also See l note 2( 2(n)) 'P 'Payables' bl ' and d note 37 'Fi 'Financial i l IInstruments'.'

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

48


Great Southern TAFE NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2009

09GLACT

08GLACT

2009

2008

$

$

28 Provisions Current Employee benefits provision Annual leave (a) Long service leave (b) Superannuation Salary deferment Other provisions Employment on-costs (c) Other (provide details) Total current Non-current Employee benefits provision Long service leave (b) Salary deferment Other provisions Employment on-costs (c)

Total non-current

692,412 778,331

517,904 688,272

1,470,743

1,206,176

147,797

122,902

147,797 1,618,540

122,902 1,329,078

622,238 622,238

543,516 2,781 546,297

37,355

32,650

37,355

32,650

659,593

578,947

692,412 692,412

517,904 517,904

778,331 622,238 1,400,569

688,272 543,516 1,231,788

155,552 29,600 185,152

134,283 21,269 155,552

51,995 46,608 912 99,515

40,443 66,000 106,443

46,608 51,995 912 99,515

66,000 40,443 106,443

2,509,407

2,415,898

(a) Annual leave liabilities have been classified as current as there is no unconditional right to defer settlement for at least 12 months after the reporting period. Assessments indicate that actual settlement of the liabilities will occur as follow: Within 12 months of the end of the reporting period

(b) Long service leave liabilities have been classified as current where there is no unconditional right to defer settlement for at least 12 months after the end of the reporting period. Assessments indicate that actual settlement of the liabilities will occur as follows: Within 12 months of the end of the reporting period More than 12 months after the end of the reporting period

(c) The settlement of annual and long service leave liabilities gives rise to the payment of employment on-costs including workers' compensation insurance. The provision is the present value of expected future payments. The associated expense, apart from the unwinding of the discount (finance cost), is disclosed in note 11'Other expenses'. Movements in other provisions Movements in each class of provisions during the financial year, other than employee benefits, are set out below. Employment on-cost provision Carrying amount at start of year Additional provisions recognised Carrying amount at end of year 29 Other liabilities Current Income received in advance (a) Grants and advances (provide details) Money/deposits held in trust Total current liabilities

(a) Income received in advance comprises: Department of Education - competitive allocation tendering Student fees and charges Other

30 Equity Equity represents the residual interest in the net assets of the College. The Government holds the equity interest in the net assets of the College. The Government holds the equity interest in the College on behalf of the community. The asset revaluation surplus represents that portion of equity resulting from the revaluation of non-current assets. or Liabilities exceed assets for the College and therefore there is no residual interest in the assets of the College. This equity deficit arose [provide details of the circumstances]. Contributed equity Balance at start of year Contributions by owners Capital contribution (a)

-

93,509

Total contributions by owners

2,509,407

2,509,407

Balance at end of year

2,509,407

2,509,407

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

49


Great Southern TAFE NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2009

09GLACT

08GLACT

2009

2008

$

$

(a).Under AASB 1004 ‘Contributions’, transfers of net assets as a result of a restructure of administrative arrangements are to be accounted for as contributions by owners and distributions to owners. Where activities are transferred from one agency to another agency as a result of a restructure of administrative arrangements, AASB 1004 (paragraph 57) requires the transferee agency to disclose the expenses and income attributable to the transferred activities for the reporting period, showing separately those expenses and income recognised by the transferor agency during the reporting period. Furthermore, AASB 1004 (paragraph 58) requires disclosures by class for each material transfer of assets and liabilities in relation to a restructure of administrative arrangements, together with the name of the counterparty transferor/transferee agency. In respect of transfers that are individually immaterial, the assets and liabilities are to be disclosed on an aggregate basis. (b) Under the Treasurer’s instruction TI 955 ‘Contributions by Owners Made to Wholly Owned Public Sector Entities’ Capital Contributions (appropriations) have been designated as contributions by owners in accordance with AASB Interpretation 1038 ‘Contributions by Owners Made to Wholly-Owned Public Sector Entities’. (c) Under TI 955, non-discretionary (non-reciprocal) transfers of net assets between State government agencies have been designated as contributions by owners in accordance with AASB Interpretation 1038, where the transferee agency accounts for a non-discretionary (non-reciprocal) transfer of net assets as a contribution by owners and the transferor agency accounts for the transfer as a distribution to owners. (d) TI 955 requires non-reciprocal transfers of net assets to Government to be accounted for as distribution to owners in accordance with AASB Interpretation 1038. Reserves Asset revaluation surplus Balance at start of year Net revaluation increments/(decrements) Land Buildings Balance at end of year

11,785,726

10,014,626

175,000 (1,884,938) 10,075,788

(76,111) 1,847,211 11,785,726

Accumulated surplus/(deficit) Balance at start of year Result for the period Balance at end of year

15,683,582 2,083,171 17,766,753

15,415,152 268,430 15,683,582

7,340 1,330,721 3,662,761 5,000,822 2,537,557 7,538,379

7,340 310,620 2,709,256 3,027,216 1,859,896 4,887,112

(13,923,480)

(15,717,457)

758,627 (2,412) 1,079,730 658,515

780,696 (5,713) 997,700 805,398 153,682 (19,545)

31 Notes to the Statement of Cash Flows Reconciliation of cash Cash at the end of the financial year, as shown in the Statement of Cash Flows is reconciled to the related items in the Statement of Financial Position as follows: Cash on hand Cash at bank Short term deposits Restricted cash and cash equivalents (refer to note 21 'Restricted cash and cash equivalents')

Reconciliation of net cost of services to net cash flows provided by/(used in) operating activities Net cost of services Non-cash items: Depreciation and amortisation expense (note 9 ) Doubtful debts expense (note 11) Superannuation expense (note 7) Resources received free of charge (note 21) Cost of disposals for non -current assets (Note 25) Non - current assets - trade ins Net (gain)/loss on sale of property, plant and equipment Losses and write-offs (excludes cash shortages / thefts of money)

19,762 (3,664)

(6,009)

(46,264) 80,320 (1,373) (7,251) -

34,455 (106,391) (4,417) (20,468) (93,509)

Increase/(decrease) in liabilities Current payables (a) Income received in advance /grants and advances Current provisions Other current liabilities Non-current Provisions Other non-current liabilities

(837) (6,928) 289,462 134,295 80,646

Net GST receipts/(payments) (b) Change in GST in receivables/payables (c)

48,972 (47,796)

570 74,309 113,300 141,999 54,960 46,484 (75,128)

(10,889,765)

(12,845,084)

(Increase)/decrease in assets: Current receivables (a) Current receiveables other Current inventories Prepayments Non-current Assets

Net cash provided by/(used in) operating activities

(a) Note that the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) receivable/payable in respect of GST and the receivable/payable (b) This is the net GST paid/received, i.e. cash transactions (c) This reverses out the GST in receivables and payables

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

50


Great Southern TAFE NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2009

09GLACT

08GLACT

2009

2008

$

$

32 Commitments Capital expenditure commitments Capital expenditure commitments, being contracted capital expenditure additional to the amounts reported in the financial statements, are payable as follows: Within 1 year The capital commitments include amounts for: Buildings Lease commitments Commitments in relation to leases contracted for at the end of the reporting period but not recognised in the financial statements, are payable as follows: Within 1 year Later than 1 year and not later than 5 years Representing: Cancellable operating leases Non-cancellable operating leases

Non-cancellable operating lease commitments (a) Commitments for minimum lease payments are payable as follows: Within 1 year Later than 1 year and not later than 5 years

641,572 641,572

1,500,000 1,500,000

641,572

1,500,000

157,921 207,013 364,934

114,513 204,504 319,017

48,519 316,415 364,934

94,107 224,910 319,017

135,625 180,789 316,414

89,964 134,946 224,910

317,516 317,516

153,600 153,600

(a) The College has a significant non cancellable leasing arrangement with Best Office Systems for the provision of multifunctional devices and a bulk printing and copying service for a term of three years from 2006. The College will exercise its one year extension option to continue the contract for 2010. Other expenditure commitments contracted for at the end of the reporting period date but not recognised as liabilities are payable as follows: (a) Within 1 year

(a) The College has contracted to purchase in 2010computers as part of its ICT Security Framework where all College computers are replaced over a four year cycle. These commitments are all inclusive of GST. 33 Contingent liabilities and contingent assets g g Contingent liabilities In addition to the liabilities incorporated in the financial statements, there are the following contingent liabilities: Contaminated sites Under the Contaminated Sites Act 2003, the College is required to report known and suspected contaminated sites to the Department of Environment and Conservation (DEC). In accordance with the Act, DEC classifies these sites on the basis of the risk to human health, the environment and environmental values. Where sites are classified as contaminated - remediation required or possibly contaminated - investigation required, the College may have a liability in respect of investigation or remediation expenses. The College reported the Katanning TAFE campus site to the Department of Environment and Conservation (DEC) as a potentially contaminated site due to its previous land use. The site was formerly used as a works depot and a service station. DEC have commissioned consultants to inspect and test the site. These consultants have completed a preliminary investigation of the site, but it will not be until the next stage of sampling and testing before it will be possible to determine any potential impacts. At this stage it remains not practicable to determine if there is a potential financial effect or to identify the uncetainties in relation to the amount or timing of any outflows. Contingent assets The College has no contingent assets. 34 Events occurring after the reporting period No events occurred after statement of financial position date.

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

51


Great Southern TAFE NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2009

09GLACT

08GLACT

2009

2008

$

$

35 Explanatory Statement Significant variations between estimates and actual results for income and expense are shown below. Significant variations are considered to be those greater than 10% or $20,000. Significant variations between estimated and actual results for 09

Expenditure Employee expenses Supplies and services Depreciation Grants and subsidies Loss on disposal of non- current assets Other Expenses Cost of sales

Income Fee for service Student fees and charges Sales Ancillary Trading Commonwealth grants and contributions Interest Other revenue Income from State Government State Funds Liabilities assumed by Treasurer Resources received free of charge

2009 Estimate $ 12,055,163 4,471,892 710,000 60,000 15,000 700,000 450,000

2009 Actual $ 13,609,206 4,805,024 758,627 8,058 19,672 949,600 396,992

Variation $ (1,554,043) (333,132) (48,627) 51,942 (4,672) (249,600) 53,008

Variation % -12.89% -7.45% -6.85% 86.57% -31.15% -35.66% 11.78%

1,200,000 1,300,000 560,000 200,000 160,000 250,000 140,000

1,408,897 1,454,105 547,149 255,057 2,511,419 250,121 196,952

(208,897) (154,105) 12,851 (55,057) (2,351,419) (121) (56,952)

-17.41% -11.85% 2.29% -27.53% -1469.64% -0.05% -40.68%

14,180,000 2,000 625,000

15,348,136 658,515

(1,168,136) 2,000 (33,515)

-8.24% 100.00% -5.36%

Expenditure Employee expenses Increase in employee costs due to higher than budgeted salary increases for lecturing staff, college achieving higher than estimated profile, increase in superannuation and annual leave expense. Supplies and Services Significant increase in delivery of student contact hours (SCH) resulting in expenditure increases over budget, in student materials, communication costs, utility expenses, software, insurance and motor vehicles operating leasing. These increases were in part offset by reductions in minor works, travel and advertising costs. Depreciation Increase in actual building depreciation due to increase value of buildings, increase in plant & equipment and increase in commercial vehicles. Grants & Subsidies Reduction in non training service delivery payments. Loss on disposal i off non - current assets Slight variation due to increase in motor vehicle sales. Other Expenses Reduction in write offs for bad debts , but increase in building repairs, payroll tax and employee on costs. Cost of sales Bookshop and cafe purchase costs slightly down due to close monitoring of costs. Income Fee for Service Increase in actual fee for services over budget, with increases in competitive tenders from Department of Education, international student courses and a reduction in customised courses. Student Fees and Charges Increase in actual student tuition and resource fees due to a significant increase in student contact hours delivered. Sales Bookshop sales were slightly down and Cafe marginally increased when compared with previous year. Ancillary Trading Increase in live works revenue, but a reduction in contracting and consulting revenue over amount budgeted. Commonwealth grants and contributions Significant increase in commonwealth recurrent and special purpose grants compared to budget. Interest Interest revenue equal budget, but interest yield down due to reduced interest rates. Other Revenue Higher than estimated revenue from sponsorships. Income from State Government State funds Higher than estimated delivery and performance revenue due to increase in profile, and a reduction in special purpose grants from the Department of Training and Education. Liabilities assumed by Treasurer Treasury have advised that Colleges are not required to report on Liability assumed by Treasurer Resources Received Free of Charge Increase in the services provided free of charge from Department of Education than estimated.

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

52


Great Southern TAFE NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2009

Significant variations between actual results for 09 and 08

Expenditure Employee expenses Supplies and services Depreciation Grants and subsidies Cost of sales Loss on disposal of assets Other expenses Income Fee for service Student fees and charges Ancillary trading Sales Commonwealth grants and contributions Interest Other revenue Income from State Government State funds Liabilities assumed by Treasurer Resources received free of charge

2009 $

2008 $

Variance $

09GLACT

08GLACT

2009

2008

$

$

Variation %

13,609,206 4,805,024 758,627 8,058 396,992 19,672 949,600

12,435,727 5,039,261 780,696 41,027 405,632 34,339 898,465

1,173,479 (234,237) (22,069) (32,969) (8,640) (14,667) 51,135

8.62% -4.87% -2.91% -409.15% -2.18% -74.56% 5.38%

1,408,897 1,454,105 255,057 547,149 2,511,419 250,121 196,952

1,033,294 1,286,891 233,565 551,222 262,908 389,031 160,776

375,603 167,214 21,492 (4,073) 2,248,511 (138,910) 36,176

26.66% 11.50% 8.43% -0.74% 89.53% -55.54% 18.37%

15,348,136 658,515

15,180,492 805,398

167,644 (146,883)

1.09% -22.31%

Employee expenses Increase in employee costs due to higher than budgeted salary increases for lecturing staff, increase in superannuation and annual leave expense with reduction in long service leave expense. Supplies and Services Decreased expenditure resulted from a reduction of minor works, travel and advertising costs and there was a reduction of services provided free of charge from DET. With increases in course consumables,communication expenses, utility costs, repairs and maintenance, motor vehicle leasing and software licence expense. Depreciation Decrease in depreciation due to a reduction in motor vehicle assets held. Grants and Subsidies Reduction in non training service delivery payments. Cost of sales Decrease of bookshop purchases and cafĂŠ purchases due to close review of costs. Loss on disposal of assets Reduction in loss on sale, due to College leasing motor vehicles rather than purchasing vehicles. Other Expenses Reduction d i in i write i offs ff ffor bbad d ddebts b , bbut iincrease iin bbuilding ildi repairs, i payroll ll tax and d employee l on costs. Income Fee for Service Increase in competitive tenders from Department of Education, international student courses and a reduction in customised courses. Student Fees and Charges Increase in student tuition and resource fees due to a significant increase in student contact hours delivered. Ancilliary Trading Increase in live works revenue, but a reduction in contracting and consulting revenue. Sales Bookshop sales were slightly down and Cafe increased marginally when compared with previous year. Commonwealth Grants and Contributions Increase in commonwealth recurrent and special purpose grants. Interest Interest revenue equal budget, but interest yield down due to reduced interest rates. Other Revenue Increased revenue from sponsorships. Income from State Government State funds Increase in resource agreement revenue due to increase in delivery, reduction in special purpose grants. Liabilities assumed by Treasurer Colleges are not required to report on Treasurer's liability as advised by Treasury Resources Received Free of Charge Decreased cost of services provided by Department of Education in career development, policy,planning & accountability and and reduction in labour relation support.

36 Financial instruments (a) Financial risk management objectives and policies Financial instruments held by the College are cash and cash equivalents, restricted cash and cash equivalents, receivables and payables. The College has limited exposure to financial risks. The College's overall risk management program focus on managing the risk identified below: Credit risk The College trades only with recognised, creditworthy third parties. The College has policies in place to ensure that sales of products and services are made to customers with an appropriate credit history. In addition, receivable balances are monitored on an ongoing basis with the result that the College's exposure to debt is minimal. There are no significant concentrations of credit risk. Liquidity risk The College has appropriate procedures to manage cash flows including drawdowns of appropriations by monitoring forecast cash flows to ensure that sufficient funds are available to meet its commitments. Interest rate risk The College's exposure to market risk for changes in interest rates relates primarily to the long-term debt obligations. The College's borrowings are all obtained through the Western Australian Treasury Corporation (WATC) and are at fixed rates with varying maturities. The risk is managed by WATC through portfolio diversification and variation in maturity dates. Other than as detailed in the Interest rate sensitivity analysis table at Note 37(c), The College is not exposed to interest rate risk because apart from minor amounts of restricted cash, all other cash and cash equivalents and a portion of restricted cash are nong and it has no borrowings g other than WATC borrowings g and finance leases (fixed ( ) interest bearing interest rate).

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

53


Great Southern TAFE NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2009

09GLACT

08GLACT

2009

2008

$

$

2009 $'000

2008 $'000

(b) Categories of financial instruments In addition to cash and bank overdraft, the carrying amounts of each of the following categories of financial assets and financial liabilities at the end of the reporting period are as follows: Financial Assets Cash and cash equivalent Restricted cash and cash equivalent Receivables (a)

5,000,822 2,537,557 393,705

3,027,216 1,859,896 463,554

545,803

453,039

Financial Liabilities Payables (a) The amount of loans and receivables excludes GST recoverable from the ATO (statutory receivable). (c) Financial instrument disclosures Credit risk, liquidity risk and interest rate risk exposures The following table details the College's maximum exposure to credit risk, and the exposure to liquidity risk and interest rate risk as at the reporting date, based on information provided to senior management of the College. The contractual maturity amounts in the table are representative of the undiscounted amounts as at the end of the reporting period. An adjustment for discounting has been made where material. The College does not hold any collateral as security or other credit enhancements relating to the financial assets it holds. The College does not hold any financial assets that had to have their terms renegotiated that would have otherwise resulted in them being past due or impaired. Contractual maturity dates Weighted Average Carrying Amount Variable Interest Non-Interest Within 1 year Effective Interest Rate Bearing Rate 2009 Financial Assets Cash and cash equivalent Cash and cash equivalent Restricted cash and cash equivalent Receivables

% 3.03% 5.16% 5.16%

$

$

1,338,061 3,662,761 2,537,557 393,705 7,932,084

1,338,061 1,338,061

Financial Liabilities Payables

545,803 545,803

Weighted Average Carrying Amount Effective Interest Rate 2008 Financial Assets Cash and cash equivalent Cash and cash equivalent Restricted cash and cash equivalent Receivables Financial Liabilities Payables

% 6.18% 7.52% 7.52%

$

Variable Interest Rate

$ 317,960 2,709,256 1,859,896 463,555 5,350,667 453,039 453,039

$

$

$

453,039 453,039

-

-

-

-

-

-

1-2 Years

2-5 Years

More than 5 years

$

$

$

$ 463,555 463,555

-

$

-

Contractual maturity dates Non-Interest Within 1 year Bearing

317,960 317,960

More than 5 years

3,662,761 2,537,557 6,200,318

545,803 545,803

$

2-5 Years

$ 393,705 393,705

-

1-2 Years

2,709,256 1,859,896 4,569,152 -

-

-

-

-

-

-

Interest rate sensitivity analysis The following table represents a summary of the interest rate sensitivity of the College's financial assets and liabilities at the end of the reporting period on the surplus for the period and equity for a 1% change in interest rates. It is assumed that the change in interest rates is held constant throughout the reporting period. The Authority should take into account past performance, future explanations, economic forecasts, and management’s knowledge and experience of the financial markets to determine the movements that are reasonably possible over the next 12 months. - 100 Basis Points

Carrying amount $

2009 Financial Assets Restricted cash and cash equivalent

Profit $

7,538,379

+ 100 Basis Points

Equity $

(75,384)

Profit E $

(75,384)

- 100 Basis Points Carrying amount $

2008 Financial Assets Restricted cash and cash equivalent

4,887,112

Profit $

75,384

75,384

+ 100 Basis Points Equity $

(48,871)

quity $

Profit $

(48,871)

Equity $

48,871

48,871

Fair values All financial assets and liabilities recognised in the Statement of Financial Position, whether they are carried at cost or fair value, are recognised at amounts that represent a reasonable approximation of fair value unless otherwise stated in the applicable notes.

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

54


Great Southern TAFE NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2009

09GLACT

08GLACT

2009

2008

$

$

37 Remuneration of members of the College and Senior Officers Remuneration of members of the College The number of members of the College whose total of fees, salaries, superannuation, non-monetary benefits and other benefits for the financial year, fall within the following bands are: $ $0 - $10,000 $170,001 -$180,000 $180,001 -$190,000 The total remuneration of the members of the College is:

14

2 1

1 181,595

176,010

Total remuneration includes the superannuation expense incurred by the College in respect of members of the College. Remuneration of Senior Officers The number of senior officers other than senior officers reported as members of the College, whose total of fees, salaries, superannuation, non-monetary benefits and other benefits for the financial year, fall within the following bands are: $ $30,001 - $40,000 $40,001 - $50,000 $60,001 - $70,000 $70,001 - $80,000 $90,001 - $100,000 $100,001 - $110,000 $110,001 -$120,000 $120,001 -$130,000 The total remuneration of senior officers is:

1 1 1 1 -

-

3 2 2

1 4 1 3

1,024,781

990,684

46,000

43,000

The total remuneration includes the superannuation expense incurred by the College in respect of senior officers other than senior officers reported as members of the College. No senior officers are members of the Pension Scheme. [Guideline: If there are senior officers who are members of the Pension Scheme, disclose in accordance with TI 952(3)(i)(d).] 38 Remuneration of auditor Remuneration payable to the Auditor General in respect to the audit for the current financial year is as follows: Auditing the accounts, financial statements and performance indicators p p The expense is included in note 11 'Other expenses'. 39 Related Bodies The College has no related bodies. 40 Affiliated Bodies The College has no affiliated bodies.

41 Supplementary Financial Information Write-Offs Public property Bad debts Inventory

4,047 4,047

Loses through theft, defaults and other causes Losses of public and other moneys and public and other property through theft, default or otherwise Recoupment of cash collections

(383) (383) 3,664

367 5,488 153 6,008 520 (264) 256 6,264

42 Schedule of Income and Expenditure by Service The college provides only one service (as defined by Treasurer's Instruction 1101 (9) and that is Vocational Education and Training Delivery.

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

55


GREAT SOUTHERN TAFE NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2009

APPENDIX 1 Great Southern TAFE S40 SUBMISSION INCOME STATEMENT

2010 Estimate $

COST OF SERVICES Expenses Employee benefits expense Supplies and services Depreciation and amortisation expense Finance costs Grants and subsidies Payments to Non TAFE Providers for VET Delivery Loss on disposal of non-current assets Cost of sales Other expenses

Total Cost of Services Income Revenue Fee for service Student charges and fees Ancillary trading Sales Commonwealth grants and contributions Interest revenue Other revenue Total Revenue Gains Gain on disposal of non-current assets Other gains Total Gains Total income other than income from State Government NET COST OF SERVICES

14,481,397 4,343,548 842,000 60,000 30,000 450,000 840,000

21,046,945

1,400,000 1 350 000 1,350,000 250,000 650,000 970,000 160,000 200,000 4,980,000

0 0 0 4,980,000 -16,066,945

INCOME FROM STATE GOVERNMENT State funds Liabilities assumed by the Treasurer Assets assumed/(transferred) Resources received free of charge Total income from State Government SURPLUS (DEFICIT) FOR THE PERIOD

15,247,254

700,000 15,947,254 (119,691)

Please use Worksheet "M" for Explanatory Notes.

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

56


GREAT SOUTHERN TAFE NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2009

Great Southern TAFE S40 SUBMISSION BALANCE SHEET ASSETS Current Assets Cash and cash equivalents Restricted cash and cash equivalents Inventories Receivables Amounts receivable for services Other current assets Non-current assets classified as held for sale Total Current Assets Non-Current Assets Restricted cash and cash equivalents Inventories Receivables Amounts receivable for services Property, plant and equipment Intangible assets Other non-current assets Total Non-Current Assets TOTAL ASSETS

2010 Estimate $

382,261 100,000 50,000 350,000 3,641,230

4,523,491

240,000

30,988,996

31,228,996 31 228 996 35,752,487

LIABILITIES Current Liabilities Payables Borrowings Amounts due to the Treasurer Provisions Other current liabilities

1,640,000 200,000

Liabilities directly associated with non-current assets classified as held for sale Total Current Liabilities

2,040,000

Non-Current Liabilities Payables Borrowings Provisions Other non-current liabilities Total Non-Current Liabilities TOTAL LIABILITIES

200,000

720,000 720,000 2,760,000

NET ASSETS

32,992,487

EQUITY Contributed Equity Reserves Accumulated surplus/(deficiency)

4,899,407 11,785,726 16,307,354

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal AndTOTAL Torres StraitEQUITY Islander people of Western Australia

32 992 487 32,992,487

57


Certification of Performance Indicators     

We hereby certify that the performance indicators are based on proper records, are  relevant and appropriate for assisting users to assess Great Southern TAFE’s performance  and fairly represent the performance of Great Southern TAFE for the financial year ended  December 31, 2009.       

    LEN SMITH  Chairperson, Governing Council  22nd February 2010       

    LIDIA ROZLAPA  Managing Director  22nd February 2010 

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

58


DESIRED OUTCOME  The provision of effective and efficient vocational education and training  services to meet community and industry training needs.  Effectiveness Indicators  The effectiveness indicators measure the achievement of vocational education and training in meeting  community and industry needs via profile achievement, student and graduate satisfaction and labour  force status of graduates.  1.1 

Annual VET College Profile Target Achievement 

This performance indicator shows the percentage of student curriculum hours (SCH) achieved for  activities as contracted with the Department of Training and Workforce Development for vocational  education and training delivery through the Delivery and Performance Agreement. The allocation of  hours to Great Southern TAFE in specific industry areas is determined by the State Training Strategy  which is developed in consultation with industry and the community. The ability of the college to fulfill  planned delivery reflects its effectiveness in meeting industry and community needs.  The planned figure reported in this indicator is the delivery agreed to in the initial Delivery and  Performance Agreement and does not reflect changes to delivery targets agreed to in subsequent  addenda to that agreement.  Annual VET College Profile Target Achievement  100.4%

102.9%

2006

2007

106.4%

100%

113.6%

80% 60% 40% 20% 0%

2006 

 

2007 

2008 2008 

2009 2009 

 

Target 

Planned SCH 

846528

838713

835713

855048

SCH Achieved 

849517 100.4%

862830 102.9%

889022 106.4%

971533   113.6% 100­102% 

Achievement % 

 

Figure 1  Achievement of Profile (%) 

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

59


In 2009 the College achieved 113.6% of the planned delivery set in the Delivery and Performance  Agreement for 2009.  This increase over the targeted amount was due to insufficient SCH funded  through the department at the start of the academic year compared to what the College anticipated.  The table below shows historical allocations by industry group (based on the occupation or outcome  qualifications are intended to serve) and highlights the College’s most recent performance in achieving  industry delivery targets.  Variations in the percentage of achievement show levels of lower or higher  than expected demand. All industry group variations are within acceptable range of parameters set in  the Delivery and Performance Agreement. The delivery targets for 2009 represent delivery agreed to in  the initial Delivery and Performance Agreement and does not reflect changes to delivery targets agreed  to in subsequent addenda to that agreement.    Profile Achievement by Industry Group  Actual

2009

Industry Group

2006

2007

2008

2009

Planned

Achieved

01A

Recreation, Sports and Entertainment

12663

20100

5065

1870

3500

53.4%

01B

Visual and Performing Arts

56545

46535

52872

59069

53582

110.2%

01C

Design

15600

18255

16930

22609

17040

132.7%

02A

Automotive

25000

16669

25319

32295

24255

133.1%

03A

Building and Constructions

47667

57157

64816

65510

61901

105.8%

03B

Surveying and Building

10020

6760

9140

6330

8010

79.0%

04A

Community Service Workers

68710

77225

92410

103830

77350

134.2%

04B

Education and Childcare

37073

33015

40865

61875

35430

174.6%

04C

Health

34112

32940

30558

39397

40815

96.5%

04D

Library Workers

05A

Finance, Insurance Property Service Workers

1226

2236

2566

2137

2796

76.4%

06A

Food Trades and Processing

32154

32244

6757

9654

9100

106.1%

07A

Clothing Footwear and Soft Furnishings

17741

12059

8365

8885

10780

82.4%

07B

Furniture Manufacture

7643

12341

6721

7358

5628

130.7%

08A

Communications

08B

Printing and Publishing

2955

2580

114.5%

09A

Engineering and Drafting

09B

Metal and Mining

10A

Animal Care

3220

3124

2150

1300

1200

108.3%

29087

26122

25621

30136

29459

102.3%

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

60


Actual

2009

Industry Group

2006

2007

2008

2009

Planned

Achieved

10B

Forestry, Farming and Landcare

63481

103111

131867

135687

103490

131.1%

10C

Fishing

10D

Horticulture

50892

54391

32214

36707

32280

113.7%

11A

Process Manufacturing

12A

Personal Service

19327

31270

42593

36599

36945

99.1%

12B

Retail

8844

2444

846

20

1450

1.4%

13A

Cooking

10444

8285

13731

7615

13938

54.6%

13B

Hospitality

10608

8771

7471

4695

4512

104.1%

13C

Tourism

5610

6340

4020

2930

4980

58.8%

13D

Travel Agents

14A

Transport Trades, Storage and Associated

2065

1280

1446

2095

69.0%

15A

Electrical and Electronic Engineering

15B

Electrical Trades

18581

20140

20519

20173

20715

97.4%

16A

Accounting and Other Business Services

50590

42090

42325

40975

48170

85.1%

16B

Management

14430

10560

11205

9370

15150

61.8%

16C

Office and Clerical

46515

57850

63670

76410

51440

148.5%

17A

Computing

56085

29351

44120

48183

36783

131.0%

18A

Science and Technical Workers

384

3698

3115

1778

8975

19.8%

19A

ACE

19B

Adult Literacy/ ESL

65910

64540

43890

62270

54950

113.3%

19C

Languages

5205

7465

7920

7080

6500

108.9%

19D

Miscellaneous

0

0

19E

Targeted Access and Participation Courses

23290

13677

28081

24385

29250

83.4%

849517

862830

889022

971533

855049

113.6%

 

860

Total Profile Delivery 

971,533 SCH

Non Profile Delivery 

180,064 SCH

College Total Delivery 

1,151,597 SCH

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

61


The Delivery and Performance Agreement (DPA) allows for flexibility in shifting delivery between  industry groups within agreed tolerances. In 2009 all but one industry group varied from original  planning to actual delivery by over 10%  •

additional programmes and SCH allocated to the Colleges as a stimulus strategy for training in  the wake of the economic downturn  • the original SCH allocation from the Department of Training insufficient to meet local demand  • increased targets for delivery in skills shortage areas  All variations are within the tolerances set by the DPA.  1.2 

Overall Student Satisfaction 

The performance indicator of overall student satisfaction expresses the number of 'very satisfied' and  ‘satisfied’ respondents, which is expressed as a proportion of the total survey respondents. It measures  students’ perceptions of the effectiveness of the college’s vocational education and training services.   WA TAFE Student Satisfaction Survey  Colmar Brunton conducted a student satisfaction survey on behalf of the Department of Training and  Workforce Development and Colleges in October 2009, with the summary of results being published in  January 2010. The survey sought students' views on the quality of vocational education training being  delivered. Students were asked about the quality of teaching and assessment, the suitability of teaching  methods and the quality of the course experience.    The 2009 survey was conducted using a sample of Great Southern TAFE students selected from  populations of institution‐based students and employment based students.   Of the 2,177 potential population identified, 1,162 were surveyed and the response rate was 28.0% The  overall satisfaction rate for 2009 was 89.1% with a relative sampling error of ±3.1% at a 95% confidence  level. The relative sampling error is a measure of the accuracy of the sampling process in giving a correct  estimate of reported items.   As in previous years, the data was weighted to ensure that the sample that was achieved was  representative of the student population. The data was weighted by College, IBS/EBS status and WADT  group.  A calculation is used to weight the data which involved dividing the percentage each student grouping  which made up in the total student population, by the percentage of responses that that group made up  in the total survey sample. The weighting uses industry group of study and whether students were  involved in employment based or institution based study.   

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

62


Student Satisfaction  100%

93%

90%

86%

93% 87%

85%

89% 86%

80% 60% 40% 20% 0% 2006

2007 GS TAFE

2008

2009

West Aust

 

2006 

2007

2008

2009 Target 

GSTAFE 

93% 

90%

93%

89% 88‐91% 

WA 

86% 

87%

85%

86%

    Figure 2 Student Satisfaction Rate 

The 2009 overall satisfaction rate for Great Southern TAFE is within the target range and higher than the  state satisfaction average of 86%.  The result is lower than for 2008 and analysis continues as to the  primary driver for this shift. Preliminary analysis suggests that lower satisfaction among the 15‐19 year  old cohort, a significant sector of the student population, may be the cause.  TAFE Student Outcomes Survey  The aim of the national TAFE Student Outcomes Survey is to measure vocational education and  training (VET) students’ employment, further study destinations and the opinions of the training  undertaken.    The National Centre for Vocational Education Research conduct surveys with an appropriate  sample design to produce statistically reliable college level data in alternative years.  College level  data was not available in 2006 and 2008.  The 2008 Student Outcomes Survey was conducted by the social Research Centre on behalf of the  National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER) and was funded by the Department of 

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

63


Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR).  The results were published in  December 2009.  The survey was administered to Great Southern TAFE students who undertook their studies at the  College and graduated in 2008. The survey included all Great Southern TAFE students who  completed a Certificate, Advanced Certificate, Associate Diploma, Diploma, Advanced Diploma or  Bachelors Degree, and who had an Australian address as their usual address.  Graduate  Employment status was measured as at 29 May 2009 for each category (employed, unemployed  and not in labour force), and the ratio of graduates in each category compared to valid respondents  expressed as a percentage.    Data from this survey was used to measure graduate employment status and graduate satisfaction.  1.3 

Graduate Employment Status 

The proportion of graduates in employment is a key performance indicator that shows the extent to  which the college is meeting industry and community need for training services that equip  graduates for changing employment opportunities.     Graduate Employment Status 

100.0% 80.0% 60.0% 40.0% 20.0% 0.0%

GSTA GSTA GSTA GSTA GSTA WA Aust WA Aust WA Aust WA Aust WA Aust FE FE FE FE FE 2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

Employed

75.0% 78.0% 79.0%

79.3% 83.0% 80.2%

77.6% 78.0% 77.1%

Unemployed

9.0% 9.0% 10.0%

7.2% 6.2% 9.2%

10.4% 10.1% 11.3%

Not in Labour Force 16.0% 13.0% 11.0%

13.3% 10.6% 10.2%

11.8% 11.8% 11.1%

Target:  78‐81%   

Figure 3 Graduate Employment Status 

Note 1: Figure 3 is taken from Student Outcome Survey targeting years to 2009. The College  is unable to provide data for 2006 and 2008 as statistically valid College level data was not  available. The National Centre for Vocational Education Research conducts surveys with an 

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

64


appropriate sample design to produce statistically reliable College level data in alternative  years commencing from 2005.  In 2007 the data for graduate employment outcomes did not include graduates who were  enrolled in TAFE at the time of the survey.  Note 2:  From 2009 the data for employment status has been taken directly from the  summary of outcomes for the Student Outcomes Survey and has not been manipulated as  was done previously to eliminate ‘not stated’ responses from the valid data set. Historically  the reported data has varied from the calculated data by up to one percent. As targets were  set according to the previous calculation method, these have potentially been set one  percent higher than they would have been given past performance with respect to the  summary outcome data in the survey report.  Note 3: Data from the 2005 survey did not report outcomes to any decimals places. For  consistency the data items are displayed with a first decimal value of zero.  The 2009 TAFE Student Outcomes Survey report for Great Southern TAFE indicated that the  graduate employment rate for Great Southern TAFE was 78.2% in keeping with state and national  results for the survey and within the target range.  1.4 

Graduate Satisfaction 

Graduate satisfaction is a key performance indicator that measures the extent to which Great  Southern TAFE graduates had wholly or partly achieved their main reason for undertaking the  course and is compared to the State average. It measures students’ perceptions of training  effectiveness.  Graduate Satisfaction    100.0% 80.0% 60.0% 40.0% 20.0% 0.0%

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

GS TAFE

85.0%

87.7%

89.8%

West Aust

84.0%

87.0%

87.1%

Australia

85.0%

86.4%

85.9%

Target: 86-89%

Figure 4 Graduate Satisfaction  

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

65


Note 4: Figure 4 is taken from Student Outcome Surveys targeting years to 2009. The College  is unable to provide data for 2006 and 2008 as statistically valid College level data was not  available. The National Centre for Vocational Education Research conducts surveys with an  appropriate sample design to produce statistically reliable College level data in alternative  years commencing from 2005.  Note5:  From 2009 the data for employment status has been taken directly from the  summary of outcomes for the Student Outcomes Survey and has not been manipulated as  was done previously to eliminate ‘not stated’ responses from the valid data set. Historically  the reported data has varied from the calculated data by up to one percent.  Note 6: Data from the 2005 survey did not report outcomes to any decimals places. For  consistency the data items are displayed with a first decimal value of zero.  The TAFE Student Outcomes Survey report for Great Southern TAFE, published in 2009 indicates  that the overall graduate satisfaction for Great Southern TAFE has improved from 86.6% to 90.0%.  and compares well with state and national results. 

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

66


Efficiency Indicators  2.1 

Overall Cost per Student Curriculum Hour (SCH) for Aggregate College Delivery 

The overall cost per SCH is an efficiency measure that shows the aggregate unit cost of delivery  output per SCH, based on the delivery costs (Total Cost of Services) as detailed in the Financial  Statements.    Target:  $20.11  Overall Cost per SCH  $19.00 $18.65 $18.50 $17.84

$17.83

$18.00 $17.50 $17.00

$16.96

$16.50 $16.00 2006

2007

2008

2009

    Figure 5 Cost per SCH for Aggregate College Delivery 

The college’s 2009 total cost of services per student curriculum hour is $17.84 is less than the  Section 40 estimate to Treasury of $20.11.  The variation of ‐$2.27 is attributable to a substantial payment made in late 2009 for capital works  projects to be expended in 2010. 

  Note 7:  Up until 2007 the cost per SCH was based on a total cost of services which included  capital user charge. From 2008, capital user charge is not included in the calculation of total    cost of services  

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

67


Other Financial Disclosures  Fees and Charges  TI903 (13)(i)  The College’s fees and charges are set by the Department of Education and Training and indexed to CPI  each year.    Future Capital Projects TI903 (13)(ii)  Stage One of the Automotive Workshop was completed in 2009 with stage two expected to be  completed by the end of 2010.   TI903 (13)(iii)   Staff Employed by Great Southern TAFE (Includes Permanent, Contract and Casual Staff)     Fixed Pay  Casuals 

15/11/07  170  130 

27/11/08 175 99

24/12/09  186  71

(a) During 2009 the new Workforce Development Plan was completed following an extensive review of  the changing economic climate.    There were 48 recruitment transactions conducted during the year with no Public Sector Standards  breach claims being lodged.    A staff training calendar is compiled each year, reflecting the generic staff development needs identified  within the College.  Individual sections also have a staff development allocation within their budgets to  cater for more specific needs.  During the year, engaging learning opportunities were provided to  benefit individual staff and assist in the achievement of the College’s strategic and operational plans.    Innovative professional development opportunities extended to staff during the year included our  annual whole of College Professional Development Day, Aboriginal Lecturing Cadetship programme and  Certificate and Diploma level qualifications offered to administrative staff which is directly related to the  work they are involved in.    (b) There were no significant industrial relations issues during the year and no disputes which required  arbitration proceedings before Industrial Tribunals.    (c) The College has a workers compensation and injury management procedure which complies with the  Act. Most return to work programmes are administered in‐house with reference to local medical  practitioners, however the College has access to Injury Management Consultants and other Workers  Compensation specialists via our relationship with the Department of Education and Training Shared  Services Centre.   There were three Workers Compensation claims made during the year.  The administration of claims  and return to work programmes are now the responsibility of our Shared Services Centre, who have  specific expertise in the field.    During 2009, the College initiated an accredited assessment of our OSH systems. 

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

68


Governance Disclosures  There were no disclosable interests that any senior officers within the Agency were required to report  during the year.   

Advertising  Advertising Agencies 

Marketforce  Media Decisions 

Market Research 

Nil 

Polling Organisations 

Nil 

Direct Mail organisations  

Australia Post ‐ (Pamphlet drop) 

Media Advertising Organisations 

Orana Cinemas  Albany Chamber of Commerce Directory  Albany Summer School Brochure  Albany Gateway Internet   Katanning Regional Business Assoc Directory  Albany Advertiser  Great Southern Herald  Denmark Chamber of Commerce Directory 

   24,586.00     13,480.00 

   3,017.00     4,945.00     778.00     450.00     235.00     454.00     346.00     45.00     237.00     48,573.00 

Disability Access and Inclusion Plan Outcomes  Great Southern TAFE’s Disability Access and Inclusion Plan (DAIP) 2007 – 2011 outlines strategies to  ensure the inclusion of people with disabilities in all aspects of college training and events.  A report on  the DAIP Implementation Plan 2008 – 2009 was provided to the Disability Services Commission in July  2009.  The college consults with students to adapt its service delivery and provide a range of individualised  supports to meet the learning needs of students with disabilities participating in training at the college.  

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

69


Customised accredited training is provided for people with disabilities that promotes pathways to  further education, training and employment including Certificate II and III in Clothing Production and  Certificates in Gaining Access to Training and Employment Introductory Woodwork and Art classes.  Great Southern TAFE continues to work collaboratively with community agencies to support the  inclusion of people with disabilities through Second Click Computer Literacy classes and the Lifestyle +  programme.    During 2009 the College, in partnership with other community agencies, conducted Take Me Home, a  community arts project for young people and people with disabilities focusing on the theme of home  and identity.  This culminated in an exhibition at the Vancouver Arts Centre providing an opportunity for  community members to gain an understanding on what home means for some people in the  community.  Accessibility improvements have been progressively implemented across the College including the  addition of a ramp to a demountable classroom, an automatic door to the Albany campus recreation  area and the introduction of temporary permit parking for students and staff with mobility difficulties.   College information is provided in a range of formats on request and texts and learning materials are  provided in accessible formats, including electronically. The Disability Liaison Officer liaises with  community organisations, schools and agencies and provides information through e‐newsletters and  community groups to ensure people with disabilities are informed of the College’s training opportunities  and support services.  Information regarding the College’s courses, services, events and facilities,  including services for people with disabilities, is available on the college website, which meets W3C Web  Content Accessibility guidelines.  A workshop was conducted at the Great Southern Careers Expo 2009 to inform students, parents and  staff about agencies that can support a successful transition for young people with disabilities from  school to employment, further education and training.  The college provided information and training to staff to ensure quality service to all clients, including an  awareness of issues affecting people with disabilities.   Information on meeting the needs of students  with disabilities is provided to staff at induction sessions and online. Mental Health First Aid Workshops  were provided for staff in 2009.    People with disabilities were encouraged to provide feedback on the College’s accessibility, services and  training, through customer feedback forms, liaison with community agencies assisting people with  disabilities into training and employment, and through the College’s complaints and grievance  procedures.  

Compliance with Public Sector Standards and Ethical Codes   During 2009, there were no allegations of breaches of the Public Sector Standards from internal or  external  clients. In terms of issues relating to compliance with ethical codes and behaviour, there was 

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

70


one minor issue involving non‐compliance with college policies and procedures which was investigated  and appropriate action taken.   During the year the College finalised customisation of the Accountable and Ethical Decision Making  Framework, which will be rolled out as an on‐line workshop to all staff during the first half of 2010.   The College continues to have an aspect of our Code of Conduct as a standing item at all Executive and  Sectional meetings.  

Recordkeeping Plan  Under Section 19 of the State Records Act 2000, every government organisation is required to have a  Recordkeeping Plan [RKP] approved by the State Records Commission.   The Education and Training sector submitted a single RKP to the State Records Commission on 4 March  2004.  It is due to be reviewed and updated by 2011.    The purpose of the sector’s RKP is to set out the manner in which records are to be created by the  agencies and how those records are to be kept.  In addition, a number of documents were jointly  devised by TAFEWA College Records Management Officers in 2006 and all have been implemented by  Great Southern TAFE.  These documents include :  ƒ Records Management Policy  ƒ TAFEWA Retention and Disposal Schedule  ƒ Records Management Standard Operating Procedures Manual  ƒ TAFEWA Thesaurus  ƒ Key Performance Indicators  In accordance with Standard 2, Principle 6 of the RKP, all government organisations are to ensure that  their employees comply with the RKP.  Great Southern TAFE has developed strategies to ensure its  employees are aware of their responsibilities, including reviewing all records policies and procedures.  We commenced updating these in 2009 and this will continue into 2010.   

 

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

71


State Records Commission Standard 2 Recordkeeping Plans: Principle 6 ‐ Compliance    Great Southern TAFE’s recordkeeping systems were  Whether the efficiency and  effectiveness of the organisation’s  last evaluated in 2008.  All files were reviewed to  ensure their titles match keywords from the TAFEWA  recordkeeping systems has been  evaluated or alternatively when  Thesaurus.  The relevant retention and disposal  such an evaluation is proposed.  information has been notated on every file as well as  on our records database.  As a member of the TAFEWA  Records Managers Network [TRMN], we have been  liaising with the former Department of Education and  Training [DET] throughout 2009 in regards to moving  from TRIM Captura to TRIM Context.  This will happen  in 2010.  The nature and extent of the  In 2009, we obtained access to DET’s online Records  recordkeeping training program  Awareness Training [RAT] course and commenced  conducted by or for the  rolling it out to staff.  Records staff attended section  organisation.  meetings (starting with our regional campuses) to  introduce the course.  Subsequently, all staff from that  section were enrolled into the course.  This will  continue into 2010 until all sections have been trained.   External and specialised training is provided to records  management staff as required, generally by attending  relevant training in Perth provided by one of the  records management training companies.  Updates  and information on recordkeeping and records  management are relayed to staff as necessary.    Recordkeeping awareness training was reviewed in  Whether the efficiency and  effectiveness of the recordkeeping  2008.  As part of this review, we implemented the RAT  training program has been  course.  Once all staff have completed the course,  reviewed or alternatively when  reports will be completed to demonstrate the  this is planned to be done.  understanding of recordkeeping at Great Southern  TAFE.  Assurance that the organisation’s  Induction sessions for new staff are conducted  biannually, early in semesters one and two.  Additional  induction program addresses  sessions are held as required.  All new staff receive in  employee roles and  responsibilities in regard to their  their induction kit a copy of the State Records Office  compliance with the  2006 publication “Recordkeeping in Western Australia:  organisation’s recordkeeping  Who is Responsible”.  A tour of the College (including  plan.  the Records section) is given to all new staff.  The  Records Manager gives a brief presentation on records  management, with topics covered including an  overview of individual recordkeeping responsibilities,  the legislative framework and procedural  documentation. 

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

72


Corruption Prevention   The College has a variety of policies and procedures available to staff to assist in the identification,  reporting, management and prevention of misconduct and corruption.     During 2009, College Executive and senior managers attended a workshop facilitated by the Crime and  Corruption Commission on dealing with, and managing, misconduct risks. The workshop was also  delivered to staff in our outlying campuses in Katanning and Denmark.     During early 2010, the College will request all staff to undergo an on‐line training exercise on  Accountable and Ethical Decision Making to reinforce the existing policies and procedures already in     place to generally raise awareness on these matters at all levels throughout the College.  

During 2009, there were no Public Interest Disclosures made.  

Substantive Equality  TAFE Colleges appreciate the invitation to be incorporated in the recently drafted DET response to  Government’s Substantive Equality policy to facilitate our advancement of inclusive practice and to  meet reporting requirements to government.    TAFE Colleges, while not required to report specifically on Substantive Equality, do, however, report on  their College Key Performance Indicators (KPIs), which include participation of equity groups in training  and in college employment.    Successful achievement of those outcomes has required Colleges to continuously address inclusive  practice appropriately, for all equity groups.    Indeed as a requirement for quality assurance, delivery and assessment specifically require attention to  substantive equality principles.    Growth targets for equity groups are unlikely to be achieved unless all aspects of our business are  inclusive.    Given that situation and to minimise the requirement for additional reporting, TAFE Colleges will note  the ‘Policy Framework for Substantive Equality’ and continue to develop and report on college  strategies, engaging our employees as appropriate to the specific college community context to address  substantive equity within their annual planning, performance and reporting.

Sustainability  In late 2009 the new College Sustainability Policy and Action Plan (2010‐2012) was accepted and  endorsed by the GSTAFE Executive Committee. The Policy has four central, inter‐connected  components, as follows: developing a workforce skilled for sustainability in the Great Southern Region  and beyond; providing products and services that support skills for sustainability; demonstrating Great  Southern TAFE leadership in the adoption of sustainability values, principles and practices; and reducing  Great Southern TAFE’s carbon footprint.   

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

73


Subsequent to the introduction of this Policy a committee was formed, the Green Star Committee, to  drive the delivery of the Policy’s four components,. This Committee met twice before year’s end 2009  and began the development of a matrix of sustainability actions for roll‐out in 2010. It was determined  that in the first instance these actions would target what may be termed the ‘low hanging fruit’, that is,  sustainability targets that could be achieved simply and efficiently. Significant among these actions was  the introduction of the Diploma of Sustainability for delivery to internal staff. This Diploma will equip  staff with the necessary ideas and practical skills to engage in sustainability practices across the College  as well as incorporate sustainability concepts in the delivery of training. (The latter capacity is  considered to be quite critical given recent VET policy developments at Commonwealth level.) The  Diploma is now under way and a significant number of College staff is attending.     The Diploma represents the first of many initiatives to be introduced by the Green Star Committee that  will position the College as a leader in sustainability and Green Skills provision in the community. The  Committee now looks forward to increasing its work across the College in conjunction with the College  Energy Committee and with the support of Executive. 

Occupational Safety and Health  During 2009, the College initiated an accredited assessment of our OSH systems which included a  summary of findings.     The assessment confirmed a satisfactory rating (60%) in terms of commitment which is further  evidenced by the fact that in 2009, the College appointed an OSH Coordinator to progress and improve  OSH and injury management initiatives.     The assessment also confirmed that the College has effective mechanisms for consulting with  employees, chiefly through the following mechanisms:     • Regular meetings of the OSH Committee,   • Formal OSH issue resolution procedures,   • Accessible, active and dedicated OSH representatives,   • Effective communication mechanisms,   • OSH training needs and opportunities are communicated to staff.     The College has a workers compensation and injury management procedure which complies with the  Act. Most return to work programmes are administered in house with reference to local medical  practitioners however the College has access to Injury Management Consultants and other Workers  Compensation specialists via our relationship with the Department of Education and Training Shared  Services Centre.        

The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

74


Annual Performance Statistics for 2009 are as follows:   Number of Fatalities: Nil   LTI/D incidence rate: .455  LTI Severity Rate: 0  % of workers returned to work within 28 days: 100%   % of managers trained in OSH: 8% 

Principles of Public Sector Governance  The college approach to the principles of accountability, transparency/openness, integrity, stewardship,  efficiency and leadership are demonstrated throughout the Annual Report. 

Authority for Directions  Great Southern TAFE has received no additional directions and guidelines in relation to vocational  education and training matters through the course of 2009. 

Strategic and Business Plans  In 2009 the college released a new three year Strategic Plan and annual Business Plan according to  TrainingWA strategic outcomes and guidelines, endorsed by the Governing Council. 

International Students  The College has appointed an officer responsible for providing international student support. Services  provided by this officer include: accommodation and employment assistance; pastoral care; liaison with  lecturers and assistance with visa enquiries.

The use of the word 'Aboriginal ' throughout this document respectfully refers to   Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia  The use of the word 'Aboriginal' throughout this document respectfully refers to Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander people of Western Australia

Page | 92 75


Annual report 2009