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P O R T F O L I O

PERIOD

AUTHOR

2019-2020 Selected

ZHANG, TING

PROGRAM

EMAIL

MSAUD

ting.zhang @columbia. edu


_TABLE OF CONTENTS

CATALOG...

URBAN DESIGN STUDIO 01 SEEDING THE MACHAMBA 02 DISPERSING WELLNESS 03 WASTE FRONT

DATA ANALYSIS 04 INFLUENZA ACTIVITIES AND NEIGHBORHOOD CHARACTERISTIC 05 THE STARBUCKS EFFECT

+ + + _TITLE

06 BIKE CAMPAIGN IN NYC

B e g i n s th e s t o r y . . . + + +

RESEARCH

_PROLOGUE

I like stories, those which tell how people meet each other and form their relationships, and I believe that the physical environment plays the essential role as the stage for those romantic plots. Coincidence or pre-ordination is driven by the interconnection of several daily routines, and the points of those intersections are urban public spaces which accommodates people’s everyday life. Designing space is designing people’s lives. I have always been thinking that architects are acting like entrepreneurs, trying to

find the balance of interests from different groups and seek an optimal solution: we organize urban space, provide possibilities for people to build connections with other objects, and the process of design resembles a social practice, which puts every aspect of the society into consideration. At the present technological society, people are drifting apart from each other, living with cell phones in the virtual world. My works in this portfolio are mostly based on human experience in attempt to recall citizens’ collective memory.

07 EXTRACTIVE URBANISM 08 PRESERVE


SEEDING THE MACHAMBA

01

SEEDING THE MACHAMBA Urban Design Studio III Spring 2020 Site: Beira, Mozambique Instructor: Kate Orff, Geeta Mehta,Thaddeus Pawlowski, Lee Altman, Dilip Da Cunha, Julia Watson, Adriana Chavez Team: Joy You-Chiao Wu, Jaime Palacios Anaya, Ashwin Nambiar, Xinyue Liu Role in Team: Research, Conceptual Design, Modeling, Renders

The city of Beira has an extensive and integrated system of traditional agriculture that is under threat. Our project conceives of this system as more than just agriculture it is a productive and preventative flood infrastructure. We envision that this agricultural system could coordinate communities, organize the city, and be the key to recovery and ongoing resilience. Our goals including Consolidate and organize cooperatives at a city scale, Protect social and ecological capital, Empower women in agriculture, Diversify income and create job opportunities, Integrate adaptive, nature-based infrastructure. Machambas in Beira, Mozambique

1


STUDIO | SPRING 2020

SEEDING THE MACHAMBA

GROUND MID

H

LOW G ROU ND

H IG

KM 180 M K 0 9

UND GRO

Of the 71 sites assessed, 82% are located in Sofala and Manica provinces which represent 85% of the displaced population.

0

0.5

1km

Currently, the resettlement plan defines “risk zones” and resettles the people to further inland, it disregards people’s livelihoods and that’s why people keep moving back to the settlements and stay in the front of the threats of flooding.

Urban Morphology 1942

2

1975

1990

2015

3


STUDIO | SPRING 2020

SEEDING THE MACHAMBA

“Flooding” is a consequence of unplanned sprawl into low-lying agricultural land. The current resettlement plan disregards people’s livelihoods and defines “risk zones” in the city, instead of recognizing them as assets for the city. Need of elevational programming for future cyclones and urban growth.

Beira 2020

Beira 1990s Since before the colonial times, small scale agriculture has been embedded in the livelihoods of the people from Beira. This map depicts the correlation of the damaged areas of the city with the 10 historical agricultural neighborhoods defined by the Green Zones Office. In 1987, about 88% of the agricultural land in the city was considered a machamba. People started organizing in women led cooperatives and, in 1990, the General Union of Coops became an independent Coop Company. Lack of support from the government disincentivized members to work together, but their agricultural practices remained in their machambas. 4

5


STUDIO | SPRING 2020

SEEDING THE MACHAMBA

SPRING

SUMMER

FALL

Cyclone Season Wet Season

300 mm 30 °C

WINTER

ture

pera average tem

200 mm 20 °C

100 mm 10 °C

09

10

annual rainfall

11

12

01

02

03

04

05

06

07

avg. warmest

avg. driest

08

avg. coldest avg. wettest

Avg. Annual Precipitation is: 1593.8mm (62.7") Source: weather-atlas.com

1

5

3

2

4

annual rotation of main crops mandioca

sweet potato corn

carrot cabbage

VERNACULAR TECHNOLOGIES

6

1 Foliage barriers as windbreak to prevent erosion.

2 Low walls to protect soil wealth.

3 Consociation mix of crops to reduce pest attacks.

4 Gentle slope for proper irrigation.

5 Reed bed to maximize water retention.

7


STUDIO | SPRING 2020

SEEDING THE MACHAMBA

Spe Ma nd cha mb ac Rig red hts U p its ma gra to Ag teri de- land roa Tra ls house inin Inc g e

nti ve s

Ag indricul t Bo ust ura ost ry l t

he eco no my

Pa rtn ers hip

Ge t Ma cha mb ac red its

Fo facod p il ro Cre ities ces sin ate job s

Based on this water-holding system we propose three community based organizing frameworks to facilitate urban transformation according to different social contexts.

g

COMID -O GR P OU ND

D UN O GR P W LOCO-O

Wa ne ter h t Pro wo old r ing d la uc k

s dit cre

un wat Mo g with

s dit d a cre n e b Sp ham and l/ c to l choong Ma s t h ion rs i Rig arme -Train duct F Agro pro nt p Crodiscou es

tiv en c In

r& atodit b u e d Inc d cr r & foo o em fo cubato yst r In dit s d e e

se l s rea ltura al land c n u I ric tion ltur ag duc agricu pro ded an Exp

cr

COHIGH -O GR P OU ND

ship tner Par

Job & Training

Agriculture land

Shift house

De up nsify hougradeand Ve sing rt t ica yp l b olo uil gie din g s

Partnersh ip

in Liv

Shift house

1

Str locengt al m he arkning Eq ets R uit a inf bl e ras e s tru oci pa orga ctu al re marcelsnizin c a g Ma hamrou c cu ham ba nd e b de for a as vel a op me nt

8

a t Ge hamb c a M

2

Training program system

nd tiv risk scap e ea mi s tig ato r

The overall objective is to strategically retreat to safer zones combined with community empowerment and economic development. High Ground Coop - Provide welfare facilities / densify housing Low Ground Coop - Increase agricultural production and manage water holding systems. Mid Ground Coop - Boost economy by scaling agriculture / aquaculture production.

3

Water holding system

Agriculture land

Ge t Ma cha mb ac red its

Spe Ma nd cha mb ac Rig red h Ch its t s ildr t M o dis ach en d land cou am a nt ba ycare ma rke t

Inc en tiv es

9


STUDIO | SPRING 2020

SEEDING THE MACHAMBA

COMMUNITY CENTER / MARKET

2

MARKET STREET

NEIGHBORHOOD MACHAMBA

3

EXTENDED MARKET

1

COMMUNITY CENTER 2

10

NEIGHBORHOOD KITCHEN

1

MACHAMBA GUIDELINE

4

ELEVATED HOUSING

3

DITCH

11


STUDIO | SPRING 2020

SEEDING THE MACHAMBA

NEIGHBORHOOD MACHAMBA

N

O

R FA N-

ME

I SH RS

G FTIN

AGRO-TRAINING HUB / MARKET SING SHIFTING TO THE HOU MO

IGH GROUND TO H

1

2

BUILD MOUNDS

3

MULTIPURPOSE GROUND FLOOR

AGRO-TRAINING

4 INTEGRATE AGRI-AQUACULTURE

UN D

2

PRODUCT STORAGE & TRANSPORTATION

1

EXISTING MACHAMBA LOCATION

AGRO-TRAINING HUB / MARKET

NEIGHBORHOOD MACHAMBA

12

13


STUDIO | SPRING 2020

SEEDING THE MACHAMBA

Here the machamba system will seed the mid-ground in the form of a co-operative industry that can sustain the large scale agriculture surrounding it. With a strong expertise in machamba management, women can easily secure skilled jobs in these industries. Also the farmer training schools in the low ground can help farmers transition to a floating machamba system by piloting it in the existing reservoir.

FOOD PROCESSING FACILITIES

LARGE MACHAMBA

FLOATING MACHAMBA

Co-op can also help communities for land transformation and building floating machambas. Floating machambas production system can Guarantee food production in different climate condition as well as food diversity.The system does not rely on available fertile land; and it uses less space than conventional crop production, generating high yields of both vegetables and fish for consumption. 14

15


STUDIO | FALL 2019

DISPERSING WELLNESS

02 DISPERSING WELLNESS Urban Design Studio II Fall 2019 Site: Hudson Valley, New York Instructor: Kaja KĂźhl, Anna Dietzsch, Jerome Haferd, Liz McEnaney, Justin Moore, Shachi Pandey, Raafi Rivero, David Smiley, Dragana Zoric Team: Mansoo Han, Niharika Shekhawat, Shailee Shah Role in Team: Preliminary Research, Conceptual Design, Modeling, Axonometric Drawing, Renders, Video Making, Community Interaction, Interview

USA produces an estimated 6,456.7 million tons of CO2 every year. Healthcare industry accounts for 10% of the total greenhouse gases generated and has experienced a 30% increase in the rate of gas emissions from 2006. In the Hudson Valley, geography of the region drives people’s health seeking behavior, residents travel upto 1.5 hours one way for their basic health needs. At the same time, many hospitals in the Hudson Valley have 50% percent vacant bed space, that can be more efficiently repurposed. The project challenges and changes the perspective of the current healthcare system from being a measure of cure to an extension of health and wellbeing of the community. Therefore, we reimagine dispersion of wellness through an additive typology that empowers the role of social infrastructure to spread a wellness network in rural areas, that substantially lower the environmental impacts of the healthcare sector, and create an equitable and sustainable model. Site Model, Mansoo Han & Ting Zhang

16

17


30.6%

USA

E

E Patients

HIGH CARBON FOOTPRINT

Health Care Facilities

ed

for he

s a lt h c a r e ne

care services

E

ed

60m

in

rvic

E

in

OF ACCESSIBILITY Inaccessiblenot healthcare preventive (PHYSICAL + MONETARY) Inaccessible healthcare

d

4% o see

r Patient se re transportation

k m o r e h e a lt h c a 4%

12%

e vi c

to

see

k m o r e h e a lt h c a

re

E

se

r vi

s ce

SYSTEM RETROFIT

53.9%

51.6%

1 : 1,860

2010

51.6%

53.2%

53.2%

2010

1 : 1,860

53.2%

2020

2020

2020

2030

31.5%

21.7% 18.6% 21.7% Adults

51.1%

31.5%

who consume 18.6% 1 or more

fruit/vegetable 31.5% 2016 Adults

51.1%

2030

2010

21.7% 18.6%

51.1%

51.6%

51.6%

in

E

121% 107.9%

130% 130% 121% 121% Coronary heart disease 107.9% mortality per 100,000 107.9% 2014-16

Coronary heart disease

mortality per disease 100,000 Coronary heart mortality per 2014-16 100,000 2014-16

392.9Substance Mental Health Use Use Mental Health Substance 461.5 369.6

392.9 392.9 461.5 461.5

369.6 Mental disorder 369.6 hosp. per 10,000 2014-16

Mental disorder hosp. per 10,000 Mental disorder hosp.2014-16 per 10,000

2014-16

2040

2040

who consume 1 or more fruit/vegetable Adults who consume2016

2040

2030

1 or more fruit/vegetable 2016

2040

42.0% 31.0% 9.0%

42.0% 31.0% Pop. without access to 42.0% 9.0% locations for physical activity 2014 9.0%

31.0%

Pop. without access to locations for physical activity 2014 Pop. without access to

locations for physical activity 2014

35.6 41.8 28.7

35.6 41.8 Drug abuse 35.6 28.7

41.8

hospitalization per 10,000 28.7 2016

Drug abuse hospitalization per 10,000 2016 Drug abuse

hospitalization per 10,000 2016

2040

bia

Colum

bia

Colum

Greene

Greene

bia

Colum

Greene

EE

E E

EE E E E

E

E E

16%

SYSTEM RETROFIT

54.2%

16%

Pharmaceutical

E

Other sector & services

Agriculture

E

E

E E

Legend PATIENT PREVENTIVEHospital HEALTHCARE E

E

Legend

E

E

E

E E

3076 - 8439

3076 - 8439

Primary Care8440 - 19986

8440 - 19986

19987 - 41245 County Boundary

19987 - 41245

Energy for

41246 - 74413 Urban Density Energy for production of plastic 0 production 32% of plasticand electrical equipment 0 5 10 Median Household Income and electrical equipment

112 - 3075 3076 - 8439 8440 - 19986 19987 - 41245

18

41246 - 74413 0

5

10

E

41246 - 74413 5

20 Miles

10

E E

46.1%

Urban Density

20 Miles

20 Miles

42.5%

E

E EE

E

E

Primary Care

E E EE

42.5%

E

E

Median Household E Income Median Household Income Legend E 112 - 3075 112 - 3075

Hospital

E

E

E

43.7%

E County Boundary County Boundary Urban Density

E

38.1%

43.7%

E E E

E

E

Hospital

E

E

E

EE

EE E

E

EEPrimary Care E

84%

E

43.7%

E

Other manufacturing

E E EE E

E

E E

E

E

38.1%

E

EE E E EE E E

16%

84%

38.1%

EE E E E E

E E

and chemical products SYSTEM RETROFIT

PATIENT PREVENTIVE HEALTHCARE

EE E E E E

E

E

E

E

Waste treatment

E

E

E

EE E E E E

E

Anesthetic gases and Anesthetic gases and metered dose inhalers 13% metered dose inhalers 84%

Energy for production of plastic and electrical equipment

2030

DISPERSING WELLNESS

54.2%

Other manufacturing

32%

2020

Greene County

2030

EE

in

E E E

E

E

PATIENT PREVENTIVE HEALTHCARE

Anesthetic gases and metered dose inhalers

2020

E

Other sector & services 11% Other manufacturing

13%

2010

1 : 2,030

m

EE E E E E

E

Patient transportation

Agriculture

obese Adultsare who are obese2016 2016

E 15

E

EE

11%

EE

E

Pharmaceutical and chemical products

Pharmaceutical 9% Agriculture 9% and chemical products

Adults who

2040

1 : 2,030

m

E E

2030

1 : 2,030 15

E E

2020

E

30min

E

25.5% 2016

58.4% bia E E CoElum 58.4%

E 58.4% 15 m E Ein E

E

E

54.2%

Building energy

5%

E

E

s

Building energy Gas, heating & cooling

3%

E

E 30min

30min

Gas, heating & cooling 12% 3% Other primary industries Patient transportation Other primary industries 3% Waste 3% treatment

5%

E

E E EE E

E

26.0% 26.0% 26.3% Adults25.5% who 26.3% are obese

31.6%

24.5%

18.2%

Greene County51.6% 53.9%

Colum

E

60min

1 : 2,790

for cure

f

t

E

1 : 2,790

Serious Illness/Disorders

E

E

60min Greene

f

d

LACK OF ACCESSIBILITY (PHYSICAL + MONETARY)

Greene

30.6% 31.6%

30.6%

53.9%

51.6%

1 : 1,860 bia

E E

60min

Serious Illness/Disorders

rcalth ca k more hoe e

more spending for cure

f

ce

in

E EE E

Greene

1 : 950

60m

1 : 2,790

LACK OF more spending ACCESSIBILITY s or cure Illness/Disorders Serious ce (PHYSICAL + for ce r vi d more MONETARY) se spending to re see

or

E

not preventive

60m

k health care se see rvic LACK n’t es do

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es

es

do

E E E EEE E EE E E EE EE E E E E E E E EE EEE E E E E EE E E EE E EEEE EE E E E E E E E E E E E E EE E EEEEEEE E E E E EE E E EE EE E EEE E E E E E E EE E E E E E E EEE E E E EE EEEEE E E E E EEEE EE E E E EE E E EEE E E E E E EE E EE E E E E E E E EEEE E bia E Colum E E E E E E E E E

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fo se more need for health k health care se r health care see rvic care services n’t es do s ne ce ed not ipreventive k health care se for he s er v see rvic a lt h c a r e n’t

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E E

Patients

HIGH more need for health CARBON care servicesPatients FOOTPRINT ne

EE

EEE E

pollute environment

FOOTPRINT

E

E E E EE

25.5%

E

EE E EE E E E EE

E

HIGH

Health Care environment pollute CARBON Facilities

%

%

E E E E E EEE EEE EE

health care se rvic vide es pro

health care se rvic vide es pro

E E EEE E

E

pollute environment

Waste treatment

%

EE E EE

U.S.A. HEALTH SECTOR

U.S.A. HEALTH SECTOR

18.2%2010

E

26.3%

24.5%

24.5%

E

E E EEE EE

E

health care se rvic vide es pro

%

%

10%

EMISSIONS

E

E

E

EMISSIONS

U.S.A. HEALTH SECTOR 10%

%

%

USA

EMISSIONS

10% USA

Building energy Other sector & Gas, heating & cooling services 8% Other primary industries 8%

%

18.2% 30.6%30.6%

Mental Health Substance Use

130% 26.0% Chronic Disease Obesity&Diabetes Chronic Disease Obesity&Diabetes

31.6%

30.6%

Columbia Columbia County County

E E

essible healthcare

%

Chronic Disease Obesity&Diabetes

Columbia County Population Age 65 and Population Age 65 Over and Over

ealth Care Facilities

%

Population Age 65 and Over

STUDIO | FALL 2019

E

E

Columbia Memorial Hospital Columbia Memorial Hospital

E

51 Fire stations 51 Fire stations

E

E 30.7%

EE

E E46.1% E EE E

E E E

E

E E

E EE

42.5%

EE

E

E EE

E EE E

30.7%

E

E

EE

E E E EE E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E EEE E E E EEE EE E E E E E EE E EE 30.7% EE E E EEE E EEEE E E E EEE E EEE E EE EE E E E E E E E E 46.1% E EE E E E EEE E E EE E E E E E E E E E E E E E EEE E EEE EE E E E EEE E E EEE E E E E E E E E EEE EE

E

E E

21 Public libraries 21 Public libraries

Columbia Memorial Hospital 51 Fire stations 21 Public libraries

19


STUDIO | FALL 2019

DISPERSING WELLNESS

HOSPITAL AS PARK PROGRAM TRANSITION OFFICE 3F 84,750 SQFT

MAIN HOSPITAL 6F 58.4% VACANCY 134,500 SQFT

PARKING 3F 67,000 SQFT RESEARCH CENTER 2F 17,200 SQFT SERVICE BUILDING 1F 18,500 SQFT

HOSPITAL 3F 55,400 SQFT HOSPITAL 3F 18,450 SQFT HOSPITAL 2F 9,500 SQFT

ORIGINAL PROGRAM

DOUBLE SKIN FACADE CARE CENTER DAY CARE & FAMILY CARE 17,200 SQFT

COMMUNITY PAVILLION TRAINING, PUBLIC KITCHEN, TELEHEALTH OFFICE 18,500 SQFT

PROPOSED PROGRAM

COLUMBIA MEMORIAL HOSPITAL HUDSON, COLUMBIA COUNTY

COMMUNITY PAVILLION TELEHEALTH CENTER COMMUNITY GYM TRAINING CENTER PUBLIC KITCHEN

20

21


STUDIO | FALL 2019

22

DISPERSING WELLNESS

Pocket Window

Community Pavilion

Stepped Green Roof

Children’s Playground

23


STUDIO | FALL 2019

DISPERSING WELLNESS

RURAL AREA MODULAR SHED

PRATTSVILLE, GREENE COUNTY

4’

2.5’ 2.5’

12 nlum300 0 o C l- l -3 0ft e ee in X1 Pan n St 1/8 8 i ft 8 X 6 X 8 n Pla with r i 2 X X 36 el ba 2in hann 3 C-c am e Ib

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25


STUDIO | FALL 2019

26

DISPERSING WELLNESS

Public Promenade

Shed As A Living Room

Storefront Healthcare

Healthcare Center

27


STUDIO | FALL 2019

DISPERSING WELLNESS

Presentation Video Interview and Sketch Diagrams Included

Community Interaction Hudson, Columbia County, New York & Prattsville, Greene County, New York

28

29


STUDIO | SUMMER 2019

WASTE FRONT

03

WASTE FRONT Urban Design Studio I Summer 2019 Site: Sunset Park, New York Instructor: Tricia Martin, Nans Voron, Hayley Eber, Sagi Golan, Quilian Riano, Austin Sakong, Shin-pei Tsay Research Team: Mansoo Han, Niharika Shekhawat, Design Team: Claudia Kleffmann, Vasanth Mayilvahanan Role in Team: Preliminary Research, Conceptual Design, Modeling, Axonometric Drawing, Renders, Video Making

Sunset Park’s Waterfront is an Industrial area which has multiple underutilized NYC properties that has a great connectivity, and it currently hosts SIMS, the facility which receives 100% of NYC’s residential recyclable waste and sorts it for later recycling. But, all this residential waste only represents 25% of NYC’s Waste Stream. The remaining 75% is Commercial Waste of which only 22% gets recycled. And this recycling happens scattered all over the city, costing a lot of money and polluting due to its distribution. This project proposes a Green Waste System that will manage and recycle NYC waste, by locating a number of processes in one specific area, therefore reducing transportation, money and time invested in recycling, creating an asset at Sunset Park that will give back to the community by providing jobs, education, public spaces and energy.

30

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33


STUDIO | SUMMER 2019

WASTE FRONT

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ON GNIKRAP

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FOR SALE

FOR SALE

34

FOR SALE

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NO PARKING

35


STUDIO | SUMMER 2019

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End of the story... + + + _EPILOGUE

Honestly, I was once a pessimist towards the present technological society where people are drifting apart from each other. However, my encounter with architecture helps me recognize the power of space and ignites my passion to explore a better living environment and a promoted city life, which leads to my decision to further my study, namely that provide a better setting for people to create their unique stories.

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Ting Zhang '20 MSAUD Columbia GSAPP  

Ting Zhang '20 MSAUD Columbia GSAPP