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ZHEN HUA PORTFOLIO Selected Academic Work Master of Science in Architecture and Urban Design GSAPP | Columbia University


CONTENTS 01 UD STUDIO_ WATER URBANISM IN GREAT RIFT VALLEY Trilateral Connection in Kechene, Addis Ababa Core studio Work, Spring 2020

02 UD STUDIO_ A GREEN NEW DEAL IN THE HUDSON VALLEY A sentence rewritten in Sing Sing Correctional Facility, Ossining Core studio Work, Fall 2019

03 UD STUDIO_ URBAN DESIGN THROUGH TRANSFORMATIVE SYSTEMS Beyond School in Sunset Park Neighborhood Core studio Work, Summer 2019

04 ARCH 6785A_ THEORY OF CITY FORM Osmopolis as future city History & Theory, Fall 2019

05 ARCH 4715A_ RETHINKING BIM Facade design for Lever House Building Technology, Spring 2020

06 PLAN 4577A_ GEOGRAPHICAL INFOMATION SYSTEM Find homes for the homeless Visual Studies, Fall 2019


TRILATERAL CONNECTION Zhen Hua Spring 2020

STUDIO CRITIC PROGRAM LOCATION PARTNER

Kate Orff Prison Space Redevelopment Kechene, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Shuo Han, Yuan Qin, Zhou Wu


RIVER

MONT ENTOTO KECHENE

RIVER ECOSYSTEM

AKAKI RIVER

HUMAN HABITAT

ADDIS AIRPORT

3.0mi

1,500ft

Kechene is located at north edge of Addis Ababa, nearby abundant forests, rivers and human resources which can be utilized in a more synergistic manner to improve environmental quality and supply much needed wood and water for daily life. Altitude

Speed and Damage

Wooden Bridge SEASONAL FLOODING Kechene is close to Entoto, with a steeply sloping terrain. The rapid flow of water down this steep topography causes seasonal floods and intense erosion.

Concrete Bridge Stone Crossing


2000

2010

2019

ECO-SYSTEM INVASIVE PLANT Deforestation has been caused by tbe need for firewood and building materials. Planting Eucalyptus has created a long-term problem instead of solving it. However, Eucalyptus wood remains an important source of firewood and building material for local people.

CRAFTS ECONOMY Fuel

Artisan communities live next to natural resources, but have to depend upon buying bare necessities:

Pottery Making

Market

Linen Washing

Brokers

Raw Linen Exogenous Production Factors

30% of cost

They live next to the city but need intermediaries to sell their goods.

Weaving 50% of cost

They live next to the forest but only use it as a source of firewood.

Water

90% of cist

They living next to the River still need to purchase water.

Clay


UNBALANCED RELATIONSHIP Water

Waste

Flood

Erosion

Consumption Economy

Ecosystem

Fuel

Local economy, water resources and the ecosystem are unmanaged, which can create a compounding negative impact - precipitating flooding, hillside erosion and overconsumption.

STRATEGY Meketaya & Kusquem River

CONNECTING NATURAL RESOURCE

Addis City

Pottery Making and Weavin

CONNECTING HUMAN RESOURCE

g

Shembeko & Eucalyptus Eco

Balance the three systems and turn them into positive resources for each other by forming: 1. Connecting people to managed Natural Resources 2. Generating mroe direct Market Connections between makers and tourists 3. Expanding the potential of peope to maintain and steward these vital landscapes


ENHANCING NATURAL RESOURCES FOR SUSTAINABILITY:

ECOLOGY CONSTRUCTION

Check Dam

Wooden Bridge

Contour Trench

Skip Point Shembeko Planting

Composing Public Toilet

Concrete Bridge

Stone Crossing

Shembeko is planted on stream banks for water purification and thatch building materials. Check Dams and Contour Trenches are built to slow the water down, reduce erosion, and define crossing points.

Public Toilets and Skip Points (Solid waste Collection Place)for waste treatment and river cleansing are introduced as nodes along the system.


EXPAND HANDICRAFT MARKETS FOR INCREASED DIRECT INCOME

SOCIAL PROGRAMS

Wooden Bridge Existing Co-op Renovation

Living & Production Units Existing Co-op Renovation Street Market Concrete Bridge

Stone Crossing

Construct street market with modular framework for direct selling

Leverage existing co-op renovation for better working environment.

Produce living & production units for economy expandability


CREATE LIVE-WORK UNITS ALONG THE STREAM BANKS

Wooden Bridge

IMPROVE THE LIVING ENVIRONMENT AND OPEN UP CRAFTS MAKER MARKETS FOR LOCAL MARKETS AND POTENTIAL TOURIST INTEREST. Footpath Living & Production Units Corridor

Riverfront Park Concrete Bridge

Stone Crossing

Define a series of activated riverfront public market spaces

Define a series of community facilities


WOODEN BRIDGE Public Space Unit Bridge Contour Trench

Pottery Making Cluster Terraces Footpath Filtration Planting Check Dam

CONCRETE BRIDGE Bridge

Market

Market

Retention Pond

STONE CROSSING N额外ew Pottery Work Space

Bridge

Shembeko Co-op

Skip Point

Co-op


The Wooden Bridge typology offers a safe crossing point and market programs.

0

202

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SE

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202

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DS

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The Concrete Bridge typology is a site for market activities and production such as drying yarn and cloth.

0

202

DS

E

SE

5

202

DS

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203

DS

The Stone Crossing typology offers an infrastructure for improved environment and seedling cultivation area.

ED

SE

020

2 S-

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SE

024

2 S-

ED

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026

2 S-


A SENTENCE REWRITTEN Zhen Hua Fall 2019

STUDIO CRITIC PROGRAM LOCATION PARTNER

Kaja Kuehl Prison Space Redevelopment Westchester, Hudson Valley, New York Aasiya, Alvi Rahman Khan, Yuan Qin


Closed Prison

WESTCHESTER COUNTY 24% PRISON POPULATION SHRINKAGE

Prisons are the second most carbon-intensive public buildings after hospitals.


1. Officers’s housing & commerical street 4. Prison Museum 5. Art Center 2. Public space 6. Oyster farm & protective park 3. Access point

The project is about the Shrinking Prison System in the Hudson Valley under the Green New Deal. Among these prisons, Sing Sing Correctional Facility is chosen for this project as an example of what a prison facility could look like under the GND. Sing Sing Correctional facility in Ossining is in proximity to New York City. Its location on the waterfront also makes it vulnerable to flooding. In a timeline spanning over 200 years, it has been a walled facility that is isolated from the community. The project addresses the goals of carbon, justice, and jobs utilising three strategies that reimagine Hudson Valley’s prison infrastructure in terms of the Green New Deal.


Integrating the prison as a part of Ossining’s fabric by softening the wall between the public and the prison

A prototype where the first floor is retail run by local business owners, and the second floor is temporary housing is designed for officers as currently most officers reside in the trailer park on the prison periphery. Along the wall towards the waterfront, public spaces like cafes, reading areas and retail are added to activate the route and generate jobs. As a resolution for high carbon emmission caused by transportation, the spaces near the prison entrance incorporate criminal justice offices like parole offices, legal-aid, courts. The project overcome the height difference of 15m by creating an access point that has two layers of terraces connected by a glazed elevator which offers a view of the site.


A connecting space is designed to overcome the segregation between the inmates and the community

Since the elevation difference and train track segregate the site, we propose a buffer zone above the sunken track with art therapy and family reunion programs. The site can be accessed by both the inmates and the local communities at different times of the day. To spatially translate the “Rehabilitation through art� program, there will be art workshops for the prisoners and a gallery exhibiting their work. Additionally, family reunion has proven to be the best program to reduce recidivism. Family reunion and inmate education programs are provided so that the families can learn and play together as part of our social justice strategy. The western half of the site has a prison museum in the old powerhouse, and the old cellblock is part of the exhibition to educate people on the horrors of the incarceration system.


A protective park along the shoreline to address flooding and the absence of public spaces in the locality

As part of the environmental justice initiative, a berm with wetlands along the water is proposed. It is a network of walkways, some cantilevered to overlook the waterfront, decks. The guard tower are transformed into view towers.

2m

1m

play gr ou nd

sw po imm ol ing

law n

law n

sk ate pa rk

law n

co m m er cia l

co m m er cia l

Beyond the wetlands, the proposal incorporates oyster farming where the local community can plant oysters, and the inmates can process them to generate employment and revenue. There are spaces along the waterfront to set up markets and commercial buildings which use green energy. Our goal is to create a cooperation program between the inmates and the community where they are both stakeholders.

was wat te tre er atm en t

0m

water treatment lawn commercial skate park swimming pool retaining wall

There are also playgrounds and sports grounds to activate the space and provide public spaces that are absent in Ossining.


The project creates affordable spaces for a diverse group of people who are currently using make-shift backyards for community spaces

Morning

Afternoon

Temporary exhibition area where at certain times of the day, prisoners can set up the exhibition of their artwork. The public can visit it at other times of the day.


BEYOND SCHOOL Zhen Hua Summer 2019

STUDIO CRITIC PROGRAM LOCATION PARTNER

Tricia Martin, Nans Voron Neighborhood Design Sunset Park, Brooklyn, New York Mansoo Han, Tal Fuerst


High School Elementry School Pre School Playground Park Children age 0-20 density distribution < 200 200 - 350 351 - 550 551 - 1000 1000 < Typs of intervention High speed street Low speed street Potential sites Stage 1 Stage 2 Stage 3 Site intervention prototype Traffic Volume (per day) < 8000 8000 - 25000 25000 - 65000 65000 - 125000 > 125000


Today Sunset Park Neighborhood has a growing population of which 30% are children. There is a lack of open space in the neigborhood, overcrowding of schools, unsafe streets for kids, and neccesity for afternoon activities, when their parents are at work. Our objective is to strengthen the routes between home, school and the park.


Large Scale Expansion

Schools

Crosswalk

Permanent Expansion

Bollards

Temporary Expansion The large scale intervention was to expand and pedestrianized the streets around schools. Each schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s compound will act as additional recreation area, during school time and after, and also provides extra open space for the neighborhood in general.


Medium Scale Park

Due to the topography differences of the park, there is a retaining wall in the perimeter of the park. This wall blocks the view of the park from the street in the eye level of a kid, and also blocks the views from the street, and creates unsafe paths in certain time of days.

Before

After


School

Park


Making

An important part of the design intervention is the material itself. It is deisgned to be part of the neighborhood, to be affordable and also to be a process the kids can learn from. It is proposaed to use recycled plastic taken from Sims factory at the waterfront. Sims factory collects, sort and bundle almost all of NYC recycled waste. In this process will also participate the manufacturing establishments in the waterfront for the shredding and washing stage, and the makers spaces for the melting, molding or printing stages, to create the finalized item.


Osmopolis Zhen Hua Fall 2019 COURSE CRITIC Vishaan Chakrabarit PROGRAM City model of the future LOCATION Poughkeepsie, New York PARTNER Adina Bauman, Erica Song, Jolene Jussif, Zhou Wu


TTERIES TH : PO INK ICE BE PR

IES CIT

JACO BS :D E

D

OSMOPOLIS

E

N: BOULEVARD DO LA RE F

RE RIÈ ER

AR RD: G DEN CI TIE WA S HO

EUG EN E

C

IFE OF GREAT A &L M ER

AN IC

H AT

LT

N FOR BARC PLA EL O N A

: DA ER

Using Jane Jacobs methodologies of densification, diversification and community-based design, our goal is to sensitively promote economic and social growth in periphery cities. Our design strategies seek to create a self sustaining city that will grow and contribute to its surrounding metropolises, rather than to rely upon it.

The Self-sustaining city The City of the Future is the Periphery City. It is one that is outside of major metropolitan centers and currently too removed to benefit from metropolitan resources. Traditionally out of the limelight, these periphery cities can evolve to be completely self-sufficient, lessening the burden on larger metropolises to provide jobs and an economic base to commuters. This mutually beneficial relationship becomes one of “osmosis” giving way to the Osmopolis: the city thriving and yet still supporting and enriching it’s neighboring metropolis. Osmopolis can offer ways of living not necessarily tied to hyper dense urban centers. Cities such as Newark, NJ; Oakland,CA; Ad Diriyah, SA; Piraeus, Greece; and Poughkeepsie, NY are all indicative of this condition. These communities are prosperous and considered more densely populated than suburbs. This project focuses on Poughkeepsie, NY as its test site. Inhabiting a grey zone between New York City and Albany, Poughkeepsie has the ideal geographic underpinnings to become the new Osmopolis.

The City of the Future will not built up from a tabula rasa using the latest technology but rather, will be self-sustaining and cultivated from existing complex urban systems and relationships. The self sustaining city intends to respect the residents and allow the city to grow organically upwards, rather than sprawl outwards, while promoting economic growth and sustainability in new commercial centers.

OSMOPOLIS

OSMOPOLIS

METROPOLIS

OSMOPOLIS


SITE Poughkeepsie, New York

LOCATION Poughkeepsie is located along the Hudson Valley, halfway between New York City and the capital Albany, making it a strategic position for a high speed train. The distance to New York City by car is 1 hour and 40 minutes while the distance to Albany by car is 1 hour and 20 minutes. NOTABLE PARTS IN HISTORY The city is known to have beautiful nature views and many wealthy families such as the Astors, the Rogers, and the Vanderbilts have built summer homes in the area. The city played an important part in the countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history, being New Yorks second capital, and the setting for the Ratification Convention for New York State where New York entered the union of the original 13 colonies. INDUSTRY The industry here in the 19th century was whale rendering, shipping, millineries, paper mills and breweries. Up until 1972, many were employed at a local cough drop factory. And until 2008, IBM had a large campus adjacent to the city that was once employed many residents, but has since relocated its work elsewhere. DEMOGRAPHICS As of 2010, the population was 32,736 people, with 5,800 inhabitants per square mile. There were 13,000 housing units with 2,500 per square mile. The racial makeup is 53% white, 36% black or African American, 11% Hispanic or Latino, 1.6% Asian, 0.4% Native American, 5% from other races, and 4.1% from two or more races. The median household income was $29,386, and median income for a family was $35,779. OPERATING TRANSPORTATION Currently, Poughkeepsie has a few different options for public transportation to New York. There is a rail commuter service to New York City where the city is the last stop along the Metro North Hudson Line. For longer trips, Amtrak also serves the city with a stop.


FUTURE

NOW

LANDF

Landfill & Anti-sprawl

LANDF

LANDF

UNIVERS

LANDF

UNIVERS

Universal Basic Mobility

FIGURE GROUND

UNIVERS

Poughkeepsie has two main arterial roads that cross the city.

UNIVERS

COMMERCIAL AREA ACTS AS A SPINE THROUGN THE CITY

Microgrid Zoning

OUTLYING AREAS ARE ZONED FOR SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL CONTRIBUTING TO SPRAWL

REG

REG

REG

REG

ZONING MAP The commerical area acts as a spine through the city.

Rigrid & Connection


TRANSPORTATION MAP TO ALBANY NETWORK OF UNIVERSAL BASIC MOBILITY FUTU

RE T RAN

S IT L IN E

FUTU

RE TR AN

EVERY CITY RESIDENT RECEIVES 2000 FREE MOBILITY CREDITS RENEWED ON A MONTHLY BASIS.

S IT L IN E

MICROMOBILITY STATION 5 CREDITS PER RIDE

S CI TY EX TE NT

ELECTRIC BUSES 10 CREDITS PER RIDE ELECTRIC TRAMS 15 CREDITS PER RIDE AUTOMATED VEHICLE ROUTE 5 CREDITS PER MILE HIGH SPEED MAGLEV TRAINS

30 CREDITS PER RIDE

R I V E R

5 MINUTE WALK

URE

H U D S O N

FUT

TERMINUS IN NYC

YE X

TE

NT

NSIT

LINE

S

CITY EXTENTS FU TU RE TR AN SIT LIN E

FU TU RE TR A N SI T

LI N E

CIT

TRA

URBAN STRATEGY Universal Basic Mobility

FU TU RE TR A N SI T LI N E

The focus is on systems and methods governing modes of transit. Every city resident is provided with a minimum level of free daily transportation allowing them to commute within and out of the city. Micro-mobility and autonomous vehicle routes fill in gaps as the city grows and infrastructure catches up.


ZONING DISTRIBUTION CREATION OF NEW COMMERCIAL CORRIDOR

RESOURCE

Asphalt

Vacant Land

Public Transpirtation

Land Bank

Nature

Micro-grids & Mix-use

Landfill & Forestry

Under-used Streets

PRODUCTION

CONSUMPTION

Energy + Land Self-sustainable Urban Life Employment

Recreation

Farm

URBAN STRATEGY Zoning Distribution Typical periphery cities have a central business district that occurs along a main street. Building heights and forms will take different shapes. This strategy seeks to diversify zoning to promote livability.


LANDFILL PROCESS LANDFILL BENEATH PARK

SOIL LAYER TO ESTABLISH VEGETATION PERVIOUS LAYER FOR LINEAR PROTECTION AND LEACHATE COLLECTION

GAS VENTS

FINAL LANDFILL SURFACE

CONTROL RUNOFF

SEALING LAYER

SLOPE STABILIZATION MONITORING WELL

MONITORING WELL

SECURE LANDFILL RUNON CONTROL

LEACHATE COLLECTION

IMPERVIOUS LAYER LEACHATE DETECTION SYSTEM

SECONDARY LAYER

WATER TABLE

URBAN STRATEGY LANDFILL AS LANDSCAPE This strategy would work to ban usage of single-use products, promote anaerobic digestion for reuse of material into energy. Waste is compressed and compacted into an ever-growing landfilled park space encircling the city.


NEW COMMERCIAL CORRIDORS FORMED OUTSIDE CENTER

NEW ZONING ALLOWS FOR MICROGRIDS

A A TH


AERTERIAL ROAD ACTS AS A SPINE HROUGH THE CITY OUTLYING AREAS ARE ZONED FOR DENSER RESIDENTIAL COMBATING SPRAWL


TWISTED LOUVER FACADE Zhen Hua Spring 2020 COURSE CRITIC PROGRAM LOCATION PARTNER

Jared B. Friedman Facade Design for Lever House 390 Park Ave, New York Kuan-I Wu


The project aims at designing a facade for Lever House to help better fit into the context and meanwhile stand out to receive public attention which the building lacks at present partialy due to the insufficiency of natural lighting resulted from the surrounding high rise buildings.


Work Flow

Sunlight Hour Analysis

Divide

Spring

Summer

Shade Analysis

Morning

Autumn

Louver Detail

Noon

Afternoon

Winter


FIND HOMES FOR THE HOMELESS

FIND HOMES FOR THE HOMELESS Zhen Hua Fall 2019 COURSE CRITIC Leah Meisterlin PROGRAM GIS Research Project LOCATION Mahattan, New York PARTNER Yuan Qin


1. We aim to identify the areas where people have high risk of being homeless. We clarify several factors that can lead to homeless issue, then we use fuzzy logic to give them weight. Thus we get the areas where people have highest risk of being homeless. 2. We find the excel of all homeless shelters in NYC, then we display X,Y data to get their location point shapefile. Then we use buffer tool to get the service area of these homeless shelters, so we can see the area where people donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have easy access to homeless shelters. 3.Overlap the two maps with population density map to get the populated areas where people have high risk of being homeless but they canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have easy access to homeless shelters. 4. Overlap the vacant space with the seleted census tract to give suggestion for proposing homeless shelter.


Methodology


factors about homelessness fuzzy cognitive map +0.773

family breakdown

+0.625

addiction

+0.250

+0.648 +0.648 +0.773

+0.634 -0.500

incarceration +0.502

+0.625

+0.625

mental illness

+0.502

-0.366 +0.648

+0.773

social support network +0.625

unemployment +0.750

poverty

+0.625

affordable housing

+0.500

-0.773 -0.773

-0.634

-0.500

education

cost of housing

+0.352

homelessness

+0.498

-0.640

-0.500 +0.500

+0.648

government assistance

income +0.750 -0.625

Reference: Mago VK, Morden HK, Fritz C, et al. Analyzing the impact of social factors on homelessness: a fuzzy cognitive map approach. BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2013;13:94. Published 2013 Aug 23. doi:10.1186/1472-6947-13-94

Calculate the vulnerable area

childhood homeless

+

negative influence

a

factors that can be quantified and spatialized

a

factors that canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be quantified or data unavailable

positive influence


map the vulnerability area


service area+most vulnerable area In previous steps we get the vulnerable area map where people have high risk of being homeless. In that map, we select the areas that have the highest point which means people there have highest risk of being homeless. Then we overlap the service area map with the most vulnerable map and substract the areas covered. Thus the black areas left are areas where people can easily become homeless but they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have accessible homeless shelters.


most vulnerable area+population density In this map, we overlay the population density map with the service area map and the most vulnerable area map to get the areas where people have highest risk of being homeless and canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have easy access to homeless shelters meanwhile have highest density. The more population they have, the more urgent the situation will become, so we select the places with highest population( ).


Suggestion on suitable spaces We overlap the vacant places map with the result, so we can see in/around these two selected census tract, are there any possible vacant places suitable for proposing homeless shelters. Below are our suggestions for the two census tract.

CENSUS TRACT 1 Geoid:36047009200

vacant place: 642 39th street

CENSUS TRACT 2 Geoid:36005042902

vacant place: webster avenue


Limitation

1.There are many other factors that can lead to homelessness but they canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be quantified, or it is hard to find their data, so we decided not to use them. These data includes mental illness problem, family breakdown, incarceration, addiction and so on.

2.There are many homeless shelters in New York City and each of them has different capacity, which means they have different service areas. We tried to find capacity data and add to the table, but there are no data available. Thus we assume that they are of the same scale and capasity.


See you in the future.

Zhen Hua From Architecture and Urban Design @ Columbia GSAPP


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Zhen Hua '20 MSAUD Columbia GSAPP  

Zhen Hua '20 MSAUD Columbia GSAPP