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WELL-HOUSE RENAISSANCE 21st Century Climatic Infrastructure

MSAUD Sudio Instructor: Kate Orff Spring 2020 Location: Tel Aviv- Yafo Collaborator: Danwei Pan, Kuan-I Wu, Zixuan Zhang

Well-house is a cultural heritage that built around the water well, surrounded by orange groves, located majorly in southern Tel Aviv-Yafo. It played an important role in irrigating famous JAFFA orchards and a gathering space enriching farmers’ social life in the 19th century. Later the landscape became urbanized around the orchards, layered up with modern developments. Our project is reimagine the former well-house network which exists in various conditions today, pulling it forward as a new nodal climatic infrastructure. Shapira is one of the most vulnerable neighborhood in Tel Aviv-Yafo, not only lacking resilience towards natural based disaster, but also lacking job opportunities for the growth of Asylum seekers and migrant workers; lacking of resources and service for getting higher education. We see the potential for the historical Well-House to be reimagined as “Well-house Renaissance” in the 21st century, serving as a climatic emergency infrastructure that provides ecological and social services.

Source: Documentary <JAFFA, the Orange’s Clockwork 2009> Source: Prof.Amnon Bar Or


The disappearance of orchards and the urban expansion. These images were erased from peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s consciousness and collective memory. (Left maps)

Highlighted roads were once the essential routes used to export Jaffa oranges. We envision these as future green corridors, funneling sea breeze from the Mediterranean into the neighborhoods and channeling water to lower grounds to recharge the aquifer. The green corridors also provide habitat for migratory birds. (Right Map)


Historic climatic technologies of Persian origin: Badgir (wind tower) and Qanat (underground irrigation channel)

DATA Source:Center for Resilient Cities and Landscapes, 2019 Evaluation of urban heat island in Shapira


Micro Cooling System (Left) and New Cooling Infrastructure (Right)


CARBON SEQUESTRATION Green New Deal

MSAUD Sudio Instructor: Kaja KĂźhl Fall 2019 Location: Hudson Valley, NewYork Collaborator: Eleni Stefania Kalapoda, Menghan Zhang, Kuan-I Wu A tree, as a carbon machine, can store huge amounts of carbon in its body, estimated to 217kg per year. Reforestation, as one of the most cost-efficient nature based solutions toward climate change, can offset 30% of the carbon emission. Currently in Hudson Valley, 74% of land is forested. However, there are still parts of forest are fragmented by urban development and human disturbance, which can decreases the amount of carbon sequestration, and negatively affecting biological diversity in the Hudson River Estuary corridor. This project is to reforest all the underutilized and inefficient land in Kingston, NY with the purpose of creating linked carbon sink. At same time, the aim is to supply local lumber and wood material to the community with green jobs.


Empower the IBZ MSAUD Sudio Instructor: Tricia Martin Summer 2019 Location: Long Island City, NYC Collaborator: Shailee Shah East Long Island City, originally developed as a manufacturing center, is home to over a thousand business that provide 26,000+ jobs. However, many educational institutions have become part of LIC, attracting thousands of young adults to the area. East LIC Industrial business zone faces threat of displacement with growing commerial and residential needs. Despite its diverse demographic, Long Island city fails to meet the basic needs of green space, safe pedestrian access, and lack of connectivity within the education and business community. The project proposes a transitional job platform to innovate, connect and empower youth and existing businesses in Long Island City. The testing centers knits together different programs that are accessible to the entire community such as shared working spaces, a business center, advanced manufacting training, and more.


The disappearance of orchards and the urban expansion. These images were erased from peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s consciousness and collective memory.(Left maps)

Highlighted roads were once the essential routes used to export Jaffa oranges. We envision these as future green corridors, funneling sea breeze from the Mediterranean into the neighborhoods and channeling water to lower grounds to recharge the aquifer. The green corridors also provide habitat for migratory birds. (Right Map)


Cotton Kingdom

Savannah burial grounds, Georgia MSAUD Seminar Instructor: Sara Zewde Spring 2020 Research Project Collaborator: Shailee Shah Olmsted during his journey through the Southern slave states visited Savannahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first African American burial ground. He records materiality and inscriptions on tombstones that are the only remaining public documentation of the lives of Savannahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most important black citizens of the time. However, today the sacred burial ground has transformed into a pleasure ground called the whitefield square with no reminiscence of its black history amidst a white neighbourhood with gardens, live oaks, and a gazebo at its center. The african american burial ground has faced unswerving neglect located farthest from the city as well as at the lowest land among the rice plantations. In 1853, the city expansion led to the pushing away of the burial ground further south, a low marsh land rice plantation to a new location called the Laurel Grove Cemetery. The project maps transformation of the burial grounds through spatial data analysis and reveals its history of racial segregation that exists until today. The whitefield square remains one of the wealthiest white neighbourhoods in Savannah today on the other hand the laurel grove continues to be a mid income black neighbourhood segregated socially and physically by a highway 204.

Cotton Kingdom Then


Cotton Kingdom Then and Now This drawing maps the transformation of the burial ground. The tombstones Olmsted documented were removed, in order to install Whitefield Square in an area of the city that was seeing intense development pressure. Today, there are no physical remnants of its black history, amidst a wealthy, white neighborhood with gardens. The city expansion led to the pushing away of the burial ground further south, to a low marsh land called the Laurel Grove Cemetery.


Cotton Kingdom Then and Now Laurel South Cemetry today, in addition to the historical record which the tombstones themselves preserve, the physical arrangement of the graves as well as the types of grave markers record changes in the social status of blacks. (Left) This drawing reveals the history of racial segregation that exists until today. The whitefield Square, the site Olmsted documents, remains one of the wealthiest white neighbourhoods in Savannah today. Conversely, Laurel Grove Cemetery continues to be a lower income Black neighborhood segregated socially and physically by Highway 204. (Right)


ARCHITECTURAL PHOTOGRAPHY

Instructor: Michael Vahrenwald

Profile for GSAPP_Digital Publishing

Tian Hao '20 MSAUD Columbia GSAPP  

Tian Hao '20 MSAUD Columbia GSAPP