__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

UZOEFU


PORTFOLIO NINA NDICHU COLUMBIA GSAPP MSAUD 2020

SUMMER


CHANGING PERCEPTIONS Long Island City is losing its identity from a heavily industrial city to a metropolitan city following in the steps of New York City. The project envisions a revitalization of its most important landmarks (sites and buildings that have been in the area for a long time and when people visit Long Island City, they reminisce about the olden days. Low rise/ old structures are the most vulnerable and most likely to undergo redevelopment. The concentration of landmarks (heritage and perceived points of significance for the community)are used as a means to reprogram the streets and bring vitality to the once old neighborhood of LIC. This part of LIC houses the major transit nodes – subway, ferry, road network (Vernon Boulevard, Jackson Avenue, Queens Plaza. Studies have shown that revitalization of “downtown” areas helps reactivate the rest of the city and mitigate effects of future development to certain extents. Long Island City was once home to many factories and bakeries, some of which are finding new uses. The former Silvercup bakery is now home to Silvercup Studios.

LAND USE

Most of the significant buildings have their frontage on the major streets. We use these significant buildings as nodes to bring the community together. The community is made aware of their history, leading to greater appreciation of the place they live in. If the community obtains ownership of these places, it will increase their sense of belonging and promote community building, helping resist outside forces from transforming the neighborhood.

Significant buildings

SIGNIFICANT BUILDINGS + VIEWS

Number of pedestrian deaths

Main streets

Walkability radius from subway stops


Challenges

THE BREAK SPACE Sunnyside yards development is a new proposal over the Long Island Rail Tracks in the center of Long Island City. The proposed development is to be on a deck ranging from as low as 10 feet to as high as 100 feet. Sunnyside Yards development is a threat to the existing neighborhoods if the development is not integrated well.

SKILLMAN AVENUE NODE

THOMPSON AVENUE NODE

QUEENS BOULEVARD NODE


FORESTS + CARBON SINKS SYSTEM The Green New Deal’s opening statement states how the main cause of climate change is human activity over the past century. Simple fact is we need our forests in order to have a healthy ecosystem. Forests and carbon sinks will turn over the climate crisis. One only needs to plant one trees as a start. One thing that was clear is that the Hudson Valley region and New York state is doing quite well when it comes to reforestation from the heavy destruction that begun in the 1600s. We also learn that forests need proper management in order for them to provide the healthy ecosystem that is the basis for clean air, clean water, clean environment as forests habitat and the other habitats that are in and around forests create a unique environment that is a symbiotic relationship for the human species to survive.

FALL

Forests are important, and we need to think of them as potentials to combat climate change. There are different benefits and threats to forests and this was investigated in Hudson valley as a system of forest management and tree cover being a potential carbon sink.

CARBON CONTRIBUTION


50 BEACON

3000-3999

AGRICULTURE + CLIMATE CRISIS

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS FROM AGRICULTURE

Agriculture makes up 9% of GHG emissions in the US and 0.64% in the Hudson Valley. Industrial Agriculture in the US today operates in a way that is out of sync with both the long term sustainability of the land and the well being of the people it is designed to feed.

2000-2999

98%

FAMILY OWNED

ALBANY

1000-1999

NEW CITY Regenerative Agriculture does the opposite and works with nature. It’s practices rebuild soil, which leads to FARMS increased carbon storage, less need for nitrogen and herbicides, a reduction in the likelihood of flooding, less erosion and healthier water systems, as well as healthier food.

TROY

NTY BIA COU COLUM96 MTCO2

0

10

20

5,384 MTCO2

HUDSON CATSKILL

NYS 4%

ns

ns

29 .6M

ns

s

io

ion

iss

Em

Liv anu gem M na Ma

Agr icu

ltur al s

oil This farming system depends on livestock, which are % 67. 15 8% crucial in keeping the land sustainable and productive if .2% 16 appropriate rotational pasture management and diverse crop management is applied.

Em

i

sio ns A NEW Agriculture FARMING sSYSTE GHG Emissions A unique spatial system h All other GHG ofEmissions an arterial route that wil paddocks and harvested c where farmers will be abl and develop social netwo and rotated through the tr to regenerate the land an

DESIGN PROPOSAL

This trail will become part cater for human movem The trail will also venture i with key town nodes and opportunities in the distr the awareness regenerati

Diversity of Farms

YONKERS 10

20

EMISSIONS BY TYPE

40 Miles

s

0

1-999

1000-1999

NEW CITY

Other

5000-6000 4000-4999 2000-2999

3000-3999

BEACON

Regenerative Agriculture works with nature. It’s practices rebuild soil, which leads to increased carbon storage, less need for nitrogen and herbicides, a reduction in the likelihood of flooding, less erosion and healthier water systems, as well as healthier food.estocrek ent 1%

MTCO2

POUGHKEEPSIE

To n

s

5.2 7

37 .1

0B

BT on

s

To n

s

206

AGRICULTURAL EMISSIONS Industrial Agriculture in the US today operates in a way that is out of sync with both the long term sustainability of the land and the well being of the people it is designed BENEFITS OF RESILIENT to feed. Agriculture makes up 9% of GHG emissionsFARMING in PRACTICES the US and 0.64% in the Hudson Valley.

iss Em KINGSTON

Emi

M To

8.905B Tons

SAUGERTIES

NEWBURGH

HV 0.64%

ssio

5,273 MTCO2

5,255 MTCO2

40 Miles

0.189M Tons

USA 9%

8.24M

GLOBAL 24%

1.7 8B To ns

5,881 MTCO2

Tons

69,8

1-999

This farming system depends on livestock, which are crucial in keeping the land sustainable and productive Diversity of Farms if YONKERS appropriate rotational pasture management and diverse crop management is applied.

AL

D

4000-4999

NEWBURGH

Multi Tree Intercropping


Individual Stakeholder Diagram

STAKEHOLDERS Farmers Market

AVAIL FRESH FOOD TO THE CONSUMER

Industrial Agriculture in the US today operates in a way that is out of sync with both the long term sustainability of the land and the well being of the people it is designed to feed.

Valatie

Valatie Kinderhook

Chatham Farmers & Makers

iles 13 m

Money is straight from the consumer

Roxbury Farms

A unique spatial system has been created in the form of an arterial route that will be connected with adjacent paddocks and harvested cropland through easements, where farmers will be able to share each others land and develop social networks. Livestock will be moved and rotated through the trail and connected paddocks, to regenerate the land and sequester carbon.

Chatham

Kinderhook Farms Farm to Table Restaurant

TEACH NEW AGRICULUTRAL PRACTICES

Education for farmers

Grocery Store

Individual

Homestay (Experience + Labor)

Practice Regenerative Agriculture Chefs at Restaurants

A NEW FARMING SYSTEM

DISCOVER NEW TECHNOLOGIES

Research Facility

Low GHG

DESIGN PROPOSAL

School Stakeholder Diagram

iles

$15,660,574 State Government

13 m

0.4% come from Public funds

5m

Kinderhook School District

This trail will become part of the public realm and also cater for human movement and passive recreation. The trail will also venture into urban areas, connecting with key town nodes and in doing so it will increase opportunities in the distribution of healthy food and the awareness regenerative agriculture practices.

Valatie Town

Low GHG

iles

Roxbury Farms Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI)

2

s

ile

m

6

4

Ichabod Crane Schools 1728 students 230 employees

2

Martin Van Buren Elementary School

0.3 miles

Kinderhook Farms

CSA Roxbury Farm Katchkie Farm

Low GHG TEACH NEW AGRICULUTRAL PRACTICES

s

Education for farmers

Valatie

ile

m

Co-ops Blue Star Farm

Homestay (Experience + Labor)

Practice Regenerative Agriculture DISCOVER NEW TECHNOLOGIES

Research Facility

Martin H. Glynn Elementary School

Low GHG | od y Fo Health

rbo Ca Low

t| rin tp oo nF

ss Le

Hospital Stakeholder Diagram

Co-ops Low GHG

5m

iles

Valatie Hospitals

13 m

State Government

iles

Roxbury Farms

Kinderhook Medical Care

Blue Star Farm

Valatie

Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI)

Valatie Family Care

Kinderhook Farms Low GHG

CSA

0.9 mi

TEACH NEW AGRICULUTRAL PRACTICES

les

Education for farmers

Columbia Memorial Cardiology 0.5 miles Columbia Memorial Hospital

Valatie Practice Regenerative Agriculture DISCOVER NEW TECHNOLOGIES

Low GHG

Research Facility

Homestay (Experience + Labor)

Roxbury Farm Katchkie Farm

CONCEPTUAL MODELS


SOCIAL CONNECTIONS + IMPROVED HEALTH The design and transition also enables improved social connections for isolated farmers and the capacity for them to build social capital in their localities which will hopefully once again make the lure of being a farmer a lucrative one. In essence if the Green New Deal comes in effect, it will also help support family farms who have felt the effects of the current degraded agriculture system and help feed the mouths of America.

Pedestrian walkway near Creek

Livestock Crossing over Main Street

Livestock crossing over Creek

Livestock + Pedestrian Path


MIGROCULTURE


CO-OPERATIVE NETWORK

THE GREEN

“Working collaboratively wit the united states to eliminate gas emissions from the ag as is technologically feasib

“Providing all people of the u quality health care; (ii) affor housing; (iii) economic se clean water, clean air, hea and nature.”

“Carbon aside, the advantages of silvopasture are considerable, with financial benefits for farmers and ranchers.”

WORKSHOP

- MATT SHEPHARD “More than a mere alternative strategy, regenerative agriculture represents a fundamental shift in our culture’s relationship to nature.”

river’s start

- MIKE CATRONE -

H

GHG emissions 189,000 MTCO2

1. BUILD BOARDSCAPE ““We know carbon farming practices work, we just need to make them happen by creating infrastructure and diverting resources to farmers.”” - MARTINA SKJELLERUDSVEEN -

NET ZERO

18% of FARMLANDS

The participants take turns placing t to form a unique boardscape.

2. COLLABORATE TO BUIL

Each turn, a player places path tiles connections to farms, towns and ins is optional to place a ‘player’ on a til participation benefits.

required to reach net zero in the Agricultural industry in the Hudson Valley

3. COMPLETE PATHS FOR

Each time a path is completed the p path collect cards with policy discus

in “At that point in time, as a farmer myself, it was clear that there’s a lot of things that the farming community and farmers can do to help reverse the detrimental impacts of climate change.” - GAIL TAYLOR -

“A lot of farmers are being educated about the capacity of soil to sequester carbon. It gets them excited to think that they can contribute to a reversal of climate change.”

river’s end

P

- MATT SHEFFER-

INSTITUTIONS

The local school district’s food vendor contract is expiring. Discuss with your co-operative how to win the bid.

IN


THE GREAT RIFT VALLEY The rift valley formed about 25 million years ago establishing some of the most critical ecosystems in two continents. WE investigate urbanization and climate challenges in three cities along a global transect that is marked with fossil evidence of the beginning of human civilization, the Great Rift Valley.

TECTONIC PLATE MOVEMENT Even as geologic forces were forming the earth’s surfaces around the globe, other geologic forces were also pulling this surface apart, creating rifts. One of the locations of those forces is the Great Rift Valley, a tectonic line that is shearing, tearing, erupting, and collapsing, but also creating.

PLATE

PLATE

SPRING

ASTHENOSPHERE TRANSFORM PLATE BOUNDARY

DIVERGENT PLATE BOUNDARY

CONVERGENT PLATE BOUNDARY


RIFT VALLEY ECOSYSTEMS Climate change continues to threaten the GreenBlue Network with temperature rise, flooding, LOW

MEDIUM

HIGH

cyclonic weather, drought, and ecosystem loss are some of the outcomes observed across the Rift. We investigate this green-blue network through the analysis of the migratory path of the

FLOURIDE POLLUTION GREEN COVER

FOREST LOSS

white stork along The Rift Valley. This lens helps us analyze the habitat loss and human-induced evolution and the direct impacts of climate change and how they vary from across the Rift.

DEFORESTATION TEMPERATURE

The migratory birds’ species inform the health of the ecosystems and are observable indicators TEMPERTURE RISE

to measure climate change. If the continued FLOODING FREQUENCY

destruction of these habitats occur, many of these species will cease to exist and inadvertently amplify the negative impacts of human activity on

LAKES AND RIVERS

these systems. To mitigate these challenges, we <1000

1000-10000 10000-25000 25000-50000 >50000MM

further zoom into the different sites showcasing the habitats and ecosystems of the greenblue network and the threats to these systems, GROUND WATER

concluding with adaptive scenarios. BOUNDARY OF COUNTRIES SITES

RIFT VALLEY ECOSYSTEMS


DAMMING OF THE NILE The continual damming of the Nile for hydroelectric power and water reservoirs, have led to the obstruction of sediment and nutrients toward the Mediterranean in the north, increasing erosion along the coastal front of Israel and Lebanon. The Mediterranean is encroaching on parts of the delta, vital farmland for a desert country with only 4% of its land suitable for cultivation and a population growing at more than 1 million a year.

A GREAT RIVER FACES A MULTITUDE OF THREATS The Nile River is under assault on two fronts â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a massive dam under construction upstream in Ethiopia and rising sea levels leading to saltwater intrusion downstream. These dual threats now jeopardize the future of a river that is the lifeblood for millions.

Green irrigated land along the Nile amidst the desert

DAMS ALONG THE NILE


COASTAL EROSION + FORMATION OF COASTAL CLIFFS The

southern

and

eastern

Mediterranean

shorelines, which spread about 650 kilometers, from Abu Quir in Egypt to Acre in northern Israel, are part of the one of the largest coastal cells in the world, known as the Nile littoral cell. The collapse of the coastal cliff is the result of three natural occurrences: ~ The constant force of waves hitting the base of the cliffs causes the cliffs to retreat and the slope to become steeper and steeper. ~ That steep slope is not stable, and is gradually collapsing. ~ Infiltration of rainwater runoff into the layers of the rock (sand, loam, gravel) that make up the cliff. A combination of urban development, industrial development, and intense tourism along Israelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coastline conflict is also hastening the erosion of coastal cliffs. Studies have found that the cliffs retreated at a rate of 20-30 cm per year during the 20th century, though there have been much longer sections that have collapsed at once over the years. In populated areas such as Ashkelon, Herzliya, and Netanya, the erosion, and in some cases, collapse of coastal cliffs have caused landslides that have put both people and nearby structures at risk.


ISRAELâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PRESSURES + THE COAST The continual damming of the Nile for hydroelectric power and water reservoirs, have led to the obstruction of sediment and nutrients toward the Mediterranean in the north, increasing erosion along the coastal front of Israel and Lebanon. The recent discovery of one of the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest offshore natural gas reserve sin the Exclusive Economic Zone of Israel has led to a huge dependency on fossil fuels and the country is no longer looking to invest in renewable energy sources. While this would be enough to provide the country with energy for the next 40 years, the impacts of the offshore drilling platforms are felt in the sea as well as the coastal threshold that is already damaged. The shoreline as already receded back enormously over the past years and the Kurkar stone found along the coast, is soft and brittle adding the risk of the cliffs collapsing due to man-made interventions. The rapid urbanization and increased population of Israel has allowed for several construction of permanent structures that add pressure to this zone. Additionally, the inappropriately designed buildings for this particular climate, fail to take advantage of the several hot months to generate energy.


COASTAL PROTECTION + TIDAL ENERGY The proposed boardwalk extensions into the water are built on nature based infrastructure reefs that are designed by altering the existing breakwaters. This is an opportunity to demonstrate new technology of energy generation using tidal momentum. The purpose of this is to generate energy while slowing down the speed of the waves hitting the coast. The cliff will be de-concertized and vegetated, creating a softer gradient from the city to the Mediterranean Sea. Lighter boardwalk structures are proposed on the beach to reactivate the coast using a different approach from what is there now. The displaced commercial programming will be incorporated in a way that has little to no impact on the environment. We promote this sustainable way. Taking into consideration the daily and seasonal variations in the tide, we have pocket beaches that include temporary programming.

REACTIVATION OF BAT YAM BEACH

DAMAGED SHORES ALONG ISRAEL COAST

BOARD-WALK SECTION


SOCIAL SOLAR This project is Social Solar a new energy landscape for the city of Bat Yam Bat Yam, which means ‘daughter of the sea’ is a coastal city south of Tel Aviv - Yafo with a dense urban fabric with a beautiful 3.5km waterfront. Social Solar is a pilot project in Bat Yam, that combines renewable energy and urbanism to attain a more sustainable system to achieve a transition toward a resilient city for the future. By creating a decentralized energy landscape that spans from the sea and all the way into the city by reducing dependency on non-renewable sources, and fostering a respectful relationship between energy, ecology and society to combat the future scenarios of extreme climate events.

INDEPENDENCE BOULEVARD ECOLOGY + SOCIAL + ENERGY

The cliff buffer zone adjacent to the Mediterranean sea, currently holds an underutilized, fenced off amphitheater. The redesigned pedestrian focused boulevard capitalizes on open space to generate and store solar energy through various design elements. The existing underused amphitheater transforms into a cultural center, providing a venue for the Bat Yam’s recent art and cultural revival. A series of covered seating spaces act as the focal point to the end of the boulevard. We also bring commercial programming, such as eateries and shopping stalls, to further activate the public space on either side of the street.

Cultural center elements

COOLING COMMERCIAL CORRIDOR

Bioswale detail


SOCIAL INFRASTRUCTURE In response to Bat Yamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Urban Renewal Plan, an additional multipurpose density will be added as a sustainable retrofit to the existing buildings. This retrofit is designed to be climate responsive, with passive and active cooling techniques together with a covered roof garden with photovoltaic capabilities.

PHOTOVOLTAIC ROOF GARDEN

Activation of the street with corner green grocers and gaming points

At the bottom of the apartment, we propose to activate the street by having corner green grocers paired with gaming stations. Corridor Modules are designed along the boulevard that house batteries which store the generated energy. These can also be used as shared co-working and makerspaces, while also creating shaded spaces for night markets and backgammon tournaments. With additional shading strategies and the cool breeze from the Mediterranean sea, Independence Boulevard is transformed to a space that is usable both during the day and at night. The battery modules lights up at night highlighting the pride of Bat Yam as being a sustainable city.

CLIMATE RESPONSIVE ARCHITECTURE + BATTERY MODULE


MARICULTURE, TIDAL ENERGY GENERATION + NATURE BASED INFRASTRUCTURE

BAT YAM BIENNIAL AT THE CULTURAL CENTER

COASTAL THRESHOLD REGENERATION + SUSTAINABLE PROGRAMMING

NEW INDEPENDENCE BOULEVARD NIGHT MARKET


IMPLEMENTATION PLAN This phasing and stakeholders diagram builds off the timeline of Bat Yam municipalityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s urban renewal plan and the urgency of climate change. We collaborate with Bat Yam municipality to develop policies to protect the marine ecosystem and start transitioning towards solar energy. In the next 5-10 years, these policies will spearhead our project into the implementation stage with the Israeli Electric Corporation which deals with energy infrastructure in Israel and Bat Yam Municipality who can aid in the activation of public spaces. In 50 years, once the energy landscape is established, we engage building science professionals and initiate public private partnerships for the operations and maintenance of the project to ensure continued sustainability. Come 100 years, we foresee this pilot projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s growth in Israel.

URBAN DESIGN 2020

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN DESIGN | COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY NINA NDICHU | 2020


UZOEFU

Profile for GSAPP_Digital Publishing

Nina Ndichu '20 MSAUD Columbia GSAPP  

Nina Ndichu '20 MSAUD Columbia GSAPP