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2013-2014

St. Albert Catholic High School


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Table of Contents 4

St. Albert Catholic High School overview

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Student services department

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High school diploma and graduation requirements

Inside cover design: Lance A., a current grade 12 student at SACHS, and 2012 Provincial Skills Canada Gold Medalist in Graphic Design.

programs 10

English program

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Social Studies program

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Mathematics program

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Science program 

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Religious Studies program

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Fine Arts program

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International Languages program

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Physical Education program

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Career and Technology Studies program

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Blended learning

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International Baccalaureate Diploma program (IB)

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General studies program

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Knowledge and Employability

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Individual support program

planning for high school 60

Post-secondary considerations

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High school entry

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Alexander Rutherford scholarships

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Grade 10 registration

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SACHS Overview programs · Challenging academic programs · Second language program includes French, Spanish and Chinese (Mandarin) · Broad range of complementary courses in fine arts · An expanded and modularized Career and Technology Studies program which fosters entrepreneurship, and includes communication and computer technology, fashion studies, cosmetology, business, food studies, design and industrial technologies, health and wellness, sports performance and work experience · Comprehensive student activities program sponsored by student council · Extensive extra-curricular, co-curricular and intramural program · Program choice · Students have the opportunity to do a variety of courses in an online blended setting

Catholic/Christian values · Christ-centered environment emphasizing respect and healthy decision-making · Caring community of dedicated staff and students working cooperatively for common goals · The fostering of service-above-self attitudes · Warm and caring learning environment · School celebrations · Retreats · Prayer and reflection · Social justice and charity initiatives

facilities · Updated facilities, which include a student cafeteria, networked communications with email, an average of one computer for every four students, four computer labs, a television studio, a fashions lab, a woods and metals lab, a food services lab, fitness facility, a digital design lab, a networked library, student gathering space, drama performance room, health and wellness leadership lab and cosmetology lab. · Parents are able to access current attendance and grades online with our data management system (Powerschool).

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Student services department information, support and guidance Student Services is designed to provide information, support and guidance to assist students in meeting their educational and emotional needs. A counsellor and/or certified career practitioner are available to: · Assist students who may have individual, family, social or emotional concerns that impact their day-to-day lives. Referrals are sometimes made to outside community agencies to better support our students and their families. · Assist students with their high school program (e.g. appropriate course selection) · Support students who may be struggling academically and may require modifications to their programs or may be in need of educational support. · Provide guidance to students who have questions regarding career choices, post-secondary institutions, prerequisites and scholarships. Student Services has an open door policy that encourages students to drop in at any time that is convenient for them. Referrals can also be made by parents, teachers, support staff or administrators.

career development Individual career development sessions, workshops, career presentations, etc. We are available to support students in the areas of test-taking skills, peer relations, portfolio development, career choices and resume writing to name a few.

post-secondary Post-secondary information evenings are hosted yearly at SACHS by our career/post-secondary counselling team. · Our school website offers plenty of helpful guidelines. Learn more at www.sachs.ab.ca under the Parents and Students tab · The counsellor’s corner link offers specific counselling sites · Post-secondary and career planning information provides links to schools, scholarships and more

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High school diploma and graduation requirements The graduation requirements for the Alberta High School Diploma are outlined below. The courses listed are the minimum level students must complete to earn a diploma. These requirements are set to ensure students graduate from high school with a broad education. These requirements are not always the same as those needed to enter postsecondary institutions. For example, Social Studies 30.1 or 30.2 is a diploma requirement, but may not be a requirement of the post-secondary institution you are interested in attending. Mathematics 20.3 fulfills the diploma requirement but may not be enough to fulfill the requirement of the post-secondary institution you are interested in attending. All students must complete three courses in Religious Studies in order to take part in the SACHS cap-and-gown commencement ceremonies. To earn an Alberta High School Diploma, a student must achieve 100 credits that includes the following: English Language Arts 30 level · English Language Arts 30.1 or 30.2 Social Studies 30 level · Social Studies 30.1 or 30.2 Mathematics 20 level · Mathematics 20.1, 20.2 or 20.3 Science 20 level · Science 20, Science 24, Biology 20, Chemistry 20 or Physics 20 Physical Education · 3 credits

10 level

Career and Life Management · 3 credits

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10 credits in any combination from: · Career and Technology Studies (CTS) · Fine Arts · Physical Education 20 and/or 30 · Locally developed / acquired authorized courses in CTS, fine arts, second languages · Knowledge and Employability (K & E) · Registered Apprenticeship Program 10 credits in any 30-level courses (In addition to 30-level English Language Arts and a 30-level Social Studies course as specified above) These courses may include: · 35-level locally developed/acquired and locally authorized courses · 3000 series: advanced level in Career and Technology Studies courses · 35-level Registered Apprenticeship Program


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English The English department offers courses in four sequences in order to accommodate a diverse range of student needs and interests: the International Baccalaureate sequence; the English Language Arts 10.1, 20.1, 30.1 sequence; the English Language Arts 10.2, 20.2, 30.2 sequence and the English 10.4, 20.4 and 30.4 sequence.

course requirements 路 Require that students write a diploma level course upon completion of the 30.1 or 30.2 level courses. 路 Maintain high standards to meet graduation requirements. 路 Feature the six language arts: listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing and representing. 路 Emphasize correct and effective communication in a variety of formats.

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ELA 10.1 20.1 30.1  5 credits This sequence is designed for students whose post secondary plans include university study and/or a career that involves the development, production, teaching and/or study of literature and media. It provides students with an increased emphasis on textual analysis. ELA 10.2 20.2 30.2  5 credits This sequence provides for students who need more assistance in developing reading and text study skills than a student in the ela 10.1, 20.1, 30.1 stream. This features the study of text at a variety of different levels of sophistication for students more diverse in their aspirations. ELA 10.4 20.4 30.4  Knowledge and Employability  5 credits Knowledge and employability courses will be available to students who meet the criteria and have unique learning needs. These courses will provide students with opportunities to experience success and become well prepared for employment, further studies, citizenship and lifelong learning. Enrollment in these courses will be based on past performance, assessment, and teacher recommendations and will include consultation with and the informed consent of parents/ guardians and the student.

International Baccalaureate stream ELA 10.1 Pre-IB 20.1 IB 30.1 IB  5 credits This sequence offers a rigorous course of study for highly motivated and intellectually curious students with strong language skills and a desire for challenge. It will prepare students to write the International Baccalaureate Language A1 internal and external assessments and exams in grades 11 and 12. As a result of extended course requirements, IB English students will complete a 3 credit component in their grade 12 year in addition to ELA 30.1 IB.

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Social Studies Social Studies provides opportunities for students to develop the skills, knowledge, attitudes and values necessary to become engaged, informed and responsible citizens. Recognition and respect for individual and collective identity is essential in a pluralistic and democratic society.

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Social Studies 10.1  perspectives on globalization  5 credits Students will explore multiple perspectives on the origins of globalization and the local, national and international impacts of globalization on lands, cultures, economies, human rights and quality of life. Students will examine the relationships among globalization, citizenship and identity to enhance skills for citizenship in a globalizing world. The infusion of multiple perspectives will allow students to examine the effects of globalization on peoples in Canada and throughout the world, including the impact on aboriginal and francophone communities. Social Studies 10.2  living in a globalizing world  5 credits Students will explore historical aspects of globalization as well as the effects of globalization on lands, cultures, human rights and quality of life. Students will explore the relationships among globalization, citizenship and identity. The infusion of multiple perspectives will allow students to examine the effects of globalization on peoples in Canada and other locations, including the impact on aboriginal and francophone communities. Students will develop skills to respond to issues emerging in an increasingly globalized world. Social Studies 20.1  perspectives on nationalism  5 credits Students will explore the complexities of nationalism in Canadian and international contexts. They will study the origins of nationalism and the influence of nationalism on regional, international and global relations. The infusion of multiple perspectives will allow students to develop understandings of nationalism and how nationalism contributes to the citizenship and identities of peoples in Canada. Social Studies 20.2  understanding nationalism  5 credits Students will examine historical and contemporary understandings of nationalism in Canada and the world. They will explore the origins of nationalism as well as the impacts of nationalism on individuals and communities in Canada and other locations. Examples of nationalism, ultranationalism, supranationalism and internationalism will be examined from multiple perspectives. Students will develop personal and civic responses to emergent issues related to nationalism. Social Studies 30.1  perspectives on ideology  5 credits Students will explore the origins and complexities of ideologies and examine multiple perspectives regarding the principles of classical and modern liberalism. An analysis of various political and economic systems will allow students to assess the viability of the principles of liberalism. Developing understandings of the roles and responsibilities associated with citizenship will encourage students to respond to emergent global issues. Social Studies 30.2  understandings of ideologies  5 credits Students will examine the origins, values and components of competing ideologies. They will explore multiple perspectives regarding relationships among individualism, liberalism, common good and collectivism. An examination of various political and economic systems will allow students to determine the viability of the values of liberalism. Developing understandings of the roles and responsibilities associated with citizenship will encourage students to respond to emergent global issues.

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Social Studies - IB Stream Social Studies  10.1 IB prep   exploring globalization  5 credits This course explores globalization from multiple perspectives, including but not limited to francophone and aboriginal perspectives. Students will consider the origins and legacy of historical globalization, the relationship between globalization and individual and collective identity, and the economic, social and political dimensions of globalization. As a prelude to the IB 20 and 30 courses, students will be introduced to the discipline of history and historical thinking. Social Studies  20.1 IB   exploring nationalism  5 credits This course will explore the origins of nationalism and consider its influence on contemporary society. This is the first year of a two year program that leads to a comprehensive IB history exam in May of student’s senior year. Students will consider various case studies including the French revolution and the Napoleonic era, Italian and German unification, the causes of World War I and II, international relations between the wars. Contemporary studies will be made of native self-government in Canada and Quebec nationalism. Students will also be introduced to the various components of the historical investigation that they will complete in their senior year. Social Studies  30.1 IB   perspectives on ideology  5 credits Students will explore the origins and complexities of ideologies and examine multiple perspectives regarding the principles of classical and modern liberalism. An analysis of various political and economic systems will allow students to assess the viability of the principles of liberalism. Developing understandings of the roles and responsibilities associated with citizenship will encourage students to respond to emergent global issues. Social Studies  30.1 IB   world history  5 credits World history is compulsory for those students registered in social 30 IB. This course allows students the time to explore more deeply topics in the IB syllabus that are not covered in the Alberta Social 30 curriculum to the same depth. In addition students will complete a formal historical investigation of a topic of their own choosing. The areas that will be considered in more depth in the grade 11 and 12 IB courses are the trends, which have altered Europe and the world in the past century two centuries. In particular: · The French revolution and Napoleon · The unification of Italy and Germany · Imperial Russia, revolutions, emergence of Soviet state 1853 - 1924 · European diplomacy and the first World War 1870 to 1923 · Interwar years: conflict and cooperation 1919 - 1939 · The second World War and post-war Western Europe · Origins and development of authoritarian and single party states · The Cold War

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social studies - IB stream History is more than the study of the past. It is the process of recording, reconstructing and interpreting the past through the investigation of a variety of sources. It is a discipline that gives people an understanding of themselves and others in relation to the world, both past and present. Students will learn how the discipline of history works. The courses in the IB history program pose questions without providing definitive answers. Students will engage in historical study involves both selection, interpretation and critical evaluation of various historical sources. The content of the history course is intrinsically interesting and it is hoped that many students who follow it will become fascinated with the discipline, developing a lasting interest in it, whether or not they continue to study it formally.

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Mathematics High school mathematics has changed. In September 2010, the new 10.C program was introduced. This revised program has a number of benefits for the students. · Greater opportunity for conceptual understanding as there is less content and so students can study topics in greater depth. · Course sequences are designed to prepare students for their future goals. The choices can now be made when students enter grade 11. Students are expected to meet with our guidance counsellor or career practitioner to determine which math courses are required by a specific facility, program of study or occupation, based on a student interest inventory. · Students can transfer between the “.1” and “.2” course sequences at the grade 11 and grade 12 level if their career goals change. Again, meeting with our counselling staff will assist them in making these decisions. All three course sequences will provide students with both mathematical reasoning and critical thinking skills. In choosing the right path, students are encouraged to consider both their current interests and their future plans. Most students now take four math courses. Students in this sequence are required to supply their own TI-84 (or 83) graphing calculator. Math students will be charged a fee for a math workbook and/or access to Math XL. For more information, please visit www.education.alberta.ca/math or contact a St. Albert Catholic High School math teacher, counsellor or grade coordinator.

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Mathematics 10.C  math 10 combined  5 credits This class is for students who have passed grade 9 mathematics and are planning to take the “.1” and “.2” series courses. Each topic area requires that the students develop a conceptual knowledge base and skill set that will be useful in both subsequent courses. (We suggest a grade 9 mark of over 60%.) The “.3” sequence is for entry into many apprenticeship programs and direct entry into the workforce. The “.4” or knowledge and employability path will be available to students who meet the criteria and have unique learning needs. These courses will provide students with the opportunities to experience success and become well prepared for employment, citizenship and lifelong learning. Enrollment in these courses will be based on past performance, assessment, and teacher recommendation and will include consultation including the informed consent of parents or guardians and the student. This program allows the student to obtain a knowledge and employability diploma (not a high school diploma). Mathematics 20.1 30.1  pre-calculus  5 credits This track is for students with very strong algebraic skills. The courses are aimed at students taking engineering, sciences and business at post-secondary programs at universities, colleges and technical institutes that require further study of calculus. The 30.1 program ends with a diploma exam. Mathematics 20.2 30.2  5 credits For many universities, colleges and technical institutions (including some civil engineering technology, medical technologies and arts apprenticeship programs) this track is appropriate. In other words, programs that do not need the study of calculus do not require the 20.1 or 30.1 programs. Students can take math 30.1 after passing 30.2. For a high school diploma, students still require 10 credits (two courses) in mathematics. Five of these credits must be at the grade 11 level. The 30.2 program ends with a diploma exam.

Mathematics 31  5 credits This course is designed for highly motivated academic students who wish to pursue a first year university course in calculus. Math 30.1 must be taken as a prerequisite or a co-requisite course. Students should try to take math 30.1 before math 31. Topics are included from both differential and integral calculus. Math 31 is highly recommended for students who intend to pursue sciences in post-secondary, and is required for some faculties at the University of Alberta, such as Engineering.

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Mathematics - IB Stream

Mathematics 10.C Pre-IB  5 credits This program designed for students who excel in, and are passionate about, mathematics. An enhanced pace allows the courses in the IB sequence to extend, enrich and supplement the outcomes covered in the Mathematics 10 combined. Students are only graded on Alberta Learning outcomes. More details regarding the IB program at St. Albert Catholic High School can be found in the IB section of this guidebook.

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Science

Grade 10 Science 10 PIB Biology 25 PIB Chemistry 20 PIB

Grade 9 Science

Science 10

Grade 11

Chemistry 35 IB

Chemistry 30 IB

Biology 20 IB

Biology 30 IB

Biology 20

Biology 30

Chemistry 20

Chemistry 30

Physics 20

Physics 30

Math 10C

Science 14

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Grade 12

Science 30

Science 24


Science 10  5 credits Components of this course are: · Matter and energy in chemical change · Energy flow in technological systems · Matter and energy in living systems · Flow in global systems Science 10 Pre-IB  5 credits Components of this course are: · Matter and energy in chemical change, including introduction to computer interfaced sensors for chemical analysis · Energy flow in technological systems, including amusement park physics (roller coasters / bumper cars) · Matter and energy in living systems, including extensive microscopy and live organism investigations · Energy flow in global systems Science 14  5 credits The four units of study integral to the course are: · Investigation of properties of matter · Understanding energy transfer technologies · Investigating matter and energy in living systems · Investigating matter and energy in the environmental health Science 24  5 credits The four units of study integral to the course are: · Applications of matter and chemical change (science and technology emphasis) · Understanding common energy conversion systems (science and technology emphasis) · Disease defense and human health (social and environmental emphasis) · Motion, change and transportation safety (nature of science emphasis) Science 30  5 credits The four units of study integral to the course are: · Living systems respond to their environment · Chemistry and the environment · Electromagnetic energy · Energy and the environment

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Science Biology 20  5 credits Components of this course are: · Matter and energy exchange in the biosphere · Photosynthesis and cellular respiration · Ecosystems and population change · Human systems Biology 25 Pre-IB  3 credits Components of this course are: · Classification · Evolution · Plant science · Photosynthesis and cellular respiration Biology 20 IB  5 credits Components of this course are: · Matter and energy exchange in the biosphere · Ecosystems and population change · Human systems · Environmental project Biology 30 30 IB  5 credits Components of this course are: · Nervous system and endocrine system · Reproduction and development · Cell division, genetics and molecular biology · Population and community dynamics Chemistry 20 20 IB  5 credits Components of this course are: · Matter as solutions, acids and bases · Matter as gases · Quantitative relationships in chemical changes · The diversity of matter and chemical bonding Chemistry 30 30 IB  5 credits Components of this course are: · Thermochemical changes · Electrochemical changes · Chemical equilibrium focusing on acid-base systems · Organic chemistry

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continued Physics 20  5 credits (65% in Math 10c is highly recommended as a prerequisite for Physics 20) Components of this course are: · Kinematics · Dynamics · Circular motion, work and energy · Oscillatory motion and mechanical waves Physics 30  5 credits Components of this course are: · Momentum and impulse · Forces and fields · Electromagnetic radiation · Atomic physics


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Religious Studies As a Catholic high school, a major purpose of our existence is to further our students’ faith development and education in a Catholic tradition. One of the primary ways our school achieves this goal is through the Religious Studies classes. The school division requires all of our students to successfully complete Religious Studies 15, 25 and 35 in order to participate in our graduation ceremonies. The Religious Studies program assumes that all of us are on a journey towards God. The various stages of this journey need to be recognized, encouraged and articulated in a non-threatening manner. With this in mind, students are expected to search in an open, honest way for solutions to the problems of the world around them. These courses will deal with some of the ultimate questions of life, such as the following: Who am I? What purpose do I serve? How do I make the world a better place? It is also our hope and prayer that students enrolled in our classes not only learn about Christ but encounter Christ through class discussion, service projects, guest speakers, retreats and liturgies. Religious Studies courses do not provide all the answers. Rather, they are meant to be a continuation of the faith growth that the student already experiences through the family and parish communities.

Christian action assignment Service to others is a vital component of the religious studies program. Not only is the service important, but also what happens to the student because of the service. We work to integrate service experience into the course so that students learn that service is not just a requirement of the course but an important part of what it means to be a Christian in today’s world. Unique service opportunities will be developed with the individual student in mind. An example of the type of service experience made available is reaching out to the homeless in Edmonton through the Marian Center.

retreats Each semester, the Religious Studies classes leave the classroom and go on retreat. Personal reflection, group discussions and theological insight on such topics as the passion, faith development and personal relationships are explored. These retreats are facilitated by teachers in the Religious Studies department, the Oblate Youth Ministry and youth ministers from St. Albert Parish and Holy Family Parish.

guest speakers Students will be given many opportunities to hear the personal witness of faith from active adults in our community. It is through these guest speakers that students will see how faith can be permeated into daily life and decisions, thus making faith relevant to their lives.

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Religious Studies 15  belonging  3 credits Have you ever stopped to think about all the cultures you belong to? Students look at these cultures and explore the idea that their relationships with themselves, others and jesus are an influence on who they are now and who they will become. The attraction of serving others is explained and experienced in this course. Religious Studies 25  believing  3 credits The underlying premise of the grade eleven Religious Studies program is that human beings attempt to make sense out of what they are experiencing. They search for meaning by trying to discover what is truth. What do I believe about myself, others and God? How am I to live my life? The purpose of this program is to guide students on an inner journey toward a more honest way of seeing and being in the world. Religious Studies 35  relating  3 credits With life comes some difficult decisions. Leaving high school brings a whole new group of challenges. Building foundations for moral decision-making in the “next” stage of life is the focus of this course. Students will examine what is the ”good life” through a clear identification of Catholic ethics and the applications of these principles in their lives. We further explore issues in social justice, ecology, mercy, marriage, family and politics. World Religions  30  The World Religions 30 course offers an opportunity to address the important role of religion in our lives, the role of family, moral codes, and the importance of ritual and basic beliefs within major religions around the world. The basic beliefs and practices of the major world religions (Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism) as well as Aboriginal Spirituality will be studied from a Catholic perspective. Other topics include: World Religions and Religious Pluralism, Living Faith Today, Who are Catholics?, and Modernity and Religion.

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Fine Arts The fine arts program at St. Albert Catholic High has grown steadily during the past few years. The courses offer a great opportunity for students to develop their creative and performing talents. In addition to the regular class work, fine arts students have the opportunity to write and perform dramatic works for in-school and community performances. Music students may join any one of four bands and two choirs for school and community concerts. Art students participate in art competitions and exhibits beyond the basic course work.

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Advanced Acting 15 25 35   This course focuses on a fully performed production that creates the opportunity to connect the theories and pragmatics of acting. There will be an audition process to determine where in the production a student would be most successful. Rehearsals and instruction will be combined and will need full participation and attendance. The above course will be run concurrently with the following program. Technical Theatre 15 25 35   This course focuses on the processes necessary to build and put up a production. This includes necessities such as set, scenery, and prop building, stage painting, aesthetics (makeup/hair), sound design and execution, light design and execution, costume and back stage crew work including stage managing. Rehearsals and instruction will be combined and will need full participation and attendance. History of Cinema In this course, you will be introduced to film as an artistic medium and as a window into the past and present. Take a journey through history, from silent flicks to the modern feature film. You will be able to better and more fully enjoy the fine and varied experience that is film, in all its genres, moods and colours. Choral Music 10 20 30  5 credits Just as everyone can sing, everyone is welcome in this popular, mixed group. Choral music 10/20/30 explores the fundamentals of vocal music by performing a variety of musical styles ranging from classic motown hits and show tunes, to traditional three, and four-part vocal music. All students contribute their voices to the development of the class as one complete unit. We do community performances, as well as festivals, and students have also created their own recording projects using their own compositions. Students are also encouraged to perform solo pieces and duets. Concert Band Instrumental Music  10  20  30  5 credits Strike it up! Explore the basic fundamentals of music structure, composition and style. Course content includes study of his/her own instrument, ear training, theoretical studies, conducting and ensemble playing. Students in this course also participate in music festivals and band trips. Students should have two years experience playing a concert band instrument. Instrumental Jazz 15 25 35  5 credits Prerequisite: Enrollment in Instrumental Music 10, 20, 30 or General Music 10, 20, 30 Funk! Swing! Jump Blues! Salsa! Rock! Students in this high energy big, bad, band do it all! Jazz Band is for all horn players with a rhythm section of guitar, bass and piano/keyboards. This is a FUN and rewarding addition to the Instrumental Music course. This course is designed to explore the basics of improvisation and ensemble playing in the jazz idiom. (It is recommended that students have some prior knowledge of at least one of: Bass, Guitar, Drums or Keyboard. Students are expected to provide their own instruments.)

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Fine Arts

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General Music  10  guitar  5 credits Come in and share your love for the guitar! This course explores the basic fundamentals of music structure, composition and style on the guitar. We explore many musical styles from rock, to bach, and back again. Recording projects are also created. Course content includes the study of guitar, ear training, theoretical studies, conducting and ensemble playing. Students use acoustic guitars (non-electric). Some acoustics are available to rent. Everyone is welcome regardless of what experience you have. General Music 20 30  guitar  5 credits Prerequisite:  General Music 10 This course builds on the skills of students completing Guitar 10, or those who pass an audition process. Greater technical ability is required as more emphasis is put on ensemble playing of more advanced music. There is also more emphasis on aspects of composition and improvisation such as voice leading, seventh chords, and advanced scales. An electric guitar is sometimes necessary, as the class does smaller combo work and the students will work on recording projects. Electric Guitar Ensemble  25  35  5 credits Prerequisite:  Audition  +  General Music Guitar 10 or 20 Crank it up! This course is for advanced students and is designed to explore ensemble playing and performance of more contemporary styles of music. Students must have an electric guitar. Rhythm section players are also invited to join as a rhythm section (bass and drum kit) is needed for this ensemble. This group has done recording projects (a full compact disc) and performs in the community and at music festivals. All guitarists are encouraged to solo in this group. Swing, pop, bop, funk, rock, Samba - you name it, we play it! Rock & Pop 10 20 30  5 credits Rock and Pop is a music class that allows students to study music and musical creativity in a unique way. Develop your talents as a rock or pop musician, while reinforcing correct technical skills on the guitar, bass, drums, keyboard or vocals. Small rock band ensembles will be formed.

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Fine Arts - IB Stream

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Art 10 10 Pre-IB  5 credits Art 10 is a three-credit course designed to give students a broad exposure to the media of art – such as drawing, painting, sculpture, print making, mixed media and graphic design. Students are introduced to the creative process through study of visual communication and the elements and principles of design. Students develop and refine their drawing skills and styles through a variety of techniques and strategies. Art 20 20 IB  5 credits Art 20 is a five-credit course that further develops and refines the creative and technical skills of students. The main units are drawing, painting, print making, sculpture, environment and architecture, graphic and industrial design and art history. Students explore personal selection of expression and engage in art criticism to interpret and to evaluate both their works and the works of others. Art 30 30 IB  5 credits Art 30 is a five-credit course that continues the development of creative and technical skills through study, experimentation, research and analysis of images. Students assume greater responsibility for personal expression and growth in the selection of appropriate themes and media, developing an independent style and approach to the creative process. This course provides opportunities for students to complete a portfolio for post-secondary institutions. Drama 10 10 Pre-IB  5 credits Drama 10 is an introductory course. It introduces students to work in speech, improvisation, movement, and emphasizes co-operation with each other in creative endeavors. In-school performances, community performances, and final project evening performances teach skills and build confidence in the student. Students explore a variety of creative drama media and gain skill and experience in each, in addition to exploring the Shakespearean genre. Drama 20 20 IB  5 credits Drama 20 is the second in the series of three drama programs offered at St. Albert Catholic High School. The program provides students with the opportunity to earn 5 credits in drama by building on the basic skills taught in Drama 10. Intense collective creation and playwriting opportunities abound as we hone this required expressive curriculum skill. We start to explore various genres and theatre styles in Drama 20 to aid in understanding theatre history. An international focus assists students in understanding the diversity of world theatre. Drama 30 30 IB  5 credits Drama 30 is the third and final course in the drama trilogy. This course provides students with the opportunity to deepen the skills acquired in the first two years of study. It asks students to challenge themselves to achieve a deeper understanding of themselves and their dramatic capabilities, and utilize this understanding to explore new characters, new scripts and new opportunities in drama. Drama 30 students are also asked to study theatre styles, critique live performances and explore the skill of directing in order to advance their knowledge of theatre and the production process. Technical aspects such as mask are also a part of this course, which enables students to explore construction, scripting and performance of a character. An international focus in both text and directors assists students in understanding their own performance and director vision.

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International Languages Canada is a country full of rich cultures and is a great place to learn a new language. Learning a second language allows you to gain a better understanding of other cultures, creating an opportunity to travel and meet new people. Think of all the amazing experiences you will have new people you’ll be able to talk to. Future opportunities include: · Post-secondary prerequisite · Scholarships · Bursaries · Foreign exchange programs

Career opportunities include: · Geological, geophysical, mining and petroleum companies · Business community · Health and education · Technology

Note: the study of a language is a demanding academic pursuit. A pre-requisite or co-requisite of English 10.1 would be an asset for students who wish to study a language for the first time at the high school level.

Spanish language and culture Students with some previous knowledge of Spanish are discouraged from registering at the beginner level. A placement test will be administered to all students to confirm appropriate course selection. There is a $20.00 fee for a Spanish workbook (for all levels). Spanish is also available online. For further information on the Spanish program, please contact Ms. Coco (lcoco@gsacrd.ab.ca).

French language Students wishing to pursue the study of French at the high school level come from a variety of elementary and junior high French programs. The student’s experience of French programming, as well as intensity of exposure to the language varies greatly. The following course sequences are recommended. A placement test will be administered to all students to confirm appropriate course selection. For further information, please contact Ms.Champagne through the school switchboard.

No prerequisite

French 10-3y

French as a Second Language since grade 4

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Grade 10

Grade 11

Grade 12

French 10-9y

French 20-9y

French 30-9y

French 10-9y

French 20-9y

French 30-9y


Spanish 10.3Y  5 credits No previous knowledge of the language is required. The classroom emphasis will be on oral communication. You will also learn the fundamentals of written Spanish and explore diverse aspects of Spanish culture in the world. Students will perform a variety of language functions such as listening, asking and describing in a variety of contexts such as school, people around us, holidays and celebrations, community and social life, trips and excursion. Spanish 20.3Y  5 credits Spanish 20 continues to expand on the vocabulary and grammar introduced in Spanish 10. The emphasis is on sentence and paragraph construction in the past tense. Spanish will be used to communicate in a number of daily situations. Students will perform a variety of language functions such as listening, asking and describing in a variety of contexts such as family, friends, relationships, sports, food, travel, shopping and clothing. Spanish 30.3Y  5 credits Spanish 30 is the final course in this three-year series. The emphasis is on developing basic oral and written communication skills. Spanish 30 offers students the opportunity to expand their knowledge of the Spanish language and culture through a variety of cultural and linguistic activities. Spanish will be used to communicate in a number of daily situations. Also, students will be introduced to classic Spanish film. French 10.3Y  5 credits This course is only offered if demand is present and students have no prior French. French 10.9Y  5 credits The course offers new challenges by exploring different life situations using French as the language of communication. The use of communicative activities, authentic documents, partner and group work based on real life situations will be emphasized. French 20.9Y  5 credits French 20-9Y is an academic course designed for the student wishing to improve his/her French at the intermediate/ advanced level. French 20-9Y not only focuses on listening to and speaking French, but introduces reading and writing in the second language. French 30.9Y  5 credits Students will continue to improve and perfect all language skills, using French exclusively as the language of communication in the classroom. This course can be used for entrance to post-secondary institutions. Francais 10 20 30  5 credits These programs are available through SACHS in partnership with Ecole Alexandre-Tache. For more information, visit the SACHS office. Chinese Language and Culture (Mandarin)  10  20  5 credits This Chinese Language and Culture program is intended for students who are beginning their study of Chinese language and culture in high school and preparing for post-secondary studies in languages, business or international studies. 33


International Languages - IB Stream Spanish  10 IB  5 credits This International Baccalaureate is a course for beginners. No previous knowledge of Spanish is necessary but students must be self-motivated and quick language learners, as they will be expected to write the Alberta Initio exam at the end of grade 12. Spanish  20 IB  30 IB  5 credits These two courses continue to expand oral and written proficiency in preparation for the IB Alberta Initio exam written in grade 12. Note: students enrolled in intermediate or advanced language classes may have the option and opportunity to complete cultural modules for extra credits. These modules will be assessed separately. French  10 Pre-IB  5 credits The grade 10 International Baccalaureate program in French has been designed to challenge self-motivated students eager to further enhance their junior high French experience. This series of courses continues to improve and perfect language skills through the formal study of grammar. A wide variety of novels, plays, short stories, and poetry will be studied. This stream also prepares them for French 20 IB and French 30 IB. French  20 IB  5 credits Through the use of a variety of authentic materials (journals, novels, plays, etc.), Students will perfect grammatical skills orally and in writing. Different types of essays will be taught in preparation for the IB examination. French  30 IB  5 credits This is the final course in the IB language B series. The emphasis will be on critical analysis of reading texts, and accuracy of oral and written expression based on cultural research.

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Physical Education Physical Education  10  3 credits Students cannot register for this course if they have taken Physical Education 10 in summer school. The Physical Education program features a student-centered learning environment where students will have the opportunity to improve their skill level and knowledge in a variety of activities. This program is intended to foster the formulation of a healthy lifestyle while promoting social skills and values transferable to other areas of the students’ lives, regardless of ability level. Participation is the essential element of this program, providing a balance between ability and achievement where all willing students can succeed. In some cases, depending on class size and maturity, an extra-curricular activity could be organized which may involve a small cost to the student (less than $10). Potential activities include: · Cross-country running · Yoga · Flag football · Soccer · Badminton · Ultimate Frisbee · Volleyball

· Wrestling · Basketball · Rugby · Broomball · Swimming · Curling · Weight training

· Baseball · Skating · Track and field · Aerobics · Indoor activities · Ping pong · Tekraw

· Dance · CPR · Co-operative games · Handball · Skating · Tchouk ball · Pickle ball

High Performance Physical Education  10  5 credits The aim of the Alberta Education Kindergarten to grade 12 Physical Education program is to enable individuals to develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to lead an active, healthy lifestyle. The purpose of the High Performance Physical Education 10 course (5 credit) is to provide students with an opportunity to cover the entire prescribed curriculum while also engaging in alternative physical activities. This course is ideal for students who want to challenge themselves both physically and mentally since the demands and expectations are much higher than that of the Physical Education 10 course (3 credit). Students enrolled in this course must demonstrate a high level of maturity and personal organization. While following the Physical Education 10 Alberta Education curriculum, this course will also be a blend of various aspects of sport and include: classroom activities, fitness sessions, as well as a cross section of activities and sports. Note: this course is subject to a cap of 30 students due to out-of-school field trip restrictions. *Students can only register for one Phys. Ed. 10 course. Whether it be through summer school, regular Phys. Ed. 10 in class or High Performance Phys. Ed. 10 in class.

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Physical Education  20  5 credits This course builds upon the skills of students completing Physical Education 10 and will provide opportunity for further expansion and depth of learning. The focus on fitness is increased at this level as students gain an understanding of the principles and physical dynamics of fitness. Students also have the opportunity to explore activities not included in the previous level and have increased behavioral expectations placed on them. This includes mandatory, in-school service/leadership hours, which also serve as a pre-requisite for Phys. Ed. 30. Other possible activities may include: · Rock climbing · Roller skating · Beach volleyball · Sledge hockey · Bowling · Wallyball · Social dance · Billiards · Self-defence · Swimming · Fencing · Golf · Spin class · Veledrome cycling · Hiking · Pilates Physical Education  30  5 credits This is the culmination of the 10 20 30 program. This course is an extension of Physical Education 20 and offers the students experiences not available at previous levels. Enrollment is based upon completion of in-school service/ leadership hours from Phys. Ed. 20, teacher recommendation, and an achievement of 60% or better in Phys. Ed. 20. Instruction may cover aspects of sports medicine, first aid and anatomy in addition to further Exploration of various activities. The student expectation is high as many activities take students beyond the immediate community and require a high level of maturity and personal organization. Students may also experience some aspects of the administration or teaching of sports or extra-curricular activities. Aside from the previously mentioned activities in Physical Education 20, other possible activities may include: · Scuba diving · Day trip to Camp Warwa

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Physical Education

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sports performance Sports Performance highly emphasizes physical activity and learning about leading a “healthy and active lifestyle”. Students will be evaluated on theory (written assignments) and active participation components. Sport Performance provides students with an opportunity to develop knowledge, skills, and attitudes in all aspects of personal fitness and health. Students will better understand how personal fitness affects their own body and how it all functions together. They will feel better about themselves, have more energy and gain self-confidence in their overall abilities. The simplest and most practical definition of personal fitness is: “An individual effort and desire to be the best one can be.” Sports Performance  10  5 credits · HCS1050  Musculoskeletal System · HCS1080  Cardiovascular System · HCS1910  HCS Project A ( Cardio / Aerobic Training ) · HSS1020  Nutrition and Wellness · REC1040  Foundations for training 1 Note: HCS1070 Musculoskeletal System will be used to supplement those students who are taking HCS1050 Musculoskeletal System in sports Medicine 15. Sports Performance  20  5 credits · REC2040  Foundations for training 2 · REC2010  Nutrition for recreational activities and sport · REC2910  REC project B (Speed, agility, quickness) · REC2920  REC Project C (Strenght and resitance for core muscles) · REC2060  Leadership in recreation and sport Note: New courses such as Strength and Resistance for Core Muscles, Foundations for Olympic power and training, Periodizationand program design, Plyometrics, Advanced power and olympic training may be substituted for any of the projects. Sports Performance  30  5 credits · REC3010  Human Movement · REC3040  Training and conditioning · REC3910  Fitness instruction and leadership principles · REC3080  Resistance training leadership · REC3130  Officiating Note: REC3910 REC Project D Plyometrics will be used to supplement those students who are taking REC3010 Human Movement in Sports Medicine 35.

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health and wellness These courses are for students interested in sports medicine, athletic therapy, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, nursing, chiropractic, medicine, kinesiology, physical education, fire fighter, pro-athlete or coach, paramedic (EMR/ EMT), fitness instructor, massage therapy, nutritionist, basic first aid instructor, child care and health industries or any other of the many medical and sport sciences. After completion of the introductory modules, students are then able to attain 5 credits at the 25 and 35 level. These strands offer opportunities for students to receive certification and training in a number of health, wellness and sport career pathways. · First aid / CPR / A.E.D. certification · Coaching certification NCCP levels · Athletic first aid; taping and strapping and sports nutrition certification Health and Wellness  15  3 credits · HSS1010-health services foundations · HCS1050-musculoskeletal system · REC1020-injury management 1 · REC1030-technical foundations for injury management Health and Wellness  25  5 credits (subject to meeting pre-requisites) · CCS2010-health care 1 · CCS2040-integrative health · HCS2020-first aid / CPR with A.E.D. · REC2020-injury management 2 · REC2120-coaching 1 Health and Wellness  35  5 credits (subject to meeting pre-requisites) · CCS3010-health care 2 · HCS3020-first responder 1 · REC3010-human movement · REC3020-injury management 3 · REC3120-coaching 2 Note: CCS1080/CCS2080 - community volunteerism is an opportunity for students to earn 1 credit for volunteering in the community in an area of interest. Time spent will be outside of a student’s daily class schedule.

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Career and Technology Studies The career and technology program’s purpose is to organize learning experiences in modules which: · Are more relevant, real world experiences that link theory with practice · Use information and technology more effectively in a wide range of applications · Focus on developing student competencies and skills which students can use daily throughout life - work/life skills will be stressed · Will increase student confidence in themselves as they prove they can contribute significantly to their community The C.T.S program at St. Albert Catholic High School involves a number of areas. Each area has modules designed at the beginning, intermediate and advanced levels. · Business · Communications media · Computer FX · Construction · Cosmetology · Design and fabrication · Fashion studies · Food studies · Forensics · Sports medicine/medical services · History of cinema · Leadership · Legal studies · Personal psychology · Work experience

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Business 10 Business 10 challenges students to explore and expand their skill sets both as innovators and leaders. Students will have the opportunity to operate their own school-based business and experience first hand the process of generating ideas and turning those ideas into reality! This would be a great course to take if you are interested in the International School of Business. Communication And Computer Technologies   3/5 credits Communication and computer technologies explores television and video, computer and presentation skills using a variety of different media. The program is offered for 3 credits for grade 10 students and 5 credits for grades 11 and 12, allowing the students to focus on their area of interests. The program allows the student to create and explore with new and innovative technologies. The program teaches students to bring their imaginations alive using programs and techniques like computer graphics, advertising, computer programming (robotics, app development), animation and 3D animation (flipbook, cell, legomation, claymation and sandmation). If that’s not enough, students can choose to develop skills in radio, news broadcasting, film making, sound/music recording, and video editing software while working on industry based project learning. Cosmetology 10  3/5 credits If you have an interest in hair, nails and/or make-up, you will have fun learning about the art and science of beauty care in Cosmetology. Courses at this introductory level introduce students to some fundamental topic areas of the beauty industry. Students will learn skills involving how to apply make-up, perform manicures, and create long hair looks using braids, twists and knots. On top of that, they will learn how to shampoo, blow-dry and style hair just like the professionals do in the salon. Courses are delivered in a modular format with each course being equivalent to 1 credit. Cosmetology 20  5 credits If you are attracted to the beauty industry, you will enjoy building on fundamental practices learned in Cosmetology 10. Whether a general interest or a career aspiration, courses at this intermediate level will provide insight into the knowledge, skills and attitudes important in the salon industry. Students will learn skills involving how to perform basic haircuts, apply hair colors and create up-do styles using advanced long hair techniques. Part of the program is client-service based and students will learn to perform client consultations, just like they do in the salon. Students will have the opportunity to bring in clients and put their skills to practice in a real salon setting on client service days. Cosmetology 30  5 credits If you have a growing attraction to the beauty industry, then you’ll have fun further engaging in and building on fundamental practices already learned. Cosmetology 30 is an advanced level interest program that offers deeper insight into the salon industry as a potential career. Students will learn advanced skills in haircutting and styling, and learn to perform advanced hair color techniques including hilights and bleach applications. Students will have the opportunity to bring in clients and put their skills to practice in a real salon setting on client service days. Advanced client service courses will build on existing skills and competencies and broaden the understanding of daily salon practices as students are encouraged to develop and refine their skills for use in a career in the beauty industry.

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Design and Industrial Technologies   3/5 credits This program offers the students experiences in graphic design, computer assisted drafting, mechanics, construction and fabrication. It is a multi-activity, project based course where the students can build an individualized program to suit their own passions. We offer both a 3 credit and a 5 credit program in both semesters. Students can also apply for a special project to build or create something that requires more time and effort than a regular project. Areas of study: construction, fabrication, mechanics, Computer Assisted Drafting (C.A.D.), graphic design Some examples of projects that have been created include: jewelry boxes, book shelves, tables, hockey stick holders, vinyl graphics, small engine teardown, vehicle maintenance and much more! Come with an idea, make a plan, create/ build it, leave with an accomplishment! Fashion 10  3 credits Please note: No prior experience in sewing or fashion is necessary. Sewing fundamentals is a prerequisite module necessary for taking most intermediate and advanced courses. Production and design at the introductory level, is designed for students to practice and develop skill levels in the construction of various projects. Students’ personal interests and abilities are assessed in the areas of designing, constructing, and merchandising. Study fashion and color through taking a course on fashion illustration. Learn about color, line and designing fashions. Explore drawing techniques and have fun creating your own designs for your own clothing line. We have equipment that is user friendly and offers the latest technology in sewing. Features include embroidery stitching as well. Courses offered at the fashion 10 level include: · Fashion Illustration I · Sewing Fundamentals · Creating Accessories I Fashion Studies 20 30  5 credits The intermediate and advanced levels allow students to continue to develop their knowledge, and understanding and extend their competencies. Career exploration and portfolios are developed. The introductory course in fashion studies gives the students the basic construction and sewing skills that are the foundation upon which the intermediate and advanced fashion courses are built upon. The variety of choices given to the students create an opportunity for students to pursue their interests in fashion. Some of the courses included in the Fashion 20/30 courses are Creators of Fashion, Active Wear, Contemporary Tailoring, Digital Embroidery Tools II, Specialty Fabrics I, Creating Accessories II, Costuming, Surface Embellishment, Creating Home Decor and Sewing for Others Students in Fashion 20/30 usually participate in the costuming and alterations needed for our school play as well. In addition to this, students in fashion also participate in various fund raising during the term such as sewing blankets and mitts for those in need during the winter months. This is a great example of service and using our gifts that God has given us to help others in need.

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Foods 10  5 credits Please note: the Food Basics course is a prerequisite necessary for taking intermediate and advanced modules. Do you like to cook? Would you like to be able to cook for your family and friends? Students in Foods 10 will enhance their kitchen skills to obtain a part time job or maybe even work towards a full time career in the hospitality industry. Students are also introduced to the wide range of related career opportunities. Students have the opportunity to become involved with the Culinary Skills school team, which provides students with the opportunity to practice and refine their kitchen skills. Courses offered at the foods 10 level include: · Food Basics · Snacks and Appetizers · Meal Planning I Foods 20 30  5 credits The Foods 20 and Foods 30 courses are designed to continue developing students’ understanding, knowledge and competencies in the management, selection and preparation of food. Through intermediate and advanced courses in foods, students have the opportunity to develop some of the skills that are used in the hospitality industry. Career exploration and portfolios are explored. Some of the courses included in foods 20/30: · Cake and Pastry · Rush Hour Cuisine · Stocks, Soups and Sauces · Basic Meat Cookery

· International Cuisine I · Creative Baking · Food Presentation · Short Order Cooking

Legal Studies 10  3 credits Legal studies is designed to promote a student’s appreciation and understanding of the legal system and relevant laws, which regulate personal interactions and business-related activities. Through the analysis of actual cases and current events, the student will develop analytical reasoning skills and an awareness of the legal issues and legal procedures with which citizens and employees must deal. Throughout the course students will learn about a variety of legal concepts through the integration of guest speakers, field trips, mock-trials and virtual school resources. Personal Psychology   3 credits Psychology is the study of human and animal behaviour and thought processes. This course will introduce students to the various schools of thought in psychology. We will explore diverse questions from a psychological perspective: can advertisers actually manipulate people with hidden messages? Why did most of the German people go along with Hitler? Why are you attracted to some people and not others? How do people become addicted to various substances or stimuli? How can this be treated? Many more options are available through the iLearn Centre.

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Photography The digital photography course will introduce and explore media communications and journalistic practices, as they pertain to both the local and global communities. Students will have ample opportunity to practice photography in a hands-on and participatory studio setting. Students will learn the technical aspects of digital imaging, including elements of typography and graphic design layout. This project-oriented course contains engaging thematic content. Coursework will include in-depth coverage of the photographic process, including research, image gathering, image manipulating, and feedback. Registered Apprenticeship Program (R.A.P.) The Registered Apprenticeship Program allows you to be enrolled in high school, and also be an apprentice. The program is designed to encourage you to complete high school while applying time spent in work experience education towards your apprenticeship. Once you finish high school there is a technical or schooling component to the apprenticeship, which you will have to complete at a post-secondary institution. By beginning your apprenticeships in high school, you will be getting a head start on an exciting career choice. Complete details about apprenticeship can be found on the website at www.tradesecrets.org. Student Leadership 15 25  35 This program seeks to make our community a better place through student leadership. Student council and leadership organize a number of events throughout the year to engage the student population with the school and the community at large. This group of students is responsible for creating, organizing and implementing events and activities to develop their leadership skills and enhance the high school experience. Students will explore principles of leadership and evaluate their personal characteristics and qualities. Students develop a plan for their personal growth as a member of a leadership team and examine their various behaviors, skills and roles of team members that contribute to team effectiveness. They will examine communication, public speaking and presentation skills and will lead and participate in meetings. Students will explore the following modules: Leadership 15 · Leadership Fundamentals I · Quality Customer Service · Communication Strategies I · Speaking and Presenting · Communication Skills for Health Professionals

Leadership 25 · Leadership Fundamentals II · Elements Of A Venture Plan · Marketing The Venture · Create The Venture · Ent Project B

Leadership 35 · Leadership Fundamentals III · Governance and Leadership · Communication Strategies III · Managing The Venture · Ent Project D

Work Experience 25 35 Work experience is an off-campus education program where grade 11 and 12 students will be able to learn employability skills in the workplace. Work Experience 25 and 35 are time based. Five credits are awarded for 125 hours of work. HCS3000 is a prerequisite for work experience and is usually taken as an introduction to the program.

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Blended Learning Centre try online Can’t schedule the course you want? …. Not a problem, try it online! The goal of the blended learning centre is to offer students the opportunity to take courses not available or accessible in-class, in an online environment. Many students take advantage of the flexibility offered in online courses, allowing them to schedule their learning around other commitments (academics, sports, jobs, etc.). Students are able to interact with and receive individual support from the teachers and educational assistants located in the centre, as well as through the use of online tools. What’s important to keep in mind is that success in online education requires learners to be self-motivated and have good reading and comprehension skills. Students are scheduled into the blended learning centre, by school administration, and the same classroom expectations of focused work completion and appropriate behaviour apply. This is not a drop-in program; attendance is mandatory.

did you know ? Although online learning isn’t for every student, post-secondary schools now demand portions of some courses be done online. It is recommended by Alberta Education that high school students take at least one online course in their high school years to prepare for this eventuality.

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International Baccalaureate frequently asked questions What is the International Baccalaureate program? The IB program is a dynamic and rigorous two year pre-university course of study leading to examinations. It serves to meet the needs of highly motivated academic and internationally minded students. Offered in grades 11 and 12, IB serves to satisfy local and international requirements. Students who have an aptitude and an interest in the IB program enroll in Pre-IB in grade 10, and are introduced to skills and abilities which will help prepare them for future studies. We ask students to reserve decisions regarding partial or full participation in the IB program until grade 11. At that time, a student may opt to enroll as a partial candidate, taking courses best suited to individual strengths and inclinations. What are the course requirements for a full IB diploma? Full diploma candidates are required to complete three central core components (CAS, EE, TOK) and six subject courses over two years: three courses at higher level and three at standard level. There are combinations geared toward specific interests, however, all six groups must be reached. The IB program is a two year program beginning in grade 11. A Pre-IB year is completed in grade 10. Which higher level and standard level IB courses are offered at SACHS for grade 11 and 12 IB students? Standard Level ( SL ) :  Chemistry, Mathematics, French, Spanish, Visual Arts, Theatre Arts Higher Level ( HL ) :  English, Social Studies, Biology, Visual Arts, Theatre Arts What are some of the benefits of the IB program? The IB program offers a challenging, engaging and rewarding education. It stresses responsibility, determination, and independence, inspiring students to reach the highest levels of achievement. Given the nature and size of grade 12 classes, opportunities may arise for more deliberate individual instruction. The IB program prepares students for post secondary academic study. Graduates have stated that completing IB gives them a competitive edge, noting strengthened development in the following areas: · Analytical skills · Critical and creative thinking skills · Essay writing skills · Math skills

· · · ·

organizational skills research skills science lab skills work habits/discipline skills

Will participation in the IB program affect my chances of achieving scholarships? Students will not be penalized for taking IB courses. Student grades are based on Alberta Education standards. It is a fact that agencies awarding scholarships look for qualities in candidates that the IB program fosters and encourages. Does the University of Alberta recognize IB students? The University of Alberta offers special services and recognition to support IB achievement, particularly in the areas of scholarships, transfer credit, student conferences, and advising. The University of Alberta grants final acceptance based on predicted marks of full IB students. (Grade requirements vary with each faculty). For more information on IB at the U of A, contact: ibstudent@ualberta.ca.

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Beginning in grade 11, what might two example student full diploma schedules look like? There are various combinations, but students must have 3 SL and 3 HL and ensure that all 6 groups are included. There are 3 SL courses and 3 HL courses covering all 6 groups. Option A: · English A1 · French B · Social · Biology · Math · Chemistry

HL SL HL HL SL SL

group 1 group 2 group 3 group 4 group 5 group 6

Option B: · English · Spanish · Social · Chemistry · Math · Art or drama

HL SL HL SL SL HL

group 1 group 2 group 3 group 4 group 5 group 6

central elements Successful completion of the IB diploma involves completion of three central elements: CAS, Extended Essay (EE) and Theory of Knowledge (TOK). These are often called the heart of IB. In order to earn the IB dipoma, candidates must complete these core elements: C.A.S. Prompts students to foster personal and interpersonal development through service to others and to experiential kinds of learning. Students are required to complete 150 hours of C.A.S. activities over the course of two years (grade 11 and 12). Creativity – this component consists of activities that include creative thinking by the student or exploring the creative aspects of our culture or another culture (dance, theatre, music, debate, photography and art). Action – this component includes those activities that a student use to enhance physical training and wellness outside of school (school teams, community teams, expeditions). Service – service projects that help foster a sense of respect for and commitment to others is an integral part of the service component of C.A.S. and a large part of SACHS culture. Extended Essay This course offers opportunities for students to choose a topic of study and, under the guidance of a teacher advisor, complete a 4,000 word paper based upon an intensive study of it. It is through this element that students will not only specialize in an area of interest, they will further extend thinking, research, and writing skills. Theory of Knowledge Theory of knowledge (TOK) is an interdisciplinary requirement intended to stimulate critical reflection on the knowledge and experience gained inside and outside the classroom. This introductory philosophy course challenges students to question the basis of knowledge, to be aware of subjective and ideological biases and to develop the ability to analyze evidence that is expressed in rational argument. It is a key element in encouraging students to appreciate other cultural perspectives and augment critical thinking skills.

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grade 10 pre IB registration In grade 10, we strongly recommend that prospective IB students register in the full Pre-IB program, reserving any decisions regarding partial or full participation in the IB program until grade 11. At that time, students may enroll in one or more courses suited to their specific aptitudes and strengths. Grade 10 English 10.1 Pre-IB French 10.9Y Pre-IB Social studies 10.1 Pre-IB Science 10 Pre-IB Biology 25 Math 10C Pre-IB Math 20.1 Pre-IB Art 10 Pre-IB Physical Education 10 Religious studies

5 credits 5 credits or Spanish (beginner) 10.3 Pre-IB 5 credits 5 credits 3 credits 5 credits   Students complete math 20.1 IB in semester 2 5 credits 3 credits or Drama 10 Pre-IB 3 credits 3 credits

5 credits

3 credits

notes Grade 10 students should plan to take either CALM and/or Religious Studies 25 in summer school. It is strongly recommended that students planning on completing the IB diploma program take Physical Education 10 and/or Religious Studies 15 during summer school following grade 9. As a result, this would allow them to experience one or two option classes during their grade 10 school year.

International Baccalaureate “The International Baccalaureate organization, founded in 1968, is a recognized leader in the field of international education. It is a non-profit, mission-driven foundation that works with 3,458 schools to develop and offer four challenging programs in 143 countries to approximately 1,062,000 students aged 3 to 19 years...We promote intercultural understanding and respect, not as an alternative to a sense of cultural and national identity, but as an essential part of life in the 21st century.” (IBO, 2012)

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General Studies Program  - G.S.P. In order to receive a high school diploma, students must acquire at least 10 credits in complementary courses at the 30 level.

philosophy The General Studies Program (GSP) is designed to meet the needs of those students who have experienced difficulties throughout their school career. It was developed with the philosophy that all students are capable of success. The General Studies Program offers students the opportunity to acquire and expand upon concepts, skills, attitudes, and strategies necessary for school success and the successful transition from high school to post-high school life.

purpose · To offer students extra support which may include: smaller class sizes, accommodations made to the learning/ testing environment and/or a education assistants assigned to the class · To teach students learning strategies that are applicable to life-long learning · To provide opportunities for work experience and practical arts placements · To acquire a high school diploma or knowledge and employability certificate

sample program Grade 10 · English 10.2 · Social Studies 10.2 · Science 14 * · Math 10.3 * · Religious Studies 15 · Physical Education 10 · 5 or 6 C.T.S. / Fine Arts / second language - complementary courses

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Grade 11 · English 20.2 · Social Studies 20.2 · Science 24 · Math 24 · Religious Studies 25 · C.A.L.M. · 5 or 6 C.T.S. / Fine Arts / second language or Physical Education courses - complementary courses

Grade 12 · English 30.2 · Social studies 30.2 · Work Experience 25 and/or 35 · Religious Studies 35 · 4 or 5 C.T.S. / Fine Arts / second language or Physical Education · Registered Apprenticeship Program (R.A.P.)


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Knowledge and Employability philosophy and overview Knowledge and Employability courses are available to students in grades 8 through 12 who meet specific criteria. The courses are intended to provide students with opportunities to experience success and become well prepared for employment, further studies, active citizenship and lifelong learning. Knowledge and Employability courses include and promote: · Workplace standards for academic, occupational and employability skills · Practical application through on-and off-campus experiences and/or community partnerships · Career development skills for exploring careers, assessing career skills and developing a career-focused portfolio · Interpersonal skills to ensure respect, support and cooperation with others in the community, workplace and home Knowledge and Employability courses are designed to provide entry-level employment skills for students who have expressed a goal of leaving school before earning the requirements for a high school diploma. Some students may transition successfully from knowledge and employability courses to other courses to achieve a high school diploma or to continuing education and training opportunities; e.g., some colleges, some apprenticeship programs. Reviewing each students’ learning plan on an annual basis and adjusting his/her goals and courses as needed are important parts of the process. At graduation, those students enrolled in the Knowledge and Employability (K & E) courses/program will receive a Certificate of High School Achievement rather than a high school diploma.

knowledge and employability courses English 10.4, 20.4, 30.4 Math 10.4, 20.4 Social 10.4, 20.4 Science 14, 24 (these are not K & E courses, but at SACHS these are the courses to be chosen to fulfill the provincial science requirements)

complementary courses Supporting the philosophy of knowledge and employability. Design and Fabrication 10, 20, 30 Foods 10, 20, 30 Cosmetology 10, 20, 30 Fashions 10, 20, 30 Communication Media 10, 20, 30 Work Experience 15, 25, 35 Registered Apprenticeship Program

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criteria for enrolment - K & E courses Student must be a minimum age of 12 years 6 months. Student goals: i. Succeed in school to become better prepared for the workplace and/or other secondary post-secondary opportunities, and ii. Parallel the philosophy, rationale, goals and outcomes of the courses Student’s assessments indicate: i. Strengths, needs and abilities will be appropriately addressed and enhanced through enrollment in one or more of the courses ii. Success will be achieved through learning activities that: · Focus on reading, writing and mathematical literacy in everyday living and occupational contexts, and · Provide practical applications and connections to the home, community and workplace Students with some identified special needs may be enrolled in one or more of the courses: i. If the courses are consistent with their individual goals, abilities and needs and are deemed the most appropriate course(s), and; ii. If the programming for these students with special needs meets the requirements outlined in the standards for special education, amended June 2004 Ensure that when students are involved in off-campus activities through occupational and other courses, the requirements included in the current Guide to Education: ECS to Grade 12, the off-campus education policy and the off-campus education guide for administrators, counsellors and teachers are met.

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continued

certificate of high school achievement requirements The requirements indicated in this chart are the minimum requirements for a student to attain a Certificate of High School Achievement. The requirements for entry into post-secondary institutions and workplaces may require additional and /or specific courses. Total credits A total of 80 credits is required (2) The total credits must include the following: English Language Arts 20.2 or 30.4 Mathematics 14 or 20.4 Science 14 Social Studies 13 or 10.2 or 26 or 20.4 Physical Education 10 (3 credits) (3) Career and Life Management (3 credits) (4) and 5 credits in (5) - 30-level Knowledge and Employability occupational course, or - 30-level Career and Technology Studies (CTS), or - 30-level locally developed course with an occupational focus and 5 Credits in - 30-level Knowledge and Employability workplace pracicum course, or - 30-level work experience course (6) , or - 30-level green certificate course (7) or 5 Credits in 30-level Registered Apprenticeship Program (RAP) course (8)

footnotes 1. Students enrolled in senior high K & E as of January 2006 may choose to complete the requirements for the Certificate of High School Achievement or the Knowledge and Employability Certificate of Achievement. 2. To qualify for a Certificate of High School Achievement, students must successfully complete a minimum of one academic Knowledge and Employability course. 3. See information on exemption from the physical education requirement in the physical education section of the guide. 4. See information on exemption from the CALM requirement in the CALM section of the guide. 5. To transition to the new Certificate of High School Achievement, 36-level occupational courses may be used in lieu of the 30.4 level Knowledge and Employability occupational courses. 6. Refer to the Off-Campus Education Guide for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers for additional information. 7. Refer to the Alberta Education website for additional Green Certificate information. 8. Refer to the Registered Apprenticeship Program Information Manual for additional information.

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Individual Support Program philosophy In keeping with the philosophy of inclusive education, students with special needs will be given a learning setting that maximizes their opportunity to be educated within the larger educational community. Decisions regarding placement and instruction will be guided by the development of an individualized program plan (IPP), which will be the result of a process of assessment and involve consultation with staff, parents and the student, when appropriate. The skills, knowledge and attitudes developed in the program are aimed at helping to prepare students to function as independently as possible within the community. In addition to the time spent on work experience and academics, there is also significant time given to life skills in the community, as well as recreation and leisure skills. This is a non-credit program. This is a comprehensive program and upon completion the students will receive a Certificate of Graduation.

purpose · To provide age and developmentally appropriate learning experiences for all students · To help students become active and contributing members of society · To promote awareness and involvement in opportunities for life-long learning

sample program Grade 10 · English 17 · Mathematics 17 · Work prep 17 · Human relations 17 · Religion 15 · Food Prep. 17 · 2 to 4 complementary courses · Work Experience 17

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Grade 11 · English 27 · Mathematics 27 · Work Prep 27 · Human Relations 27 · Religion 25 · Food Prep. 27 · 2 to 4 complementary courses · Work experience 27

Grade 12 · English 37 · Mathematics 37 · Work Prep 37 · Human Relations 37 · · Food prep. 37 · 2 to 4 complementary courses · Work experience 37


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Post-Secondary Information When choosing high school courses, it is important to keep in mind the direction you wish to take for post-secondary studies. University or college entrance requirements vary significantly depending on institution, faculty and program. Your average is important. Acceptance to post-secondary programs is becoming increasingly competitive. Institutional calendars indicate minimum application averages. Competitive averages needed for acceptance can be significantly higher and are based on the number of students applying to the programs. Information regarding pre-requisite courses for specific programs and institutions is available in the Student Services department. Scholarships can help fund the cost of expensive post-secondary education. A list of criteria for SACHS specific awards can be found in the Student Planner. Entrance scholarships (available at most post-secondary institutions) and general scholarship sites can be linked through our school webpage. For more on post-secondary and career planning information, check out the Parents and Students section on the SACHS website at www.sachs.ab.ca, or stop by the Student Services department.

frequently asked questions What should I take in high school to be ready for university or college? What prerequisites do I need to get into university? Prerequisites vary depending on school and faculty. Check with the post-secondary school you wish to apply at. Keep in mind that your high school academic average counts. Student selection in some programs can be competitive and may be based on academic achievement beyond specified prerequisites. To boost your average many faculties will accept one of the many 5-credit, 30 level courses offered in Fine Arts, CTS or second language programs. (e.g. Physics 30 is a prerequisite to apply to Engineering or Pre-Veterinary Science. You do not require Physics 30 to apply to the Faculties of Arts or General Science). What courses provide the most career paths if I am not sure about what I want to do beyond high school? In order to keep as many doors open as possible, take the highest level of each subject that you can manage. (e.g. English 30.1 is required for university entrance, English 30.2 is often accepted at the college level). How do I choose a faculty or major? How do I know which post-secondary program is best for me? Choice of program is often based on your favorite school subjects or whatever your passion is. Our career practitioner is always available to students wishing to take an interest inventory or to assist with career investigation. What is the difference between college, technical school and university? What is the difference between a certificate, a diploma an applied degree and degree? What is a bachelor’s degree? Colleges offer a range of programs including academic upgrading, job readiness, apprenticeship, certificates, diplomas, university transfer, baccalaureate and applied degrees. Technical schools offer much the same programming with a focus on workplace requirements. Universities offer a wider range of undergraduate programs (Bachelor Degrees) than colleges and tech. schools. They also offer graduate programming (Masters degrees and P.H. D. degrees) and are responsible for much of the research within the province’s post-secondary system.

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High School Entry In order to be successful in high school, Grade 9 students are expected to meet the criteria outlined below. Students with 80% or greater are not mandated to take Pre-IB courses, but they have met the requirements to take these courses if they so wish. Grade 9 Course

Grade 9 Mark

High School Course

Language Arts 9

Less than 60%

English 10.2  or English 10.4 (K & E)

60% or greater

English 10.1

80% or greater

English 10.1 Pre-IB

Less than 60%

Social Studies 10.2  or Social Studies 10.4 (K & E)

60% or greater

Social Studies 10.1

80% or greater

Social Studies 10.1 Pre-IB

Less than 50%

Math 10.3  or 10.4 (K & E)

50%

Math 10 Combined

80% or greater

Math 10C Pre-IB

Less than 50%

Science 14

50-79% - 65% is recommended

Science 10

80% or higher

Science 10 Pre-IB

80% or greater

Science 10 Pre-IB Biology 25 IB Chemistry 20 Pre-IB

Social Studies 9

Math 9

Science 9

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high school program planning worksheet Grade 10

Grade 11

Grade 12

English

English

English

Social Studies

Social Studies

Social Studies

Math

Math

Math

Science

Science

Science

Option Option

Science #2 or Fine Arts

Science #2 or Fine Arts

Option Option

Option

Option or spare

Option Option

Option

Option or spare

Religion 15

Religion 25

Phys. Ed. 10

CALM 20

Religion 35

路 20 level science and math courses are required for a high school diploma 路 Various science courses are prerequisites for post-secondary institutions and programs. Students can select from Biology, Chemistry and Physics 路 Phys. Ed 10, CALM 20 and Religious Studies 15, 25 and 35 are all required for a high school diploma

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High School Entry

continued

high school program planing worksheet - sample Grade 10 English

Grade 11

10.1

English

Social Studies

Math

Science

20.1

English

10.2

Social Studies

20.2

Social Studies

10.C

Math

20.2

Math

10

Science

Chem 20

30.1 30.2 30.2

Science

chem 30

Option Option

Science #2 or Fine Arts

Science #2 or Fine Arts

Option Option

Option

Option or spare

Option Option

Option

Option or spare

Religion 15

Religion 25

Foods

Drama

French French 10.9y 10.9y Legal Business Studies

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Grade 12

Phys. Ed. 10

Bio 20

French 20.9y Foods 20 CALM 20

bio 30

French 30.9y spare

Religion 35


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ALEXANDER RUTHERFORD SCHOLARSHIPS Students must apply by May 1 in the year he/she will enter a post secondary institution. The minimum average, value of the award, and course that can be used depend on the year that the student graduates. For confirmation of awards, please visit www.alis.gov.ab.ca.

course requirements - as of 2009 C.T.S. Courses: Three one-credit courses can be combined and used as one of the other courses at the Grade 10 and/or Grade 11 level. Five one-credit modules can be combined and used as an option at the Grade 12 level. To be combined: all courses must be from the same level (i.e. Introductory, Intermediate or Advanced) GRADE 10 75.0 – 79.9% average in 5 subjects

- $300.00

80.0% or higher average in 5 subjects - $400.00 One of: English 10.1,  English 10.2,  Francais 10,  Francais 13 Two of: Mathematics 10,  Science 10,  Social Studies 10.1 or 10.2,  Language other than that used above at the Grade 10 level Two of: Any other courses with a minimum three credit value at the Grade 10 level including those listed above and Introductory C.T.S. courses. GRADE 11 75.0 – 79.9% average in 5 subjects

- $500.00

80.0% or higher average in 5 subjects - $800.00 One of: English 20.1,  English 20.2,  Francais 20,  Francais 23 Two of: Mathematics 20.1 or 20.2,  Science 20,  Bio 20,  Chemistry 20,  Physics 20,  Social Studies 20.1 or 20.2,  Language other than that used above at the Grade 11 level Two of: Any other courses with a minimum three credit value at the Grade 10 level including those listed above and Intermediate C.T.S. courses. GRADE 12 75.0 – 79.9% average in 5 subjects

- $700.00

80.0% or higher average in 5 subjects - $1300.00 One of: English 30.1,  English 30.2,  Francais 30 Four of: Mathematics 30.1 or 30.2 or 31,  Science 30,  Bio 30,  Chemistry 30,  Physics 30,  Social Studies 30.1 or 30.2,  Language other than that used above at the Grade 12 level Two of: Any other courses with a minimum five credit value at the Grade 12 level (3000 to 6000) including those listed above and combined Advanced C.T.S. courses.

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scholarship notes · French and Francais are not the same course, and are not interchangeable · Only marks obtained prior to post-secondary study can be used · A course cannot be repeated after a higher level course has been taken in the same series · Eligibility is restricted to grades obtained while a resident of Alberta · Averages are not rounded up for scholarship purposes · Driver Education and Special Projects WILL NOT be used when calculating a student’s average · Regarding CALM, this course can be taken in any grade but the final mark will be calculated in Grade 11 · IB courses can be used as core subjects for Grades 10 and 11 · IB language at the Grade 12 level is accepted if language taken is different from the main language · LDC courses are acceptable in Grade 10, 11 and 12 · All students receiving Rutherford Scholarships will be honoured at our Awards Night held in the fall

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Grade 10 Registration registration All students registering (from outside of GSACRD schools) at St. Albert Catholic High School must report to the principal and present their academic achievement and attendance records. Students from out of province/country must present their documents for evaluation before placement can be finalized. Students should discuss their program and course selections with parents and their program counsellor. Because planning for the year is based on your course selections, please ensure you make your choices with care. Your timetable and school opening information will be made available to you by mid-July. If you need to revise your registration because of failure in a pre-requisite course, please fill out a course change form and hand it in to the office during Summer School (July 4 - July 29). Program counsellors will also be available in the third week of August. School opening procedures and times will be advertised in the local newspapers in August, and the information will also be available on our website. To register using the website information, print off the registration form, complete it and mail it to the school along with a cheque for the fees. A payment option form must accompany your registration form.

fees The fee schedule for the current school year is outlined on a separate sheet, included with this registration guide. The information sheet outlines the basic fees for each grade, the payment options available, as well as descriptions of both basic and additional fees that may be associated with a specific course. All other fees will be collected at a later date by the teacher. Overview of basic fees due at registration: Grade 10 fees due at registration: Learning resource fee 100.00 General material fee 55.00 Student Handbook fee 7.00 Technology fee 10.00 Student Union fee 25.00 Math resource fee 15.00 Equipment protection fee (science) 5.00 Total 217.00 optional fees Yearbook 35.00 This must be added to the above fees if the student wishes to purchase the current year’s yearbook. Yearbooks will not be distributed if a student has any outstanding fees or textbooks. Yearbook fee after Nov. 1, 2013 will be $38.00

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other fees Art 25.00 Art IB 35.00 Physical Education 10 (High Performance) 80.00 Physical Education 20 80.00 Physical Education 30 180.00 Physics 30 Workbook 15.00 Spanish Workbook 20.00 CTS - Cosmetology 10 30.00 CTS - Cosmetology 20 and 30 70.00 CTS - Design and Industrial Tech. (3 credits) 25.00 CTS - Design and Industrial Tech. (5 credits) 40.00 CTS - Foods 10 (3 credit) 30.00 CTS - Foods 20 and 30 (5 credit) 40.00 CTS - Health Pathways 10 and Leadership 10 50.00 CTS - Photography 20.00 CTS - Sports Medicine 25/35 50.00 CTS - Medical Services 25 50.00


course selection Choose the subjects you wish to take. Choose 7 elective courses. Prioritize with 1 as your top pick. The number of elective courses available will depend on the number of 5 credit classes you enrolled in. Mark “B” on the registration sheet if you would prefer to take the course via an online/classroom blended model. Gr. 10 students will be placed in a full program (no spares). Typical credit load is 44-46 credits per year.

required courses

elective courses

_____ (last years mark)

English 10.1 English 10.1 Pre-IB English 10.2 English 10.4

5    5    5    5   

Business 10 Learning Strategies 10 Leadership 10 Legal Studies 10

3    3    5    3   

_____ (mark)

Social Studies 10.1 Soc. Studies 10 Pre-IB Social Studies 10.2 Social Studies 10.4 (K & E)

5    5    5    5   

Communication and Computer Technology 10

3   

_____ (mark)

Etudes Sociales 10.1 French Language Arts 10

5    5   

_____ (mark)

Mathematics 10.C Mathematics 10.C Pre-IB Mathematics 10.3 Math 20.1 IB Math 10.4 (K & E)

5    5    5    5    5   

Art 10 Art 10 Pre-IB Drama 10 Drama 10 Pre-IB Choral Music 10 Gen Music 10 (GUITAR) Instrumental Jazz 15 Instrumental Music 10 Photography 10 Rock and Pop 15

3    3    3    3    5    5    5    5    3    5   

_____ (mark)

Science 10 Science 10 Pre-IB Biology 25 Pre-IB Science 14

5    5    3    5   

CALM 20

3   

Religious Studies 15 Phys. Ed. 10 (M) OR Phys. Ed. 10 (F)

3    3    3   

Name of Student: Parent Signature: Parent Email:

Design and Industrial Technologies

3/5   

Cosmetology 10 Fashion Studies 10 Foods 10

3/5    3    3   

French 10.3y French 10.9y French 10.9y Pre-IB Chinese (Mandarin) 10 Spanish 10.3y Spanish 10.3Y Pre-IB

5    5    5    5    5    5   

Personal Psychology

3   

High Performance Phys. Ed. 10 Health and Wellness 15 Sports Performance 15

5    3    5   

Summer School Courses Taken:

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2013-2014

St. Albert Catholic High School

“Student learning is our purpose... Christ is our way”

www.sachs.ab.ca

33 Malmo Drive,  St. Albert, Alberta,  T8N 1L5 Tel : 780.459.7781  Fax : 780.458.7912

2013/2014 SACHS Registration Guide  

St. Albert Catholic High School course selection guide for the 2013/2014 school year.

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