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Traceability & Safety New Members 2017 Ten steps to barcode Changing Oneself for Safety GS1 Traceability Standards Frequently Asked Questions

www.gs1kenya.org

ISSUE 21

JANUARY - MARCH 2017


Contents Traceability

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Article

Board sectors

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Article

Annual general Meeting 2015

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Panari Hotel, Nairobi

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New members GS1 Kenya Gateway JAN - MARCH 2017 ISSUE 20 Editorial Team Project Leader : Eva Buyu Consulting Editor : Munyiva Mutuku Contributor : Dorothy Kwamboka, Paul Pasaka Design & Layout : Ovakast

Gateway is published by GS1 Kenya, it is distributed throughout East Africa. Contributions are highly welcome.The editor reserves the right to edit, amend or alter material in anyway deemed necessary. Comments and/or suggestions to be emailed to eva@gs1kenya.org GS1 Kenya, Allbid House, 2nd Flr, Wing C, Opp. ASL Packaging, Mombasa Road Tel: +254 20 238 5270, Cell: + 254 71 012 2252, 73 596 5168

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2017

GS1 barcode quality

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at the supply chain process

Ten steps to barcode Implementation at the supply chain process

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Changing Oneself for Safety Article

GS1 Traceability Standards Frequently Asked Questions

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Chairman’s Message

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The Global Language of Business.

Sospeter Kioko | Chairman, GS1 Kenya HAPPY NEW YEAR I would like to welcome you to gateway JanMarch 2017 edition. GS1 Kenya has opened a very new chapter in its evolution with commitments to a new vision mission and core values. Our Vision To be a leading member driven organization, offering globally acceptable standards for seamless business operations. Our Mission To promote the adoption of global business practices by offering value addition products and services to members and other business partners. Our Motto The Global Language of Business. Our Core Values. Innovativeness: GS1 Kenya is committed to support innovation, creativity and development of products and relevant to the market needs. Professionalism: We shall do our work with sincerity as well as maintaining and conducting ourselves in a professional manner and with the highest standard of ethics.

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Our actions will be characterized by the highest level of professionalism and this value will be realized through enhancing a sense of integrity, objectivity, accountability, and respect for time in carrying out responsibilities. Team Work: We contribute fully to GS1 Kenya mandate by sharing information and resources to create a workplace that fosters community and cooperation. We promote open communication, collaboration and commitment in our approach to work . Integrity and accountability: We shall seek to remain accountable and transparent in all our dealings as we deliver our services to the members and partners. Efficiency and responsiveness: We shall always be responsible for our actions and omissions. This will be done through being focused, ambitious, consistent, and having the capacity to distinguish between what is important and what is urgent. We look forward to implementing these values in your organizations for the benefit of all users with a key focus on the core values to our members. Wishing you the best in 2016.


GS1 Kenya Staff Message

Lillians Wafukho | Finance & Admin. Manager Happy New Year. Welcome to this edition of Jan- March issue 21. I am confident in the GS1 Kenya team that they will deliver in all the areas and we shall partner with you out there to have a more productive business relationship.

Paul Pasaka | Technical Manager

The modern world is anchored in technology through which it has turned to a global village. Embrace technology.

Paschal kasimu | Research and development manager “Without an accurate and scannable barcode, manufacturers can’t sell products, retailers can’t stock shelves and customers can’t buy goods”.

Maureen Kimani | Corporate communication manager “The power of one, if fearless is formidable and focused, but the power of many working together is better. – Gloria Arroyo.”

Maureen Tracy | Customer care Executive Welcome to GS1 Kenya where we shall give your business utmost care to make you sure to return for more services related to technology and what we have to offer.

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Miriam Opicho | Regional Representative – Western Dedicated to the design and implementation of global standards and solutions to improve efficiency in every sector, it’s a pleasure serving our members giving them edge in the global market.”

Rose Ngure | Regional Representative – Central We are honored to have members like you and we are looking forward to serve you in the coming years. We would not and cannot achieve this success without you. Thanks for your trust, confidence and loyalty to our business.

Maryanne Wakio | Regional Representative – Coast GS1 Kenya: a modern approach to business.”

Noelle Bomett | Regional Representative – Rift valley “If opportunity doesn’t knock build a door.

Lillian Wambui | Member service executive Keep updating us on your barcodes for us to be able to serve you better effectively and efficiently.

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Tom Awendo | Accountant Payment of subscription fee for any membership organizations key for you to be able to enjoy the services offered. Urging you all members out there to pay your annual fees. Have a successful year.

Gerald Nyamboga | Technical Executive You need to know all the assets you own in your various businesses and in a proper register urging you all out there to tag your assets contact us you will never regret it.

Corazon Aquino | Training Executive ‘Some people dream of success while others wake up and work hard for it’ wake up and do something today that your future self will thank you for.

Eva Buyu | Public Relations Executive The first impression is what counts image can be said to be everything .we are asking you to join hands with us to make both your image and ours beautiful.

Lucy Rutere | Support staff Happy new year members, we wish you well in all your business endeavors and together we stand as one we can make a difference in the business world with the technology that we have to offer.

Evans Barongo | Support staff Your present circumstances don’t determine where you go; they merely determine where you start.


Traceability T

raceability involves identification of products, actors and locations, labelling and capturing of data on products, data recording and sharing relevant information with trading partners.

GS1 Global Traceability Standard describes the traceability process from the initial definition of the traceability system that will be used between trading partners, the exchange of product master data before the physical flow, the capturing, recording and sharing of data during the physical flow of goods, to the trace requests to retrieve information whenever it is needed. Increasingly, the movement of products up and down the supply chain has evolved into a sophisticated network, increasing the need for visibility. Traceability supports good logistics practices as well as quality & risk management. During a recall, the ability to determine the origin of a problem and to locate the products to be removed from the supply chain is essential. Track and trace systems have been used to validate claims and the absence and presence of attributes important to consumers (e.g. fairtrade and ethical characteristics, organic food, allergens, country of origin). Traceability has become a regulatory requirement in several sectors and countries. Furthermore, it is a tool in fighting product counterfeiting and protecting brands. Major Drivers of Traceability Traceability is particularly important in the food sector for many reasons including an increase of food safety awareness and technological advancement in society today. The key drivers for traceability in the food sector are: • legislation and common food safety laws (EU Food Law 178/2002, EU Food Labelling requirements, Bio Terrorism Act & Food Modernization Act in the US) • food safety standards and certification schemes such as ISO 22000, BRC, IFS that require traceability • the need to be able to determine the origin of a contamination during a food outbreak and to recall products efficiently • rationalization of labor/cost reduction through an increased system efficiency • integration and sharing of information systems between trade partners • building brand loyalty amongst consumers Who are the key players in traceability? Ensuring traceability through the supply chain requires a commitment and actions from all operators in the supply chain: from suppliers of raw material and packaging to manufacturers, carriers, logistic providers and retailers, whatever the size and country. As a consequence, traceability systems should be user friendly, leveraging on existing industry systems and interoperable to enable full chain traceability.

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Governments’ clear objectives and guidelines can help provide a common framework. Quality managers usually play a great role in ensuring effective traceability within their organization while logistics managers, logistics providers and transporters need to possess a good data tracking system to locate products as they move. Experienced and well trained traceability auditors are important in conducting assessments to determine that the traceability system used is reliable and effective. Therefore, it is important that each key player understands their role in the food supply chain. Benefits The GS1 Global Traceability Standard enables interoperability between traceability systems across the whole supply chain whilst accommodating specific business, sector trading or national requirements. Moreover while companies often face multiple regulatory and business traceability requirements, GS1 Global Traceability Standard describes one single process that supports all these requirements. The GS1 Traceability Standard addresses these business needs in the following ways:

• It is based on existing business practices, and

there is no need to purchase, create or integrate new systems. • It uses a common language, the GS1 System of identification and bar coding, as well as GS1 EANCOM® and GS1 XML messaging. • It is, therefore, broad-based because GS1 Standards are used in over 150 countries around the world by a large majority of supply chain partners (there are over 1 million GS1 user companies). • It takes a global approach, addressing the supply chain as a whole rather than any particular individual partner. • It is thorough, covering the fundamentals of traceability – identification, data capture and management, links management, and communication. • It focuses on the interfaces of physical flow of materials and products, establishing an open, global relationship between independent partners. • It is flexible, recognizing that circumstances vary within and between sectors, and thus providing for tailored applications. • It allows companies to choose their tools based on minimum requirements for any traceability. >> By Paul Pasaka

GS1 Global Traceability Standard describes one single process that supports all these requirements.


Board sectors Gravy train. It has been a while since barcodes became part of Kenya history. Immediately after the fall of EAN( European Article Numbering) stop issuing 616 prefix to the business community in Kenya, GS1 embarked on a journey to transform how barcode business is being managed in the country. At the onset, several sectors in less coordinated format emerged it has been difficult to steer these sectors toward a mining full group with clear road map as to how they can benefit from within their sectors and between inter sectors. Mostly these were sectors relating to retails, manufacturing large and small trading and so forth. Sector representation at the board level would change Depending on personal need rather than the sector needs. In 2016 the board led by Sospeter Kioko assisted by Peter Otieno, Charles Nduati and Pro mike Okoth looked at this issue of sector Representation with a view to include as many sectors as they can reach after all GS1 technology is universal to all sectors both inter and intra relations. After serious sector study the following groping of sectors were table in the 2016 AGM for adoption. 1_ Manufacturing, Trading and Financial Institution this sector representation on the board will now comprise of a) all level of manufacturing, from small, medium to large. b) all level of Trading small or big c) Motor vehicle assemble d) Banking, insurance, other financial houses. 2_ Retailing in the past this sector was considered to be supermarkets only however in the new dispensation this sector will now include the following a) All supermarkets either small, medium, or large. b) Kiosks and other dukawallah c) Shopping malls d) butcheries, water dispensers and any other form of retail business. 3_ Academia this sector in the past only catered for the need of the universities. but now it will oversee the following sectors. a) Printers and publishers b) universities and Polytechnics c) Colleges and schools d) E-Government and inter government (county Governments) 4_ Healthcare, This is a new sector in our fold and several sub sectors have already shown huge intersest in joing the GS1 Family. The sub sectors here include a) Hospitals and Dispensaries b) Pharmacies and Chemist c) Pharmaceutical Manufacturing d) Funeral homes e) drugs and forensic medicine 5_Agribusiness Like healthcare above, this is another new sector in our fold even though in the past a few farmers especially flower exporters were already in our membership, little had been developed to steer this sector to full potential. The sector will now oversee the following sub sector

a) small and large Farmers b) Livestock, fishery and dairy industry c) Wild life and agro forestry d) Farm machinery and equipment 6_ Transport and Communication, in the past this sector was not well developed as majority in this group were made of Mobile phone retailers, The sector has since been revamped to include a) Rail road b) Road transport c) Couriers and courier services d) Mobile telephony (this excludes mobile phone retailers as their needs will now be handled at retail level) e) Print and Electronic Media. 7_ Supply Chain, Warehousing and Construction. This sector as seven above was also not well developed and their need were never looked into, In the new dispensation this sector will include the following a) Counterfeits and licensing b) Import and export traceability c) warehousing d) Distribution and logistics e) Construction Industry. The following Directors have taken the role to champion and steer these sectors to full potential Sospeter Kioko, a supply chain expert with over 14years in corporate management and another 10years in retail business will champion the Retail sector. Sospeter is the current board Chair. Peter Otieno with over 13 years in corporate management another 16 in import/export business in construction materials including warehousing will now lead the Supply Chain warehousing and Construction sector. Prof Mike Okoth as well establish Don at the Nairobi university, with over 30 years university management and Government matters will now take over the role of steering the Academia sector Charles Nduati, an IT and financial expert with over 30 years in institutional management will lead the Manufacturing, Trade and Financial sector. It wise note that Charles has played a key role in Gs1 new financial set up. Dr Jerusha a pharmacist by profession is coming to the board with a huge experience in managing and tracing drugs usage in the country. It is important to note that she volunteered to help set up this sector in GS1 Kenya at its initial stage, Rosemary Amondi Gs1 home grown rose within the ranks GS1 Kenya to become assistant General Manager, she later Left to start her own traceability company in flowers and agro business. Rosemary has come back as Director to help set up this sector within the GS1 fraternity. Like Dr. Jerusha she too volunteer her time. Last but not least is Maria Limo, Maria comes from a well established members organization company. KAM, her secondment and her acceptance to the board by KAM is highly appreciated >> Peter otieno GS1 GATEWAY | JAN - MAR 2017

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GS1 New Zealand Pasture to plate traceability enabled with GS1 standards

Which tags, which standards? In 2004, New Zealand industry leaders approached their government with a request to introduce radio frequency to enhance biosecurity incursion response and assist with market access. This led to a project known as National

It was clear from the start that NAIT favored an RFID system using ISO-standard, low-frequency (LF) livestock tags and data standards rather than GS1 EPC standards. It was the opinion of GS1 New Zealand that while adequate, these traditional standards would deliver a sub-optimal solution. Modern traceability programmes recognised the advantages of using data standards from “pasture-to-plate”. Furthermore, GS1 New Zealand distance reads and the ability to identify large numbers of moving animals automatically rather than individually. However, GS1 New Zealand recognised there were no existing UHF animal tags in the market. NAIT technical teams were openly skeptical, and even stated that “UHF will never work on livestock”.

LF tags, and EPC antenna/reader systems were potentially cheaper. The partners saw that GS1 standards for item Network could enable pasture-to-plate traceability and smooth exchange of data between trading partners. The power of proof impact. The NAIT governance board have accepted a recommendation to facilitate a future transition to full GS1-compliant data and recognised that UHF EPC tags are part of the future.

GS1 New Zealand realised they would have to prove

GS1 MOs in Action

work with livestock. GS1 New Zealand worked with a consortium of partners in four key trials: • The development of prototype UHF Gen-2 animal tags (2007-8) • tags versus LF tags on sheep, deer and cattle (2008) • An extended trial of commercially-available UHF tags using a variety of antennas and tag/chip sets on animals • A full, end-to-end EPC and EPCIS proof-of-concept for tracking animals from a farm to the meat processor, through the chill chain and into retail butchery (2010) From theory to success The trials demonstrated comprehensively that UHF EPC distances up to 4m, even in wet conditions. The price of

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One of New Zealand’s key exporter companies, ANZCO Foods noted: “The Proof of Concept has shown that the EPCglobal Network is more than capable of meeting [New Zealand’s] future traceability and proof-of-origin demands of customers and consumers in international markets.” For more information about GS1 New Zealand, visit www.gs1nz.org For more information about New Zealand National Animal www.nait.org.nz

“A key export company noted that the EPCglobal Network is more than capable of meeting proof-oforigin demands of customers and consumers in international markets.”


GS1 KENYA AGM 2015 PANARI HOTEL, NAIROBI

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GS1 KENYA ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING 2015 PANARI HOTEL, NAIROBI

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Barcode Colours Do’s and Don’ts The Ideal Colour Combination is Black Bars on White Background Other Suitable Colour Combinations:

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Dark Bars :

Blue / Green / Purple

Light Bars :

Red / Orange / Yellow

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TWO COUSINS DISTILLERS LTD Our esteemed partners Gs1 kenya Introduction

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Hallo Cousin, wo cousins distillers ltd is a company duly registered and licensed to manufacture premium alcoholic beverages. Located within the mount Kenya region, kiambu county, Thika town, two cousins distillers ltd works within its deep rooted principles to produce products that can be enjoyed across board at an affordable price. With only two years in existence and amidst joys and tribulations that we encounter, two cousins distillers ltd has been able to spread its tentacles reaching a good percentage of the market satisfying consumers while guaranteeing them the rich natural taste of a Kenyan made and owned experience. As a consumer driven entity, Two Cousins Distillers ltd have our consumers at heart. The business does take time to give a listening ear to its consumers and stakeholders. The market response is at every time recorded, analyzed and acted on as Two Cousins distillers ltd knows that it is a crucial factor in service delivery. The market is dynamic, the consumer response is therefore a driving tool in keeping up with the ever changing consumer needs. Two cousins distillers ltd works closely with its regulators in the industry to ensure that its delivery is top notch. Safety of products is a core principal in our operations and with that, two cousins distillers ltd boosts a healthy relationship with the Kenya Bureau

of standards (Kebs) in ensuring quality in every sip passed on to our consumers. NACADA is another partner whose slogan, safe and responsible drinking is inscribed in the very heart of the companies acts. In safety and accountability Two Cousins Distillers ltd believe, and it is in that light that we at the organization endeavor to partner up with service providers who share our zeal at consumer satisfaction such as GS1 kenya. GS1 kenya “the barcode people’’ as we fondly refer to them, has been a partner since inception and we continue share the responsibility we owe the market to date. GS1 Kenya have an array of products which we at Two Cousins Distillers ltd vest our profound interest in. one of them being the ability to know where our products are at a particular time. This ability quenches our thirst for responsibility as in the long run Two Cousins distillers ltd grows to be a responsible adult. Traceability of product Who makes trace vodka? What are the raw materials? Who just sold it to me? Are the questions consumers ask all the time, maybe not expressly, but it sure does run at the back of their minds. These are queries that we at Two Cousins Distillers ltd love to answer as much as we love to track movement of our product in the market. The need to have that information readily available to consumers was imminent. Other means of facilitating the same seemed to be tedious, time consuming and financially.

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GS1 welcomes these Organisations who have attained Membership as from JULY 2015 to JANUARY 2017 Oct-15 • MICHROTECH ENTERPRISES LIMITED • PLAZA SOAP LIMITED • ADANSONIA ORGANIC OILS • ALMA TANA ENTERPRIISES LIMITED • LEODA ENTERPRISES LIMITED • WEBWAVE ELECTRIC MANUCTARURERS (K) CO. LTD • TAIFA TAPES LIMITED • LIBRA CORPORATION LIMITED • TWAWEZA PRINTING PRESS LIMITED • METHS AGENCIES • SWEETHAVEN PACKERS • PUB PROPERTIES LIMITED • NEPTUNE PROCHEMIE LIMITED • KITUI ENTERPRISES PROMOTION COMPANY LIMITED • JOKERO FASHIONS & BOUTIQUE • HITAJI CORPORATION LIMITED • FAHAN BAKERY LIMITED • DAN VEGGIED • VALOUR ENTERPRISES • ABORE FRESH LOGISTICS LIMITED • IMPACT HOLDINGS COMPANY LIMITED • TEK SEVEN FIVE ENTERPRISES • CHILWA INVESTMENT LIMITED • GOODWILL STRATEGIES LIMITED • DIASPORA DRIED KALES TRADERS • JAWIMI VENTURES • ARDAP LIMITED • ROSSMINA INVESTMENT LIMITED • ROSKY ENTERPRISES • KIWAFA WOMEN GROUP • ORION MEDIA LIMITED • KENSIGMA ENTERPRISES LIMITED • RICO ZAEL ENTERPRISES • FURAHA ENTRPRISES • MALEZI DAYCARE • THE PROMISE AGENCIES • SEVEN DAYS INTERNATIONAL (K) LIMITED • FINE SPINNERS UGANDA LIMITED • CLEAR WATER ENVIROTECH LIMITED • MARINI NATURALS LIMITED • DELTA ELECTRIC AND COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES LIMITED • NURU SOCIAL ENTERPRISES LIMITED • SHANIZ SNACKS • AMMA TIDINGS LIMITED • RUDRA INDUSTRIES LIMITED Nov-15 • JAWABUTECH COMPANY LIMITED • DEMK ARTS • THE SIMANATE LIMITED • PROACTIVE MERIT • TOOPICKS ENTERPRISES • AAA GROWERS LIMITED • TRANSLIFE INDUSTRIES LIMITED • TOONSWORLD MEDIA • BEE PRODUCTS E.A LIMITED • PRECIOUS DIVINE VENTURES LIMITED • SOTIK HIGHLANDS TEA ESTATES LIMITED • EBADO TRADERS LIMITED • OSERO AND SONS BAKERY • CRYSTAL RIVER PRODUCTS • DENAB ENTERPRISES • NEXT STYLE ENTERPRISES • DEJMON NUTPLUS ENTERPRISES • PARMA PACKAGING AGENCIES • RACHEMO HONEY MARKETING CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY LIMITED • STENIC ENTERPRISES

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• REDOX ENTERPRISES • SKY VAST INTERNATIONAL • TRENDY LINKS LIMITED • FLORA BAKERS LIMITED • NGONG VEG LIMITED • EDEN TRADERS LIMITED • EDEN SPRINGS INVESTMENTS • TALEH LIMITED • NURO GROUP COMPANY LIMITED • CONNECTOR COMMUNICATIONS LIMITED • TWIN GULF INDUSTRIES • SUNVALLEY LIMITED • KWALE COUNTY CITRUS FRUITS FARMERS CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY LTD • SHORELINE INDUTRIES • CHING CHING BAKERS • REDDAMAC LEATHER CENTRE LIMITED • TAWI NATURALS AFRICA LIMITED (FOR MERLY SILQUE LIMITED) • FRESHMAX COMPANY LIMITED Dec-15 • UNIQUE BAKERY LIMITED • AUTUMN MIST ENRERPRISES • JAFF POULTRY FARMS • HIANA PRODUCTS ENTERPRISES • SAMBURU BEE-KEEPERS CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY LIMITED • TRACESOFT LIMITED • KEVSINKO INVESTMENTS AND SUPPLIES LIMITED • CHALBI DESERT DESIGNERS LIMITED • IGARE RURAL DEVELOPMENT ORGANIZATION • TAMU MILLERS LIMITED • ARKMAN LIMITED • LAKE NAIVASHA DAIRIES • BLUEBOUND ENTERPRISES LIMITED • KITENGELA MUTHAIGA CATERERS COMPANY LIMITED • ROYAL SPRINGS ENTERPRISES • GRANYA TRADERS LIMITED • MOTOWN JUICE • PINK TURTLE INTERNATIONAL LIMITED • AFRICAQUA LIMITED • MOI’S BRIDGE DAIRY LIMITED • EMMASHA BRANDS ENTERPRISES • NORTH POLE SUPPLIES AGENCIES • JOYLAND INVESTMENT LIMITED • PERRY FRESH LIMITED • TWOKAY CHEMICALS LIMITED • DEEP THIRTS MINERAL WATER LIMITED • SHIRAZ INTERNATIONAL LIMITED • VIRTUAL ESSENCE LIMITED • MAKEST ENTERPRISE • GOLDEN BROSS LIMITED • HEBRON WATERS • ABENSCOM LIMITED • IDEA FRUITS LIMITED • THE TREND JUICE Jan-16 • • • • • • • •

AQUASAFE ENTERPRISES TEDDY HERITAGE COMPANY VAMILIFE SOLUTIONS LIMITED FARMPRO INTERNATIONAL LIMITED HIGHTECH PHARMACEUTICALS & RE SEARCH LIMITED PINNACLE FOODS KENYA LIMITED SAWA MILLERS LIMITED SAVVY TEC AGENCIES LIMITED

• CRUCHY MASTERS ENTERPRISES • MORAN MILLERS LIMITED • TASTE AFRIQUE COMPANY LIMITED • BRIDHOK COMPANY LIMITED • HOMEBRITE INDUSTRIES (U) LIMITED • TIWANI SPIRULINA • DALAS COMPANY LIMITED • MELIA VOLKENSII LIMITED • HIGHRANCE MARKETING COMPANY • KILOSTAR LIMITED ( FORMERLY MAU WATER SPRINGS) • HOMA BAY NUTRIFOODS • SMARTWOOD VENTURES • AROR INDUSTRIES LIMITED • SILVER BIRD COSMETICS LIMITED • TOTAL QUALITY COMPANY LIMITED • THAKISHA LIMITED • TWIGA VENTURES (U) LIMITED • AMKI (K) LIMITED • TOPAZ NETWORK LIMITED • GIWA CEREALS & PACKERS • CLEAN WELL RWANDA LIMITED • SEVI ENTERPRISES • DISCIPLES OF ACTION SAVINGS AND CREDIT CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY LIMITED • GITITU DAY MIXED SECONDARY • ELEVEN SPRINGS ENTERPRISES LIMITED • PRIME RANGE VENTURES LIMITED • AMINICA FOODS • AROMA PACK LIMITED • KAT-AL LOGISTICS SYSTEMS LIMITED • VITENDO WOMEN GROUP • ARDHI INDUSTRIES • PAMCO AGENCIES Feb-16 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

TARGET TRADING LIMITED HIGH STAR INTERNATIONAL LIMITED MIYEESA TRADING COMPANY LIMITED ABBANY ENTERPRISES JAJA’S DELIGHTS AFRITOPIA LIMITED KOLEZA AFRICA LIMITED BODY EVOLUTION BY WINNIE LIMITED ELI-SHIMMAH BAKERS HOUSE KOKISE MULTI SUPPLIES BRIOCHE KENYA LIMITED UPLANDS MEAT PRODUCTS LIMITED DAMICO SUPPLIERS LIMITED NJUNU TEA FACTORY COMPANY LIMITED ALNA ENTERPRISES LIMITED TROPICALWOODS PRODUCTS LIMITED RHINE WATER ENTERPRISES E-CONSORTIUM LIMITED BREATH OF HEAVEN OILS MULTICHOICE KENYA LIMITED KIANGIMA SELF HELP GROUP GATAMAIYU HOLDINGS LIMITED BORA DAIRY FARM ALEX AFRICA LIMITED BRAVA FOOD INDUSTRIES LIMITED BRANDS & BEYOND TECHNOLOGIES LIMITED RIHAB SUPERMARKET LIMITED RUTLANDS LIMITED SQUEEZE FOODS & BEVERAGES LIMITED IRONGS NATURAL BEE PRODUCE PSALMS ONE LIMITED APPLIED INDUSTRIES LIMITED NESI LIMITED UNITED DISABLED PERSONS OF LAIKIPIA WAHOME TEAK FURNITURE IRUZU LIMITED ELLE KENYA LIMITED

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GS1 KENYA END YEAR DINNER 2016 OLE SERENI HOTEL, NAIROBI

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GS1 KENYA END YEAR DINNER 2016 OLE SERENI HOTEL, NAIROBI

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Cell +254 790 208 602 Shamir.Jaffer@Honeywell.com


GS1 & Dental Health Care

D

ue to the limited resources allocated to health care in our country, we are always faced with the choice of quality against quantity while having the safety of the patient in mind.

There is always a continuous struggle against affordable quality medicines and supplies versus cheap counterfeit. It is therefore the hope of any government to have medicines and supplies ‘traceable’ and verified at the point of dispensing, to fight counterfeit hence improving patient safety and increasing efficiency. GS1 deals with a much wider range of products and services than the general public understands. In the medical field, there is a lot we can benefit from GS1. Medicines and supplies In drug management, verification of source and date of manufacture, the quality and quantity procured, the dosage administered and the half-life of the medication can be verified by GS1 coding. This would also apply to the consumables like gloves, needles, syringes, dental materials (filling, impression, surgical dressing). Equipments On dental equipment like dental units, dental scalers, light cure machines, x-ray machines, among others, the date of manufacture, the capacity of machine, the halflife, and duration to next service can be tracked. These devices can automatically and uniquely be identified, to enable effective and efficient product recalls and adverse event reporting. Currently, manufacturers manuals are used which do not tell of the source of the supplies, medication or equipment and are also difficult to trace back and verify the source. It is difficult to track equipment and hence quality is not assured. It is also difficult to track maintenance, spare parts, reagents, and other consumables. Patients follow up On patient follow-up which is mostly via phones calls and text messages leading to loss to follow-up, GS1 can simplify this process and ensure that person with chronic illnesses are properly followed up and managed. Patient validation To verify that the patient being treated is the right patient and that treatment is the appropriate one. This can be done by having a barcode on patients’ wristband for in patients or file and patients re-visit cards that can be scanned every time the patient is attended to or given medication.

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This would work very well with psychiatric patients, the ones with intellectual challenges, the elderly, and sick unaccompanied minors. Inventory GS1 coding would help manage medical supplies and equipment wherever they are located so that the right materials are available when and where they are needed. The Barcoding would also speed up the recording process and greatly minimize the margin of error. We hope that one day Healthcare will automate all its supply chain process, to increase efficiency and save costs. Tracking Medical supplies and Equipment Coding can help identify supply for a specific patient and identify the clinician who used it on the patient and help in case of mismanagement or litigation It could also help trace back to the manufacturer to enable refund/replacement in case of defective equipment or a source of referral on mode of use and maintenance of equipment Coding could also help in identifying drugs banned in other countries to ensure their use is also prohibited locally. This would allow health care providers to control drugs and other supplies at the entry point, in an effort to enhance patient safety. Reduced time in inventory movement and drug management, such as inventory check-up and shelf-life control, can lead to higher efficiency in drug management work. Laboratory specimen identification: Coding would help prevent mistakes that could occur, like, wrong medication\procedure resulting in adverse health effects including death and litigation. Medicines should be bar coded and scanned at every step in the dispensing process, to avoid medication errors. Procedures under sedation /general anesthesia Coding of patients and procedures would help eradicate the misfortune of patients undergoing the wrong procedures especially when they are sedated or under general anesthesia. (Like one who underwent vasectomy instead of a surgical disimpaction of a wisdom tooth) Implants and other prostheses Bar code scanning of implants and other prostheses can help in patients follow up on compatibility, side effects, costing, and information updates. This will go a long way in improving patients’ outcomes.

>> Dr. Miriam


GS1 Barcode Quality

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he accurate printing of barcodes is fundamental for effective value chain management as the rapid and accurate scanning in of GS1 data provides the basis for all the electronic business transactions that follow. Barcode scanning provides no indication of barcode quality as it gives no information about the symbol other than whether it can be scanned or not by that particular scanner. Scanners look for sufficient contrast between the bars and spaces, and decode the different widths of bars and spaces into data that is sent to the software for processing. The GS1 General Specifications describe a process for the production of barcodes that should result in scannable symbols, but a verification procedure needs to be followed to provide more information about symbol quality.

The ideal barcode

The aim is to produce barcodes with grades 4 or A, although this will be difficult with some printing processes and materials. All barcodes must be grade 1.5 or C or above, except for ITF-14 symbols printed on to fiberboards, when grade 0.5 or D is acceptable. In general, higher quality barcodes can be expected to scan more easily and quickly than lower quality barcodes of the same size. Barcodes of similar sizes, with no reduction in height (truncation), and high print quality contribute to fast, effortless scanning.

• Barcodes must be in the same location on all

Common problems to avoid

• The Quiet Zones required for each barcode are

not large enough. • The barcode is shortened below the standard height (known as truncation). • Missing bars or horizontal white lines crossing the barcode because of faulty print heads used for on demand printing. • Choosing incorrect colour combinations, often orange or red bars on a pale background, which will not scan. • Reversed out images, where the bars are white against a colored background, are again not scannable. • Using transparent or semitransparent substrates, such as glass or plastic, and hoping that the • contents will provide a suitable background colour either for the bars or the spaces. • Printing barcodes that are either too large or too small. • Incorrect adjustment for ink spread (the bar width reduction). The printed bars are out of specification, either being too narrow or too wide

The ideal barcode is one that represents the correct data, and is scannable on all correctly adjusted scanners. The GS1 General Specifications provide a basis for determining the correct size of a barcode and also recommend the use of verification equipment which can measure how well a barcode has been printed and give an indication of how easily it will be scanned in practice. The correct type of barcode must be chosen before including it on the packaging of the product. The different types of product and the barcodes will now be explained. For consumer units Scanners at the retail point of sale are designed to read EAN- 13, UPC-A, EAN-8 and UPC-E barcodes so one of these symbols must be used. similar shaped products • The barcode must be no closer than 8 mm to a seam or packaging fold • The barcode must be on a flat or consistently curved surface • The barcodes on consumer units must not be visible through the outer packaging • For small cylindrical products, the barcode must be positioned vertically (ladder orientation), subject to the printing process and/or the direction of print. Barcode management It is good practice to assign the role of symbol quality manager to a specific individual in the organization. Depending on the type of organization, retailer or manufacturer, the use of barcodes will differ, which will affect the specific role of the assigned manager. However, their primary objective will be the same, to ensure good quality barcodes. For a retailer the manager will ensure that the symbols scan properly at the retail or wholesale checkout and at the distribution center. A symbol quality manager for a manufacturer will ensure that good quality barcodes are accurately and consistently applied to products.

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GS1 welcomes these Organisations who have attained Membership as from JULY 2015 to JANUARY 2017 Mar-16 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

SWIFT ERRANDS GLOBAL HOSSANA CURIO AGENCIES ZANZABAR SPICES KENYA LIMITED HIMILO EAST AFRICA (L) LIMITED U-TURN ENTERPRISES LIMITED GREENFIELD LIMITED VINE FRESH (E.A) LIMITED FAIRFIELD DAIRY LIMITED VIVA HEALTHCARE LIMITED WESTERN DELUX MAIZE COMPANY LIMITED JUBICOM AGENCIES VERDE BEEF PROCESSING PLC GICSONS HOLDINGS LIMITED SHUKRI-MASALA TRADING CO. LIMITED EAGLES BAKERS SURMOUNT LIMITED STILL PURE INVESTMENT LIMITED GLOFAM ENTERPRISES KENCHOICE LIMITED MWACHAKA GROUP LIMITED MWAFAKA FOODS INDUSTRIES FRESH BLEND COMPANY LIMITED THAI GROUP KENYA LIMITED KENSTORES GENERAL SUPPLIES Z SKIN AFRIQ LIMITED ROYAL TASTY PISHORI RICE BAY VIEW (UG) LIMITED SHIVA MOMBASA LIMITED BETTANA VENTURES ANEDAL ENTERPRISES NEWS CORPORATION LIMITED BLOOMON INTERNATIONAL LIMITED BON-SAI ENTERPRISES LIMITED AQUADROPS PURE WATER LIMITED SUSAN GIFTED HANDS VIWIA GEYSERS LIMITED BUY RENT KENYA LIMITED STELDEN EAST AFRICA LIMITED MY FUTURE VENTURE LIMITED ELYAMA FOODS (K) LIMITED MAAGIK INDUSTRIES LIMITED CAKE VILLE BAKERS TOWFIQ KENYA LIMITED FAIBA GROUP LIMITED ANGIES TEA NATURES GRACE DIOCESE OF NYERI TRUSTEES OSHWAL FLAVOURS LIMITED IMARA AFRICAN COFFEE PATINUM MEAT NUTRIA AFRICA LIMITED WISDOM INNOVATION ROYAL STILL WATER HANNIDA CANE PRODUCTS EVERSWEET FOOD PROCESSORS LIMITED

Apr-16 • CENTTRIHEX ENTERPRISES • GACHY’S ALL GLAM LIMITED • SKYMIST WATER • SUNSHARE INVESTMENT COMPANY UGANDA LIMITED • CLEANFIL ENTERPRISES • GLORY IBRAHIM MSUYA • EDEN CONFERENCE RESORT CENTRE • UNILINK LIMITED • IGAAL TRADING COMPANY LIMITED • ERACLE KENYA LIMITED • VINIEL ENTERPRISES • KAMIGUMO POULTRY FARM • NTASHAT RANCH LIMITED • HOMELAND DAIRY FOODS LIMITED • AGRO HEALTH PRODUCTS (U) LIMITED • JADAK BEAUTY PRODUCTS LIMITED • LIVEPHIX KENYA LIMITED • LINKMASS IDUSTRIES LIMITED

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• SAMSARALINE COMPANY LIMITED • MOGOR MULTIPURPOSE CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY LIMITED • ZA BOOST LIMITED • EXPORT TRADING COMPANY INPUTS KENYA LIMITED • IMANI ELEGANCE • BRIGAP COMPANY LIMITED • PEARL OF AFRICA NATURAL SPICE EXPORTERS • MBACHIMU ENTERPRISES LIMITED • MASHARIKI RICE PACKERS • COOKIKO GOURMET FOODS • ABIGISA ENTERPRISE • JULIEMTA ENTERPRISE • JUSANTOS ENTERPRISES • HELSUE AGENCIES • DAWIN CONSUMER PRODUCTS LIMITED • PANA INTERNATIONAL • HANEX SPRINGS • TRUMP EAST AFRICA LIMITED • WILLCARD GENERAL SUPPLIES • RUIRU POULTRY FARM • ANHAR COMPANY LIGHT • GLOBAL PACKAGING TECHNOLOGIES LIMITED • INITIAL PRODUCTS (E.A) LIMITED • MURANG’A WATER AND SANITATION COMPANY LIMITED • BARICHU CO-OPERATIVE SOCIEY LIMITED May-16 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

KIMS MILLER LIMITED OLOLOITOT SUPPLIES SOTTON DAIRIES LIMITED BEAUTIFUL MOUNTAIN DAIRY FARM WINWORLD IMPEX LIMITED RIFT BAKERS FOOD & BEVERAGE PROCESSING LIMITED EMERALD TRADING COMPANY LIMITED SAVANNAH SAPHIRE ENTERPRISES SOLIT INVESTMENTS LIMITED TRANCE AFRICA GROUP LIMITED PRESTIGE LEISURE AFRICA LIMITED UPENDO MAGONGONI WOMEN GROUP IKUMBI TEA FACTORY LIMITED TECHINVA KENYA LIMITED MCMILLAN FARM FRESH KITCHEN SOKO LIMITED FAULU FLOUR MILLS MUDETE TEA FACTORY CO. LIMITED SANALI VENTURES LIMITED HYDROMAX SUPPLIERS TALIAN COMPANY LIMITED KIGELIA FRESH PRODUCE LIMITED ANYOUN LIMITED PLASPAK INDUSTRIES LIMITED PROVIDENCE TRADING COMPANY JARS OF GOODNESS ENTERPRISES GATHIGA LENNERMARK LIMITED DAVIS & SHIRTLIFF LIMITED DAILLIES COMPAN LIMITED SMARTMOVE INVESTMENT CO. LIMITED IMELBROS SIX KENYA SUPPLIERS JENISSI INVESTMENT COMPANY LIMITED AGROPY LIMITED WATUGA IMPORTS AND EXPORTS COMPANY LIMITED MAVUNO BORA CEREALS AND GROCERIES LIMITED SAHICO INVESTMENTS LIMITED PUMA INTERNATIONAL TRADING AND LOGISTICS LIMITED JEWELLERY DEBSSIE BEADS UNGA MILLERS (U) LIMITED PRIYANSH ENTERPRISES NDALEX DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY LIMITED ZACHO INVESTMENT

• • • • • •

HOBBY WORLD LIMITED KENYA STOVE WORKS LIMITED THE MANGO COMPANY LIMITED JAMBAN LIMITED ALIMA HOLDINGS LIMITED PACE ( PROGRAM FOR ACCESSIBLE HEALTH COMMUNICATION EDUCATION)

Jun-16 • UKAMBANI HONEY PRODUCERS • KENTAPRISE INTERNATIONAL COMPANY LIMITED • ORBIT GROUP INTERNATIONLA LIMITED • TASTYZAIQA FOOD & CATERERS LIMITED • BIMBO ICE-CREAM 2005 LIMITED • BOTANICE DIAMONDS LIMITED • RIVERSIDE INDUSTRIES LIMITED • TAG N FRESH ENTERPRISES • LUCKY DIARIES • SATAA JUAKALI WOMEN GROUP • CREADIS AGRIBUSINESS & DEVELOPMENT SERVICES LIMITED • KING ENTERPRISES LIMITED • D-TECH SYSTEMS LIMITED • LICMUT SUPPLIES CO. LIMITED • AWALI SHEA BUTTER • BAKEMARK LIMITED • NIMLEON ENTERPRISES • DOMESTIC PRIDE • PETRELLA SERVICES • KAGWE TEA FACTORY CO. LIMITED • MWAKA OFFICE SOLUTIONS • ALICIEN QUALITY PRODUCTS • PREFERENTIAL SERCISES • FROST COMPANY LIMITED • KIKIMA DAIRY CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY LIMITED • HIGH UPLANDS TEA PACKERS LIMITED • SYSFLOW ENTERPRISES LIMITED • DESIGN THREE SIXTY FIVE LIMITED • KILI NATURAL LIMITED • JONAS FOOD COMPANY LIMITED • AMREF FLYING DOCTOR LIMITED • SISIBO TEA FACTORY LIMITED Jul-16 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

SNOW FLAKES SERVICES UBBERIMA COMPANY LIMITED AMARANTHUS PALMERI ENTERPRISES SPARKLING DAILY LIMITED NEW REHOBOTH BARAKA ENTERPRISES MAMA FRESH COMPANY LIMITED TASTE AND TELL LIMITED MARIA AND DAUGHTERS PACKERS LIMITED VYASINGA BAKERY LIMITED DEMA BAKERY CONFECTIONERY LIMITED AMIRA COMPANY LIMITED TABARAK INVESTMENTS LIMITED MINASOTA TRADERS LIMITED ALVAKESH ENTEPRISES TAVETA INDUSTRIES LIMITED MARYMART ENTERPRISES AGROLIFE SOLUTIONS DISJOVIC ENTERPRISE ADESH PLANET COMPANY LIMITED THE ACTIVE BEE COMPANY LIMITED TANGAKONA COMMERCIAL VILLAGE COM PANY LIMITED SEVEN ELEVEN TRADERS LIMITED ARVIA ENTERPRISES NATURES BEST FOOD PRODUCTS EMADOWIS ENTERPRISES LISWAN ENTERPRISES LIMITED HELIUM BALLOON COMPANY LIMITED CANNAN INDUSTRIES LIMITED BLISO INVESTMENTS (U) LIMITED MOSHIK BAKERS

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GS1 Barcode Quality at the supply chain process Ensuring that barcodes scan first time every time

• •

barcode’s primary function is to carry data from the point at which it is originated to the point which the data has to be captured. Since a barcode is a vital link in the data communication chain of any application, if it fails, the chain breaks. A barcode which does not scan or has scanning difficulties may causes more problems to trading partners. Verification of barcodes is, therefore a mandatory and useful tool to add to quality control procedures in order to ensure that the barcodes will scan correctly throughout the supply chain.

A

Good quality barcodes enables rapid and accurate data collection which is the basis for an efficient supply chain management. This build stronger, more profitable relationships with trading partners by ensuring barcodes scan first time every time. Bad barcodes! Very risky to trading partners. Over 5 million barcodes are scanned worldwide every day. If the barcode on your packaging does not scan, the data would have to be entered manually. Some retailers/distributors are increasingly intolerant towards poor quality barcodes. Poor quality barcodes undermines the benefits of a barcode based system and puts a tremendous strain on the customer & supplier relationship. They can also prove very expensive in terms of packaging redesign and rejected products.

Lost man-hours Poor Customer Service at Checkouts (queues build-up) Frustration by staff trying to scan over and over again

Recommendations : To manufacturers Barcode verification offers manufacturers, printers and packaging designers reassurance that their barcode symbol images are of sufficient quality to ensure they scan first time, every time. Get your barcode symbols verified by GS1 Kenya by simply submit a completed application form, along with some actual product samples. For more information contact the GS1 Helpdesk. To retailers GS1 conducts a scan test exercise to the products on the shelves at the retail outlets. It is advisable to have frequent tests on the barcodes to ensure that they are correctly scanning and have no errors. For more information contact the GS1 Helpdesk or the Technical Department >> Gerald Nyamboga

This is what you risk if your barcodes do not / poorly scan: • The trading partner might refuse your products • You might incur fines • You lose credibility with your trading partner • You might have to re-print the barcodes on your products, thus incurring in additional costs. • Delay with checkout processes at the POS • Errors (incorrect inventory data, wrong price lookup.) • Inaccuracy in the supply chain (warehouse, replenishment)

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TEN STEPS TO BARCODE IMPLEMENTATION 1. Get a GS1 Company Prefix Before a company can begin using barcodes, they must first assign the numbers that go inside the barcode, called GS1 Identification Keys. The first step in assigning a GS1 Identification Key is to obtain a GS1 Company Prefix. The GS1 Company Prefix provides a way for companies to create identification keys for trade items, logistic units, locations, parties, assets, coupons, etc. which are unique all around the world. 2. Assign numbers After receiving a GS1 Company Prefix, a company is ready to begin assigning identification numbers to their trade items (products or services), themselves (as a legal entity), locations, logistic units, individual company assets, returnable assets (pallets, kegs, tubs), and/or service relationships. 3. Select a barcode printing process To begin, you should decide what you are barcoding and if the barcode will carry static or dynamic information inside it. An example of static information would be simply a product identification number (GTIN) on a cereal box. An example of dynamic information would be printing serial numbers on product labels. Some common printing methods Traditional -Flexography -Offset Digital -Thermal -Laser Direct marking e.g. etching, engraving 4. Select a “primary” scanning environment The specifications for barcode type, size, placement, and quality all depend on where the barcode will be scanned. Barcodes to be scanned at the retail point-of-sale will need to support Omni-directional scanning. If the barcode will be scanned at point-of-sale as well as in the warehouse, you will need to use a symbol that accommodates point-of-sale scanning, but printed in a larger size to accommodate scanning in the distribution process. 5. Select a barcode Selecting the right barcode is critical to the success of your barcode implementation plan, but here are some high level tips: • If you need tobarcode a trade item that will be scanned at the retail point-of-sale (POS), first symbol of choice is the EAN/UPC symbol. This symbol is guaranteed to be scanned by POS systems all over the world. In some casesGS1 Data Bar symbol may be applied.

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• If you are printing a barcode with variable information like serial numbers, expiry dates, or measures, then you will use GS1-128, GS1 Data Bar, or GS1 2D symbols. • If you want to encode a URL into a barcode to make extended packaging information available to the end consumer, then you should use a GS1 2D symbol. • If you need to barcode an outer case to be scanned in a logistics environment, and you want to print directly on corrugated carton, ITF-14 may be the choice for you. 6. Pick a barcode size After the correct barcode symbol is specified together with the information to encode in it, the design stage begins. The size of the symbol within the design will depend on the symbol specified, where the symbol will be used, and how the symbol will be printed. 7. Format the barcode text The text beneath a barcode, called Human Readable Interpretation (HRI), is important because if the barcode is damaged or of poor quality to begin with, then the text is used as a back-up. 8. Pick a barcode colour The optimum colour combination for a barcode symbol is black bars with a white background. If you want to use other colours, the following may help you in choosing satisfactory ones: • GS1 barcodes require dark colours for bars (e.g., black, dark blue, dark brown or dark green). • The bars should always consist of a single line colour and should never be printed by multiple imaging tools (e.g., plate, screen,and cylinder). • GS1 barcodes require light backgrounds for the Quiet Zones (area free of printing around the barcode) and spaces (e.g., white). 9. Pick the barcode placement When discussing symbol location we are referring to the symbol placement on the design. The symbol placement should be such that the symbol will not be obscured or damaged (e.g., over a carton edge, beneath a carton fold, beneath a package flap, or covered by another packaging layer). 10. Build a barcode quality plan It is important as a GS1 member to have a plan on how barcodes are tested to ensure the quality are of high standards so as they can always scan. If such plans cannot be put in place, GS1 Kenya can be contacted as it has the expertise to do so.


GDTI Global Document Type Identifier (GDTI) The Global Document Type

• The GDTI can be encoded in a barcode or

Identifier can be used by

printed directly on the document. Companies

companies to identify documents,

can use the GDTI as a method of identification

including the class or type of each document.

events.

• In cases where companies require identification of individual documents, an optional alphanumeric serial number can be included in the GDTI. • The term “document” is applied broadly to cover any official or private paper that infers a right (a proof of ownership) or obligation

and registration of documents and related • They can also use the GDTI for information retrieval, document tracking, and electronic retrie archiving. • One specific application is the prevention of fraud and document falsification; for example, assigning a GDTI to each diploma or certificate that is then linked to a central registry.

(notification or call for military service) upon the bearer, or a diploma or certificate. • Such documents typically require recording of the appropriate information contained on the document. Examples of the kind of documents that could benefit from a GDTI are physical documents such as certificates, p invoices, driving licenses, and electronic documents such as digital images, EDI messages.

Contact us for more information T +254 (20)2385270/2318414, M +254 710122252/ 735 965168, E info@gs1kenya.org

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Changing Oneself for Safety

M

ost people have this feeling: Accidents happen to others, they can’t happen to me. Don’t we think that if earthquake occurs in Kathmandu, others may die and I will manage to escape somehow? Some people think they have years of experience in taking risks. Accident may occur to anyone, and its cause may be anything. We need to realize this. We need to change our attitude and misconceptions about safety issues. We take hundreds of steps every day, but how many of these steps do we take seriously? Most accidents occur because of walking without thinking. We do not always watch where we are going. That’s why sometimes we slip and fall from a height. Walking on a wet floor poses a great risk of slipping. None of us is ready to do anything when we find a wet and slippery object on the road. Someone could step on it and have an accident, sometimes even us or our relatives. Not only in public places, we smoke carelessly even in places with combustibles and inflammable materials. We think that no one is affected by our activity. We are not serious all the time, but we are reckless. We think that safety rules don’t apply to us. We are not sincere with ourselves; we do not implement what we have learned most people lie. In a survey, nine out of 10 people said they washed their hands after using a public restroom; but only six of them were found to be doing so. Mostly, we know what we should do to be safe from hazards, but still we neglect to do it. Only when accidents occur do we realize what mistakes we have made.

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We see that our roads are strewn with litter and stones. In some places, there are big holes. Driving during the night is very risky. Even in the daytime, thousands of people and vehicles pass these holes and curse those who made them, but not one of us is ready to do something about it. We could put warning signs at those places if we can’t fix them ourselves, but who bothers? Safety is the first requirement and we should not compromise on it. Mostly, we recognize the problems but we are unwilling to solve them. Accidents are explained away, and generally we fix the cause rather than its symptoms. Our attitude needs to change so that we can build safety habits and a safety culture. Understand that even very simple cases can be unsafe. No job is worth getting hurt for. There is always a way out. By following certain methods, we can be safe in performing every type of job. The only thing needed is interest and devotion to obtain safe result We should change our attitude to improve health and safety. Let’s be aware about being safe ourselves and create safe surroundings. Adopted from Warriors4Safety.com >> Nirajan Pudasaini


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GS1 Traceability Standards Frequently Asked Questions 1 What is traceability? Traceability is the ability to trace the history, application or location of that which is under consideration. (ISO 9001: 2000) 2 Why do we need traceability? Increasingly, the ability to trace materials and products up and down the supply chain has become an integral part of doing business. One traditional use has been to identify and locate unsafe foods or pharmaceuticals and remove them from commerce. Later, track and trace systems have been used to validate the presence or absence of attributes important to consumers (e.g., organic foods, non-allergenic cosmetics). Traceability has also become one tool in fighting product counterfeiting and protecting brands. Most recently, traceability of foods has become a regulatory requirement to protect against bioterrorism. Traceability can be used for these specific objectives as well as a tool to assess other business systems and tools such as: • Quality Management • Risk Management • Information Management • Logistical Flows • Commercial Advantage • Evaluation of Management Demands 3 Why has GS1 developed a global Traceability Standard? Safety, security and traceability are currently at the forefront of both government regulations and industry concerns around the world. As a result, numerous irreconcilable track and trace solutions have been proposed to the national, regional and global supply chain participants.

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The cost of diverse government regulations, proprietary service offerings and incompatible commercial solutions to the consumers, companies and the global supply chain called for defining traceability as a business process, which is supported by voluntary business standards that are accepted around the world. To further develop our capability to assist consumers, businesses and governments worldwide, GS1 has defined traceability as a business process and produced a global Traceability Standard, which links it to enabling technologies and relevant GS1 System tools. 4 Who has developed the GS1 Traceability Standard? An Industry Requirements Team, working within the GS1 Global Standards Management Process framework, developed the Standard in 2005. The Team was composed of 73 experts from 18 countries, including representatives of Allied Domecq, Albertsons, BASF, Carrefour, Casino, CIES, CPMA, Daymon, Dole, ECR Europe, FMI, General Mills, Glon, GMA, GS1, Imaje, John Deere Food Origins, Metler Toledo, mpXML, Nestlé, NTT Data Corp, P&G, Safeway, Syngenta, Target, TraceTracker, Tyson Foods, Verisign, Wal-Mart and Wegmans amongst others. 5 What is the GS1 Traceability Standard? The GS1 Traceability Standard is a business process standard describing the traceability process independently from the choice of enabling technologies. It defines minimum requirements for companies of all sizes across industry sectors and corresponding GS1 Standards used within information management tools. The Standard maximises the use of globally established and implemented GS1 System tools that uniquely identify any “traceable item”, describe the creation of accurate records of transactions, and provide for fast data communication about the traceable item between trading partners.


It meets the core legislative and business need to costefficiently trace back (one step down) and track forward (one step up) at any point along the whole length of the supply chain, no matter how many trading partners and business process steps are involved and how many national borders have been crossed.

the right materials and products to the next step in the supply chain. And if a problem arises, the application of this Standard will make it easier to locate unsafe or defective products, remove them from or keep them out of the supply chain, thus reducing consumption or use of unsafe or defective products.

6 What is the value of the GS1 Traceability Standard? GS1 has succeeded in producing a global business agreement on generic requirements and a common way to describe the traceability process, while taking into account differences imposed by diverse legislative and business requirements and diverging expectations in terms of enabling technologies.

8 Does the Standard apply to all types of companies and supply chains? The Standard is a high level description of the traceability process enabling and promoting supply chain collaboration. At the same time, it allows each company to design its own traceability system in terms of width, depth and precision in accordance to its own commercial objectives.

While businesses recognize the value of traceability, they do not want multiple, potentially conflicting, traceability systems, and they do not want to increase costs unnecessarily. Businesses also recognize that an individual company is only one partner in the supply chain, and that a chain is only as strong as its weakest link. So they want a system that could easily be adopted by just about everyone in the supply chain. The GS1 Traceability Standard addresses these business needs, we believe, in the following ways: • It is based on existing business practices, and there isno need to purchase, create or integrate new systems. • It uses a common language, the GS1 System of identification and bar coding, as well as GS1 EANCOM® and GS1 XML messaging. • It is, therefore, broad-based in that GS1 Standards are used in over 150 countries around the world by a large majority of supply chain partners (there are over 1 million GS1 user companies). • It takes a global approach, addressing the supply chain as a whole rather than any particular individual partner. • It is thorough, covering the fundamentals of traceability – identification, data capture and management, links management, and communication. • It focuses on the interfaces of physical flow of materials and products, establishing an open, global relationship between independent partners. • It is flexible, recognizing that circumstances vary within and between sectors, and thus providing for tailored applications. 7 What is the benefit for the consumers? All of us are consumers and all of us expect the products we purchase to be safe, perform well and deliver consistent quality. The GS1 Traceability Standard will help companies meet those expectations. When used with other quality and safety systems, the Standard will identify materials and products making it easier to get

By defining a shared minimum requirement and showing what action is required from trading partners, the GS1 Traceability Standard enables maximum interoperability between traceability systems across the whole supply chain whilst accommodating specific commercial, industry sector or legislative requirements. It serves as a foundational standard to be used as a starting point for identifying the unique requirements of each actor in the supply chain. This framework will ensure a common approach and understanding of key principles by businesses and governments around the world. 9 Which areas does the GS1 Traceability Standard not cover? • It is not a standard for internal traceability, although it does show the inputs and outputs that must be linked by an internal traceability system. • It is not a law or regulation, although it is designed to help business comply with existing and expected laws or regulations. • It is not a replacement for a service provider for e.g. training or implementation support, although it does identify the types of information and core specifications that a service provider needs to consider in designing a system to manage traceability. • It is not a replacement for safety or quality programmes. It complements them when a problem arises. For example, food safety programs such as the CIES Global Food Safety Initiative and quality programmes such as EUREPGAP. 10 Why is GS1 best suited to develop and support a Traceability Standard? From an information management point of view, implementing a traceability system within a supply chain requires all parties involved to systematically associate the physical flow of materials, intermediate and finished products with the flow of information about them.

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GS1 welcomes these Organisations who have attained Membership as from OCTOBER 2015 to JANUARY 2017 Aug-16 • BEST INGREDIENTS AFRICA LIMITED • SUSTAINABLE TRAVEL & TOURISM AGENDA • SHOPPERS PRODUCTS ENTERPRISES • SOLVIC ENTERPRISES • KAUGU HARDWARE & BUILDING CONTRAC TORS LIMITED • KOTE AFRIQUE LIMITED • KAMI MILK DAIRY DAIRY LIMITED • PREAD PRODUCTS • GATHUTHI TEA FACTORY COMPANY LIMITED • BHIVE HONEY LIMITED • PEACHHEDGE AFRICA LIMITED • CHOICE MARKETING SERVICES • FOOT PLUS LIMITED • SPANEX ENTERPRISES • WANJEKA TRADERS • ALFINE DAIRY FARM • KAIZEN EXPORT LIMITED • ALMASI FOODS • TWIN STEPS BEAUTY SHOP • SANVIN BEAUTY LINE LIMITED • MWIRERI HEALTH CARE STINGING NETTLE S.H.G • MAMA AFYA PRODUCE • NJAKISE ENTERPRISES LIMITED • CANA PROCESSORS LIMITED • ECOMIX AFRICA LIMITED • AFEX LOGISTICS LIMITED • STEVANS CREATIONS • GRAPHICS CHEMICALS LIMITED • MAZ INTERNATIONAL LIMITED • KAKAMEGA DAIRY CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY LIMITED • MTANGAMANO EASY PLUS • KENAPOL LIMITED • OLIVE ISLAND ENTERPRISES • AIM GLOBAL COMPANY LIMITED • AKETA KENYA LIMITED • REHTSE MEDIA LIMITED • FARM GATE EAST AFRICA (EPZ) LIMITED • FARMNET AGRIBUSINESS LIMITED • BIOFRESH LIMITED • PASHA PASHA SWEETS • RRK AGRO & FOOD INDUSTRIES LIMITED • CASCO LIMITED • MAWINGU FARM LIMITED • JEMMYS SOLUTIONS Sep-16 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

CAFRICA IMPROVED FOOD LIMITED BAHATI SUPPLIES LIMITED KENYA PAPAYA PRODUCTS AQUAPOINT SOLUTIONS LIMITED CUSTOMERIZED ENTERPRISES JAY N KET AGENCIES LIMITED JENYRIC ENTERPRISES NAVKAAR LIMITED SUPER QUALITY INTERNATIONAL LIMITED EVERREST INDUSTRIES LIMITED HEINEKEN EAST IMPORT COMPANY LINITED EMBAKASI SPRINGS TUYAS FRESH YOGHURT PRIME CHEM SUPPLIES GEE TEE INDUSTRIES LIMITED LITTLE SISTERS OF ST. FRANCIS DICII SUPERMARKET THE SHRAND PROMOTIONS KABAHA MERCHANTS BATH PALACE

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• G&B IMAGES U LIMITED • SUPA FESTIVE LIMITED • ABEMARC INDUCSTRIES LIMITED • AFRICAN COFFEE ROASTERS (EPZ) LIMITED • MULEKA FOOD PROCESSORS • FUFU GLOBAL LIMITED • SIMPLY BRANDED LIMITED • METROCART LIMITED • UBUNTU LIFE FOUNDATION • SYBRA KENYA AGENCIES • MARSHA ARTS • LYLANG ENTERPRISES AND GENERAL SUPPLIES • ALGENZ CONSTRUCTION & CONSULTANCY LIMITED • HENKEN WINE AGENCY LIMITED Oct-16 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

VIENA FOOD SPICES COMPANY LIMITED MIALE LIMITED DANDORA MILLERS LIMITED PAGE ONE VENTURES TWENTY NINE E HOLDINGS LIMITED SLOPES C.S ENTERPRISES AROMA GENERAL TRADERS LIMITED OSILIGI FRESH PRODUCE FARM LIMITED JANDEE GENERALL STORES NATURES GREEN GOLD BLUE NILE DISTILLERS LIMITED TZ REVIVE CONSULTING SOLUTIONS LIMITED THREEG INVESTMENTS LIMITED KONGONYOT MILLERS GOLDCEIL AGENCIES LIMITED DIANA’S PASTRIES LASCHO ENTERPRISES KRYSTAL HYDRATE ALLE FOODS LIMITED BALI SPRING NEUTRACEUTICALS KENYA LIMITED KEYS INVESTMENTS KOINTILIL WATER DISTRIBUTORS JEYFLEX CONSULTANTS LIMITED AFRICAN SESAME OIL ELDIN TRADING LIMITED PAPHOS VENTURES LIMITED KATIENO BUTCHERY ENTERPRISES SOLVOCHEM EAST AFRICA LIMITED AKIBA VENTURES CENTURY MILLERS

Nov-16 • VEGOL LIMITED • SKYEND COMPANY LIMITED • EQUATOR ONE LOGISTICS LIMITED • KENBEEF BUTCHERS AND CATERERS LIMITED • EAST AFRICA CABLES • THAMES ELECTRICALS • LINCY SPICES • SUPER FINE BAKERS • YIMMY AFRICA LIMITED • NARKA INVESNTMENTS CO. LIMITED • SHOA COMPANY LIMITED • DEEP KUMAR TYAGI HEALTHCARE INTER NATIONAL LIMITED • AQUANIX HOLDINGS LIMITED • HERBAL FORMULA KENYA LIMITED • SOLSTAR IMPEX LIMITED • TAG MARKET INVESTMENTS LIMITED • OSACIA INTERNATIONAL CONSULTANCY COMPANY LIMITED

• LESATIMA LIMITED • ISOMART INTERNATIONAL LIMITED • JOKAMAMA MEDICOS LIMITED • PAPAYA HOLDINGS LIMITED • AROMAKARE LIMITED • NDUME FLOUR MILLERS • TYRO GENERAL MERCHANDIZE COMPANY LIMITED • EUREKA NUTS LIMITED • RAYAAN TRADERS LIMITED • JACARANDA HOTEL (MOMBASA) LIMITED • MUMTAAZ COMMUNICATION LIMITED • GARDEN FRESH LIMITED Dec-16 • • • • • • • • • • • •

TROPICAL ROOSTERS DUKAP TRADING LIMITED SWIFT EAST AFRICA LIMITED YILMAZ COMPANY LIMITED SKIN HAIR PRODUCTS LIFETIME COMPANY LIMITED BEI NAFUU SHOPPERS CORNERS WODA COMPANY LIMITED METRO ELEGANT SUPPLIES LIMITED SWANE AGENCIES ADORIS INTERNATIONAL LIMITED HILD-HAN INVESTMENTS

Jan-17 • VIS SPARK SERVICES LIMITED • SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC RESEARCH FOUN DATION • MILE AGE AFRICA LIMITED • JULS & PAUL INTERNATIONAL COMPANY LIMITED • TIENG’RE & TIENG’RE PUBLISHERS • MURSIK DELIGHT LIMITED • ELIYAMA SERVICES • WINECRAFT VINTINERS LIMITED • RURAL ENVIROMENTAL CONSERVATION VOLUNTEERS YOUTH GROUP(REVOY) • PAULINE COSMETICS • THREE PONDS INVESTMENTS • TASTYPOPS FOOD • WAKARM INVESTMENTS • CROFTS LIMITED • SAFARI INDUSTRIES LIMITED • BIDCORO AFRICA LIMITED • TOPAZ INTERNATIONAL LIMITED • MADE FOR MUMS LIMITED • WESTBROOKE DAIRIES LIMITED • EMERGENCY CARE SOLUTIONS LIMITED • GIKANDA FARMERS CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY LIMITED • MILELE FRESH • TOOLS AND TRADES LIMITED • ESSYKAH ENTERPRISES • MIREYA BAKERY • NEEMCOS LIMITED • PHILAN ENTERPRISES • PEPERUKA LIMITED • JEDAH’S PATH HOLDINGS LIMITED • KELPHARM LIMITED • UWEZO KENYA LIMITED • THE G-ZONE LIMITED • GALAXY MOBILE ACCESSORIES LIMITED • OCEAN FOODS LIMITED


Google require GS1 barcodes for shopping data feeds

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recent post on the official Google Commerce blog outlines that Google require all shopping data feeds to contain a GTIN (Global Trade Item Number).

This means that all sellers on Google Commerce must include GS1 barcodes (GTINs) for the products listed in the feeds they provide to Google, effective 15th September 2015. Google said “We’ve found that providing GTINs in your product data feed increases the likelihood that your offers are matched to the Google Shopping product catalogue. This helps us surface relevant, accurate results on Google Shopping; in fact, early experiments indicate that offers matched to the catalogue receive up to 40% more user clicks than those that do not.” This requirement is now active so any Google shopping feeds targeting Australia, Brazil, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, Spain, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and the United States must submit a valid GTIN and brand for all new branded products. Google have also clearly stated that they will disapprove offers that do not meet this requirement or are submitted with GTINs that are invalid. Mark Fuller, GS1 Australia’s Chief Operating Officer said, “As the world continues to transition through the digital transformation and the emerging retail reality of the Omnichannel shopper, companies are actively undergoing a process of change to embrace the digital future. Amazon and eBay are also requesting sellers to use GTINs in their new listing feeds to enhance the quality of product data to improve online and mobile search results.” >> Linda Holmes, GS1 Australia

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Want More Information? Just Scan Me!

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he traditional barcodes you see everyday are sometimes called one-dimensional barcodes. This is because they are scanned, or “read”, in only one direction — horizontally. The vertical height of the barcode makes for easy scanning, but in itself does not add any additional information. The next generation of barcodes is generally referred to as 2D, two-dimensional, barcodes. These new style barcodes get their name from the ability to be read both horizontally and vertically, therefore increasing the density of information that can be encoded in the same amount of space. A QR (Quick Response) code is the trademark for a two-dimensional barcode first designed for the automotive industry. The QR Code is a square barcode, which is made up of black modules (square dots/pixels), arranged in a square pattern on a white background. It is text based data, which has been encoded to be read by specific hardware (image based scanners) or software (applications or “apps”) contained in smart phones. Background Invented by the Toyota subsidiary Denso Wave to track vehicles during the manufacturing process, the QR Code has become one of the most popular types of two-dimensional barcodes. Recently, the symbol has become popular outside the automotive industry due, in part, to its large storage capacity compared to standard linear (1D) barcodes. Advances in technology have greatly enhanced the ability to read QR Codes via mobile devices at a reduced cost resulting in the explosion in the adoption of the QR Code. QR codes are the most robust of the current 2D barcode formats. Technology Two-dimensional barcodes encode data in multiple dimensions. Data is encoded in the width and height of the square modules. The GS1 Data Matrix and GS1 QR Code symbols are two-dimensional barcodes within the GS1 System. In the past, linear barcodes (1D) were scanned utilizing a laser-based technology. Nowadays, two-dimensional imaging scanners are the newest type of barcode reader. As with any new technology, imaging scanners were once perceived to be cost prohibitive. With the development and implementation of mobile applications on Smart Phones, cost has been removed as a barrier to adoption. Since you can encode just about any data, you can begin to use it for applications such as inventory control or unique ids for database look-ups, and beyond. Figure 1 is an example of what a GS1 QR code looks like.

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GS1 GATEWAY | JAN - MAR 2017

Fig 1 You can recognize a QR code by the 3 large squares in the corners. These are registration marks — they tell the QR Code reader which side is the top. A good scanner can read a 2D barcode from any direction and rotate it in memory so those registration marks and the rest of the barcode are in the right orientation. The black and white squares in the area between the registration marks are the encoded data. This makes the format even more robust and resistant to damage from the elements. GS1 QR codes can also encode more data than other barcode formats. It is important to note the GS1 QR Code requires the mandatory association of the GTIN and Extended Packaging URL. Additional information can be encoded as required. Both the GS1 QR Code and GS1 Data Matrix support the GS1 Identification Numbers and the use of GS1 Application Identifiers. GS1 Kenya can create a QR Code by using your GS1 Company Prefix, as you do with other GS1 Identifiers. This will allow you to create the GS1 QR Code with the encoded GTIN and Extended Packaging URL. Usage • Magazines, signs, buses, business cards, buildings etc. to deliver marketing material via the internet to consumers utilizing the associated Global Trade Item Number (GTIN) and Application Identifier • Industrial sector for uniquely identifying the relationship between a finished consumer trade item and one of its packaging components Since its introduction, the QR Code has gained wide acceptance in such diverse industries as manufacturing, warehousing and logistics, retailing, transportation, and most recently mobile applications.


Retail from a consumer perspective standards make it possible Retail has been through a fairly turbulent time in the UK. In what overall has been a low growth market, online has been the area that retailers are looking to for more business. But with the shopper of 2016 being well and truly in the driving seat, the online experience needs to be seamless on a mobile, tablet or desktop and with their interactions in-store. Making these improvements can be proven difficult against the pressures from disruptors from online retailers like Amazon, and the discounters like Lidl and Aldi. What’s more overhauling is that the current business processes and systems can be a monumental and costly task. But it doesn’t have to be By increasing the level of collaboration between retailers and their suppliers, everyone can improve the way they serve the customer. This means working together, and in ways that are consistent with each other. Improving the flow of data The first step towards effectively working together is breaking down the barriers to communication. How you identify and describe a product is a basic building block of your supply chain. When trading partners use their own methods of identifying and describing products, it creates multiple versions of what is supposed to be the same data – kept in slightly nuanced versions. Information needs to be translated between systems and can also become altered – losing as such quality and accuracy. But, using a standardised process for data management, with the product owner creating the master data in a globally recognised format creates just one version of the truth. The version of truth that everyone can use and understand, from endto-end in the supply chain.

Author: Ian Walters

Streamlining your operations With information able to move freely across touchpoints, the next vital step is removing the bottlenecks in moving products. Having to repack products or using different packaging for different customers cause delays in moving a product. Variation in processes immediately creates inconsistencies in the system. Truly simplifying the working processes requires collaboration at a wider industry level. Groups that are able to determine what best practice looks like and build a consensus on adopting these practices. GS1 UK’s perfect order initiative was put together to help the retail industry determine what standardised end-to-end supply chain processes might look like. Collaborating in order to reduce the complexity in how a product is moved through the supply chain has some great practical benefits as it removes unnecessary administration costs, increases turnaround times for vehicles and reduces the industries carbon footprint. But, it also increases the level of trust between retailers and suppliers. Connecting the dots How retailers and their suppliers work together will shape the success of their long-term growth. And, it’s only with the right foundation they’ll be able to deliver the seamless experience the consumer expects. By getting the basics right, the retail industry can become more agile. Better data gives more visibility of which product is where, while consistent processes reduce the time it takes to move it to where the customer wants it. Breaking down the concept of a linear supply chain and creating a network where the consumer is right at the heart of – that’s what industry collaboration means.

Source: www.gs1uk.org

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GS1 SERVICE CHARTER 2016

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GS1 GATEWAY | JAN - MAR 2017


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he complimentary gateway magazine showcases various issues with the supply chain. We are currently expanding distribution beyond our more than 5,000 GS1 member Companies. With our wide distribution coverage, through aggressive direct marketing campaign, the GS1 Exhibitions, Seminars, Training and Conferences, we are now reaching thousands not only in Kenya but within the East African Region and beyond! We invite you to advertise in our next issue of this dynamic magazine at our subsidized rates below in order to enjoy this great marketing avenue. Advertising rates for the Gateway Magazine valid for 2014/2015 Advertising Space 1. Eighth Page 2. Quarter Page 3. Half Page 4. Full Page 5. Inner Cover Page • All costs Exclusive of 16% VAT • The above rates are for full colour advertisements. • All adverts should be saved in PDF, EPS, High Resolution Jpeg or CorelDraw. For further information, please contact the us on +254 (20) 2319414/2385270 or email: dorothy@gs1kenya.org

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GS1 Kenya 2nd Floor, Allbid House Mombasa Road P.o. Box 3243-00200 Nairobi, Kenya T +254 (20)2385270/2318414 M +254 710 122252/ 735 965168 E info@gs1kenya.org www.gs1kenya.org

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Gateway Magazine Issue 21  

Gateway Magazine Issue 21. The first publication for 2017.

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