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ISSUE 19 SEPTEMBER - NOVEMBER 2014

www.gs1kenya.org

Barcodes & Retail Industry +

Impact of poor quality barcodes Increasing micro businesses sales Retailers on tech investment


CLUB 2013/14

Magic Mirror

Hard Tag

Detacher Display Alarms

Cable Tag Open Display Security

Tag


CONTENTS GS1 Business to Consumer

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Impact of poor quality barcodes

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Leestar supermarket: Dentist turned retailer

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Retailers demand quick ROI on tech investment

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Open minds in leadership & management

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GS1 Kenya Gateway SEPT - NOV 2014 ISSUE 19

Increasing sales for micro businesses

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Editorial Team Project Leader : Eva Buyu Consulting Editor : Munyiva Mutuku Design & Layout : Ovakast

Gateway is published by GS1 Kenya, it is distributed throughout East Africa. Contributions are highly welcome. The editor reserves the right to edit, amend or alter material in anyway deemed necessary. Comments and/or suggestions to be emailed to eva@gs1kenya.org

CONTRIBUTORS Eva Buyu Carole Muema Dorothy Kwamboka

Corazon Baraza Ephantus Achebi Paul Pasaka Paschal Kasimu

GS1 Kenya, Allbid House, 2nd Flr, Wing C, Opp. ASL Packaging, Mombasa Road Tel: +254 20-231 9414/238 5270, 232 1927 Cell: + 254 71 012 2252, 73 596 5168 Fax : + 254- 20 - 2353520 GS1 GATEWAY | SEP - NOV 2014

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systematic pursuit of brand strategies, initiated by suppliers that focused on premium-quality and value, has led to an improvement in this situation. Aligned with these brand strategies, suppliers have developed suitable product, pricing, distribution, and communication strategies, implementing step-by-step. The brands, aligned with target groups’ needs and operative measures, have focused on certain buying habits. On the other hand, the buzz word “never-out-ofstock” (NOS) has evolved along with the Efficient Consumer Response (ECR) concept’s “continuous replenishment” within the Fast Moving Consumer Goods (FMCG) industry. Meanwhile, the share of NOS items has increased rapidly. In conjunction with this development, retailers expanded the scope of their private label strategies. New vertically integrated players that are combining excellence in all stages of product and assortment development as well as the consumer experience have started to gain importance.

The Barcode – our Agenda It is a pleasure to invite all new members on board. GS1 Kenya is keen to ensure that it provides all that is new in the market to all our members with regards to our services. To begin with, as we seek to enhance the services provided, we have introduced a new short message (SMS) service which will enable all the members receive updates - local and global GS1 product development through their mobile phone from GS1 Kenya. The deep structural change within the Apparel, Fashion & Footwear (AFF) industry has had a farreaching impact on all phases of the value chain. The continuing decline in consumer spending on fashion along with the corresponding decline of inventory turns and intense competition, have all contributed to accelerate the shift to low-wage production and the ongoing concentration of processes within the industry. In addition, the market entry of foreign readymade apparel fashion and foot ware within the chain stores has intensified in an already-highly competitive industry, resulting in the further consolidation of players. Domestic retailers have adopted aggressive pricing strategies as counter measures, which diminished their selling opportunities within the low-price and low-quality sectors. This approach has accelerated the shift of production into low-wage countries while eroding gross margins at the same time. Only the

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Together with the development of brand strategies on behalf of the suppliers, a structural change in the way products are offered on the sales floor has been set in motion, moving from an item-centered presentation to one that is brand centered. Within this scope, numerous, different semi-vertical business models for any number of characteristics have been developed. Away from the NOS and ECR, the GS1 128 bar code is another product that can further enhance the retail – bar code relationship. GS1 128 carries the Serialized Shipping Container Code characterized with application identifiers such as counts in a carton, batch and lot numbers as well as manufacturing and expiry dates. This becomes easy and faster in cases of product recalls for instance and out of stock goods replacements. Local retailers have to start scanning the GS1 128 at the receiving level. GS1 Kenya believes manufacturers will have no challenge embracing the already in use GS1 128 bar code. As I conclude, I wish to sincerely thank the GS1 Kenya team – the Board of Directors and Staff for their support and hard work as we endeavor to have different sectors embrace the GS1 standards. As the last quarter of the year beckons, lets us all work towards achieving what we have put forth to achieve. It is my hope that all our members will continue to lend us their support. Have a pleasant reading and thank you!

Allan Odhiambo General Manager, GS1 Kenya


GS1 products address an informed, dynamic and competitive market Many of us especially those in the urban centers have experienced standing in line while patiently waiting for our turn to purchase goods at a grocery store or supermarket. The cashier works quickly as he scans the barcode for each item in our shopping baskets. Unfortunately, this was not the case when I visited a local retail store in one of the Counties. Unlike their ‘urban’ counterparts, this cashier was busy conducting a manual transaction at times consulting the prices of some goods from the shelf attendants.

The need for barcodes in the ever growing Kenyan retail scene has prompted GS1 Kenya to set up a Committee aimed at reaching out to more retailers and other barcode users countrywide. Our Technical and Industry Committee has been charged with the responsibility of sensitizing and spreading the barcode agenda. As we roll up our sleeves for the last quarter of the year, we endeavor to have more barcode users in the Counties understand the need and benefits presented by barcodes. At the same time, GS1 Kenya is focused on unveiling new products aimed at addressing an informed, dynamic and competitive market. The digital era presents us with opportunities especially in the Radio Frequency Identification Devices (RFID) - intelligent barcodes that can talk to a networked system to track every product put into one’s shopping cart. GS1 Kenya is also working with the Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Fisheries to roll out RFID tags that can be used by livestock farmers. Secondly, the ultra-modern Standard Gauge Railway (SGR) which many a business folk are eagerly awaiting for to ease doing business is another opportunity for GS1 Kenya to further cast its net wider. Business people will be able to invest in GS1 Kenya’s RFID technology to track and trace the location of their cargo.

tossed in a shopping cart. Outside the realm of retail merchandise, RFID tags are used in tracking vehicles, airline passengers. Of importance to retailers and other barcode users to remember is that one’s point of sale ought to have a powerful barcode management and generation capabilities built into it. By using the barcode technology, your inventory management and tracking will be much more accurate. Those having trouble with this, my humble appeal is do not hesitate to call, email or visit the GS1 Kenya office where our able staff are always available to help you have your barcodes in place and working. Finally, none of these can be successful without everyone’s commitment and hard work. Confident of the GS1 Kenya team – the Board of Directors and Staff, I urge everyone to work towards achieving what we have put forth to achieve. It is my hope that all our members will continue to lend us their support. Happy reading and thank you!

Chairman’s Message

Barcodes are integral to managing any retail operation. A number of vertical black strips, usually forming a rectangular shape, a barcode is a small, powerful label that has continued to make our time spent in line-ups much shorter. Presently, the commonly used barcodes help retail sales in various ways; enables faster more efficient customer service, keeps track of products and need for replenishment, helps in relation to inventory management, increases check-out operations at point of sale and assists customers at self-service check-outs.

Sospeter Kioko Chairman, GS1 Kenya

Generally, manufacturers use the RFID technology to track the location of each product they make from the time it is made until it is pulled off the shelf and

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GS1 Business to Consumer (B2C) Prepared by Corazon Baraza Product manufacturers and retailers that are core members of GS1 all sell their goods to consumers. But the way that consumers shop is changing with technology improvements. Although physical stores remain central, consumers also research and buy products online or via their smart phone. Research in 2012 by Nielsen shows that 25% of all Consumer Package Goods purchase decisions are influenced by some online or mobile activity. That figure is growing daily. For example according to eMarketer Mobile commerce sales are increased from 3.5billions in 2010 to 11.6 billion dollars in 2012. Current investments show that the trend will continue, and we will reach the 30 billion mark by 2015. Additionally more and more products are appearing with bar codes that are intended to be scanned by users with their mobile devices, usually smart phones, but any device could be used. At present there is no international standard for the way in which these bar codes work, the data they encode, or any consistent advice for brand owners who want to use this new technology to provide more and better information to their customers. There are almost 6 billion mobile subscriptions worldwide (Source: ITU – International Telecommunication Union), yet only 968.2 million smartphones have been sold in total in 2009, 2010 and 2011, according to IDC – International Data Corporation, i.e. only 16 percent of global mobile subscriptions. Two-dimensional bar codes that are appearing in print advertising and on billboard posters are encouraging consumers to try out their phones to see

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what extra information they can find. As more smartphones are used, it becomes more important for brand owners to have a strategy about how they can use this extra functionality to provide a better and more direct relationship with these customers. We use smartphone generally for media related information. For example 16% read book, 27% play video games this is absolutely true if you have a little kid who likes phones and simple games on a smartphone. 29% use it for internet purposes and many of us like 44% listens music. How many of us scan a barcode? 8%. So why do we scan the barcode? A consumer has a question about a product they are buying. Extended Packaging is a concept where consumers scan bar codes on product packaging to obtain: • Either the same information displayed on the packaging in an easier to use or more personalised format • Or additional information to that displaying on the packaging So they receive the answer from a trusted source by scanning the product. The most widespread extended packaging implementation in QR code in Japan - used widely since 2005. Companies are still wondering about the possibilities in many cases, but GS1 wants to provide a global standard that will provide a foundation for the building of different applications that will be appropriate for different types of device. Worldwide smartphone adoption since 2005 means

that Extended Packaging is now possible in other markets, but there are challenges… Because smartphones make it possible to scan both linear and two-dimensional barcodes, consumers are confused. If there are multiple bar codes on a pack, which one should they scan? If they do scan, what information be displayed on their mobile phone and can it be trusted? The GS1 vision for extended packaging is that: It should be simple, easy and cost-effective for brands, retailers and solution providers. • Brand-owners use GS1 keys and data carriers • Mobile applications show product information directly provided by brandowners. So it is an easy access to trusted product data. GS1 had identified the need for a “Trusted Source of Data” Framework to make product data available to mobile app providers. To make this happen, GS1 is working with manufacturers and retailers to develop a standard that will provide a platform for development by application providers. The GS1 Trusted Source of Data Project is now well underway. The objective is to provide a framework for brand-owners to share digital product information with internet application providers. More information about this project will be released as it continues. For more information please visit our main page www.gs1.org/b2cproject Adapted from Gs1 MO B2C PROJECT 2012. www.gs1.org


RETRAK lobbies for better terms to facilitate industry growth Retail Traders Association of Kenya (RETRAK) continues to receive new members having embarked on an aggressive recruitment program. This, RETRAK notes will be an added advantage while discussing, lobbying and negotiating with the government and other agencies on various key sector issues. Other than the recruitment campaign, RETRAK held training sessions with the Kenya Revenue Authority (KRA) and member accountants in the first quarter of the year 2014. The Association has had an opportunity to engage and lobby with other business associations such as Kenya Association of Manufacturers (KAM), Kenya Bankers Association (KBA) and Kenya Debit Credit Card Association for better terms to facilitate growth of the industry.

RETRAK’s activities The Association’s impact is already being felt in the retail industry. Below are a few highlights from the year 2012 - 2013;

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A close working relationship with the Kenya Private Sector Alliance (KEPSA) is further aimed at creating more opportunities to consult with the government and other business bodies. RETRAK has also taken part in the Presidential and Parliamentary Roundtable sessions, as well as continuously participating in sector board meetings. The Association is also in consultation with the Nairobi City County on the issue of addressing plastic paper bags through the proposed County Assembly Bill that seeks to set charges based on quality and size of the packaging papers. The idea of establishing RETRAK was born in 2012 during a Retailers Forum organized by GFK Retail and Technology East Africa and Hipora Business Systems. The Association aims at bringing together all retailers from various sectors while dealing with issues such but not limited to the following:

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Have a central source for business information on trade Stock shrinkage and engage the government to have greater punitive legislation for shoplifters and employees tried under theft Address labor matters- including unrest and unions Advocate matters on behalf of the industry to the government Deal with tax issues in case of changes in tax regime which may affect the industry Development of round table models to help solve issues from the industry such as those involving government or suppliers. Share best practices amongst members.

GS1 GATEWAY | SEP - NOV 2014

November 2012 – RETRAK partnered with Central Bank of Kenya and KBA to promote the recirculation and use of coins. September 2013- RETRAK through the press addressed the lack of clarity in the VAT Bill and offered suggestion on how the process could have been handled better. October 2013- RETRAK hosted an event at the Fogo Gaucho restaurant in Westlands. This was a formal introduction of the Association to the industry players. Coming soon after the Westgate terrorist attack of September 21st, 2013, it was also used as a show of solidarity with members of the industry, who had outlets at the mall, mainly Nakumatt, Deacons and Mimosa Pharmacy. Industry players took time during the dinner to analyze the attack and discuss lessons learned from it in relation to security, human resources and stock handling. November 2013 – RETRAK together with other stakeholders, endorsed the first Retail Forum in Nairobi’s Eka Hotel whose aim is to give industry players access to new ideas, solutions and innovations which would propel their companies forward. November 2013/March 2014 – RETRAK hosted two meetings for Human Resource Managers for members and non-members. The purpose of this was to formulate the creation of a database where members would in future share their employees’ information, so as to discourage “recycling” of employees blacklisted with vices such as shoplifting, theft, immoral behavior, etc. February 2014 – I- TAX Seminar hosted by RETRAK and lead by KRA Trainers

Retail Trade Association of Kenya 3rd Flr, PC World House, Westlands P.O.Box 10161-00100 Nairobi, Kenya Cell No.+254 721 362 895 www.retrak.co.ke


The impact of poor quality barcodes at the point of sale By Dorothy Kwamboka When a bar code fails to scan, the entire movement of goods through the supply chain is challenged. The inability to “Read” a barcode has a negative global effect on everyone – suppliers, manufacturers, retailers and consumers. The accuracy of barcodes remains fundamentally important because its failure to scan adds cost to the trading process. At best, data has to be keyed in manually, and at worst, customers may reject a complete consignment of goods, resulting in lost sales and possible financial penalties. For retailers, poor quality bar codes that fail to scan result to poor customer service at checkouts, frustrated staff and customers, a tendency to dislike and avoid the product that do not scan, delays and extra cost, retailers’ point of sale (POS) and replenishment systems are negatively affected too, creating further problems. A barcode conforming to the GS1 Standards should scan at a 100% level the first time, irrespective of the scan equipment being used or the environment in which it is being read. Recent studies indicate that the scan rate in the retail sector can be considered “good” when it achieves 99.4% level while in the distribution center environment once it achieves more than 99.0% level.

Faster scanning speed The speed and ease with which scanners can read a bar code depends on the quality of the printed symbol, scanner capability and maintenance, and operator technique. Retailers and other users of the bar code can select and maintain their scanners as well as train their operators but must rely on suppliers to provide good quality bar codes on products. There are five general criteria, relevant to all bar codes, which must be adhered to for good bar code performance. These are; Barcode print quality - the overall print quality is directly related to the bar code’s performance Number notification - ensuring that the Global Trade Item Numbers (GTINs) are on file with trading partners Barcode size - the size of a bar code is fundamental to guaranteeing that it can be read the first time and faster Barcode colors - the correct contrast between the dark bars and the light back ground must be maintained Location of barcodes - ensuring that the bar codes are located sensibly for ease of scanning.

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Levi Strauss & Co. Pockets of Opportunity with GS1 EPC-Enabled RFID Levi Strauss & Co. (Levi Strauss) invented blue jeans 140 years ago. Founded in 1852 in Sacramento, California by Levi Strauss, the company manufactures jeans and casual wear under its leading global brands: Levi’s®, Dockers® and Denizen®. The company employs approximately 5,000 people around the world, with a presence in more than 110 countries.

Once approved by the Levi Strauss headquarters, a work group was formed, consisting primarily of key people from Systems Architecture, Sales and IT Management.

Opportunities for Improvement

• Discrepancy of 20 percent between een phy physical ysiccal invento inventory nveentoryy levels reported compared to those reported d in syste systems. ystems. m

Levi Strauss generally llyy manufactures manufactu nufactures es its prod products in regions where it also markets markets ketts and an sells them. them By managing 50 production on ce centres entress and an nd d going go ng to market m in 110 countries, thee ccompany om mpan ny cer certainly ertaiinly ly h has a ccomplex supply chain. In n 2005, 20005, Levi Le Strauss Strau uss decided it needed more reliable and precise pre ecise i e control co ont ol of its inventory – an improvement that could, cou uld in turn, increase the efficiency of its processes as well as profitability. As a result, Levi Strauss introduced GS1 w Electronic Product Code (EPC)-enabled radio frequency identification (RFID) technology into its operations. The organisation decided to initiate an EPC/RFID pilot in Mexico since its operation there was highly structured and could effectively ff facilitate and follow-up on each step of the pilot along the way, tracking and reporting overall progress of the project.

After an n exhaustive analysis o off the supply chain, the team uncovered uncov u un nco n ove vereed these fifindings: ndings • Inventory supply ply in stores storres o off four m months orr m more. ore. ore

• Incomplete or incorrect orders. • Unnecessary purchases, resulting in inactive or overstocked products. • Lack of detail such as sizes and colours in inventory reporting. • Sales not meeting the expectations of high inventory levels.

“It [GS1 EPC-enabled RFID] is a competitive advantage and an innovation within the organisation.” – Abel García Director of IT, Levi Strauss, Latin America


Fresh Milk Dispensers for added value and profit

Farming Solutions Limited Tel: +254 722 249 600. Celian House, Embakasi Village, next to Total Petrol Station, Mezzanine Room No.6 Email: info@farmingsolutionsltd.com. website: http://farmingsolutionsltd.com.


Barcode Colours Do’s and Don’ts The Ideal Colour Combination is Black Bars on White Background Other Suitable Colour Combinations:

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Dark Bars :

Blue / Green / Purple

Light Bars :

Red / Orange / Yellow

GS1 GATEWAY | SEP - NOV 2014


Dentist turned Retailer “I wanted a situation where my money would work for me” Listening to him narrate his entrepreneurial journey, one would easily pass a judgment that Antony Ndonga, a co-Director at Leestar Supermarket is a master in the trade even though he believes things are just picking up. “When my wife took some time off her business to attend to other domestic matters, I had no choice but to step into her shoes,” explains, Mr. Ndonga who was by was then running a dental clinic in Kikuyu town. The shoes fit him so comfortably that he decided to move away from his 15 year old profession to a retailer. Mr. Ndonga, then running a medium retail store in Nairobi’s Githurai area, was convinced that the business was ready for expansion. In 2011, the couple opened their second retail store in the Makongeni area of Thika town. “Having looked at our first store coupled with suppliers’ confidence, I was convinced it was time to fly higher,” he adds. For the last three years, the second branch of Leestar Supermarket stands high and proud to serve its Thika town clientele and is not about to back down even as it operates in a market characterized by other bigger boys. The industrial town which continues to witness phenomenal growth thanks to the numerous industries located there and a surge in real estate sector has seen the larger retail stores set shop which Mr. Ndonga is not worried about. “The demand for retail services especially supermarkets in other smaller but developing towns which are outside the larger and more populated towns such as Nairobi is still high,” he explains. Secondly, though a recent report indicated that Kenya’s middle income earners stand at four percent, there is a higher level of spending among those

who live in major towns. Like many of his counterparts in the wholesale and retail sub-sector, the opportunities available are far from being exploited. The market is still undeveloped with statistics indicating that only 40 percent of the retail opportunities have been taken up. This is the reason why retail stores such as Leestar Supermarket have an opportunity to catch up and leverage on the gaps. “The culture of self-service stores is far from taking over in a market well represented by the so called ‘kiosks’, wholesalers and other middlemen, translating to more business opportunities for supermarket stores,” he adds. Such gaps presented the with a chance of investing in a bakery in 2013 as well as an automated milk dispenser thereafter. “These two are good crowd pullers,” he notes. When the retailer introduced these products, he had to manually feed the stocks’ record which further meant manual transactions at the point of sale (POS). Unlike most of the stocked products which come with barcodes making it easy for store – POS tracking, the store was presented with the challenge of selling its bakery products manually due to lack of barcodes. Mr. Ndonga acknowledges a rise in sales, faster transactions and easy tracking of products sold once he invested in the barcodes. “When we branded our bread and introduced it to the barcode arena, we have seen a jump in the sales,” he reveals. As Leestar Supermarket plans to introduce to its clientele more private labels, he believes that a barcode is an important element in the retail value chain. Lessons and challenges With retail stores desperate to make every sale they can, there is one type

of customer that retailers dread at all times; shoplifters. Shoplifting and theft are veritable threats to a retail business. More than planned burglary, day-to-day petty thefts can add up to huge losses in revenue. Pilferage or stock shrinkage remains a challenge to retailer; big or small. In Kenya, while formal retail trade market is estimated to be worth more than KShs. 200 billion, it could well be losing more than KShs. 3 billion annually to shoplifters among other shrinkage avenues. “Another retailer’s nightmare is that of handling cash,” adding that he is optimistic that the anti-theft/shoplifting techniques employed and which he continues to invest in will counter these vices. The dentist now turned retailer employing 55 admits that managing people of diverse backgrounds is not a walk in the park but with two branches to run coupled with a host of other operational issues such as dealing with suppliers has seen him employ a branch manager at the Thika store. This is the person who takes care of branch and staff issues before anything is escalated to my level. “We meet for reviews and consult each other all the time,” he adds. Furthermore, cultivating a good working relationship with his spouse has come in handy. He says it is important to ‘move together’ in business despite the fact that the many have the ‘it’s a man’s world’ perception. “Entrepreneurs should also learn and in calculate financial discipline be it in their personal or business life, practice contentment, focus on the bigger picture and strive to rise up to the challenge amidst a stiff market,” he advises. These are some of the lessons driving Leestar Supermarket to open a third branch which Mr. Ndonga reveals he is in search for more retail space. GS1 GATEWAY | SEP-NOV 2014

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Retailers demand quick ROI on tech investment Prepared By Carole Muema.

Inventory management and predictive analytics software, in-store mobile device integration and e-commerce solutions are the biggest technology priorities for independent brick-and-mortar retailers, according to the first annual Retail Tech Forecast from LightSpeed. LightSpeed surveyed 640 of its independent retail customers and found that most have focused their limited technology budget 82 percent plan to spend just $200 per month on digital tools that will yield a quick return on investment. Of those tools, inventory management tops the list. Retailers are looking to keep track of inventory in real time and get sales data analysis to better inform inventory buys: 44 percent said inventory levels were the biggest challenge at brick and mortar stores. A vast majority of these retailers, 95 percent, have already invested in inventory management tools and are seeing results, and 96 percent of respondents using predictive analytics said it has helped increase sales.

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Mobile is another priority, but not m-commerce. Rather, independent retailers are looking to deploy mobile devices in stores for mobile checkout and inventory lookup. Just 17 percent currently have this option in stores, but that number is expected to rise 170 percent in coming years, according to LightSpeed. E-commerce investment is expected to grow as 38 percent of independent retailers without an e-commerce presence plan to establish one by the end of this year. “Retailers are sending a clear message when it comes to technology: They want solutions that enhance efficiency and improve the customer experience, all things that can help them make more money right away,” said Dax Dasilva, founder and CEO, LightSpeed. “Tools which help retailers sell smarter and better, like mobile checkout, mobile inventory lookup and integrated e-commerce, are on the rise, because they generate tangible results virtually the minute they get deployed.” Adapted from supplychanibrain.com


From Peter Mulei to

Mulleys The Peter Mulei chain of supermarkets rebranded to Mulleys as it seeks to attain and offer world class service to its clientele. Mulleys - whose concentration is in the lower and upper parts of Eastern Kenya says the strategy is meant to get ready for new markets and become a world-class enterprise. Started in 1969 by Peter Mulei Ngumbi the founder of the Peter Mulei & Sons brand and the father of the firm’s three directors as a wholesale and retail chain of shops, Mulleys currently operates in Mlolongo and Machakos towns. Kevin Mulei, the chief executive officer revealed plans to expand to other towns in the vast county before expanding its network to Mombasa and Nairobi. “Ever since our inception, we have been concentrated in Machakos, more specifically Ukambani,” explains the CEO adding “We are moving beyond this area thus the need to rebrand.” Since it opened its first store in 2011 - the Pioneer, the supermarkets chain has opened three more branches in Machakos town and more recently its largest store in Mlolongo area along Mombasa Road known as Highway. Fresh from the rebrand, Mulleys supermarkets becomes the first indigenous chain to invest in a gymnasium in one of its major stores. Located inside Highway branch, the CEO says the addition service further raises the supermarket’s quest to be a one stop shop for various services. “Though a

Supermarket rebrands in pursuit of world - class status small superstore compared to other more established players in the Kenyan retail market, Mulleys is not only differentiating itself, it is also blazing the trail. This is all in line with its “to be world-class” mission statement,” he explains. Highway also has a deli and a coffee lounge that dispenses pizza and other exotic hot drinks such as mocha, cappuccino and latte. All Mulley’s branches have a butchery and a bakery while Masaa (Machakos) and Mtaani (also in Mlolongo) have a deli too. In addition, each branch has an automated milk dispenser providing milk consumers with farm-fresh milk supplied by Kinangop Dairies Limited. Express – the other Machakos targets shoppers pressed for time with regards to doing their shopping. In 2014, Mulleys plans to open branches in Tala and Emali towns with more in the pipeline for Mombasa and Nairobi shoppers. The history But while the history of individually-owned business conglomerates in Kenya is that the passing away of the owner and pioneer heralds the crumbling of the empire, Peter Mulei was different. Other than education, the he brought his children on board, mentoring, modelling for them strong business ethics and deep respect for and relationship with customers while providing them with education.

Throughout their years as their father’s apprentices, one of the most important lessons they learnt is that relationships are cardinal. Hence the newly-rebranded stores’ tag-line - “It’s All About Family.” In the pursuit of making Mulleys an international world-class brand, the company is engaged in corporate social responsibility. In 2011, the supermarket initiated the Peter Mulei Road Race, which seeks to raise funds for the education of HIV and Aids orphans in the county. It has since become an annual race that takes place every October. In partnership with the Africa Finance Bank, Mulleys is working to introduce a retail credit card which customers would be able to enjoy credit facilities and pay in six months. The firm is also pursuing the introduction of a Visa card in conjunction with a local bank as well as the introduction of an online shopping platform. Highway branch which closes its doors at 10 pm daily offering convenience for numerous travelers along the busy road, is set to start its 24 hour operations, a first for the supermarket which Shem Musau the branch manager notes is being driven by customer demand.

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GS1 KENYA ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING 17th July 2014 at Ole Sereni Hotel, Nairobi

1 2 Members registering for the meeting 3 Refreshments are served 4 Muema & Associates, GS1 Kenya Auditors presents the ďŹ nancials

5 Mr. Sospeter Kioko, Chairman, GS1 Kenya gives his speech

6 Mr. Peter Otieno, Vice Chairman, GS1 Kenya gives his speech

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GS1 Kenya staff: Paschal, Dorothy & Gerald

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Mr. Allan Odhiambo, GM, GS1 Kenya gives his remarks for the ďŹ nancial year

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A hearty moment

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Question and answer time

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Members enjoy refreshments

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Members get a chance to network

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OPEN MINDS IN

LEADERSHIP & MANAGEMENT By Ephantus Achebi

If you walked into your house or office and found a padlock locking the main entrance door, what would you do? Would you simply knock, call out loudly expecting someone to answer or stand there and whine about it? How about those who will stop to watch your theatrics? Wouldn’t they think you have gone insane or laugh at you? True, it is your right to gain access to your property as the mind is at that moment fixed to that despite the drama however, it is better to first establish how and why the door was locked. Leaders and managers make vital and essential decisions for their organizations. Their minds easily get fixed or closed to the good decisions just like the locked padlock as they proceed to execute. It is easy for them to impose these decisions to their workers expecting them to adhere or follow but the sluggish execution or resistance met is what turns out to be most interesting. Some workers will giggle, ridicule and even laugh silently at the decision makers while making fun of their thoughtless, just as they would laugh at the person who found a padlock on his door and made unnecessary noise. This is the fruit given to close minded leaders who make decisions that are non-accommodative to the people they lead. Their verdicts are not consultatively achieved even though someone among the people he leads had a better approach or idea to the issue at hand. Early in the year, a bullet was lodged into the brain of a young boy after a terrorist attack in a Mombasa church. It took a team of doctors to consult thus opening their minds to each other’s intellects leading to successful operation of the boy. On the other hand, we have come across close minded doctors who will not share their diagnostics with their colleagues nor open their minds to additional knowledge from others about the complicated conditions at hand resulting to mismanaged patients and even loss of life. Open minds philosophy dictates that every employees’ mind needs to open up to each other’s wits. Let me nail it down by looking at a machine like a car; some minds focus on refining glass for the windows, others are busy smelting metal for the mechanical and body parts, others focus on designing and working on its electrical, wiring system and lights, others are mining and taming gas for its use while others are busy refining lubricants, calculating chemical

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reaction equations for burning gas and thinning leather for seats. These minds work super independently and upon them opening up to each other’s intellects, they assemble the car. The sum total of these open minds is what constitutes to the creative capacity of an organization. Open minded leaders open and adapt their visions with their creative capacity for them to relate and refine their creativeness with the set vision; followed by providing a favorable environment that inspires creativity and finally manage creativity through performance measures. Their businesses remain relevant in the market with assured continuous growth due to creativity and innovation. On the other hand, close minded leaders identify their desired result; then rigidly close their minds on the expected output and work backwards managing every activity through performance measures. They are result oriented and care about outcomes regardless of the process. Their businesses are characterized by old practices, lack innovation coupled with a demotivated workforce due to repetitive tasks that end up boring. Walking from a strategic meeting, certain managers went straight on effecting their double digit growth strategy, and it was joy and celebrations during their end year party once the set objectives were achieved. Unfortunately, the following year, all the employees declined to renew their contracts as the success of the firm had yoked them. When leaders decide to manage every workers’ activity they risk compromising on boss - worker relationship and the worst happened in this case. The leaders closed their minds on production and never opened them to the production process that included their creative capacity. They never took time to find out how the padlock got there - they never did some research. Leaders’ minds begin opening up when they research, distinguish and understand the three sets of overlapping demands of organizational or task needs, workers or team needs and individual employee’s or players needs then crack a balance among them. Ephantus Achebi, Enterprise Revolution Ltd. P.O. Box. 100426 – 00101, Nairobi. Mobile: +254 721 705881Email: ephantus.achebi@gmail.com


governor governor governor governor governor the

Ksh 350 | Tsh 6,500 | Ush 10,500 | RWF 2,700 | US$ 4.5

County Focus | Business | Economy

December

Mombasa County

the

Ksh 350 | Tsh 6,500 | Ush 10,500 | RWF 2,700 | US$ 4.5

Monthly

County Focus | Business | Economy | January 2014 | Edition 7

anuary 2014 Edition 6

Economy

Case study

SPECIAL EDITION

Meru County

Meru vs. Missouri

Investment

10 reasons why you should invest in Meru

Urbanization

County feature: Kenya’s beach destination

December - Janua

Business: Mohamed Hersi: Boosting greater gains in Mombasa

1

County feature: Meru’s future lies in the cooperative movement Januar y 2014 | the governor month

T ourism : The surprise package of the Mt. K enya tourist circuit

Travel: Meru National Park

1

governor governor the

Ksh 350 | Tsh 6,500 | Ush 10,500 | RWF 2,700 | US$ 4

County Focus | Business | Economy

Monthly

| May 2014 | Edition 11

GODANA

Case Study New Mexico’s lessons on farming and tourism

DOYO

Perspective

on the road to peace and prosperity

Six action points for county government

SME Talk We need mentors to grow steadily

the

Ksh 350 | Tsh 6,500 | Ush 10,500 | RWF 2,700 | US$ 4

County Focus | Business | Economy

| May 2014 | Edition 11

Monthly

KISII COUNTY

Case Study lley

Last Word

KIBWANA

government handle security matters

owards sustainable healthcare and food security

February 2014 | the governor month

ly

County F eature : Kenya’s newest tourist attraction

Travel : A drive through the hills and valleys of Mandera

Healthy Living: Hard feelings about soft drinks

1

Economy: Water sets the pace for count y’s growt h

March 2014 | the governor month

Historical F eature : The fascinating past of Makueni County

To urism: Culture takes the place of beaches and wildlif e

SME TA LK : When passion dies, it’s time to find something new

ly

1

Ksh 350 | Tsh 6,500 | Ush 10,500 | RWF 2,700 | US$ 4

County Focus | Business | Economy | August 2014 | Edition 14

Monthly

SME talk

AMASON

In business, image is not everything

KINGI Banking on rapid results initiative to spur development

Tourism Playground for the rich and famous

Economy: A blend of tourism, farming and mining

Historical Feature : Kilifi holds key position in Kenya’s history

County Feature: Malindi Festival Week promises a carnival

April 2014 | the governor monthly

Health: Watch out, your children could be obese

1

the

Ksh 350 | Tsh 6,500 | Ush 10,500 | RWF 2,700 | US$ 4

County Focus | Business | Economy

| September 2014 | Edition 15

Monthly

Building a prosperous county with vibrant rural and urban economies whose people enjoy high quality life

Using servant leadership to transform people’s living standards and stimulate economic growth

Potential mining giant With 14 different types of minerals, Kitui County offers highly lucrative opportunities in the extractive sector

Modernising and turning agriculture into business

Exploiting new and innovative ways of adding value to soapstone industry

Kenya’s New York?

KITUI COUNTY

NYAMIRA COUNTY

Home of soapstone

Case Study Beyond tourism: A drive to stimulate other sectors

governor governor the

NYAGARAMA

Laying the foundation for an economic hub. Why controlling 60% of the region’s money market is a big deal

Monthly

| April 2014 | Edition 10

ALI

H.E. JOHN

DR JULIUS

Historical feature

Last Word Governors should motivate star performers

ounty

County Focus | Business | Economy

Tr Mandera into a strat c r business hub

Economy: County has potential to fl y from zero to hero

Enter tainment: Born free in Meru

ly

Monthly

| March 2014 | Edition

Ksh 350 | Tsh 6,500 | Ush 10,500 | RWF 2,700 | US$ 4.5

ROBA

Kenya may need to borrow a leaf from the Cuban healthcare system

Excellence in County public service delivery

Enter tainment : The ar t of car ving at the akamba handicraft indust ry

ry 2014 | www .thegovernor.co.ke

MPs must keep to their docket

Last word

PETER

MUNYA

ourism Travel : Turn back the sands of time at F ort Jesus

Last Word

In your small business, your banker is Just a banker

Last word

Rebranding Mombasa’s T

Case Study Mandera vs Arizona

the

Ksh 350 | Tsh 6,500 | Ush 10,500 | RWF 2,700 | US$ 4.5

County Focus | Business | Economy

Governors Summit

SME’s

Managing business systems

the

3UHVLGHQW.DJDPHάs tips

Metropolitan growth strategy, the missing link for prosperity

SME’s

Monthly

Mandera County endless possibilities

to spur growth

opportunities

Ksh 350 | Tsh 6,500 | Ush 10,500 | RWF 2,700 | US$ 4.5

County Focus | Business | Economy | February 2014 | Edition

Kenyaάs tourism industry the sleeping giant

the

MALOMBE

Home of national and international sporting heroes

Effective service delivery for sustainable and inclusive socio-economic development

H.E. JAMES

ONGWAE

Case study Lessons from Hawaii on honey and coffee

CBS, EBS, OGW.

Institutionalising Kisii County to deliver his Government’s development agenda

Economy: With an international airport, it’s time to fly

May 2014 | the governor monthly

Historical Feature : A confluence of cultures and chequered history

County Feature: Gemstones begging to be exploited in Garbatula

Health: Why skipping breakfast could be a suicidal move

1

County Watch: Who is best? An inside view from an outsider

June 2014 | the governor monthly

SME TALK : Staying afloat in turbulent times needs creative mind

Health: Too much of vitamin supplements is risky

Last Word: County commissioners and governors need each other

1

County Watch: Thought-provoking ideas from Monrovia

August 2014 | the governor monthly

SME TALK : Limited access to financing stunts growth of SMEs

Health: Why smoke when you know it will kill you?

Tourism: Counties need to get cre ative to attract travellers

1

County Watch: Rules must be followed in finance management

September 2014 | the governor monthly

SME Talk : Funding: When the deal is too good, think twice

Money Talk: How national budget is shared among counties

Guest Column: Competetive sourcing of drugs good for healthcare

1


Under-utilized barcodes; sad state of affairs By Paul Pasaka

It is a common scenario in some retail outlets to ďŹ nd long queues at the point of sale while serving either clients or at times suppliers. The sad business reality is that the solution lies squarely with the business owners and the reason they have to suffer the same fate over and over again remains puzzling even though it is all in the proper use of bar codes. Barcodes, as simple as they seem, when properly used can revolutionize the way companies conduct their businesses. Firms should go beyond the notion that barcodes are merely used for facilitation at the formal retail outlets. Receiving goods in bulk By use of pallets, companies considerably reduce the time involved in receiving of goods and thus increasing the efďŹ ciency of the whole process. Bar codes on pallets provide a mechanism of capturing data comprehensively in one scan, with details such as product descriptions, quantity, batch number, supplier name among others being captured. The cost of receiving goods in the palletize form reduces the cost of labor thus no need to employ numerous people at the receiving end.

20

GS1 GATEWAY | SEP - NOV 2014

Business Documents Barcodes can be used to effectively manage business documents such as invoices, dispatch orders, credit notes, picking orders in stores among others. It is a common trend yet to be adopted by companies in Kenya. For those who have done so though, their implementation is less than pleasing. Beyond retail The high usage of bar codes is mostly at the retail front, their application and capability is beyond what anyone can comprehend. Bar codes can be used in various areas such as identiďŹ cation of assets and documents, an important aspect in many organizations.


Sous Chef Delicious range of Frozen Party Foods Today, most average consumers place added attention to their careers, thus leading a more hectic lifestyle. This in turn has seen consumers demand convenience, including a quick meal solution, which is directly benefitting ready meals. Thanks to the rapid changes in consumer lifestyles, the packaged and pre-cooked foods have continued to command a high demand among many a busy Kenyan especially city residents. This growing desire for convenience among Kenyan consumers continues to drive the strong growth of pre-cooked frozen and packaged foods mainly sold in the retail stores. Such demands have given companies such as SOUS CHEF LIMITED a great advantage to grow from a small home based activity producing pureed garlic and ginger sold to the local shops to a company that deals with frozen pre-cooked products ranging from cocktail and regular samosas, spring rolls, chapatis, naans, parotas, pizzas, waffles and pancakes.

include all major retail stores in Nairobi, and throughout Kenya, five star hotels as well as private and airline caterers. All products are made from high quality ingredients based on traditional homemade recipes. “We have a continuous product development exercise with an eye on satisfying our customer’s needs for quality and durability,” Ms. Gwaderi explains. The meats used is Halal – Certified by the Supreme Council of Kenya, while the food is prepared under strict hygienic conditions with the premises being regularly audited for quality and hygiene. The company has been awarded the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) certification SANS 10330:2007 making it the first small and medium enterprise to attain the certification.

20 years later, the company – a brainchild of Julie Gwaderi and Rosy Mohamed which occupies the whole first floor (6,000 square Fit) of the City Park Shopping Centre, has invested in state of the art preparation rooms, cooking, freezing and chilling facilities.

Using barcodes issued by GS1 Kenya has enabled the company venture and do business with all major supermarkets taking into consideration that products with barcodes can be easily tracked from the stores to the point of sale counter. “We have also been able to sell our products regionally, this was only made possible by the use of barcode on our range of products,” adds Ms. Gwaderi.

Issue of food handling is a very sensitive matter thus the reason why SOUS CHEF strives to maintain the highest quality, standard and service to its clientele. These clients

Sous Chef Limited. Phone/fax: +254 20 374 7418, E-mail:sales@souschefltd.com

GS1 GATEWAY | SEP-NOV 2014

21


Lawrence Miruka, Accountant, Ukwala Supermarkets

Barcodes a solution to track our products As Ukwala Supermarkets – Nakuru opened its doors in November 2004, the retail store stocked thousands of products in different of brands and sizes to sell at some markup. Keeping track of these products and maintaining inventories to prevent stock outs was not an easy task. The supermarket who had enlisted the services of Compulynx Limited as its software providers introduced it to the world of bar codes and bar code scanners. Based on the advice given, Ukwala joined the GS1 Kenya membership list, where it found the total products’ tracking solution. To date, with barcodes, Ukwala’s till operators at the point of sale are able to scan the items as the product description coupled with its price appears on the screen compared to the manual system that produced a whole list of different products making it a tedious and time consuming exercise. Bar codes have simplified the purchase of products from our newly opened Ukwala deli and Ukwala bakery counters. “Once we finalized on our menu and range of products to be sold from our two counters, we sent an email to GS1 Kenya with a list of over 200 different products and in less than an hour, we had received all the necessary bar codes,” explains Lawrence Miruka of Ukwala Supermarkets – Nakuru. Entrepreneurs and businesses alike especially those in the retail sector should be assured of efficiency while using bar codes.

GS1 GATEWAY | SEP-NOV 2014

23


REACH YOUR TARGET AUDIENCE AFFORDABLY

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ISSUE 04 / SEPTEMBER - NOVEMBER 2013

9 772305

RETAIL BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE

RETAIL BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE JANUARY/MARCH 2013 Q1

9 772305

ISSN 2305-5561

06

B2B | RETAIL & HOSPITALITY MAGAZINES


TUMAINI SUPERMARKETS

Barcodes have worked for us As at 1990, Kenya was home to less than five supermarkets mostly located within the central business districts (CBD) of some of the major towns while majority of Kenyans in smaller towns and the rural areas relied on the services of smaller retail shops. Today, there are over 100 supermarkets countrywidethanks to economic liberalization and competitive efforts by investors to reach out to more clients. In addition, an attempt to move closer to their clients, supermarkets have continued to set up near residential areas, further bringing the services at the convenience of the customers. It is in this spirit of concerted efforts to reach to more clients that Tumaini self - services Supermarket set shop in Nairobi’s Pipeline Estate in 2006 targeting middle and lower income earners. Seven years later, the supermarket that started as an improved version of a small retail shop has grownand now operates branches in Nairobi and Kisumu cities. These include along Outering road, Donholm estate, Utawala along the Eastern bypass, Rongai, Pipeline and Kisumu’s CBD as well as Kondele area. Tumaini - a Swahili word meaning hope has plans to reach out to all the 47 counties in the next five years obviously taking advantage of the devolved system of government. “Our model has always been to target the middle and lowerincome earners, a segment that some of the industry bigger boys have been reluctant to serve,” explains Moses Nditika, the managing director. He adds that Tumaini Supermarkets aims at creating a competitive edge in Nairobi and Kisumu cities and their environs by becoming a true “one stop shop” for all.

Their location within residential estates coupled with a work force of lower to middle class has also given it a competitive edge. The need for bar codes The supermarket continues to invest in new avenues aimed at improving its quality and service value. As a growing organization, though costly embracing technology to ensure a smooth running of operations while increasing efficiency. The GS1 bar coding is one such technological advancement. Bar codes have helped Tumaini in the area of stock control. “Initially, when we did not have bar codes on our stock, the cashiers would manually search from the system, a time consuming exercise that at even led to loss of sales,” explains, James Macharia, Tumaini’s Head of Accounts Department. With barcodes even on all its bakery and deli products, Tumaini has eliminated such delays while stock leakages within the system have also declined. Bar coding has also helped the supermarket in differentiating items. For instance, in a case where an item comes in different variants and SKUs, bar codes differentiate and also assist in costing and allocation of margins against such items. Here, duplication is fully avoided. This is a differentiation strategy from what others could be doing. As such accounting on the movement of products and their profitability ratios is done with much ease and convenience. An analysis of the movement viz-a-viz competitor products becomes an easy task. Asserts Mr. Macharia.

GS1 GATEWAY | SEP-NOV 2014

25


Ziad Al Habal [CEO] - Chief Executive Officer, GS1 UAE, Sospeter Kioko, Chairman GS1 Kenya and Prof. Michael Okoth, Board Member GS1 Kenya

Allan Odhiambo with fellow attendees from other MOs during a networking party at this year’s General Assembly held in Berlin, Germany.

Antoinette Jansen - Global Events Manager, GS1 Global Office congratulating Allan Odhiambo at the Global Forum held early this year.

Where digital meets paper 4HNHaPULZ‹(UU\HS9LWVY[Z‹ *H[HSVN\LZ‹5L^ZSL[[LYZ‹-S`LYZ ‹)YVJO\YLZ‹7VZ[LYZ‹>HSS;HISL HUK:OPWWPUNJHSLUKHYZ‹5V[L 7HKZ‹+LZR+PHYPLZ‹)VVRWYPU[PUN ‹3HILSZ

Colourprint Ltd. P. O. Box 44466 - 00100 - GPO, Nairobi, Kenya. Industrial Area - Road-C, Off Enterprise Rd. Mob: +254 722-203 645 / 0733-203 645 Wireless: +254 20 2101740 / 41 / 42

26

For high quality and maximum efficiency in all kinds of commercial printing... GS1 GATEWAY | SEP - NOV 2014

info@colourprint.co.ke, colourprint.nairobi@gmail.com “Producing New Impressions of Excellence”

Year after Year


THE IMPORTANCE OF

Barcode Verification By Paschal Kasimu. IT and Verification Executive

The ease with which a bar code can be read or scanned depends upon how well the code has been printed, and on certain parameters of the scanner. Specifications lay down the ideal dimensions and methods of production of codes, but it is not always possible to adhere to the ideal conditions.

Therefore, in practice, bar codes can be produced that are not perfect and which may or may not scan successfully. In addition there are other problems that can occur in the printing or production process which may contribute to the difficulty of scanning at the Point of Sale. (POS)

• • • • •

• •

In order to achieve good quality Barcodes, the following needs to be ensured Use good quality origination artwork i.e. a film master from an accredited supplier, or an image setter with an appropriate resolution and adjustment for dot gain. Use high quality platemaking equipment, plate material and chemicals. Beware of ink breaking up, either in the bars or the background, leading to poor defects, modulation or decodability grades. For Thermal or Thermal Transfer printing, be sure to use a high quality ribbon that complements the material. Use higher speeds for resin ribbons, lower speeds for wax/resin mixes, remembering that high accuracy codes demand lower temperatures. Barcodes printed from wax ribbons are prone to smudging and scratching, which will affect the quality of the barcode. Print picket fence format if possible. If you must print ladder format, reduce the speed and temperature. Ladder format is may have a tendency to produce more bar gain at one side of the code than the other. Try to keep bar gain/loss to a minimum. Although average bar gain does not feature in the CEN/ ANSI grading system directly, it can affect both the modulation and decodability elements of the grading, and therefore should not be allowed to persist unchecked. You can compensate by adjusting the print head temperature and pressure of your printer, or if using traditional printing methods by adjusting the Bar Width Reduction on your film master. Look out for reflectance problems, which will lead to inaccurate results. These may be caused by a very shiny substrate or glossy inks. When applying bar code labels to products, look out for shine through from behind. Using black-out adhesive labels may cure this.

Always ensure you have your products verified at GS1 before mass printing to avoid unnecessary losses.

28

GS1 GATEWAY | SEP - NOV 2014


GS1 welcomes these Organisations who have attained Membership as from MARCH to JULY 2014 SAMALIC COTTAGE INDUSTRIES GEOFBIGGS AGENCIES TITO FARM SUPPLIES MUKURWE -INI WAKULIMA DAIRY LIMITED CHER BEAUTY DIVINE INDUSTRIES LIMITED JINVENJ ENTERPRISES LIMITED

SUNNY PROCESSORS LIMITED

ALPHATECH LOGOSTICS LIMITED

UAP INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

ICELANDIC LIMITED

MOMECE INVESTMENTS LIMITED

GALANT BEVERAGED LIMITED

IN NEED HOME

TEILINE ENTERPRISES

INTERGRATED CONSUMER SERVICES LIMITED

NADHIK LIGHT INDUSTRIES

HIDDEN TREASURES BOOKS WHOLESALE LIMITED

ESSENTIAL MANUFACTURING CO. LTD

ANTIMARKS PRODUCTS ENTERPRISES

DENIM CITY COLLECTION

IMENTI COMMUNITY BASED ORGANIZASTION CO. LTD

ARID SPRING JUICE ENTERPRISES

MOUNT KENYA FOOD INDUSTRIES LIMITED

KAMUIGA ARTEMISIA FARMERS LIMITED

KINUNU AGROPROCESSING LIMITED

ADEQUATE COLLECTIONS LIMITED

FRAME PACK COMPANY LIMITED

EMMAY COMMODITIES KENYA LIMITED

THE SUN PUBLISHERS LIMITED

ALPHA PAINTS LIMITED

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF QUAILS AND GUINEA FOWLS

MAYATIMA GENERAL MERCHANTS

PRODUCERS SMALL

ALFRANK SUPPLIERS

AXAK ENTERPRISES LIMITED

DAVIS $ SONS ENTERPRISES LIMITED

ELGON AROMA LIMITED

MALUINI ENTERPRISES

FAVOURITA DAIRY PRODUCTS

FREMER LIMITED

COUNTIES BUSINESS FOCUS LIMITED

DIAKIM FRESH

AGRO CRISPO ENTERPRISES

KAJAL OVERSEAS LIMITED

HOME ASSURED LIMITED

ROCK AND STONES LIMITED

KENYA NATIONAL EXAMINATION COUNCIL(KNEC)

SAWAND CARE PRODUCTS LIMITED

MAZIBU FARM LIMITED

GREENLEAF TRADING COMPANY LIMITED

PRISAM BAKERS

LIKII FRUITS ENTERPRISES

ABC-LAB.NET COMPANY LIMITED

JAMII MILLING LIMITED

MARIAH’S CEREALS

RONSAFETY LIMITED

BRIDGES ORGANICS

J.H AVER & SONS NIG LIMITED

WINSCON SUPPLIERS

PARMA MEDICAL EQUIPMENT

BERNANNA LIMITED

NGARE NAROK MEAT INDUSTRIES LIMITED

KALINKA FARMERS LIMITED

MALEWA GORGE LIMITED

CHALOAM BAKERS

COAST BEST TRADERS

BARRY ENTERPRISES

NICE SPRINGS WATER

SPRINGVINE VENTURES LIMITED

MERSGATE INVESTMENT

AEXCEL AUTO SPARES LIMITED

KENAQUA LIMITED

CAPITAL BRANDS (K) LIMITED

ORBIT CHEMICAL INDUSTRIES LIMITED

HARSHIN DRILLING AND SPARE ENTERPRISES

SAFARI WORTH SOUVENIRS

CATHYFRANS ENTERPRISES

LAKERS EAST AFRICA LIMITED

RIVANAHS HOLDINGS LIMITED

RWANDA COFFEE TRADERS LIMITED

FOR YOU DISTRIBUTORS LTD

SHIGOLI SONGOLE BAKERIES

KITUI ORCHARDS COMMUNITY BASED ORGANISATION GS1 GATEWAY | SEP-NOV 2014

29


30

NIA COSMETICS LIMITED

THE KENYA GOOD FOOD COMPANY

NYANZA LOCAL DISTILLERS LIMITED

ESSENCE MANUFACTURING LIMITED

BELMAK QUAIL AND POULTRY ENTERPRISES

MICROGRAPHICS DESIGNS COMPANY

UNITED GENERAL TRADING COMPANY LIMITED

Jun-14

HOUSE OF HONEY BEE

IEAT ENTERPRISES LIMITED

KITCHEN KING (K) LIMITED

ELEKEA LIMITED

RABBIT BREEDER ASSOCIATION OF KENYA

AQUARIQ ENTERPRISES

COUNTY BAKERS

SIXTY NINE DEGREES LIMITED

MAYMUN ENTERPRISES LIMITED

DYLAN KENYA LIMITED

LIMURU TEAVANA

ICHAKA PRODUCTS LIMITED

TRANSVOGEL COMPANY LIMITED

SWEET CUPS ENTERPRISES

ANGEL SAFETY SOLUTIONS

CRESTIVE PRODUCTS LIMITED

FOUNTAIN SPRINGS ENTERPRISES

VARGIN BEAUTY COMPANY

May-14

SUPER IDEAL AGENCIES

APONYE UGANDA LIMITED

TRADEKEN ENTERPRISES

PLATINUM DISTILLERS LIMITED

L’OREAL EAST AFRICA LIMITED

KAY SEVEN GROUP LIMITED

MARK ELECTRONICS TECHNOLOGY

BAKERY SOLUTIONS LIMITED

SIGOSE FARM COMPANY LIMITED

VEGA LIMITED

BOSCONY BEST ENTERPRISES

RUNG’ETO FARMERS CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY

KALIKA FOODS

GALAXY VENTURES SERVICES

JOINT COMMERCIAL SUPPLIES LIMITED

MUSLINE COMMUNITY LIMITED

VIBS ENTERPRISES LIMITED

ERIS INDUSTRIES

GOLDEN ALPINE ENTERPRISES

COTTON CRAFT

NAIROBI BEAUTY FASHIONS CENTRE & GARMENTS

FULLWAYS COMPANY LIMITED

MEDINA CHEMICALS LIMITED

MWOSIETA COMPANY LIMITED

SIALO KUNGU COLLECTIONS

VICWAK LIMITED

PHILLIPS PHARMACEUTICALS LIMITED

KALU SHOES COLLECTION

SUNGOLD FOODS LIMITED

WEMA COOL

MUAMKO MORINGA PROCESORS

NAPSBURRY PRODUCTS

IKIREZI NATURAL PRODUCTS

CAPTAIN COOK (U) LIMITED

DREAM -LIFE PRODUCTS ENTERPRISES

NGUVU KENYA GRAIN MILLERS LIMITED

IMARA WOMEN JUAKALI ASSOCOATION

TULLON TEA LIMITED

MISTICAL LIMITED

TRINITY THREE IN ONE ENTERPRISES

VISUAL VANITYS

INNOVEX LIMITED SOLUTIONS

SMARTJOY ENETERPRISES

RIVERINE FOODS

MBULIRO GENERAL ENTERPRISES LTD

TUREA LIMITED

CHARNAT LTD

MEKAH EAST AFRICA LIMITED

Jul-14

WATAHAUZERPRISES LIMITED

GARISSA QUALITY BAKERY

RUSIAN ENTERPRISES

DEEDS PRODUCTION

BENTLY ENTERPRISES

ELITE LODGIT LIMITED

VALUE MASTERS LIMITED

LILY SERVICES LIMITED

NEOTERIC KENYA LIMITED

GOOD SHEPHERD EMPOWERMENT PROGRAMME EMBU (C.B.O)

CHRISTIAN IMPACT MISSION

BEE CARE APIARES INTERNATIONAL LIMITED

SUERECKAHH INTERNATIONAL LIMITED

INSTITUTE OF CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS OF KEN-

QUESTA CARE

YA(ICPAK)

SARA FOODS

MAGUNA-ANDU SELF SELECTION STORES LIMITED

TAIFA QUALITY TEA

SALCOMBE ROAD ENTERPRISES

DAZZLING COMMUNICATONS LIMITED

JAPI INVESTMENTS LIMITED

ELIAS MABIRIA BUSINESS SYSTEMS

ALGARVE DISTILLERS LIMITED

MUKAMULA INVESTMENTS LIMITED

AGREWA LIMITED

MANISU LIMITED

UBBINK EAST AFRICA LIMITED

HUDART UGANDA LIMITED

JOREEN’S EGGYOLK TRADERS

JENTAR INVESTMENTS LIMITED

ADRINA EAST AFRICA LIMITED

THE PROPERTY EXPERTS INTERNATIONAL LIMITED

SIMPLY HIRED

GS1 GATEWAY | SEP - NOV 2014


The complimentary gateway magazine showcases various issues with the supply chain. We are currently expanding distribution beyond our more than 5,000 GS1 member Companies. With our wide distribution coverage, through aggressive direct marketing campaign, the GS1 Exhibitions, Seminars, Training and Conferences, we are now reaching thousands not only in Kenya but within the East African Region and beyond! We invite you to advertise in our next issue of this dynamic magazine at our subsidized rates below in order to enjoy this great marketing avenue.

Advertising rates for the Gateway Magazine valid for 2014/2015 Advertising Space

Rate for GS1 Members

Rate for Non- Members

Eighth Page Quarter Page

Ksh 30,000 Ksh 55,000

40,000 65,000

Half Page Full Page

Ksh 70,000 Ksh 120,000

80,000 130,000

Inner Cover Page

Ksh 150,000

160,000

• All costs Exclusive of 16% VAT • The above rates are for full colour advertisements. • All adverts should be saved in PDF, EPS, High Resolution Jpeg or CorelDraw. For further information, please contact the us on +254 (20) 2319414/2385270 or email: dorothy@gs1kenya.org

GS1 GATEWAY | SEP-NOV 2014

31


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