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SUPPLY CHAIN PRACTICES

STYLE INDUSTRIES LIMITED

Hair Additions our Business INSIDE:

Fixed Asset Management Get it Right in Barcoding GS1 Goes to the Counties www.gs1kenya.org ISSUE 18 : FEBRUARY - APRIL 2014


CONTENTS Fixed Asset Management

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GS1 Goes to the Counties

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Combating Counterfeits in Healthcare Industry

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F E AT U R E

GS1 Gateway February - April 2014 ISSUE 18

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HAIR ADDITIONS NS OUR BUSINESS SS

Editorial Team Project Leader : Eva Buyu Consulting Editor : Munyiva Mutuku Design & Layout : Ovakast

Gateway is published by GS1 Kenya, it is distributed through out East Africa. Contributions are highly welcome. The editor reserves the right to edit, amend or alter material in anyway deemed necessary. Comments and/or suggestions to be emailed to eva@gs1kenya.org

GS1 Kenya, Allbid House, 2nd Flr, Wing C, Opp. ASL Packaging, Mombasa Road Tel: +254 20-231 9414/238 5270, 232 1927 Cell: + 254 71 012 2252, 73 596 5168 Fax : + 254- 20 - 2353520

Get it Right in Barcoding

24 CONTRIBUTORS BUTORS

Carole Muema Corazon Baraza Dorothy Kwamboka Ephantus Achebi

Eunicee Mwangi Eva Buyu yamboga Gerald Nyamboga al Kasimu Paschal aul Pasaka Paul GSSS1 GS1 G 1 GAT GATEWAY G GATE A AT ATE T W WAY WA AY A Y | FEB FE EB - APR EB AP A PR 2014 20 201 014

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Dear Members, Just the other day, we were wishing each other prosperity as we eagerly waited to usher in the New Year; indeed time waits for no man. The first quarter (Q1 – 2014) is gone and have already rolled up our sleeves for yet another quarter. Despite the numerous business challenges that many of us are going through, we at GS1 Kenya are still committed to making your operations better by providing you with the required solutions. GS1 - the Global Language of Business continues to serve not only one a many industries but each and every consumer locally and beyond borders across the supply chain. From traceability to automatic restocking of store shelves to faster and more efficient export and import processes, GS1 standards have made a hyper-efficient supply chain possible. And as trading takes place everyday/time, becoming more sophisticated, broader use of GS1 standards will be required hence the reason GS1 provides new standards and solutions to an increasing number of sectors. It is at this point that GS1 Kenya takes this opportunity to commend all members for their business support and helping us cross over to the 5,000+ members and we believe that we are headed for bigger and better days. During the previous quarter, GS1 Kenya participated in the GS1 Global Forum held in Brussels, Belgium from 17 – 21 February 2014. The event was dedicated to the 40th anniversary of GS1 while looking into the future with an agenda of “Shaping the future together for one goal achievement”. The forum provided an opportunity for GS1 Kenya to interact and network allowing us return with insights which we continue sharing with the local market. GS1 Kenya is keen on launching products which the modern and dynamic market requires. One such product is the Unique Device Identifier (UDI), a system that has the potential to improve the quality of information in sectors such as the pharmaceutical. When fully implemented, the UDI system can allow more accurate reporting, reviewing and analyzing of adverse event reports so that problem devices can be identified and corrected more quickly.

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GS1 GATEWAY | FEB - APR 2014

Allan Odhiambo General Manager, GS1 Kenya Secondly, it is capable of reducing medical errors by enabling health care professionals to more rapidly and precisely identify a device and obtain important information concerning its characteristics among other benefits. The food industry is another critical area that moving forward will require embracing some of the available GS1 standards. One such is a Recall System – which the whole food supply chain should not operate without in this day and age. We are living in a world of “recalls” from a global market however, these “recalled products” unfortunately have found their way into the local market. As we put our best foot forward to curb risks associated with such products, we are calling on the relevant Government regulatory bodies to partner with us to avert any sort of unexpected crises that could arise due to negligence and lack of proper standards. Lastly, I wish to thank the GS1 Kenya Board of Directors under the leadership of Mr. Sospeter Kioko as well as the staff for contributing to a successful Q1 – 2014. I also take this opportunity to thank all members for your continuous support and participation, your contribution is highly acknowledged and appreciated. Thank you!


Chairman, GS1 Kenya In any economy, the social, economic and political pillars form the basis on which to rely on while operating and growth of businesses. One year later, after a new government took charge to run the affairs of the country, the economic and political pillars are yet to give investors and entrepreneurs alike assurance that businesses will maneuver and come out of the current harsh times. However the whole nation is optimistic that the Jubilee Government has laid the foundation of economic growth and we now wait to see it happen in order to unlock our business potential. Even as most businesses expect some improvement, though not an exception, we at GS1 Kenya are forging on and have not at any one time departed from our strategy; to aggressively market GS1 products and ensure that most consumer goods enter into the barcode arena as per the required standards.

Secondly, as a vital organization in the industry and Kenya’s economy at large, we also believe in the importance of communication and awareness. It is for this reason that we will continue enlightening our clients through the various media on the importance of these standards. Nevertheless, none of these can be successful without everyone’s commitment and hard work. With the already set goals and targets, confident of the GS1 Kenya team – the Board of Directors and Staff, I urge everyone to work towards achieving what we have put forth to achieve. It is my hope that all our members will continue to lend us their support as we tackle this new quarter.

Chairman’s Message

Sospeter Kioko

GS1 Kenya remains focused on unveiling new products to address an informed, dynamic and competitive market. Away from the usual barcode business, we are looking into product diversification taking into consideration factors such as value for our clients’ money and safety. Food safety, product tracing, and product recalls are currently at the forefront of both government regulations and industry concerns around the world. Companies are facing numerous track - trace requirements, not always easily reconcilable. Moreover technology offers various ways of achieving traceability and many solutions exist for national, regional and global supply chain participants. As a result, to facilitate trade today, it is necessary to implement international standards and ensure interoperability of traceability systems and that is where GS1 comes in.

Thank you! The January – March 2014 quarter has been quite encouraging. Thanks to a dedicated Board of Directors and Staff, our performance is commendable and way above that reported during the same quarter in 2013.

GS1 GATEWAY | FEB - APR 2014

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Fixed Asset Management By Paul Pasaka Asset management is a topic that is not discussed more often but the truth is that few organizations today have a thorough understanding of what asset they have at any given time. Having an accurate data that shows condition, location and responsible contact ensures that assets are available when needed and that they can be used when needed. With an ever growing asset base organizations are constantly struggling to address a variety of issues surrounding accountability of their assets. Most organizations are faced with problems which are as a result of poor asset management system such as:• Over investing on fixed assets • Over investing in repair and maintenance • Not completing proper auditing of assets • Incorrect information on assets • Lack of support • No balance in asset elements • Too little risks taken for growth • Not knowing exact worth of asset base • Loss of asset by employees without holding them accountable

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• Fixed asset management is an important function, although it is something some organizations fail to realize. The fixed assets in some businesses directly contribute to turnover, and hence profitability, and without these key fixed assets the business would fail. Because of the importance of fixed assets it is important they are adequately managed. Even if the fixed assets deployed by a business has no direct effect on turnover, they are still important and should be adequately managed.

Asset Records – Customizable asset record detail forms Location-Based Security – Flexible location hierarchy Tracking – Owner, assignment, repair, calibration, maintenance and utilization tracking Disposals – Batch disposal with unlimited disposal method options Fund Accounting – Allocate expenses across multiple funds Depreciation – Maintain an unlimited number of depreciation methods History – Complete history tracking and audit trails Reports – Standard asset, GASB, depreciation, ad hoc and user-defined reporting Schedules – NIGP and custom classification schedules Transfers – Automated transfer management with email notification and optional approvals Security – Secure server location and administration, secure authentication, data encryption and user log Import/Export – Data import and export capabilities Fields – Supports user-defined fields and business rules

FIXED ASSET MANAGEMENT PRACTICES Fixed Asset Management covers the entire asset lifecycle from procurement to disposal, including all financial aspects of those lifecycle elements. Organizations face a significant challenge to track the location, quantity, condition, and maintenance and depreciation status of their fixed assets. A popular approach to tracking fixed assets uses serial numbered Asset Tags, which are labels often with barcodes asset tags for easy and accurate reading. The solution however cannot be complete without having in place fixed asset management software. WHY USE BARCODED ASSET TAGS Barcodes provide error-free, machine-readable (barcode scanners) recording which avoid manual transcription errors by humans. Bar codes are often valuable and necessary to organizations, businesses or educational institutions which have large inventories of physical property to monitor, track or maintain. Bar code readers or scanners decode the barcodes and compare them against a database for tracking or maintenance purposes. THE SOFTWARE Asset management software helps to efficiently and confidently manage company’s fixed assets and depreciation from acquisition to disposal. Most asset management software have the following features:-

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Correct management of Fixed Assets can have a substantial impact on the profitability of any company. Corporate taxation and insurance can be cut substantially by removing retired assets from the depreciation schedule. Manpower is saved through easy access to the corporate asset register, enabling staff to quickly locate and deploy assets as needed. Safety, risk and asset life are optimized through correct retirement and servicing, and money is saved through asset reuse, increased reliability and effective procurement.


Company Focus

We share Lake Victoria, We share Swahili language , We SHARE & SHOP at


Mr. Sospeter Kioko, Chairman GS1 Kenya presents a cheque of Ksh. 100,000 donation to Ms. Asmita Gillani, CEO Aga Khan University Hospital towards the Patient Welfare Programme. The programme is funded by contributions from the Hospital revenues, individual and corporate donors and gives financial assistance to patients who are not able to afford care at the hospital.

Patient Welfare Programme By Eunice Mwangi

What is the patient welfare Programme? The Aga Khan University Hospital, Nairobi (AKUH) Patient Welfare Programme (PWP) was developed to provide assistance to patients who would otherwise be unable to afford medical care regardless of gender, faith or ethnic origin.

Who is eligible for the Patient Welfare Programme? The programme benefits un-insured and low-income patients by subsidising their hospital fees, allowing them to receive specialised treatment they would otherwise be unable to afford. Using a team based approach, the doctors, nurses, faculty and staff work together to help choose a course of treatment that reflects the latest advances in medical research enabling the best possible outcomes. PWP then provides financial support to those who need it, ensuring that they receive quality health care. In a region where the majority of the inhabitants are below the poverty line, the demand for support is great. The Patient Welfare Programme supports patients in need of specialised treatment and care. The Patient Welfare Committee evaluates each case to determine the patient’s financial ability and the level of financial aid required. The entire process is documented and audited to ensure transparency.

How is the Patient Welfare Programme funded? The Patient Welfare Programme is funded through contributions from hospital revenues, as well as donations received from corporate partners, donors and well-wishers. These donations cover the complete cost of specialised treatment including accommodation, medical and surgical supplies, pharmacy needs, diagnostic procedures, follow up care and the attention of fully qualified attending physicians. Over 40% of patients at the heart and cancer centre are on patient welfare programme. With the demand for welfare support increasing each year, the hospital is in need of continuous support.

How can you support the Patient Welfare Programme? Your generous contribution to the Patient Welfare Programme will enable access to specialised care for patients who require financial assistance. Your donation can be deposited into a Patient Welfare Programme general fund and made available to the patients in need of support, or you can choose to dedicate your funds to a specific cause or treatment.

To discuss how you can help please contact Rubina Haroon, Director Resource Development Tel: +254 20 366 2236 Cell: +254 733 447 276 Email: rubina.haroon@aku.edu

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GS1 Kenya provides increased opportunities for SMEs by Gerald Nyamboga

GS1 Kenya organized a Barcoding workshop at Ukunda Forest Lodge, South Coast sponsored by the Kwale County Government.

GS1 is the international standard for bar codes and the hope is that by providing a compliance advisory service in country, producers in Kenya will be able to meet the needs of the global market as well as changing domestic market. To assist and facilitate local suppliers do business in the formal retail chains, GS1 Kenya, in collaboration and support from the counties, and other authoritative bodies, has rolled out a program aimed at meeting micro, small and medium enterprises (MSMEs) and other producers through workshops to educate them on how to meet all the required trading standards. GS1 Kenya will offer guidance and assistance including training and consultancy on bar coding providing these entrepreneurs an opportunity to do business at the formal retail arena. The support includes a needs assessment involving surveys and interactions with industry associations. It also includes awareness seminars at major business locations and provision of business guidance on the best trade practices for producers and retailers. Some of the groups that have so far benefited include the NEFSALF Women Hub at Mazingira Institute Westlands and Eastlands Youth and Women Groups. In March 2014, GS1 Kenya organized a Barcoding workshop at Ukunda

Forest Lodge, South Coast sponsored by the Kwale County Government. The workshop’s objective was to provide value added information to Kwale SMEs on how to enhance their business through marketing and branding while being compliant to the standards issued by the variuos Government departments and agencies such as Kenya Bureau of Standards (KEBS), Export Promotion Council (EPC) as well as financial institutions. The Executive Committee Member, Hon. Safina Kwekwe and the County Officer of Enterprise Mr. Victor Msamale, encouraged the local producers to emphasize on quality productions as well as adhering to the required production standards. Hon. Safina assured the participating SMEs that the County Government will support them once they are ready to do business at a higher level as they seek to diversify their markets. GS1 Kenya is seeking to partner with other counties to educate more Kenyans about the role and importance of bar codes for their businesses in a bid to ensure that all SMEs and other trading partners are aware of the best trading practices. The rapid growth in the number of supermarkets chain and stores in country is creating more opportunities for local industries as well as SMEs to sell their products.

The importance of Barcoding standards Adoption of bar coding standards is important for manufacturers and retailers to have a level playing field. Barcoding is obligatory in the case of manufacturing; exporting and retail business however, if manufacturers want to supply to the large retailers and have better vendors, bar code standardization is indispensable for them. Bar coding is also important for the efficient management of their stocks in the retail industry.

“It is an honor and pleasure to partner with GS1 Kenya in aiding the Kwale MSME sector venture into formal markets. I trust this initial training will guide them towards that direction. As a county government, our commitment to supporting the MSME sector to succeed in their respective trade disciplines is unequivocal. I pray that GS1 Kenya will walk this journey with us to the end.” Remarks made by Hon. Safina Kwekwe during the Barcoding Workshop in Ukunda. GS1 GATEWAY | FEB - APR 2014

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BLUE RING PRODUCTS LTD P.O BOX 56337 - 00200 City Square. Tel: 020 2027208, 2043108, 2321611/12. Fax: 20227208. Nairobi. Email: info@bluering.co.ke

COMPANY PROFILE COMPANY BACKGROUND: Blue Ring products is a Limited liability company incorporated in Kenya in 1991, and which has been in operation since 1992 The company specializes in the manufacturing of cleansing detergents and related specialties for Industrial, Institutional and Household applications. We have over the years emerged as a key player in the industry.

CUSTOMERS PROFILE: We have over the years successfully supplied our products to major players within the following sectors: •

Educational Institutions Utalii Collage, Kenyatta University, Nairobi University, Jomo Kenyatta University, Alliance Boys & Girls, Imani School, Moi Forces Academy,

MISSION STATEMENT: In pursuit of this vision, Blue Ring Products Ltd endeavors to: Be the leading provider of quality cleansing materials and systems in Kenya, and in East Africa Region in general.

Industries Chemserve Cleaning Services, Cadbury Kenya, Zingo, Africa Apparels, Mirage International, Milly Foods Processors, New KCC, Mount Kenya Bottlers, KMC.

PRODUCTS CATEGORIES: We offer products within the various categories outlined below:-

Hospitals Nairobi Hospital, Gertrude’s Hospital, Aga Khan Hospital, Jocham Hospital Mombasa, Moi Referral Hospital, Kenyatta National Hospital, Mater Hospital, MP Shah Hospital.

Hotels / Hospitality industries Safari Park Hotel, Whitesands Hotel, Mombasa Beach Hotel, Travellers Beach Hotel, Sun & Sand Hotel, Royal Reserve Hotel, Bamburi Beach Hotel, The Stanley Hotel, Serena Hotels, The Bounty Hotel, Diani Reeft Hotel

Supermarkets / Retail Outlets Tuskys Supermarket, Nakumatt supermarket, Uchumi Supermarket, Naivas supermarket, Eastmart supermarket, Woolmart Supermarket, Maathai supermarket, cleanshelf Supermarket, Leens Supermarket, Maguna andu Supermarket, Chandarana Supermarket, Sepros and many others

OUR VISION: “To partner with and support our customers in achieving the highest levels of environmental hygiene. I doing this, we aim to promote those products and systems that emphasize efficiency, cost effectiveness, safety and environmental considerations.”

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Multipurpose liquid cleaners Scouring and cleansing products Bleaching, Disinfecting products Degreasing products Sanitizers Battery acid & de-ionized water Laundry detergents and specialities Personal hygiene products Environmental hygiene products Balances, Hot Plates, Water Baths, Ovens etc Water treatment chemicals and products We are accredited by KEBS and all our products are produced in conformity to their standards as well as meeting the ever changing needs of our customers

BUSINESS STRATEGY: Through close monitoring of our customers’ needs and in line with the ever changing technological and environmental challenges, we commit ourselves to adopting updated training and product offerings that meet these demands. In doing this we strive to adopt up to date safe practices, for our staff and consumers as a guiding philosophy.

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We are also committed to being a responsible corporate citizen, through adoption of ethical practices and timely payment of appropriate statutory dues, as well as supporting charitable causes.

GS1 GATEWAY | FEB - APR 2014

EMAILS: Head office Nanyuki road, industrial area, Nairobi info@bluering.co.ke Mombasa Branch New Malindi, Mombasa Road msa@bluering.co.ke


GS1 GATEWAY | FEB - APR 2014

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Barcode Colours Do’s and Don’ts The Ideal Colour Combination is Black Bars on White Background Other Suitable Colour Combinations:

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Dark Bars :

Blue / Green / Purple

Light Bars :

Red / Orange / Yellow

GS1 GATEWAY | FEB - APR 2014


Do you want to implement traceability in your organization using the best standards? By Corazon Baraza

GS1 offers a few guidelines on how you can achieve this Implementation Considerations for traceability The following key steps should be considered by each organization and / or industry sector that is considering how to implement best business practices to utilize the recommended approach described in the GS1 Global Traceability Standard. Contact your GS1 organization to get expert advice Your GS1 Member Organization (MO) will provide expert advice about the GS1 Global Traceability Standard and any existing extension, support during your project to implement a traceability policy, plus help to identify technology most suited to your requirements and to help you get an appropriate level of knowledge and training on this technology and the appropriate GS1 Standards. Model the supply chain where traceability is to be accomplished. It is extremely important to determine the scope of the traceability process in your supply chain, the Traceability Partners who are involved and to clearly identify the boundaries of your traceability model. Determine priority business needs As the data to record and the relevant level of traceable item depends on business needs, it is important to determine at the beginning what the main uses are that you expect from the traceability system and the type of trace request (by data elements) that you want to be able to conduct. Example: In case of anti-counterfeiting, a common useful trace request is to be able to retrieve logistic information about a particular unit of product. In that case, the relevant level of traceable item in addition to logistic units is the serialized traceable item. Describe the physical flow of products Identify the type of products that are exchanged between your traceability partners and describe the logistical hierarchy you may find it helpful to “walk” each step of your supply chain and identify the physical locations, inputs, internal processes, and outputs. The supply chain “map” can be prepared in the form of a diagram or template, providing a record and the basis for a comprehensive traceability plan.

Define Traceability Partners’ roles Associate the roles that each Traceability Partner has according to the GS1 Global Traceability Standard. These roles determine which roles / business processes the Traceability Partner must perform to achieve traceability. Select the enabling technology to support traceability. Some use case and traceability requirements are technology independent (e.g. assigning the identification to the traceable item, list of minimum data to record). Yet you need to select an appropriate enabling technology to attain traceability and data exchange based on the model of your supply chain process. Validate the process Validate your Implementation and Technical Guidelines with your GS1 MO to obtain verification of global standards compliance. This could be under a certification process for the use of GS1 standards for traceability. Once all parties and business processes have been defined, you should validate the whole model. In particular, attention must be paid to the capabilities of Parties to fulfill the goods receiving process requirements and the delivery process requirements (i.e. answer the question - will it be possible to link receiving and delivery traceability information). For instance it would not be logical for a logistics operator that performs picking operations to decide that his reception process is based on a manual procedure (e.g., no barcode labels on the pallet) but that the delivery process is based on bar-coding systems. All such inconsistencies should be eliminated to ensure success for the application of the GS1 Global Traceability Standard. Standards Maintenance When an organization implements the GS1 standards, and a gap is recognized against their business needs, the organization should contact their local GS1 MO and receive guidance on submitting a Change Request into the Global Standard Management Process (GSMP). The local GS1 MO can provide the latest standard development. To get information about GS1 Standards, the following website can be used: www.gs1.org. For examples of application, please refer to the industry specific implementation guidelines. Adapted from Global Traceability Standards, March issue 1.2.2. All contents copyright ©of GS1

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FARMING SOLUTIONS LIMITED

Milk Automated Dispensing Machines

be found in supermarkets such as Uchumi, Naivas, Peter Mulei, East Matt, Kamindi, and Homematt. Other than Nairobi, Mr. Gitonga says the same is being replicated in towns such as Naivasha and Eldoret. Milk Automated Dispensing Machines (ADMs) are taking over the market cutting avenues for commodity contamination. Kenya leads the pack with 120 liters per capita annually for milk consumption, although this is 89 liters below the recommended amount from the World Health Organization (WHO). Statistics aside, increased demand for milk, necessitated by the ever rising urban population in towns such as Nairobi has led to a continued growth of ineffective marketing of milk and other dairy products through unofficial marketing outlets. Various diary sector reports indicate that more raw milk than processed milk is consumed not only in rural Kenya, but also in the urban centers including Nairobi where 80 percent of all milk consumption is unprocessed. In some parts, processed packaged milk has no market. The over-burdened Kenyans with meager incomes can hardly afford such milk. To bridge and address some of these gaps – health, milk consumption versus price issues the concept of dispensing milk through an ADM has continued to change the way milk consumers purchase this valuable commodity

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in many homes. An ADM, many of which have been installed inside retail stores/supermarkets dispenses milk by inserting some coins – depending on one’s pocket, giving consumers an opportunity to purchase clean fresh milk. The ADM concept borrowed from Italy is a brainchild of Farming Solutions Limited, a company which continues to change the milk purchasing arena through these machines. Geoffrey Gitonga, the chief executive explains that the company gets farm fresh milk from farmers, distributes to its dispensing machines all over the country mainly in the urban areas for easy access by the consumers. Advantages In terms of market and management the ADMs offer a number of advantages. It is a crowd-puller as milk is a basic and vital in nearly all households. This means that an entrepreneur who chooses to invest in an ADM to sell milk to the rest expects increased traffic to his store or shop. It is for this reason that various supermarket stores have taken advantage of this. ADMs can

Secondly, an ADM is able to serve a wide market; low income to high income earners. Currently a 500ml packet of milk retails at between KShs. 45- 50. ”With the dispensing machine, anyone can get milk for as little as Ksh 5,” Mr. Gitonga adds. Above all, an ADM cuts off possible avenues for contamination as the number of handlers are reduced. Once the milk is in the dispensing machine, workers have no gain in considering adding the quality of milk with water as all the monies have to be inserted into a safe box that only the owner has access. The dispensers are also eco-friendly as customer can reuse or refill using plastic or glass containers; reducing pollution of the environment. ADMs can also be installed and come in handy for entrepreneurs/ investors of milk bars, smaller retail and institutions such as schools and hospitals. For more information contact; Farming Solutions Limited +254 722 249 600 Celian House, Embakasi Village, next to Total Petrol Station Mezzanine Room No.6 info@farmingsolutionsltd.com http://farmingsolutionsltd.com.


COMBATING

COUNTERFEITS in the Healthcare Industry By Carole Muema Counterfeits are a vexing problem that has permeated the society not only locally, but also internationally. It is a predicament that has put many countries in a dilemma as they continue destroying the very socio-economic fabric and well-being of these nations. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that up to 30 per cent of all sold drugs are counterfeits while less than one per cent of drugs are affected by counterfeits in developing and developed countries respectively. Even in countries with a safe system for marketing medicinal products, patients must know their risks. Counterfeit drugs can endanger the health of unsuspecting users or can even be life-threatening. Many countries are rightly proud of the safety and quality of their supply of pharmaceuticals. In some developing countries, however, the situation is unfortunately very different. In 1990, more than 100 Nigerian children died because they had been administered to a cough syrup that was diluted with toxic solvent. Five years later, 2500 people lost their lives when a supposed meningitis vaccine turned out to be water and the list is inexhaustible. The reason for these catastrophic events; in developing countries, the World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that up to 30 per cent of all sold drugs are counterfeited while in the developed countries less than one per cent of drugs are affected by counterfeits. On the other hand, illegitimate internet pharmacies ship their illegal products worldwide. Here, the ratio of counterfeited drugs is over 50 per cent. These drugs can harm the health and even the lives of patients. This means that if patients purchase drugs online they increasingly run the risk of coming across counterfeits.

considering emerging markets as the next growth opportunity: they are looking for partnership opportunities. A testified statement by Marcia Crosse, US director for health care at the Government Accountability Office dated 27th of February 2014 states that despite recent legislation to establish a more secure pharmaceutical supply chain to deliver high quality, approved medicines to even American patients, efforts to block the import of substandard, fraudulent and counterfeit drugs remains an uphill fight. Criminals are expanding from “lifestyle” drugs to widely used anticholesterol and cancer medicines, attracted by huge profits and low risks from drug counterfeiting activities. Howard Sklamberg, US Food & Drug Administration deputy commissioner for global regulatory operations and policy also explained that the main problem is that penalties for distributing counterfeit drugs are too low to spur prosecution and to deter illegal operators. FDA is working with other federal agencies to identify and take action against illegal operators, with a focus on fraudulent internet pharmacy sites that sell low-cost “Canadian” medicines. But most counterfeiters end up facing charges of “misbranding” or importing “unapproved foreign-made drugs,” which carry minor fines and minimal jail terms. The introduction of new drug tracking operation may help spot fraudulent products at US borders, noted Elizabeth Jungman, director of drug safety and Innovation at Pew Charitable Trusts. And a process for “decommissioning” retired drug package serial numbers could prevent criminals from buying and reusing drug identifiers to escape detection, she added. But the program

does little to prevent consumers from purchasing drugs on rogue Internet pharmacy websites, Sklamberg said, or to deter medical practitioners from obtaining unapproved therapies. To be more effective, the system needs to provide automatic product verification with each transaction through the drug supply chain, something that is not fully required by the legislation, Jungman explained. Committee investigators also are probing the role played by online business-to-business (B2B) networks or trade boards in marketing illicit supplies of bulk active ingredients to drug makers. Although the wrong view has been propagated that Kenya’s Anticounterfeits Bill 2008 is out to kill generics, and therefore parallel importation, the fact of the matter is that this Bill is actually to protect mwananchi from the detrimental effects of using bogus products. Counterfeiting has become more sophisticated, as the prevalence of trade in fake medicines increases in countries with weak drug regulation and enforcement, scarcity or erratic supply of basic medicines, unregulated markets and unaffordable prices including Kenya. Everyone must join hands in the fight against counterfeits because they can harm or kill the users. Counterfeit medicines represent an enormous public health challenge. It is possible for any Kenyan to come across medicines that seem to have been packaged correctly, in the form of tablets, capsules or syrup that look right, but which do not contain the correct ingredients. In the worst case scenario, they may be filled with highly toxic substances. The war against counterfeits is therefore not just one that is being generated by multinationals, with the aim of fighting of cheap imports but an issue that concerns human lives which must be protected at all costs.

Today, the health care sector, the worldwide over are finding ways of fighting counterfeits out of the market and global pharmaceutical companies, medical devices manufacturers and insurance groups are increasingly

GS1 GATEWAY | FEB - APR 2014

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HAIR ADDITIONS;

OUR BUSINESS Style Industries Limited

Picture this; a stylist is finishing off a head bearing tumbling curls for a glamour model. The cascade of hair makes her look like a Walt Disney drawing; she seems happy with her new look as she agrees that she looks like a princess. This is one but a tip of the iceberg when it comes to the feelings that women have when they step out of the salon with that glamorous smart look thanks to hair additions. Hair additions have been popular for three decades or more; in fact in the last decade, demand for extra hair has really taken off. Despite all the never-ending hullaballoo and debates that surround hair extensions among many a Kenyan male folk, their female counterparts have totally ignored any related accusations and recommendations to ensure they look good and their best with the hair extensions. “Kenyan women want to look good, they have an outstanding fashion sense,” explains Mahmoud Saffideen, Head of East Africa and Country Manager, Style Industries Limited. It is on this basis that Style Industries Limited has continued to be the preferred choice among women when it comes to hair additions; weaves, wigs, extension wiglets and braids. For more than two decades, the company’s Darling hair brand

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has been known for the highest quality synthetic hair additions made from a Japanese fiber known as Kanekalon. When it comes to braids, the Abuja brand is perhaps the most popular locally. Mr. Saffideen notes that the company is the pioneer of the Abuja braid, a mass hot water hair addition which remains a darling to many a Kenyan woman as well as a similar product designed for children. “The Princess braid was designed with children’s soft hair and in mind and to date remains one of our successful brand,” the MD notes. At the same time, the company boasts of a wide range of weaves and wigs to suit the market; the celebrity collection is targeted at the mass while the VIP and Classic are for that discerning woman willing to spend more to look good. Humble Beginning With a current workforce of 6,000 workers and operating manufacturing plants in Nairobi, Nakuru and Mombasa towns, the Darling brand in Kenya was born in the early 90s with only 25 staff and five braid machines. Then, the brand was limited to only six braids and one weave, known as Perm Calypso. 20 years later, coming out of a monopolized market coupled with trade

barriers, the company in 2007, partnered with Japanese suppliers of raw materials to carry out market research on the quality of their products. Their recommendations and subsequent changes saw a remarkable improvement in its brand. Recently, Style Industries partnered with one of the largest conglomerates called Godrej Consumer Products based in Mumbai, India. This joint venture aims to improve systems, controls and infuse fresh, corporate ideas to grow market share while meeting customer demand for high quality range products. Visible Brand The African woman is very beauty conscious and Darling endeavors to go the extra mile in helping her redefine her beauty, style and sense of uniqueness everyday with a wide range of products. Mr. Saffideen explains that the success of the brand has largely been attributed by the versatility of its styles in line with current trends internationally and locally. “90 percent of the women in Kenya put on hair additions. Kenya remains a weave market, thanks to their high rate of fashion exposure,” he adds. Darling is the leading brand in Kenya and the sub-region and recently earned a “SUPERBRAND” status for being the leading Hair Manufacturer in East Africa.


At the same time, modern retailing trends have had tremendous impact in promoting the brand while the expansion of retail stores has further seen the products freely displayed whilst many wholesalers have also adopted a similar approach and now display their items on shelves to give better access to customers. Even as the products are sold to supermarkets, there is a team of merchandisers who ensure that the products are clean and properly displayed on the shelves. Darling wholesalers and other resellers also enjoy personalized service from their large team of marketing executives. Style Industries is also the pioneer of a hair salon loyalty program, known as Fidelity that recognizes the role of the hairdresser as an advisor and custodian of its brands to customer. The company is in partnership with the Nike Foundation which has seen the setup of a Micro franchisee project in Kenya to assist destitute girls in acquiring hair dressing skills to make them self-reliant. This has seen the company running three

training centers countrywide dedicated to training young destitute ladies who have dreams of being hairdressers but due to poverty, cannot raise the fees required for such training. The centers are located in Nairobi’s Industrial Area, along Likoni road, Mwingi Town in Kitui County and Rongo in Migori County. But all is not rosy, as the Managing Director laments that cheap imports have continued to ruin the market. He also hopes that the concerned regulatory bodies would be able to find solutions for dealing with the counterfeits’ menace as well as issues regarding trademarks. To further improve its regional brand presence, Style Industries is focusing its attention on countries in the sub-region; Uganda, Tanzania, Burundi, Rwanda and Ethiopia, where hair additions are not as popular compared to their Kenyan counterparts. “It’s a matter of awareness and we are working on it,” Mr. Saffideen concludes.

www.darlingkenya.biz ARDED FO R AW

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IN C

2012-14 R I EL IA BILIT Y - D

ST

Q U A LIT Y

TIO N

East Africa

VOTED ONE OF EA'S STRONGEST CONSUMER BRAND BY EXPERTS & CONSUMERS

Darling has been selected the strongest, most valuable and trusted brand in the women’s hair industry in East Africa.


THE MAKING OF MAGNETIC EMPLOYEES We came across the philosophy of open minds and magnetic employees in the 17th issue and many organizations would like keeping magnetic workers or players. They admire and try their best to lure magnetic personnel from other firms or competitors to their keep as a way of boosting their production capacity. Apparently, when this staffs join their firms or teams, they begin losing their attractiveness and many leaders wonder “what usually happens to them?” as they toil with meeting their heavily promised benefits. Here is a secret that has been the missing wisdom to this mystery - artificial magnets and personnel are made and destroyed by the same process. Let’s progress and see how magnets and magnetic employees come into being. A non-metallic rod is stroked by one pole (north or south) of a natural magnet from one end of the rod to the other. When the magnet reaches the second end, it is lifted up slightly and brought back to the initial point to repeat the same direction of stroking and with the same pole. This process magnetizes the metallic rod after several stroking and is commonly known as the “Stroking Effect.” With personnel, the stroking effect is achieved by walking the worker with a mentor. It’s the mentor that strokes the worker by his/her repeated, correctional and directional guidance hence producing a magnetic employee. The other method is called: “The Solenoid Effect.” A solenoid is a coil of wire with electric current flowing through it from one direction to the other. A non-metallic rod is passed through the coil from one end to

18

GS1 GATEWAY | FEB - APR 2014

By Ephantus Achebi. Enterprise Revolution Ltd P.O. Box. 100426 – 00101, Nairobi. Mobile: +254 721 705881 Email: ephantus.achebi@gmail.com

the other and the metallic rod gets magnetized. In our case, the solenoid represents a system or a class of knowledge; workers are taken through relevant trainings and get magnetized at the end of knowledge impartation. Now, the one similar thing about these artificial methods of making magnets is the maintenance of same direction: The direction of stroking the non-magnetic metal and the direction of electric current flow in the solenoid MUST be maintained for achieving results. Reverse or change the direction of electric current flow and that of stroking and you end up demagnetizing the metallic rod. This reveals to us that companies have different visions, thus differences in direction. When magnetic personnel are lured from one firm to the other, they are taken from that firms’ vision and brought into your firms’ vision. This result to change in direction (vision) the worker was functioning in and is the major contributor to demagnetization of personnel. It is only natural magnets that can never be destroyed; their magnetism is internal or inbuilt as opposed to artificial magnetic personnel whose magnetism is built from external conditions of solenoids, mentors, tutors or formal class room trainings. Their attractiveness or charm will always be lost when changes in vision or direction occur with the employee. Hence, companies should focus on building their own permanent or natural magnetic personnel by developing their internal skills or interpersonal values, organizational in-house values and employees inner response mechanisms to different events. The focus MUST be internal or

inbuilt as when a person changes in his/ her inner values, attitude, perception, knowledge, wisdom, response, integrity etc he/she affects the environment around the individual. Internal magnetism of personnel is developed by exposing the worker to experiences. An experience or experiential activity (like a specific task or problem to be solved) is designed with a specific learning focus in mind for the worker to go through or execute it. Then analysis of his/her performance is done while pointing out the enlightening aspects of what was done right and wrong. Workers are then taken through a focused reflection process in relating their learning to their daily duties at the workplace and personal life as various options of transferring the learned knowledge to the workplace being explored. This is the best way of making permanent magnetic personnel as the experiential activities are designed with a focused learning, full of fun and challenging for the learners to be entertained as they explore their creative and logical skills. It is the injected fun in these activities that makes the learning most memorable as workers learn from their own challenges, mistakes, natural consequences and successes. The science of Experiential Learning has been applauded as the best adult learning model due to the presence of experiencing (doing), reflection & application phases and I can’t resist suggesting it to any organization or institution that would like to permanently magnetize their employees.


By Eva Buyu

Her love for numbers is unexplainable but writing off bad debts and having to deal with the negative perception that folks have over accountants are her biggest challenges, Gateway Magazine spoke to Mrs. Beth Gakii Njoori, the company accountant, married with two children. Gateway Magazine (GM): How long have been working at GS1 Kenya Limited I am in my 12th year at the company exclusively in the accounts department. GM: What are your responsibilities/duties at the company? Reporting to the General Manager, GS1 Kenya, I am responsible for invoicing, receipting, preparation of management accounts, accounts’ reconciliation, company budgeting and payroll management. GM: What are your department’s highs and lows? The season from January to April is the busiest as GS1 Kenya’s members are renewing their membership while new ones are joining. Keeping tabs of more than 5,000 member accounts is not an easy job as it may seem. The low season runs from September – December as less people are renewing membership. GM: What do you enjoy doing during your free time? I love listening to gospel music and humming to some of these great songs. Though I am a mother, I also enjoy playing with my daughters; it lifts me up, rejuvenates my mind and of course puts a smile on me even on the dullest day. When I have some time, I take a long nature walk within where I live; a sure way to clear my head and meditate on life.

Beth Gakii Njoori, GS1 Kenya Accountant GM: What are you currently reading? The Bible – my current focus is the Book of Isaiah. It has a lot of encouragement in this walk called Life. GM: Who inspires you? Any role model/s? The First Lady of Kenya, Mrs. Margaret Kenyatta, clamor aside, she is very hardworking, selfless, caring and I like her voice; a commanding authority. GM: Do you ever get tired of numbers? Not really. I am fascinated by numbers and love working with them. It is my chosen career…numbers are me! GM: Is the accountancy profession all about money? Accountants know and possess much more knowledge than many folks assume. It is not about cash every other minute. I get involved in management issues, Management of Information Systems, Leadership and Entrepreneurship.

GM: What is your typical day like? I am an early riser; my alarm goes on every 5:00 a.m. Later, I see off the children to school before I set off to work, I am usually in the office by 7:30 a.m. where I start my office day with a Bible verse which I meditate upon before switching on my computer.

GM: What external challenges come with this job? Bank issues – when I have to figure and work out why a certain amount of money is not reflecting in the company account.

GM: How would you describe a rewarding day in the office? When I supersede my monthly targets and expectations, it is rewarding to my soul.

GM: Is accountancy such a great profession? This is a lovely and beautiful profession as this what I love doing. It is fulfilling and well-paying however one has to work hard to meet the set targets. Hard work means that the targets are achieved and superseded.

GM: If you were not an accountant what would you be doing? I love aeroplanes, when I was young my dream was to become an air hostess but this is where I landed. I always have an eye for entrepreneurship but that is a story for another day.

Final word: I thank all members for the never-ending support; the GS1 Kenya Board of Directors, my fellow colleagues and my lovely family who continue making my responsibility at GS1 Kenya an easy ship to steer.

GS1 GATEWAY | FEB - APR 2014

19


CLEANING

MAGIC Explore Magic’s Oxy-Bleach

Cleaning is as much of a science as it is an art. Since the 1920’s, chemists have long been dictating the technology and trends of cleaning to better consumer lifestyle. However, there have been limitations. While powerful cleaning products, like bleach, have emerged, the resulting effects on the body, clothes and the environment are detrimental. Similarly, the gentle enticing scents we have grown to enjoy have often been utilized to mask the foul odor of bacteria that are not otherwise disinfected. The era of modern cleaning is now upon us.Today, a multi-functioning cleaning product has emerged with the power to clean, bleach, deodorize, disinfect, and remove stains. My friends, I invite you to explore Magic’s Oxy-Bleach. Our chemists have finally devised an all-in-one cleaner for every household purpose. As a nonchlorine beach, Magic’s Oxy-Bleach is as safe for your hands and clothes as it is for the environment. Through a powerful, yet safe proprietary formula, Magic’s Oxy-Bleach can simultaneously clean, bleach (makes whites whiter and colors brighter without separating them), disinfect (mild to medium), deodorize and remove stubborn stains. Just one product for your laundry, toilet & pit latrine, floors, blocked drains and anything you can imagine. No longer will you need medicated soap to cure the rashes caused by bacteria in your clothes. No longer will your colors fade from harmful bleaches. We invite you to try the half kilo pack; we know you’ll be back for the five kilo pack soon enough. We encourage you to become a responsible global citizen and use your purchase decision to save our environment. Its’ Just Magic!

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GS1 GATEWAY | FEB - APR 2014


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Barcode VERIFICATION By Paschal Kasimu Once you have a bar coded product, you need to ensure the bar code scans first time, every time. Bar code verification involves having your bar coded product as it will appear in store. We test the bar code for compliance with GS1 Standards;we ensure your bar code is unique and assess things like size, colour, print quality, quiet zones, bar code height, location, and check digit calculation. Once we have tested the bar code, we will provide you a verification report. Verification is an important quality control tool, helping to ensure that the bar code on your product

scans with accuracy and speed at each point in the supply chain. When we do verification, we require the final product. The reason is that the final bar code is printed using different methods and media than the artwork so it will have different reflective properties. In the final product stage, the packaging may also affect the bar code. As part of retailers requirements GS1 need to measure and photograph the fully formed product, as it will be sold in stores. Verification ensures maximum efficiency in the manufacturing process, provides real quality control as you will be able to verify the output from your printer, minimize returned goods due to bad labels as well as increase customer satisfaction.

Kindly contact Paschal Kasimu paschal@gs1kenya.org to have your products verified.

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Get it right in barcoding

5.

By Dorothy Kwamboka

Barcoding has transformed value chain management and the ability to capture data automatically at every significant point in the chain enables faster and more efficient management. The accuracy of barcodes remains important because when a barcode fails to scan it adds cost to the trading process. At best, data has to be keyed in manually, and at worst customers may reject a complete consignment of goods, resulting in lost sales and possible financial penalties All barcodes represent data in a machine readable form. The different

Choosing the correct barcode for each level of packaging 1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

24

If the product is a consumer unit (it could be sold at a retail point of sale), use an EAN-13, UPC-A, EAN8 or UPC-E barcode to identify it If the product is a traded unit (a product that will not be sold at a retail point of sale), any of the GS1 bar codes may be used however, if bar codes are printed direct onto fiberboard packaging, ITF-14 symbols may need to be used If the traded unit could also be sold at a retail point of sale (for example, a box of 24 cans of beer), it must be barcoded with at least one EAN-13 or UPC-A at a magnification of at least 150% If EAN-13 or UPC-A symbols are printed on a traded unit, make sure that the packaging materials are of an adequate quality to allow for scannable symbols to be printed. The outer packaging of the traded unit must also obscure all the bar codes that appear on the products inside it If the traded unit has a short shelf life, say less than 42 days, use a GS1-128 bar code to encode the GTIN for the item and its expiry date. Most users will not be able to achieve a symbol of adequate quality unless they use print and apply labels or use white Kraft board as the substrate

GS1 GATEWAY | FEB - APR 2014

widths of bars and spaces in a barcode symbol represent different numbers or letters which can be decoded by a scanner. The data is then sent back to the appropriate computer system where it is recorded and used to prompt further action. Barcodes used at the retail point of sale represent a global trade item number (GTIN) which acts as a key to information held on a database. It is important that each GTIN correctly identifies the product and that the bar code representing this number can easily be seen and scanned successfully.

6.

7.

8.

If the traded unit has to be barcoded with extra information, such as a batch number or variant number, use aGS1-128 bar code to en code this information together with the GTIN If the traded unit is of variable measure, use a GS1-128 barcode, which will encode the measure (often the weight in kilograms) alongside the GTIN If pallets are being labelled, only GS1-128 bar codes must be used on the label.

Consumer units Scanners at the retail point of sale are designed to read EAN-13, UPC-A, EAN-8 and UPC-E bar codes so one of these symbols must be used. Most Kenyan producers will use EAN-13 bar codes on their products or EAN-8 bar codes for very small products. Barcode application rules include; 1.

Barcodes must be in the same location on all similar shaped products

2.

The barcode must be no closer than 8 mm to a seam or packaging fold

3.

The barcode must be on a flat or consistently curved surface

4.

The barcodes on consumer units must not be visible through the outer packaging

For small cylindrical products the bar code must be positioned (vertically ladder orientation), subject to the printing process and/ or the direction of print.

Changing the Barcode The barcode allocated to a consumer unit (an item that could be sold at a retail point of sale) must be changed when; 1.

The declared weight is different

2.

Extra product is provided free, for example 10% extra

3.

The name of the product changes, for example from Uji Mix to Uji Mix Sour

4.

The price that is pre-printed on the packaging is changed.

Numbers allocated to consumer units must remain unaltered when; 1.

A promotional offer is being advertised

2.

The undeclared weight changes by an amount that does not affect its handling within any supply chain

3.

A minor packaging change for example a different type of similar packaging material is in use.

Different numbers are required on outer cases (traded units or trade items that do not cross a retail point of sale retail point of sale) when; 1.

They contain different quantities of the same consumer unit

2.

The products inside the outer case have a new item number

3.

A promotion needs to be distinguished for ordering and in voicing purposes

4.

The packaging of the consumer units changes significantly, for example when a glass container replaces a plastic container.

Changes of number are required when the outer case needs to be distinguished from any other outer case. Changes in packaging material may affect the gross weight of the item even though all other aspects are unaltered. This weight change may affect the logistics processes involved in the product’s handling, so a different number is required.


governor the

Ksh 350 | Tsh 6,500 | Ush 10,500 | RWF 2,700 | US$ 4.5

County Focus | Business | Economy

December - January 2014 Edition 6

Mombasa County

Economy

Mombasa Port: the sleeping giant

Kenya’s tourism industry

Investment Strategic investments to spur growth

SME’s Managing business systems

Last word Lamu corridor opportunities

HASSAN

JOHO

Rebranding Mombasa’s Tourism County feature: Kenya’s beach destination

Business: Mohamed Hersi: Boosting greater gains in Mombasa

Travel: Turn back the sands of time at Fort Jesus

Entertainment: The art of carving at the akamba handicraft industry

December - January 2014 | www.thegovernor.co.ke

1

governor governor governor the

Ksh 350 | Tsh 6,500 | Ush 10,500 | RWF 2,700 | US$ 4.5

County Focus | Business | Economy | January 2014 | Edition 7

Monthly

Meru County

Meru vs. Missouri

10 reasons why you should invest in Meru

Urbanization

Monthly

Unlimited opportunities, endless possibilities

Case Study Mandera vs Arizona

Last Word

SME’s

MPs must keep to their docket

Tourism: The surprise package of the Mt. Kenya tourist circuit

Travel: Meru National Park

Case Study

Where people come

Konza City vs Silicon Valley

Last Word

KIVUTHA

Let the national government handle security matters

KIBWANA Towards sustainable healthcare and food security

ALI

Transforming Mandera into a strategic regional business hub

Economy: County has potential to fly from zero to hero

Entertainment: Born free in Meru

Makueni County

ROBA

Last word Kenya may need to borrow a leaf from the Cuban healthcare system

Excellence in County public service delivery County feature: Meru’s future lies in the cooperative movement January 2014 | the governor monthly

Monthly

| March 2014 | Edition 9

President Kagame’s tips

In your small business, your banker is Just a banker

MUNYA

Ksh 350 | Tsh 6,500 | Ush 10,500 | RWF 2,700 | US$ 4.5

County Focus | Business | Economy

Governors Summit

Mandera County

Metropolitan growth strategy, the missing link for prosperity

PETER

the

Ksh 350 | Tsh 6,500 | Ush 10,500 | RWF 2,700 | US$ 4.5

County Focus | Business | Economy | February 2014 | Edition 8

Case study

SPECIAL EDITION

the

County Feature : Kenya’s newest tourist attraction

Travel: A drive through the hills and valleys of Mandera

February 2014 | the governor monthly

1

Healthy Living: Hard feelings about soft drinks

1

Economy: Water sets the pace for county’s growth

March 2014 | the governor monthly

Historical Feature : The fascinating past of Makueni County

Tourism: Culture takes the place of beaches and wildlife

SME TALK: When passion dies, it’s time to find something new

1

KENYA’S PREMIER MAGAZINE ON COUNTIES AND DEVOLUTION PUBLISHED BY:


26

GS1 GATEWAY | FEB - APR 2014


CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY IN KENYA Why do these companies keep giving us free goodies? They must be making lots of profit from us the consumers.” This is a common question and self-answer heard among Kenyans of different walks of life. One will usually hear the statements in pubs, public transport (matatus), social gatherings and tea joints among rural and urban people alike. It would be interesting to find out how many Kenyans out there understand the concept and intent of executing corporate social responsibility (CSR) and how best they can utilize CSR opportunities to augment their socioeconomic development. CSR is a concept born of the premise that both for profit and not for profit organizations have various stakeholders whose different interests are affected one way or the other by an organization’s goals, operations or the behavior of its members. An organization’s managers for instance are more concerned and interested in the size and growth of the organization, its profitability, job security, social status, power and prestige. Business owners on the other hand have profitability of the organization as their primary interest. No wonder in business, the profit is simply called “the bottom line”. The community in which the organization operates will be interested in employment opportunities, increased economic activity, improved development and good environmental management. Stakeholders in an organization include employees, providers of finance, government, community and environment, consumers of the organization’s products and special interest organizations or groups. CSR demands that good corporate leadership and governance should therefore strive to maintain a balance between the organizational interests and those of stakeholders in order for the organization’s business to be conducted in a profitable and sustainable manner. This requirement transcends across both for profit and not for profit organizations whether public or private. A good example of abdication of CSR is the City Council of Nairobi, a public organization that has over many years continued to gravely pollute the environment through its unsuitable Dandora Refuse Dump Site and neglect to death of the Nairobi River. Cleaning the Nairobi River and translocation of the Dandora Site will cost Kenyans billions of shillings at the expense of other highly needed development. In the meantime, Kenyans living in the vicinity of the dumpsite and the environment in the city will have suffered irreparable damage due to long standing pollution. Even people as far away as Machakos and Kitui will be affected because they use water from the

28

GS1 GATEWAY | FEB - APR 2014

Athi- River, into which the polluted Nairobi River empties. If the City Council of Nairobi had taken its CSR seriously, citizens and the environment would have been saved the pain and cost of pollution through gradual improvements of the Council’s cleansing operations. Examples of good practice of CSR in the country abound, more so with for profit corporations, pioneered by those affiliated to American, European and Japanese multinationals. Companies in Kenya have taken to CSR with gusto in the last about five years improving staff welfare and work environment, embracing transparency and accountability in their business transactions, ethically improving profitability, selfregulation and implementing community development programs. However, it is the community component that is highly visible to most people and gives companies the much sought after enviable public image. Companies have been involved in various activities in sports, environment, health, education and training, the needy in society and even national leadership and governance. CSR therefore is not just a goodwill gesture by organizations wanting to look good to the public in order to hike their profits. It is a prerequisite for good corporate leadership and governance as well as sustained operation and profitability. CSR is in fact a corporate competitive marketing strategy that ensures high organizational and product visibility thereby branding the business as an organization that cares about its consumers, the community it does business with and other stakeholders. That is why in many cases, an organization will prefer to sponsor a CSR activity with one of the company’s products such as “Tusker Project Fame” or the “Dettol Heart Run”. Organizations require implementing partners for their CSR programs since the activities are often not within the company’s core competence. Many organizations such as the Kenya Commercial Bank (KCB), Safaricom and the East African Breweries have formed foundations to help them implement their respective CSR programs. Not all organizations may have the resources to set up foundations and in any case, successful CSR programs essentially have to have community implementing partners. Communities should therefore form their own credible structures to partner with organizations in their implementation of CSR projects and programs. Such structures include non-governmental organizations (NGOs), community based organizations (CBOs), women, youth and self-help groups, special interest groups such as environmental, HIV/AIDS, town

management committees and village development committees. Individuals could also form credible for profit CSR implementation organizations. CSR activities are likely to be more effective both to the target beneficiaries and the initiating organization when carried out either as high impact projects, timed or open ended programs than when done as one off events. Some organizations just carry out one time or many uncoordinated high media profile events erroneously believing that the members of the public will remember the events, hold the organization in high esteem and increase their business transactions with the company. Unfortunately, such events are a waste of resources because their impact is like a grass fire- quick, short-lived and quickly forgotten. They neither effectively benefit the organization nor the targeted beneficiaries. Programmatic CSR activities eventually cultivate loyal partners and a grateful clientele thereby developing a highly productive and sustainable relationship between the initiating organizations, partner donors both individual and corporate as well as beneficiaries in the community. Such a relationship should be the target of any organization with CSR programs. Good examples of such relationships are the Dettol Heart Run, Safaricom Marathon and the Rhino Charge where individual and corporate Kenyans as well as some foreigners book the activities in their diaries and set aside funds to participate. International government aid to developing countries has a component of CSR. However, because of the cold war era tendency of developed country governments to use aid as a political weapon, most people in underdeveloped countries did not realize when international aid changed mainly from being a political weapon to CSR. Current international aid from developed country governments to underdeveloped countries has three main components namely CSR, humanitarian and political. That however, is a topic for another day. In conclusion, CSR is not about free goodies. It is an effort by organizations to deploy their resources in a way that helps the organizations build a mutually productive and sustainable business relationship between them and the communities with which they do business. If well implemented, CSR is a win-win initiative for both the organization and the CSR beneficiaries. SOURCE :INFOTRACK EAST AFRICA LTD. http://infotrackea.co.ke).


GS1 welcomes these Organisations who have attained Membership as from DECEMBER 2013 to FEBRUARY 2014

BELLSOUTH TECHNOLOGY LTD

KRISTA VENTURES LTD

DEMBE TRADING ENTERPRISES LTD

PETE EMPRESAS

AHADI COMMODITIES

DOMINION MINERAL WATER COMPANY LTD

FRESH AQUA ENTERPRISES

AGRO IMPACT INNOVATIONS HOLDINGS

SCALES SERVICES LTD

MOIPEI SELENKEN QUARTLET

KILIMANJARO CARVINGS EXPORTS LTD

AGRO-CHEMICAL FOODS COMPANY LTD

BLUE ROOM COMPANY LTD

KIRINYAGA QUAILS & IMPROVED KIENYEJI CHICKEN

DENIM YARD COLLECTION

JOKA INVESTMENTS

FLAG FACTORY TWO LTD

NOWEGIAN SYSTEMS

H & L INVESTMENT KENYA LTD

GADPATH LIMITED

MILTON MEAT PRODUCTS

QUAIL KENYA LTD

EMMERDALE LTD

HOMES & NATURES

BASHAN HILLS ENTERPRISES

POINT OF GRACE INVESTMENTS

GERMAN DELI COMPANY LTD

STAR VISION BAKERS

ONE TWO ONE KENYA LTD

SAFI WATER LTD

LIZAK SUPPLIES

FLASHMAK KENYA LTD

EL PASO ENTERPRISES LTD

VICTORIA SANDS LTD

BROADOAK AGENCIES LTD

SUPER SWEETS LTD

EVERFRESH SHOP ENTERPRISES

MULA SHAH AGENCIES

GEL MAK ORCHARDS

THORNELINNK LTD

ZAWADI ONE STOP SHOP

BIOPHARMA LTD

NILKANTH OIL REFINARY LTD

JOVEM FOOD ENTERPRISES

SYNCHRONY INVESTMENTS LTD

DASTE ENTERPRISES

QUAILS KENYA LTD

RABBIT QUILL EMPIRE LTD

MARKI ENTERPRISES

GOODALL ENTERPRISE

KENEGG LTD

KAJUJU QUILS ENTERPRISES

GRASS INTERNATIONAL LTD

VALLEY VIEW MASTERS

PHYLLMMART PURPOSES

MERCYKIM INVESTMENT

GARFARM INVESTMENT

TAQ LTD

ISOGERO ENTERPRISE

AFRIGAM POULTRY FARM

NICE RICE MILLERS LTD

JAZIM GROWERS

BIG MEDIA MARKETING SERVICES

BETHEL CHRISTIAN GUEST HOUSE

GEM HONEY PRODUCERS CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY LTD

TUDA COMPANY LTD

BIG AND BEST BUSINESS CENTRE

TRIMAK INVESTMENTS

GS1 GATEWAY | FEB - APR 2014

29


ANGAZA BLOOMS KENYA LIMITED

SILVER LINE FARM LIMITED

KAMBAA TEA FACTORY CO. LTD

BELAN MERCHANDISE

TAMU MILLAS AND FOOD PRODUCTS

TIMIZA NUTS SUPPLIES

R.K. SHAH & BROS PHARMACEUTICALS LTD

MINYAKA FOOD PROCESSORS

THE NURSE AT HOME

EASY STEPS KENYA LTD

NYABENE ARITHU MILKING JELLY

FERRY GARDEN ESTATES

FRITOS LTD

JUAMLOH ENTERPRISES

ROGER LTD

MWANAINCHI FOODS

ELCIEM SERVICES

SITINA ENTERPRISES

PALOMA PRODUCTS

TABIBU CURES INTERNATIONAL LTD

MONTANA SUPPLIES

AD GLOBAL SERVICES LIMITED

KINSLEY HOLDINGS SUPPLIES LTD

JOYTIM INVESTMENTS

NOBEL ENTERPRISES LTD

TRADEX COMMODITIES LIMITED

EXCLUSIVE AFRICA TOUCH DESIGNERS

LISTER PHARMACEUTICALS LIMITED

META FARMS LTD

SCALINA HOME DÉCOR

JOKARI ENTERPRISES

RIDGEWAYS PARTNERS

REHAM ENTERPRISES

WISNA ENTERPRISES

BUNJUFRESH GROWERS AND EXPORTERS COMPANY LTD

SAFE EBERGY LIMITED

SEGA SUPPLIERS LTD

AMYLLAN INTERNATIONAL LIMITED

OCEANS GENERAL MERCHANTS LTD

JEFFWAM ENTERPRISES

KANDON SUPPLIES

PACK INGRIDIENTS E.A LIMITED

COFFEE NOVE INVESTMENT LTD

KISII WIMBI INVESTMENTS

JENTONICS ENTERPRISES

TEEKAY LIMITED

HYDROLIFE TECH LTD

SCRUMPTIOUS FOODS

NELMA MARKETING CONSULTANTS

JUNGLE ENERGY KENYA LIMITED

JAMII EDIBLE OILS LIMITED

SALWA KENYA LIMITED

MANU VENTURES LIMITED

SOUTHSEAS FOOD LIMITED

DAVREEN JUBILEE INVESTMENTS

AHMED NUREDIN ABDELLA

HAFRIKOM ENTERPRISES (E.A)

FOREST EDGE FARM KENYA LIMITED

KAWARE ENTERPRISES

DAKSHIN UGANDA LIMITED

JULI MULTI SUPPLIES

BONWA PRODUCTS

JENMA GENERAL SUPPLIES LTD

FINE SMART INVESTMENTS

MBA GROUP LTD

GITUE SPRINGS ENTERPRISES

VALUE QUEST AFRICA

COOLWISE DAIRY

MAKUYU EVERGREEN INVESTMENT

FUMBWE MULTISECTORIAL FARM (FMSF) LTD

SUMTEK GENERAL SUPPLIES

HARRIET GROUP OF COMPANIES LIMITED

SUEMIS FAM LIMITED

RAFIKI MILLERS LIMITED

UNIGEN AGENCIES AFRICA LIMITED

FOOD TRUCK OUTSIDE CATERING

DEWALLAH BUSINESS SYSTEMS

FARMING SOLUTIONS

SHETHIA INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS LIMITED

EMURQS LIMITED

ACTIVE BRANDS WORKS LIMITED

MUKTI LIMITED

LIMOONS ENTERPRISES

MYCHEZO LIMITED

FOOD ISOMETRY

ROBATO ENTERPRISES

USWAHILINI FOODS

ESCARPMENT SPRINGS MINERAL WATER

KARUSHI SUPPLIES

TANFAM IDEAL VENTURES

ALL ABOUT CATERING

FASAM LIMITED

RANSLEY COFFEE CO. LTD

CLEAN AND CLEAR WATER SERVICES

CHICO-CO INVESTMENTS

FARM MASTERS LIMITED

ICON SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

30

GS1 GATEWAY | FEB - APR 2014


The complimentary gateway magazine showcases various issues with the supply chain. We are currently expanding distribution beyond our more than 5,000 GS1 member Companies. With our wide distribution coverage, through aggressive direct marketing campaign, the GS1 Exhibitions, Seminars, Training and Conferences, we are now reaching thousands not only in Kenya but within the East African Region and beyond! We invite you to advertise in our next issue of this dynamic magazine at our subsidized rates below in order to enjoy this great marketing avenue.

Advertising rates for the Gateway Magazine valid for 2014/2015 Advertising Space

Rate for GS1 Members

Rate for Non- Members

Eighth Page Quarter Page

Ksh 30,000 Ksh 55,000

40,000 65,000

Half Page Full Page

Ksh 70,000 Ksh 120,000

80,000 130,000

Inner Cover Page

Ksh 150,000

160,000

• All costs Exclusive of 16% VAT • The above rates are for full colour advertisements. • All adverts should be saved in PDF, EPS, High Resolution Jpeg or CorelDraw.

Rate Card

For further information, please contact the us on +254 (20) 2319414/2385270 or email: dorothy@gs1kenya.org

GS1 GATEWAY | FEB - APR 2014

31


Gateway Issue 18  
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