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www.gs1kenya.org ISSUE 16 : August - October 2013

Traceability

in Manufacturing

+

Deluxe Food Industries Retail Management Solutions RETRAK Open Mind Entrepreneurship

Bhavesh Jakhariya Director, Deluxe Food Industries


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GS1 Gateway 2013


04 07 08 11 14 18 22 24 26

Celebrating 40 years General Manager's Message

Retail Management Solutions RETRAK Verification Deluxe Industries Omies Enterprises FAQ’s Barcodes Membership Open mind in Entrepreneurship

GS1 Gateway August - October 2013 ISSUE 16

EDITORIAL TEAM PROJECT LEADER CONSULTING EDITOR DESIGN & LAYOUT

: Dorothy Kwamboka : Munyiva Mutuku : ovakast

Gateway is published by GS1 Kenya, it’s distributed through out East Africa. Contributions are highly welcome. The editor reserves the rights to edit, amend or alter material in anyway deemed necessary. Comments and/or suggestions to be emailed to dorothy@gs1kenya.org © 2013 Gateway all rights reserved, and may not be reproduced in any manner, in whole or in part at all times. GS1 Kenya Allbid House, 2nd Flr, Wing C, Opp. ASL Packaging, Mombasa Road Tel: +254 20-231 9414/238 5270, 232 1927 Cell: + 254 71 012 2252, 73 596 5168 Fax : + 254- 20 - 2353520 email: dorothy@gs1kenya.org


Message From The Chairman

Hello,

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new reality is becoming the basis of uncertainty and volatility in the business environment. New paradigms in global supply and demand chains are shaking established business models and are focusing on all of us to rethink on the approach of existing standards. Researchers predict that the centre of gravity for consumers whose habits will change the markets will shift inexorably towards the developing world in general and due to the interdependencies, our region will invariably be under focus.

Mr. Sospeter Kioko Chairman, GS1 Kenya Board

There is a rise to seek knowledge and solutions on the Internet resulting in digital consumers, whose habits will change from the traditional business models and habits. The new consumers will challenge consumer packaged goods, companies and retailers in order to understand them more eďŹƒciently and exploit technology to connect with them more often. Dedicated as we are to the design and implementation of global standards and solutions to improve eďŹƒciency and visibility of supply and demand chains, it’s therefore critical to appreciate how these forces will change the supply chains. GS1 is fundamental especially through collaboration with all the users. There are robust, user generated scalable standards allowing companies in multiple sectors and industries save costs therefore making GS1 system of standards the most widely used supply chain standard in the world today. Our plan going forward as outlined in the Strategic plan is to increase the value of our system of standards so that our users are ready to meet the challenges of the future. We will count on the support of all members as well as collaborators to ensure that GS1 Standards improve the lives of humanity within and without the country. Our business model should be based on a win-win situation and continuous improvements on supply chain with the aim of lowering overall supply chain costs.

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I feel humbled and honored to chair an organization whose daily focus has such enormous potential impact on the improvement of everyday lives of our people I thank you all for the support you have given us as an organization and look forward to even more support in the future.

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General Manager’s Message

For over 40 years, GS1 has been bringing industries together to revolutionize the way they do business. As our fellow member organizations celebrate the 40th anniversary of the use of GS1 bar codes, GS1 Kenya joins the other GS1 global member organizations in celebrating one of the most widely used standards for identifying and tracking goods and services.

SAFETY

COLLABORATION

SUSTAINABILITY

You will ask me, why at 40? Whenever I make my routine visits to manufacturers in this country, they always link me to a debt collector. “He has come to collect the annual license fees again”, a whisper goes. I rarely get challenged by clients who keep the supply chain going. In fact, most of them do not even know how a bar code is composed. One day, one of my simple down to earth client asked me to explain the history of these dark bars on a light background and the importance of having these GS1 bar codes on to their product. So I promised to explain this in our next issue of the Gateway magazine. Once upon a time on 26th June 1974, to be more precise e to pass that at exactly 08.01a.m., it came a packet of Wrigley’s Juicy Fruit chewing gum was scanned and a beep was heard. This took place in Marsh supermarket in Ohio, USA. wson The shopper was Clyde Dawson and the cashier who made that first scan was Sharon Buchanan.. That was how a bar code came in place.

ODHIAMBO

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EFFICIENCY

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General Manager’s Message

the barcode story

celebrating

However in

Then came the introduction of GS1 128 for

1976, based on

logistics units, these bar codes include application

the original GS1

years

identifiers, which encode a more detailed product

barcodes, a 13 digit bar code was engineered

information such as batch number. Lot number, date of manufacturer/expiry etc.

allowing the identification system to go global. The UK had to wait until 1978, when the first product scanned was a box of Melrose teabags. Today that beep sounds five billion times a day.

With the world global focus into new ways towards a more safety and secure way of living and getting even better services, GS1 has not been left behind.

In Kenya, we were endorsed as a Member

We have a traceability system in place that uses the

Organization in 1999. All companies in this region

track and trace process, better and secure ways of

had to get their bar codes from GS1 South Africa

administering in healthcare such as the Barcode

who started using the standards in 1982.

at the point of care (BPOC) using GS1 standards,

Early this year (2013), we did a sample telephone call to companies operating in Kenya and the idea was to find out how many users fully understand

these and many others have slightly improved our lives. Today, you can track and trace your product and services using the GS1 standards.

the real uses and importance of this very important standard. The result was amazing and I will reveal this in the coming issue.

To summarize, The GS1 System of Standards enables visibility to identify, capture and share

The GS1 bar code briefly has measurable benefits such as higher invoice accuracy for manufactures, fewer out-of-stock for retailers, shorter lead time for warehouse operators and lower cost for

information about products, business locations, and more make it possible for companies to speak the same language, connect with each other and move their business forward.

distribution centers. IDENTIFY

CAPTURE

Different types of barcodes has since then been introduced such as the outer case bar code (GS1 ITF 14) in 1989. This type of bar code is mostly used on the outer cases such as

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cartons.

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On behalf of the board of directors and the entire GS1 Kenya staff wish to thank all the Kenya companies, especially the first 40 companies that have supported the presence of GS1 Standards here in Kenya since 1999. We owe it to you. Don’t miss the next issue where we will officially publish the first 40 companies to implement these standards in Kenya.

Asanteni sana.

SHARE


Retail Solution

Retail Management Solutions Your Labour Solution what happens? At such situations, the ongoing casuals should be guaranteed of their job security. RMS will sign a service level agreement with the relevant Authority to ensure that the terms and conditions of the contract are as required by all the parties. It is important to note that RMS will abide by the general labour laws that govern employment in Kenya. In addition, RMS is working closely with an Advocate of the High Court who is well versed with human resource, labor and union issues.

Ms. Hasina Ismail, RMS Country Manager

Recent human studies indicate that 61 per cent of Kenya’s top executives are outsourcing business functions and using up to 46 per cent more temporary or contractual sta. On the other hand, for some time, the outsourcing concept has predominantly been applied in the information technology (IT) ďŹ eld and in areas such as security and cleaning. Today, the concept continues to gain a footing in other sectors as some employers seek to outsource their recruitment and human resource function. Gateway Magazine caught up with Ms. Hasina Ismail, the Country Manager at Retail Management Solutions (RMS) as she delves into the general employee outsourcing concept from the company’s viewpoint.

How do you deďŹ ne outsourcing as? Outsourcing is the contracting out of an internal business process to a third party organization. The practice of contracting a business process out to a third party rather than staďŹƒng it internally is common in the modern economy. Outsourcing sometimes involves transferring employees and assets from one ďŹ rm to another but not always.

Briey tell us about RMS? RMS is a new business opening since we have realized that employers are ďŹ nding it diďŹƒcult to manage casuals. Generally, more and more companies are considering the option of outsourcing their casuals to HR ďŹ rms who will handle recruitment, payrolls, sta beneďŹ ts, industrial relations and government regulations as per the new laws. At RMS we deal with supplying and outsourcing of general labor. At the moment, our concentration is the retailers/supermarkets where we want to ensure that they have the right sta for general functions such as the security, shelf packers/pickers, lorry loaders, customer service agents, queue management agents, packers, trolley agents and chefs. RMS will interview and train them in readiness for the assignments. The concept has already been piloted at some retail shops.

Who else can seek the services of RMS? Anywhere where labor is needed; there are dierent sectors that could employ the services of RMS. These include the pharmaceutical, clothing and the general manufacturing industry. In cases where a company has been using casuals and your services are enlisted (at times throwing the casuals into some confusion)

RMS services are able to beneďŹ t all company sizes, from one employee to over 500. Ms. Hasina says the company will help businesses lower costs/ risks and protect them from the increasing number of employment rules and regulations that all companies need to abide by. If you are looking or planning to outsource in Kenya look no further that RMS. “Outsourcing will you to ooad work that in not part of your core business. It also saves money,â€? she adds.

Retail Management Solutions As businesses stretch to ďŹ nd solutions to increase revenue reduce expenses and enhance proďŹ tability, outsourcing continues to be one of the options available. Those charged with analyzing the beneďŹ ts vs. the costs of such an undertaking face the challenge of conducting research, remaining objective and ďŹ nding the best business solution. The survival and success of any business is dependent on 3 main factors: 1. Manpower 2. Sales and 3. The Managing of Risk and Losses (Shrinkage) Retail Management Solutions is a company that oers staďŹƒng solutions to all industries that have a general labor sta function within their organizational structure. Partnering with RMS assures that the general manpower is attended to in its entirety. This now allows you more leverage and concentration to increased sales and managing of risk and losses areas of your business. Further to this; you are now rendered more competitive in your industry as you will be in the position to channel your resources in increasing sales and reducing losses than your competitors. As an option, outsourcing often calls into focus the cost/beneďŹ t of such an undertaking. Before undertaking such an analysis, however, it’s critical to understand the underlying reasons that outsourcing is under consideration. Is it to reduce costs? Improve processes? Allow HR to focus on more strategic issues? Being able to objectively answer these questions is a good start into the journey of outsourcing. The following list indicates the most common reasons cited. t*NQSPWFCVTJOFTTNFUSJDT tNBLFVQGPSSFEVDFETUBĂľ t-BDLPGJOIPVTFUBMFOUFYQFSUJTF t"MMPX)3UPGPDVTPOTUSBUFHZ t*NQSPWFTFSWJDFEFMJWFSZ t3FEVDFTUBĂľSFMBUFEFYQFOTFT t"MMPXGPDVTPO$PSFCVTJOFTT t4USFBNMJOF)3'VODUJPO t*NQSPWFTUBUVUPSZDPNQMJBODF These objectives suggest a transformation thought process with regards to outsourcing, however in many cases only transactional activities are eliminated. At Retail Management Solutions, we place all emphasis on the critical areas by means of industry skilled knowledge and skilled project managers that stay with the project through its life cycle helping our clients realize more beneďŹ ts and also continuously and consistently adapting the relationship where necessary or as external factors change.


RETRAK

The Retailers’ Association Business And Trade Associations

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usiness and trade associations are mutual assistance organizations formed for the purpose of promoting growth and progress in their particular industries by providing a central information source about the industry and its issues, establishing best practices guidelines, lobbying with local and state government, and promoting the image of the industry through licensing, membership standards and public service advertising. Associations differ from one to another depending on the objectives and purpose they are established for and the benefits their members or stakeholders acquire from them. Most business and trade associations are not-for-profit corporations; formed as informal clubs and do not collect money.

One of the newly registered associations is Retail Traders Association of Kenya (RETRAK) which seeks to fill in on some of the existing gaps and address the wholesale and retail sector challenges through one common platform. Bobby Gadhia, the Chairman of RETRAK explains that the association is the sector’s central body representative comprising of various stakeholders. “RETRAK is the sector’s advocate and seeks solutions for the numerous issues within and out of the sector,” he explains. Its objectives are;

To be a central representative body putting views of retail trade companies to Government departments and agencies, Parliament and other relevant organizations. To be a research and policy analysis center, aggregate and publish statistics, and to provide analysis on retail trade and other relevant market information. To be a technical center providing commentary, guidance and advice on all legal and other regulatory developments of relevance to the retail trade sector. To provide a forum for the exchange of non-competitive information by articulating retail trade concerns.

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Mr. Gadhia says RETRAK is planning to roll out a massive recruitment drive. Already the association has attracted membership from the supermarkets’ fraternity as it further seeks to recruit more members; those operating and employed in shops and supermarkets, those in telecommunication and electronic consumer goods’ businesses, airtime dealers as well as those in the clothing and other related accessories but not only limited to these.

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One of its recent notable activity was the ‘Chomoa Coins’ campaign. Towards the end of November 2012, the Central Bank of Kenya partnered with key stakeholders such as the Kenya Bankers Association (KBA) and RETRAK among others, to promote the re-circulation and use of coins. Formed in 2012 spearheaded by GfK Retail and Technology East Africa, a Nairobi based research company, Mr. Gadhia reveals that RETRAK is

Bobby Gadhia Chairman, RETRAK

also seeking to tackle the controversial plastic paper research by the National Environment Managemen (NEMA), the United Nations Environment Programme the Kenya Institute for Public Policy Research and Analy indicates that 100 million plastic bags are handed out Kenya by supermarkets alone, the vast majority dest up in the environment, clogging sewers and drains, p posing a danger to marine life and causing death to live inadvertently consumed. The report further suggested bans the common plastic bag that one gets at the till levy on other plastic bags, to combat the country's en problems stemming from the bags' popularity. In 2007, the government banned the use of very thin (up to 0.06 millimeters thick) commonly used by gro Controversy aside, RETRAK is seeking ways to put an en through a drastic approach. “The association through i is consulting on how to handle the issue as we seek to re-cycling and re-using among consumers,” Mr. Gadhia Pilferage or stock shrinkage is another issue that RETRA


Retail Association

working to reduce. According to industry insiders, with the formal retail trade market estimated to be worth more than KShs. 200 billion, it could well be losing more than KShs. 3 billion annually to shoplifters among other shrinkage avenues. Beyond surveillance systems, retailers are of the opinion that there is need to review existing laws to make them more punitive both for shoplifters and employees tried under theft by servant clauses. “We want to lobby the government to pass punitive laws to discourage shoplifting,” he reveals. At the same time, RETRAK seeks to pass a motion that will see members share their employees’ database aimed at discouraging ‘recycling’ of employees blacklisted with vices such as shoplifting. RETRAK is also seeking to address a brewing row between retailers, the Kenya Copyright Board and Music Copyright Society of Kenya with regards to playing music as well as collection of royalties. With all formal systems is place, Mr. Gadhia notes that RETRAK is geared to work for the betterment of the retail sector.

“According to industry insiders, with the formal retail trade market estimated to be worth more than KShs. 200 billion, it could well be losing more than KShs. 3 billion annually to shoplifters among other shrinkage avenues.”

Holdings (Treasurer), Mr. John Wanjohi of Hippora Business Solutions (Ass. Treasurer), Mr. John Muthee of GfK (Secretary), Mr. Willy Kimani of Naivas Supermarkets and Ms. Hasina Ismail of Hippora/ Retail Management Solutions handing the association’s public relations issues and Mr. Madhav Bhalla of Taibjee & Bhalla Advocates as the Legal Officer.

RETRAK’s executive committee is comprised of Mr. Bobby Gadhia of PC World (Chairman), Mr. Anil Dhingra of Ukwala Supermarkets (Vice Chair), Mr. Sameer Shah of Nakumatt

r en me aly ut st p ve ed ill en

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n gro en hi to ia RA

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Technical

The Ideal Colour Combination is Black Bars on White Background Other Suitable Colour Combinations: Dark Bars :

Blue / Green / Purple

Light Bars

:

Red / Orange / Yellow

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COMING SOON

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Technical

Verification By: Paschal Kasimu, IT / Verification Executive

A

barcodes primary function is that of carrying data from the point at which it is originated to the point at which the data has to be captured. So a barcode is a vital link in the data communication chain of any application. If it fails, the chain breaks.

You therefore need to bring samples for every run of packing material to GS1 Kenya for verification and also note that we have designed special yearly rates for verification.

A barcode which does not scan often causes more problems to trading partners than no symbol at all. Verification of barcodes is, therefore a useful tool to add to quality control procedures in order to ensure that the barcodes will scan correctly throughout the supply chain. Verification aims to check that the symbol is able to fulfil its function, by performing two principal tasks: Enabling the symbol producer to measure his output and to apply feedback in order to control his process; Predicting the scanning performance likely to be achieved by a symbol

What Is A Verifier? A verifier is a precision instrument that is made to predict how well the bar code will be read by the typical scanner, any bar code scanner. It should decode, measure and check formatting of even the most inferior symbol and indicate areas that are deficient so that corrective action may take place. Barcode Verification is the most certain way to ensure that you are printing good barcodes. In today´s world we cannot find a single product without a barcode associated with it. Bar Codes are the least expensive and reliable way of entering data. Barcode Verification is the best way to ensure 100% scannability.

Verification aims to check that the symbol is able to fulfil its function

616411 0

GS1 Gateway 2013

Verification should be done to ensure that any faulty bar codes do not enter the system to avoid faulty scanning. If a bar code does not scan at all then the data has to be entered manually thus increasing the risk of making mistakes and amount of time taken which may cause bottlenecks or may even stop critical applications.

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Barcodes in Business

How GS1 Standards could lead to Success in Business The GS1 Standards are able to bring success to your business by delivering the right solution to overcome business challenges by; Improving Supply Chain Efficiency Ensuring Product Security and Consumer Safety Enabling Sustainable Supply Chain Automating business and saving on costs: GS1 uses Electronic Data Interchange (eCom) to provide global standards for electronic business messaging which allow rapid, efficient and accurate automatic electronic transmission of agreed business data between trading partners. Business which employ eCom are able to automate transaction processes such as orders, dispatches, shipping , receiving, invoicing thus improving speed and accuracy in the exchange of information and eliminating costly errors and duplication.

Saving further costs by improving the quality of the data shared: The GS1 Global Data Synchronization Network provides a single and reliable source to upload and share product attribute information, thus contribute to the elimination of errors and facilitate the process of data exchange. Improving consumer confidence by tracking and tracing the origin of raw materials and fresh produce: GS1 Standards allow companies to follow-up on their products throughout the value chain, in particular through the process described by the Global Traceability Standard. Ensuring secure recalls of defective products or unsafe food by using GS1 Standards to identify products and exchange recall notification between trading partners.

Increasing customer satisfaction through better inventory management: GS1 Standards help in providing better accurate inventory views, ensuring reduction in inventory all along the value chain, as well as on-time delivery and increasing product availability at the point of sales.

Reducing carbon footprint and wasted resources in the supply chain: GS1 Standards allow the reduction of inefficiencies in multiple areas; paper trails in orders/deliveries/invoices’ processes, unnecessary returns due to miscommunication between partners or discrepancies in data, food spoilage.

Reducing costly shrinkage: GS1 DataBar symbols can carry more information and identify small items than the current EAN/UPC allowing companies to track produce, manage sell-by-date and reduce food spoilage creating solutions to support product authentication and traceability for fresh food products and couponing.

Lastly, Barcodes lead to an annual saving of 5.64 percent of retail revenue. These savings are related to the reduction in time at the checkout, fewer errors, better use of the cashier operators’ time, the increased in sales due to better customer service, better tracking of stocks and store flows and the reduction of unknown markdowns.

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Supply scales to the Retail industry including Barcoding PRICE COMPUTING SCALES LABEL PRINTING SCALES RECEIPT PRINTING SCALES HEAVYDUTY RECEIVING PLATFORM SCALES POS CONNECTING SCALES BARCODING LABELING SCALES Weighing solutions at: Engineering Development Ltd

Tel: +254 703 55 77 64, 0733 55 77 64 email: engdev@africaonline.co.ke


Cover Story

Bhavesh Jakhariya Director

Deluxe Food Industries Deluxe Food Industries continues to wade off the ever rising market competition to remain relevant in a market saturated with both informal and formal food processors

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s a world food, potatoes are second in human consumption after rice. In Kenya, potato ranks as the second most important food crop after maize. Various published research, the potato crop is the second most important staple crop in the country boasting a national farm-gate value of over KShs. 5 billion and a retail value of KShs. 10 billion. This sub-sector employs over 2.5 million Kenyans as farmers, market agents, transporters, food industry, agrobusinesses, and sellers of finished food products.

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Furthermore, the statistics indicate that 73.9 percent consume potato crisps on average once a week. Other than gender, the frequency of purchasing crisps is also influenced by factors such as occasions, seasons and availability of money. The crisps come in various flavors-plain, barbecue as well as cheese and onion.

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On the other hand, many a Kenyan; those of the Indian descent and the general lovers of snacks are familiar with chevdo or chevra; also referred to as Bombay Mix in the United Kingdom and Ireland. Chevra often consists of waste potato pieces, fried lentils, peanuts, chickpea flour noodles, corn, vegetable oil, flaked rice and fried onion with some sugar sprinkled in or flavored with salt and a blend of spices that may include coriander and mustard seed. This traditional Indian food can be eaten as part of a meal; as a standalone snack, though, it is usually consumed with the hands

These are just some of the products that Deluxe Food Industries Limited has been processing and packaging over the last two decades. Tucked off the busy Enterprise Road in Nairobi’s Industrial Area, Deluxe Food Industries continues to wade off the ever rising market competition to remain relevant in a market saturated with both informal and formal food processors. “There are over 20 crisps brands in the market but Yankee Doodle has remained strong and is still doing well in the market,” explains Bhavesh Jakhariya, one of the company’s directors. Other than crisps and chevda, the company processes and packs groundnuts/peanuts, Ghathiya/Ghatia; crunchy and spicy deep fried strands made from gram flour dough, popcorns and cashew-nuts. The company also packs various culinary spices. The use of packed spices has over time increased as a result of modern households evolving to appreciate the value added to cooked food through spices and herbs. Kenyan dishes use a variety of spices such as chilies, garlic, ginger, cloves, pepper and turmeric. Mr. Jakhariya notes that all the spices and seasonings packed in 50 and 100 grams bottles and pouches are aimed at a wide cross-section of consumers who prefer fresh, natural, hygienically prepared quality spices sourced from well-known and reputed regions of the world.


Deluxe Food Industries has further diversified into the packing of grains such as green grams, black beans, beans as well as raw groundnuts pop-corn. “Every day we are able to pack up to to 500 kilograms of crisps, groundnuts and cashew nuts. Our factory has a capacity of processing and packing up to three tones daily,” he explains. Business as Usual Deluxe Food Industries has defied all odds to remain focused on its business. Mr. Jakhariya is quick to point that the myriad business challenges that entrepreneurs face have not pinned them down whatsoever. “Issues such as security and other operating challenges remain just ‘challenges’ and we have no control over them,” he adds To keep up with the market demand, the company has invested in what he terms as a laminated polythene bag which ensures freshness of the products. At the same time, Deluxe Food Industries has entered into various contracts with farmers to ensure that they always have a rich supply of the raw materials. “We are also KEBS (Kenya Bureau of Standards) certified with regards to the quality and hygiene of our products,” he adds. Mr. Jakhariya notes that the Yankee Doodle brand is among the few products whose presence is in the upcountry towns boasting of up to 60 percent of the market share. This, he says has been made possible thanks to investing in a reliable transport and distribution system as well as salesmen. In addition, the use of barcodes on their products has made it easy for supermarkets where the products are present to scan accurately. The Yankee Doodle brand of products are available in all leading local retail chain of supermarkets; Nakumatt, Tuskys, Uchumi, Naivas and Ukwala.

Otherr than n crisp ps and d che evda a, the e co ompa any proce esses and packss grou undn nutss/pea anutts, hiya/G Ghatia a; cru unchy and d spiicy deep p Ghath KZTH HKLMYYVTN NYHT TÅV\ \YKV V\NO O MYPLKZZ[YHUK popc corns and cashe ew-nutts. The com mpan ny also packss vario ous cu ulinarry sp picess.

Recent long-term studies have linked potato chips/crisps as the greatest contributor to weight gain while the starch in potato chips is known to cause tooth decay. Some potato chip companies have responded to the criticism by investing in research and development to modify existing recipes and create health-conscious products. Mr. Jakhariya says the opportunity to diversify into arrow roots, cassava and banana crisps will be dependent on the demand from consumers.

GS1 Gateway 2013

Mr. Bhavesh displaying his products

Mr. Bhavesh at the factory with his staff

Mr. Bhavesh at the factory warehouse located in Industrial Area, Nairobi.

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Healthcare

Global Standards

Could Help Save Thousands Of Lives And Billions Of Ksh. Each Year

G

lobal Standards could be a critical enable to improving the safety and quality of patient care in a cost eective way. The analysis shows that these standards have greater potential to improve care and save resources if they are truly global and adopted by all stakeholders. Including manufacturers, distributors, wholesalers, pharmacies and providers. Universally accepted methods for identifying products and locations and exchanging data could enable organizations to share vital information along the entire value chain, eliminating today’s broad array of custom data conďŹ gurations, while improving compatibility and interoperability, reducing redundancy, preventing mediation errors, enhancing visibility, and enabling seamless, automated information exchange among supply chain partners. The â€œďŹ ve Rightsâ€? are the cornerstone of safe medication practices. A complete and uniform deďŹ nition for the â€œďŹ ve Rightsâ€? does not exist, but healthcare practitioners generally understand the essential meaning in the following way: 1. Right Patient: The patient’s identity must be veriďŹ ed against the prescription to ensure the right patient is receiving treatment 2. Right Medication : The provider must verify the right medication is used 3. Right Dose: The right dose should be conďŹ rmed against the prescription

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4. Right time: Medications should be given at the right time and

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5. Right Route: Medications that can be given in the dierent ways, such as intramuscularly or intravenously, must be given via the right route Global Standards could enable industry-wide applications and processed that support the ďŹ ve rights, improving patient safety and supply chain eďŹƒciency:

t #FTJEF TDBOOJOH #FGPSF BENJOJTUFSJOH NFEJBUJPOT  DBSFHJWFST DPVME scan barcodes on medications, patient wristbands, and their sta ID badges to conduct an automated ďŹ ve rights checks. This simple process could eliminate thousands of errors and help prvent the sue of expired and recalled medication and medical devices. t5BSHFUFEGVMMSFDBMMBENJOJTUSBUJPOBOBVUPNBUFEEBUBDBQUVSFQSPDFTT at mediation dispensing points and operating rooms could use unique identiďŹ ers. Pharmacists, operating room sta, and caregivers could record the production identiďŹ ers associated with medications and medical devices administered to each patient. In the event of a recall, providers could promptly identify and contact each patient who received the product and remove every recalled product from inventory. t 5SBDFBCJMJUZ PG NFEJDBM EFWJDFT  TVQQMZ DIBJO QBSUOFST DPVME VTF barcodes to track medical devices through the supply chain according to their risk category, and for the appropriate class of products, full traceability of medical devices could further enhance the processing of recalls and facilitate inventory management. t .FEJDBUJPO SFDFJQU BVUIFOUJDBUJPO %JTUSJCVUPST  QIBSNBDJFT BOE hospitals could use barcodes to track and validate all medications against data from manufacturers and potentially other supply chains points, making it signiďŹ cantly more diďŹƒcult for counterfeit and compromised products to each patients. t*OWFOUPSZNBOBHFNFOUDPMMBCPSBUJPO%JTQFOTJOHQPJOUT EJTUSJCVUPST and manufacturers could seamlessly exchange medical device or medication usage, location and product availability information. Inventory planning and forecasting programs could analyze the data to optimize inventory levels, improve medication and medical device availability across the supply chain, and ensure that medical products are available at critical moments of treatment. t 5SBOTBDUJPO BVUPNBUJPO QSPDFTTFT BOE TZTUFNT DBO CF BVUPNBUFE  eliminating most of today’s manual data entry, validation and correction, medication and medical device administration could be captured through barcode scanning and automatically fed into logistics , billing and procurement systems that connect all stakeholders, including payors and registries.


Traceability

GS1 and Traceability By: Corazon Baraza Traceability & Training Executive

Traceability is a system of tracing back and tracing forward the movement of goods, services or business processes all along the supply chain. There is need for consistent traceability solutions spanning the full supply chain regardless of industry sector or country.

The GS1 standards to be used will be the GTIN, SSCC, GLN and GS1-128. Why this standards?- because they will enable unique identification of a traceable item, describe the establishment of appropriate and effective records of events and provides for accurate communication about the traceable item between trading partners. With this we shall be able to track forward and trace back at any point along the full supply chain no matter how many trading or traceability partners and business process steps are involved.

Why us? Be it for quality management, inventory management, safety or regulatory reasons, organizations require traceability solutions all along the supply chain. Using the GS1 Global Traceability Standards it enables interoperability between traceability systems across the supply chain while accommodating specific business, industry sector or regulatory requirements. Target audience Our target audience is traceability in the food industry, healthcare and transport and logistics. In a world where consumers are becoming more insightful, organizations are under more pressure to innovate and address the increasing demand from consumers and legislators. There is a need for traceability and GS1 has the standards to implement the traceability process regardless of industry or business process.

GS1 Gateway 2013

W

ith GS1 we shall provide a single traceability process for trade items using the GS1 system standards that will meet compliance needs. The intention is to create a framework that is expected to be used by any business in any industry sector. We shall issue a process standard describing the traceability process independent from the choice of enabling technologies. Our implementation guidelines will take into consideration the scope and traceable item hierarchy specific to the business needs.

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Entrepreneurship

Small Fish Big Business At the Lake Victoria region, the fisheries industry continues to play a very important role in terms of employment and nutrition. Here, among the most important commercial fish species is Rastrinobola argentea; Luo for Omena-a type of a fish many a Kenyan will easily identify.

M

ost fish are low in fat and cholesterol and a good source of protein, making them a good choice for a healthy diet. In addition, fish is a good source of Vitamin B, able to convert food to energy in cells and also help to build healthy nerve tissue.

GS1 Gateway 2013

At the Lake Victoria region, the fisheries industry continues to play a very important role in terms of employment and nutrition. Here, among the most important commercial fish species is Rastrinobola argentea; Luo for Omena-a type of a fish many a Kenyan will easily identify.

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Omena is a small 2-inch silvery, sardinelike fish usually sold dried. Omena plays a significant role in the livelihood of more than four (4) million people in terms of employment, income and nutritional needs – making it an important contributor to the regional lakeside economies and lifestyles. According to the Kenyan Ministry of Fisheries Development, the value of the Omena fishing industry in East Africa is a whopping US$ 200 million when both the local and export sales values are considered.

Omena, though a common delicacy among the Luo community, the culture of serving this fish continues to spread to the urban centers due to its food value. When cooked properly, Omena makes a very great accompaniment for Ugali while served with some vegetables leaving one licking their fingers after the meal. Ugali, also sometimes called Sima in Swahili is a dish of maize flour (cornmeal) cooked with water to a porridge- or dough-like consistency. It is the most common staple starch featured in the local cuisines of the Eastern African Great Lakes region and Southern Africa. Anita Kilunda is one such entrepreneur whose livelihood depends on the Omena trade. While many of the entrepreneurs have ventured in the trading of sun-dried ready to cook Omena, Mrs. Kilunda has opted for

deep fried Omena under her company Omies Enterprises. “Initially, my sister (Sheila Oyugi) was trading in deep fried Omena on a casual and informal which was indeed very unique,” she explains. With her eyes cast on making this a lucrative venture, Mrs. Kilunda quit formal employment, teamed up with Ms. Oyugi and registered Omies Enterprises in February 2012, went ahead to obtain the all-important Health and Safety Certification required by anyone trading in foodstuff. “We also got the Kenya Bureau of Standards (KEBS) Standardization Mark, a mandatory product certification scheme for locally manufactured products provided for under section 10 of the Standards Act Cap 496, Laws of Kenya as well as a Barcode from GS1 Kenya, another vital requirement for anyone wishing to have his goods at the supermarket level,” she explains. Since then, Omies Enterprises has not turned back. Mrs. Kilunda explains that

Omena is said to boost immunity among those suffering from various chronic illnesses and is also a source of Calcium for the formation of bones and teeth especially for toddlers


Currently the deep-fried Omena is sold in packets of 150 and 300 grams. Mrs. Kilunda is categorical that this type of pre-cooked product is not only unique but also gaining momentum. Generally, pre-cooked packaged foods are not new at the retail stores. Today, entrepreneurs have ventured in areas that make it easy for many a Kenyan who do not need or want to avoid the hassles that come with meals’ preparation. On the supermarket shelves but under refrigeration, one can find pre-cooked Chapatti, Peas, Beans and Maize as well as a combination of Beans and Maize popularly known as Githeri. With an 8-months shelf life, Mrs. Kilunda notes that the deep fried Omena is easy to prepare. One can enjoy them as they are or add some ingredients to make them tastier. This includes further frying them in some Onions and Tomatoes. The product is currently available in the various local retail stores mainly located within the city’s residential areas. Omies Enterprises seeks to penetrate into the larger retail stores based on the substantial traffic they boast of. She notes that the smaller retail stores have in a way contributed to the popularity of the product. “We are also able to do deliveries to clients not within reach of the product,” she says. Generally, the dried Omena product has various advantages over other fish species because of its long shelf life, divisibility into smaller portions (making it affordable) and its high nutritive value. Omena is said

to boost immunity among those suffering from various chronic illnesses and is also a source of Calcium for the formation of bones and teeth especially for toddlers Challenges Mrs. Kilunda notes that while getting into the Omena business requires a relatively lower start-up capital compared to all other Lake commercial species Omies Enterprises is faced with the daunting task of marketing its product to a more potential clientele. “Omena’s nutritive value speaks for itself but we still have to convince the doubting Thomases,” she adds. Secondly, the ever fluctuating prices of cooking oil as well as transport costs coupled with delays in the arrival of the product from the Lake-side further pose major challenges to the business. The company is seeking to increase the popularity of the product not only through retail stores but also in areas such as hospitals which she admits requires a lot of nutritional education. That aside, Omies is also in the process of setting up a physical office as well as acquire a sizeable store which could minimize the back and forth transportation of Omena from Kisumu to Nairobi as demand continues to rise.

GS1 Gateway 2013

unlike sun-dried Omena which do not require thorough cleaning, a detailed process of cleaning the fish before they deep-frying is key. “Even before undergoing the latter processes; cleaning and deep frying, the Omena is also dried for about 20 minutes once from the Lake,” she adds. Afterwards, only liquid cooking oil is used and later on the product is ready for transportation to Nairobi where packaging and distribution is done.

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6 Members networking during the cocktail 7 Members dancing during the cocktail 8 Members networking during the cocktail 9 Kayamba fiesta group entertaining members during the cocktail 10 Members dancing during the cocktail

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GS1 Gateway 2013

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21


FAQs

FAQs for Bar Codes Answers to your most common questions What is a bar code? A bar code (also barcode) is a machine-readable representation of information in a visual format on a surface.

Are all Barcodes Unique numbers?

Originally Bar Codes stored data in the widths and spacing’s of printed parallel lines, but today they also come in patterns of dots, concentric circles, and hidden within images. Bar codes can be read by optical scanners called barcode readers or scanned from an image by special software.

Are the description and price of the item included in the barcodes?

Yes. All Barcodes are unique.

Bar codes are widely used to implement Automatic Identification & Data capture (AIDC) systems that improve the speed and accuracy of computer data entry.

Generally no. the barcode represents the number that simply identifies the item uniquely. All the information about a product is held in a computer database. By scanning the barcode, this information (also description and price) may be retrieved from the database.

Becoming a GS1 member and obtaining a GS1 When you need a bar code number, you must contact a GS1 kenya for (log in: HYPERLINK “http://www.gs1kenya.org” www. gs1kenya.org).after subscription, we will provide you with a GS1 Company prefix and a list of barcodes for the products to be barcoded.

What is the GS1 bar code commonly used for trade item The EAN-13 is the most widely used for trade item identification.

Can the GS1 System be used to support internal applications? The encoded barcode is composed of: – Issued by the GS1 Kenya to a user company Item Reference – each item will receive a different item reference, , according to the variations of model, colour, size, fragrance, weight, presentation, etc Check Digit – Ensuring the integrity of the number, it is calculated according to the GS1 Check Digit Algorithm.

The main benefit of the GS1 System for trade items is that it provides a unique and unambiguous identification number for every trade item, which is applicable worldwide in open environments. In addition, the system provides for other number series that may be exclusively used for restricted distribution e.g. Company internal use, National use

For high quality and maximum efficiency in all kinds of commercial printing...

Colourprint Ltd. P. O. Box 44466 - 00100 - GPO, Nairobi, Kenya. Tel: 2101740 / 2101741 / 2101742 info@colourprint.co.ke | www.colourprint.co.ke “Producing New Impressions of Excellence”

GS1 Gateway 2013

Year after Year Our second and third Impressions are as good as the first

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Magazines ‹ Annual Reports ‹ Catalogues ‹Newsletters ‹ Flyers ‹Brochures ‹ Posters ‹ Wall, Table and Shipping calendars ‹ Note Pads ‹ Desk Diaries ‹ Book printing ‹ Labels.


Inventory

Inventory Control as a major challenge to retailers The Rise and Success of Retailers by use of Barcodes

B

arcodes are (everything in business) the ubiquitous business standards used, (with GS1 barcodes as the world’s most familiar business standard) for the visual capture of information at retail point of sale and in business, and other supply chains. Barcodes are used regularly by consumers when scanning items at supermarket checkouts. But the barcode is far more than this. GS1 barcodes and related standards have become indispensable tools for the management of global supply chains, providing previously unimagined transparency about the location and progress of goods and materials. It plays an essential role in the safe and effective delivery goods and services.

GS1 KENYA IN PARTNERSHIP WITH SME RETAILERS After contacting and visiting SME retailers, among others, I noted that there have been weak private adoption incentives, especially when standardization lowers barriers to entry, the challenge of coordinating change across the industry, and an apparent cultural bias against investment that cannot be justified by an immediate impact on the bottom line. Instituting an effective use of GS1 barcodes in the inventory control system can give a company a boost in competitiveness and translate into a heftier bottom line. It is therefore necessary for all products on the shelves to be barcoded. This include: own packaged commodities like sugar, rice, cereals and other own purchased products which may not come with barcodes. However retailers are encouraged to advise all their suppliers to acquire their own barcodes from GS1 so that all goods received at the purchasing department have barcodes. Advantages of barcodes to retailers t An accurate efficient source of sales data t Save cost by automating business processes t Few products out of stock t Faster, more efficient service at POS t Accurate pricing without human intervention t No missing or illegible price tags t No in-house barcode & no Sharing of barcodes t Ensure better inventory t Reduce costly shrinkage Manufacturers and suppliers also will experience among others the following: t Automated counting & sorting of products t Retailers globally will accept your products t Improve product planning-Just in time t Ability to track products through manufacturing and delivery t Ability to obtain real sales data t Provide safe products to consumers

Gerald Nyamboga, Barcode Executive.

GS1 Bar codes provide a rapid, accurate, and efficient means to collect, process, transmit record and manage data in a variety of industries. This include: Retail, package delivery, warehousing and distribution, manufacturing, health care, Asset tracking, and point-of-service applications. A barcode is described as an “optical Morse code”. Series of black bars and white space of varying widths are printed on labels to uniquely identify items. The barcode labels are read with a scanner, which measures reflected light and interprets the code into numbers and letters that are passed on to a computer.

These are just a few examples to get you started thinking about what you can do with bar codes. Barcode systems routinely save companies money while improving quality, on-time performance, and other key business factors. It is necessary to have barcodes from a valid source GS1 Gateway 2013

GS1 Kenya has been conducting physical survey on trading techniques and proofed that, GS1 bar codes’ economic benefits to businesses are so immense that it is necessary to be as a major requirement to any retailer / trader who wish to succeed and rise to a higher level in trading cycles. Inventory costs can be a significant part of any company’s expenditures, but many business owners struggle to discover how to get control of inventory in a way that maximizes profit while reducing waste, spoilage and theft.

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Events Membership

GS1 Gateway 2013

GS1 welcomes these Organisations who have attained Membership as from October 2012 to March 2013

24

6160221-230

S.C. JOHNSON & SON KENYA LTD

6164002797

NICE FOODS AFRICA

6160231-240

INFUSION MEDCARE (K) LTD

6164002798

THOYA AND THOYA COCONUT PRODUCTS LTD

6160241-250

NEW KCC LTD

6164002799

SIGMA SUPPLIES LTD

6160251-260

BLUE RING PRODUCTS LTD

6164002800

MIRIANAH SNACKS

6164002801

ABALEN FOODS

6160261-270

SBC KENYA LTD

6164002754

NAI-TEA ENTERPRISE

6164002802

JEMMY'S HILL ENTERPRISES

6164002755

SAMAK COMMERCIAL AGENCIES

6164002803

PROGRESSIVE INNOVATIONS

6164002756

HONEST INVESTMENT

6164002804

MUTHIRU ENTERPRISES

6164002757

COMMERCIAL GRAIN SERVICES LTD

6164002805

TSWANAPRIDE LTD

6164002758

CENTRIC HOLDINGS LTD

6164002806

MWAGANZO MUSIC & FILM PRODUCTIONS

6164002759

BUGISU FARMERS AA COFFEE LTD

6164002807

GEOMAX PRODUCTS ENTERPRISES

6164002760

ZURI FOODS

6164002808

MWANAINCHI BAKERS AND CONFECTIONERS LTD

6164002761

SANPOA LIMITED

6164002809

GREENHOUSE-PRIDE DISTRIBUTORS

6164002762

ROMWAKULE ENTERPRISES

6164002810

HALDA TRADING COMPANY

6164002763

SAHARA FRESH WATER LTD

6164002811

BALIKKA PRODUCTS

6164002764

KENYA GIN MANUFACTURERS LTD

6164002812

PEARL DAIRY FARMS LTD

6164002765

NYUKI AFRIQUE PRODUCTS

6164002813

JOEVIC ENTERPRISES LTD MAGNUM PLANNING & INTERIORS LTD

6164002766

AVAYA CONNECT LTD

6164002814

6164002767

DOMINION SPRING WATER LTD

6164002815

NEW YALA DAIRY FARMERS CO-OP SOCIETY LTD

6164002768

DECKA LTD

6164002816

TIFFANY (K) LTD

6164002817

LIMURU ARCHDIOCESAN FARM- ARCHDIOCESE OF NAIROBI

6164002769

KARSANDAS INDUSTRIES

6164002770

CRANO ENTERPRISES

6164002818

GREEN BIO ENERGY LTD

6164002771

BOTANIC TREASURES LTD

6164002819

SILZANN ENTERPRISES LTD

6164002772

BUDALANG'I SMALL SCALE FARMERS

6164002820

BUGISU CO-OPERATIVE UNION LTD

MARKETING CO-OPERATIVE LTD

6164002821

VANILLA VALLEY

6164002773

QUINCY BAKERS AND EVENT MASTERS

6164002822

CHAI BORA LADHA SAFI TEA PACKERS

6164002774

METRO DRINKING WATER

6164002823

KITALE NATURAL HONEY LTD

6164002775

KENYA CO-OPERATIVE COFFEE DEALERS LTD

6164002824

SHIJEVINCE INTERNATIONAL (K) LTD

6164002776

NYUMBANI DEPOT LTD

6164002825

DIOPEX TRADING COMPANY LTD

6164002777

ALYMA SUPPLIERS

6164002826

MASTERSTOUCH BAKERY

6164002778

PAN AFRIC COMMODITIES LTD

6164002827

JAPALA ENTERPRISES

6164002779

LIMOWISE INVESTMENT

6164002828

NEWTONS CONFECTIONERS

6164002780

RUWA AGENCIES

6164002829

GARVIN ENTERPRISES

6164002781

KEYSHIA JEWELLERIES ENTERPRISES

6164002830

AGF GENERAL TRADING LTD

6164002782

GROWING MARKET SOLUTIONS LTD

6164002831

MODERN SOAP FACTORY LTD

6164002783

INTERSTATE BEVERAGES ENTERPRISES

6164002832

ASSURANCE AFRICAN TEA EXPERTS (ATECO)

6164002784

BATHES AGENCIES

6164002833

JULIJO INVESTMENTS LTD

6164002785

BAYCHEM KENYA LTD

6164002834

ROYAL MILLERS LTD

6164002786

A.O.S.K CHEMI CHEMI YA UZIMA

6164002835

NUTRINE CORPORATION S.P.R.L

6164002787

POP PARADISE

6164002836

BROADWAY BAKERY

6164002788

PENKAR SPRINGS

6164002837

SHIRUHZ FOODS

6164002789

HI MI LAYA LTD

6164002838

MEENA MULTI-PURPOSE CO-OP SOCIETY LTD

6164002790

HANS FOODS KENYA LTD

6164002839

TAI MAIZE FLOUR

6164002791

ITHITHINI ENTERPRISES

6164002840

JOYLITE FOOD

6164002792

KAHAWA NA KADHALIKA

6164002841

KENFINE FOODS LTD

6164002793

CONTRAST-TEA

6164002842

TRANSMARKET TRADING (U) LTD

6164002794

KEMMIE DISTRIBUTORS

6164002843

RAHMA ICE WATER

6164002795

FABULOUS CREATIONS LTD

6164002844

SALLEX ENTERPRISES

6164002796

KAZINGA FOOD & JUICE FACTORY LTD

6164002845

ANKY ENTERPRISES LTD


NAMUGONGO MILLERS

61660000671

SPECIAL WAY INVESTMENTS

KOMUNKA SUPPLIES COMPANY LTD

61660000672

CANNAN NATURAL FOOD PRODUCTS

6164002848

NAVIDA NATURAL FOODS LTD

61660000673

FOUNTAIN MEDIA LTD

6164002849

CENTALINE SUPERMARKET LTD

61660000674

VEMAVET SUPPLIERS

6164002850

CAFFE DEL DUCA LTD

61660000675

CHEWELE AGRI-BUSINESS INVESTMENT

6164002851

TRAD-J KENYA

61660000676

KANSAS STATE BAKERS

6164002852

ROYAL MANUFACTURERS LTD

61660000677

VEEKAY LTD

6164002853

ERDEMANN SAFARIS LTD

61660000678

INFRASTRUCTURE EAST AFRICA PUBLICATIONS

6164002854

NEW VESTAN ENTERPRISES

61660000679

KITENGELA CHILLIES LTD

6164002855

GOTTARD ENTERPRISES LTD

61660000680

STATERI ENTERPRISES

6164002856

CLEAN POWER DETERGENTS CO. RWANDA LTD

61660000681

NGENYILEL ANIMAL FEEDS

6164002857

BRADE GATE HOLDINGS LTD

61660000682

THE MUSHROOM FAMILY LTD VACAVILLES FINEST

6164002858

CHERISH FRUIT WORLD LTD

61660000683

6164002859

JERSEY FARM PRODUCTS

61660000684

VOORTREKKERS LTD

6164002860

GEE GLOBE COMPANY LTD

61660000685

BIG BITE BAKERS & CONFECTIONERS LTD

6164002861

BLUE NILE DISTILLERIES LTD

61660000686

LE CAPITAL FOODS LTD GENERICKS KENYA LTD

6164002862

SAWA BEVERAGES (SBL) LTD

61660000687

6164002863

OLOBOROSAT WATER COMPANY

61660000688

MACHERO AFRICA TRAVELLER

6164002864

BERMACO ADDISALES COMPANY LTD

61660000689

HOPE COMMUNITY MENTAL SERVICES

6164002865

PROFARM TWO SUPPLIERS

61660000690

GREEN PENCILS LTD

6164002866

PIECE OF CAKE

61660000691

EXPAT GLOBAL LTD

6164002867

KIPIRASH HOLDINGS LTD

61660000692

RACHE FOODS

6164002868

MARERE OASIS FOODS LTD

61660000693

KIMOSH SUPPLIES

6164002869

SPICE & HERBS

61660000694

MBOYASPEAR INTERNATIONAL LTD SIZON GENERAL SUPPLIES

6164002870

GALAXY DISTRIBUTION LTD

61660000695

6164002871

DEMKA DAIRY

61660000696

BUSINESS JOURNAL AFRICA MEDIA LTD

6164002872

JJASM MINI DISTILLERY

61660000697

WELL SPRING PRODUCTS LTD

6164002873

KIRWAI ENTERPRISES

61660000698

ST. JOSEPH SHELTER OF HOPE

6164002874

DORINA SUPPLIES AGENCY

61660000699

CENTAUR MILLING ENTERPRISES LTD

6164002875

ZESTY DAIRIES

61660000700

AUTHENTIC LIVING INTL. COMPANY LIMITED

6164002876

MIKELINE DERTEGENTS

616110960

AIYUE (K) LTD

6164002877

KEDSTA INVESTMENT

616110961

SYNERGIA LTD

6164002878

ROYOLTY SUPPLIES ENTERPRISES

616110962

FOREFRONT INDUSTRIES LTD

61660000647

MAKIT EAST AFRICA LTD

616110963

HILLSIDE GREEN GROWERS & EXPORTERS CO. LTD

61660000648

KUSCOLTD

616110964

WIRE PRODUCTS LTD

61660000649

DS MAX FOUNDATION

616110965

TASCO INDUSTRIES (U) LTD

61660000650

NDUMUNYA INVESTMENT SOLUTIONS

616110966

SONIC FASHIONS LTD

61660000651

SABERO AGENCIES

616110967

TUMAINI SELF SERVICE LTD

61660000652

OMIES ENTERPRISES

616110968

TRUCKS DIRECT LTD

61660000653

WEMA CENTRE TRUST

616110969

ALPHA MEDICAL MANUFACTURERS LTD

61660000654

SIMBA-MART

616110970

AKWALI ENTERPRISES

61660000655

GOOD BRANDS

616110971

BALAJI GROUP (E.A) LTD

61660000656

HAWAMWA MANUFACTURERS

616110972

UNILEVER KENYA LTD

61660000657

JUMEDICY ENTERPRISES

616110973

JIGEILI LTD

61660000658

SANJEMU TRADERS LTD

616110974

SANTOSH ELECTRONICS (E.A) LTD

61660000659

MARYFAN FRESH FARM PRODUCE (K) LTD

616110975

HETMATT ENTERPRISES

61660000660

MASAI STORE LTD

616110976

CORUM AGENCIES

61660000661

PEALAH SERVICES LTD

616110977

OFFICE MART LTD

61660000662

LIVING FAITH INTERNATIONAL

616110978

REVIN SPRL

61660000663

INTERGRITY ONE LTD

616110979

ROSAKIND (E.A) LTD

61660000664

INTERGRITY ONE LTD

616110980

LEISURE QUALITY FOOD PRODUCERS

61660000665

INTERGRITY ONE LTD

616110981

STYLE INDUSTRIES LTD

61660000666

MAKADADAS INDUSTRIES LTD

616110982

CONTINENTAL BRANDS LTD

61660000667

CHRISM ENTERPRISES

616110983

MAGIC ENTERPRISES

61660000668

TEKNON DAIRY

616110984

RECORDEZ LTD

61660000669

SEVEN FALLS LTD

616110985

PANDORIA ASSOCIATES

61660000670

JAMBO AGENCIES

61620051

ELBURGON FLIES SUPPLY

GS1 Gateway 2013

6164002846 6164002847

25


Entrepreneurship

Open Minds In Entrepreneurship By: Ephantus Achebi We all have heard great speakers & thinkers talk about “Thinking Outside the Box” with some genius writers going ahead and replacing the word “Outside” with “Without” to read “Thinking Without the Box. I can’t resist asking, How many of us have ever used or applied this philosophy in our entrepreneurship? Since its inception, this philosophy has always had different meaning to entrepreneurs. Some of them interpret it to mean locking yourself in a room to think of things that have never been tried or implemented in the world. But thought alone is never enough; however positive it may be; thought has to be mixed with action for you to get results.

minded employees. An IT executive should be able to offer after sales services to a customer who came to the office when all your sales team is out for the market place. Likewise, an accountant should be able to fix a small printing problem like a printer cable that was accidentally unplugged from its socket by the floor cleaner, and save time by continuing with printing of his financial statements, instead of waiting for the IT executive; who could be held up in the boardroom meeting. This example shows an open minded IT executive stepping out of his domain of specialization to get some skills in customer care services: And an open minded accountant who leaves his domain of study to acquire some knowledge in IT.

I am in agreement with thinkers that say; Thinking outside the Box is to step aside from your habits. It is true that human beings are creatures of habits. Once they are made aware of achieving certain results in a certain way they tend to cling and stick to those ways or methods and end up with same results for a long period of time.

When employees function in one department only, they normally develop a habitual way of executing duties as a result of continues repetition of tasks in the department. These often lead to on going negative thinking at the workplace commonly known as boredom and its related feelings. To control this negative thoughts and sluggish execution of assignments, employees need training on open minded philosophy to positively step out of their working habits while creating room for creativity.

Companies struggle in their initiation phase and after break even, they gain growth up to a certain limit where they hit a plateau phase by getting same results for a long period of time. I call this phase “The Closed Minded Phase” and most of our companies have reached here. They need a new philosophy of walking away from their daily routines. This is the philosophy of open minds and not thinking outside or without the box. Open Minds is simply stepping outside your industrialist norms to participate in an activity or learn a function or acquire a new skill that is inline with your entrepreneurial activity. Many people often slip backwards and misunderstand this philosophy. They perceive it to mean doing so many things at the same time. This is not true; you will find an entrepreneur being engaged in different business industries at the same time or a business man selling products and services from different industries at the same time. In the science of electricity and physics a metal that has its positive and negative electrons roaming in different directions is normally called a confused element. And doing so many things at the same time creates confusion to the individual or company. When leaders and managers of companies & organizations have performed their staffing function; they usually end up with competent workers who function well within their job descriptions.

GS1 Gateway 2013

The marketers deploy their marketing functions, the accountants executing their financial analysis & reporting functions with the ICT officers working on the business information systems etc. These separations of tasks and functions often lead to specialization within the company, which births closed minded workforce that only function productively in their restricted areas of interest.

When your company demands for the extra service from its employees, you need employees to give up on excuses, like; it is not part of my job, I am not being paid for doing that extra work, who’s paying for the extra time etc. You need open minded employees who can easily go beyond their job descriptions and accommodate the additional duty for a while or extent a helping hand to a stranded colleague. Our organizations need Open Minded Philosophy; this is what physicians call a magnet since its electrons are aligned in one direction: Magnetic force pulls in one dimension and magnetic employees are a force that pulls organizational functions towards the Vision and Mission of the company. Their minds open up and acquire knowledge that is inline with the organizational functions.

In order to achieve the objectives of the organization - the mission and vision; then departmental functions can not work in isolation.

Ephantus Achebi is a consultant in the finance industry and he teaches people on achieving their financial goals, walking them through the road to financial success & freedom. He is the author to the book title: “ Harnessing the Honey & Power in You” and a speaker: He talks on financial and motivational topics.

Organizational departments are normally interlinked by the organizational chart/structure which provides the instrument for departmental employees to interact within the links. Interaction leads to learning within ones surrounding and knowledge grows peoples intellects which is the habit of open

You can reach him on the folowing contacts; Ephantus Achebi P.o. Box. 100426 – 00101, Nairobi. Mobile: +254 721 705 881 Email: ephantus.achebi@gmail.com

© 2013 Enterprise Revolution Ltd All rights reserved.

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Some employees have their minds closed to their job description to the extent that they refuse to switch tasks when asked, and become reluctant or resistant to change; especially when asked to switch departments or branches. These employees have conditioned their minds to only think and function in just one dimension and often stage demonstrations when asked to function outside their norms. When dissatisfied with their norms, they incite others towards negative activities like employee strikes. Closed minded is the root cause of striking employers for reasons like pay rise; open minded employees open’s up to other income generating activities when not happy with their present activities.


The complimentary gateway magazine showcases various issues with the supply chain. We are currently expanding distribution beyond our more than 5,000 GS1 member Companies. With our wide distribution coverage, through aggressive direct marketing campaign, the GS1 Exhibitions, Seminars, Training and Conferences, we are now reaching thousands not only in Kenya but within the East African Region and beyond! We invite you to advertise in our next issue of this dynamic magazine at our subsidized rates below in order to enjoy this great marketing avenue.

Advertising rates for the Gateway Magazine valid for 2012/2013 Advertising Space

Rate for GS1 Members

Rate for Non- Members

Eighth Page Quarter Page

Ksh 30,000 Ksh 55,000

40,000 65,000

Half Page Full Page

Ksh 70,000 Ksh 120,000

80,000 130,000

Inner Cover Page

Ksh 150,000

160,000

t"MMDPTUT&YDMVTJWFPG7"5 t5IFBCPWFSBUFTBSFGPSGVMMDPMPVSBEWFSUJTFNFOUT t"MMBEWFSUTTIPVMECFTBWFEJO1%' &14 )JHI3FTPMVUJPO+QFHPS$PSFM%SBX

GS1 Gateway 2013

For further information, please contact the us on +254 (20) 2319414/2385270 or email: eva@gs1kenya.org

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