Page 1

affect a

portfolio of research and performative

DESIGN GILLIAN RODALE STONEBACK / ASSOCIATE AIA /

LEED GA

GRStoneback@gmail.com / 610.390.0320 / 7008 NE Ronler Way, Apt 3238. Hillsboro, OR 97124


This is a collection of work whose objective is to affect. The projects are active architecture, projects that perform, function, and have a purpose greater than being a decorated shed. Each design has an agenda. To affect is to create an action or reaction, stimulate the senses, change perspective, and alter the environment. The means of which are an investigation specific to each project. A personal design intention is innovative experimentation, combining scientific research and discovery with performative design. This research leads to new and creative opportunities in design.


affect generate

dog-E park

filter

colored clean

frame

pont de vue pause

teahouse

optimize

empt-Ease define

sun-e-scape

direct

sound affect


dog-E park waste to green

energy

frame

colored clean

neutralize

clean H2O

pause

empt-Ease optimizing

green living

sun-e-scape

response

direct

acid rain

to shadow and sun


affect generate pont de vue sweeping

structure

performance

compost

sound affect sound

waves

attract or repel

filter

teahouse private

relaxation

define


COMPRESSOR METHANE

FUEL

BIOGAS

SMELL

MERCAPTANS

GAS FILTER FILTER

DIGESTER

FERTILIZER

GARDEN

DOG WASTE

POUNDS OF WASTE PER DAY ONE DOG

POUNDS OF WASTE PER YEAR

3/4

273.75

150 dogs (3/4 pounds a day) 41062.5 pounds a year (density of 11.7 lb/cuft) BIOGAS

246,375 cuFT/YEAR

13.6 FEET

SOLID

3,509.6 cuFT/YEAR

2.3 INCHES

147,825,000 BTU/year methane 149,983,245 BTU/year

BTUs PER YEAR 999,888.3

% OF A HOUSE

1/15th

# OF 60 WATT LIGHT BULBS FOR 8 HOURS A DAY 1.65

CO2 AMMONIA HYDROGEN SULFIDE WATER VAPOR


Solid Waste Methane gas

The Dog-E Park of Orianna Hill, Philadelphia is a leash-free dog park that is also the home of the Lama Foundation Meditation facility. The goal of the park is to be a self-sustaining environment, illustrating the importance of using natural resources to provide energy. The most predominant resource on the site is dog waste—a great source of methane gas. The methane gas is utilized to power the Lama Foundation’s Meditation Center. With the number of dogs which frequent the dog park currently, 41,062.5 pounds of waste is produced. The waste can be converted into 149,983,245 BTUs per year. This amount of methane gas is enough to power 10.3 typical Philadelphia single family houses. The diagram above illustrates the physical quantity of solid waste and methane gas produced throughout a given year on the site.


Waste is collected and deposited in a digester rather than thrown away. The gas is produced in the digester, a tank which decomposes the waste. Methane travels up the pipes to a gasometer. Using principles of atmospheric pressure, the gas is stored in the gasometer which raises and lowers depending on the amount and the pressure of the gas contained. As the gasometer moves up and down, the gas and structural pipes are revealed as a signifier of what is happening on the site.


Below the Dog-E Park is the Lama Foundation Meditation Center which is completely powered by the methane generated from dog waste. The center follows an open spiritual principle which promotes kindness and peace. The program of the space follows the concept of the Buddhist Eight Fold Path. It begins with open communal space focusing on principles of wisdom and ethical conduct and moves toward a private place for reflection, mental development and contemplation. As one moves within the space, views are revealed in accordance with the Buddhist philosophy. The private space is located within the gasometer at the end of the site which has a changing view as the gasometer raises and lowers.


Buddhist Eightfold Path Right View, Right Intention, Right Speech, Right Action, Right Livelihood, Right Effort, Right Mindfulness, Right Concentration


dog-E park waste to green

energy

frame

colored clean

neutralize

clean H2O

pause

empt-Ease optimizing

green living

sun-e-scape

response

direct

acid rain

to shadow and sun


affect generate

pont de vue sweeping

structure

performance

compost

sound affect sound

waves

attract or repel

filter teahouse private

relaxation

define


outer glass shell color changing hydrogel limestone filtering shield water collecting front cover


3.0 Initial Project Research: Filtering and Cleaning

Large Matter

Large Matter animals, insects, debris

Animals, insects, debris sieving with screens or porous surfaces – Sieving with screens or porous surfaces hydrophobic surface can be used to speed up insufficient flow – Hydrophobic surfaces can be used to speed up insufficient flow – Continuous rotary filters may also aid in removing the matter

Particular Matter Matter Particulate

dissolved matter washed off roofoffand pollution Dissolved matter washed of from roof air and from air pollution fine fine filtersfilters are effective for dissolved –simple Simple are effective for particles dissolved particles precipitation of suspended particles particles –requires Requires precipitation of suspended and Nitric(H2SO4) Acid HNO3 Acids: Sulfuric Acid H2SO4Acid Acids: Sulfuric & Nitric Acid (HNO3)

main effect on rain Main effectofofpollution pollution on water rain water; some acidity is natural due to reaction of CO2 forming some acidity is the natural reaction of carbon dioxideviaforming carbonic acid – Requires permanent acid neutralization chemical reaction requires permanent acid neutralization via chemical reaction – Natural limestone precipitates Calcium Carbonate which reacts effectively to neutralize a natural limestone precipitates calcium carbonate which reacts effectively to neutralize acids – Ionization may also be used, but is temporary Other Pollutants carbon monoxide, Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), hydrocarbons Other Pollutants chemical treatment precipitates the harmful chemicals Carbon Monoxide, VOCs, Hydrocarbons – Chemical treatment precipitates the harmful chemicals

Minerals, Salts, and Metals

magnesium, calcium, lead, & copper from the atmosphere and water collection tanks Minerals, Salts Metals

Magnesium, Calcium, Lead,forCopper the atmosphere and and water collection hardness is a concern primarily high levelfrom potability, metals can be toxic degrade piping tanks –cation Hardness concern for high level potability; Metals beortoxic and degrade pi exchangea resins with primarily sodium or potassium chloride (ions replaced with can sodium potassium Cation exchange resins with sodium or potassium chloride (ions replaced with sodium or –ions) –water Water softening with negatively charged ionspositively to bindcharged the positively charged softening with negatively charged ions to bind the metals ions, univalentmetal ions; U hydrogen, sodium or potassium divalent sodium hydrogen, sodium or potassium exchange exchange with divalent with calcium, sodiumcalcium, or potassium ions or potassium ion

Microorganisms/ Pathogens

Microorganisms/ typically from organic matter inPathogens water collection and storage tanks

Typically from matter in water collection and storage tanks essential for waterorganic purification – Essential for water purification UV radiation used in wastewater treatments and spring water – UV Radiation: used in wastewater treatments and spring water aseptic final filtration with a 0.22 mm pore membrane filter – Aseptic final filtration with a 0.22-mm-pore membrane filter; UV treatment

the pH sponge Colored Clean is a water filtering wall component. Acid rain has become more of an environmental concern as emissions collect in the atmosphere. Acid rain is incredibly destructive to exposed masonry and metal, as well as contaminates open water sources. The goal was to neutralize the acid using natural means. The component is a four part system which collects water, filters out large matter, neutralizes acid, and displays the acidity level.


The wall component utilizes passive means to neutralize the acid. Through the natural chemical reaction with limestone the acid breaks down the stone and produces harmless calcium sulfate. The limestone only reacts with acidic rain and will not dissolve in neutral water. The outer surface of the wall component is a combination of hydrophilic and hydrophobic glass. The different surface conditions direct water into the wall component for collection.

+ CaCO3 Self Regulating Limestone only dissolves at a pH between 6.0 and 8.0

+ H2SO4

CaSO4

+ CO2

Useful Byproducts Calcium sulfate can be extracted and sold for numerous functions including: gypsum pellets for crop fertilizers drierite drying agent plaster of paris pigments portland cement manufacturing of sulfuric acid paper agent Low Acidity Water Neutralized water is safe to use for any non-potable water needs

H2O


low pH high acidity

Clusters of crushed unfinished limestone 2 to 3 inches in size in each wall component Super-hydrophobic glass prevents collection of calcium sulfate byproduct Glass coated with color-changing pH indicators suspended in hydrogel

Water pours at base of component to control the flow rate, allowing a flow of 120 seconds or less through each component Calcium sulfate byproduct flows through the components

neutral pH low acidity


methyl thymol purple blue azolitmin leucomalachite green

pH 7

pH 5

pH 3

Increasing Acidity

pH 1


change in color with change in pH

hydrogel pH indicators

The back wall of the component is coated with a layer of hydrogel. Hydrogel is a gelatin-like material with embedded pH indicators to react with the acid rain and display the acidity level. Four different pH indicators were chosen based on the acidity levels at which they change color as well as the specific colors themselves. The indicators implemented are methyl purple, which turns from purple to green at pH 1.5, leucomalachite green, which turns from yellow to green at pH 1.8, azolitmin, which turns from purple to blue at pH 3, and thymol blue, which turns from red to yellow at pH 7. As the water filters through the component, the colors of the indicators turn from more warm red and purple tones to cool green tones.


Lab tests were conducted to determine the appropriateness and accuracy of the hydrogel, limestone, and unit’s perforations. The hydrogel implemented was saturated in the pH indicator solutions of thymol blue and mythol purple. The hydrogels were tested with acid at levels of pH 1, pH 3, pH 7 and a general basic solution. The tests confirmed the predictions of color change at various stages of acidity tested over a minimum time period of 60 seconds. Limestone was tested in an acidic solution to show its acid-reducing properties. The calcium carbonate was exposed to acid of pH 3 for 30 seconds and litmus paper was used to test the resulting pH of the liquid, which had been reduced to a pH of 7. The perforation of the Colored Clean component was tested by sampling various opening shapes and sizes on at multiple angles. The undulating shape of the component is most conducive to unpredictable rain and wind angles, as well as a variety in perforation size.


The bright colors are displayed on the wall and onlookers are aware of the acidity level of the rain outside. The wall becomes a great education tool showing the acidity of the atmosphere and how we can neutralize it through passive means.


dog-E park waste to green

energy

colored clean

frame

neutralize

clean H2O

pause

empt-Ease optimizing

green living

sun-e-scape

response

direct

acid rain

to shadow and sun


affect generate

pont de vue sweeping

structure

performance

compost

sound affect sound

waves

attract or repel

filter

teahouse private

relaxation

define


Pont de Vue is a bridge joining Ile Saint Louis and Il de la Cite in the center of Paris. The concept was a sleek design, complimentary to Paris’s already distinct and ornate architecture. The bridge sweeps from the main avenue of Ile Saint Louis and connects to Rue du Cloitre Notre Dame at the South end of Notre Dame Cathedral. Directing view and framing the historic monument is the strategy for the bridge.


Max. Stress, fc(max) All Members: Max = 44.7 Ksi (out19) Min = -8.58 Ksi (tie1)

44.7 Ksi 55.2 K

aKrsc h i 12 atie r c 2h 1 0 1 0 .2 Ks - 4 .2130 .2 K s Ki i s i

i

13

in

.5

i

99.3 K

27.4 K

33.7 K

721 K

60.8 K

632 K

i

15

2 .1 2 Ksi a rch 11

2 .3 4 K s i a rch 9

i

Ks

Ks

Ks

1

0 .8

12

m

ar

4

5

1 .2

4 4 .7 K si

0 .9

1 7 .6 K si 3 o u t2 0 a r .9 6 m 6 K si 2 4 .3 K si 3 o u t2 1 a r m .1 1 11 K si 8 .9 3 K s i 1 .7 ar m 3K o u t1 9 5 si

6 .8 0 K o u t3 2 s i

a 8 .8 4rm K 1s o u t3 1 3 i 4 .2 0 1 2 .5 KKs i 4 a s i .8 o u t3 0 r m 1 7 K 5 si

o u0t2K2 s i

o u t1 6

546 K

527 K 8.28 K 24.7 KK 24.7

99.3 K

ti e 4 -3 .8 tie 6 K3 si - 2 .1 5 Ks

36.7 K

24.6 K

-a0 .3 4 in rch a rch 9 1 2 a rch 1 0 - 0 .3 4 in - 0 .3 5 in - 0 .1 1 in

27.4 K-173 K 0 in

in

6

546 -K206 K

8.28 K

be am 55 -104 K 632 K 0tiein2

m1

11

- 0 .3 3

bea

60.8 K

a rch

721 -K255 K

33.7-69.0 K K

0 in527 K 0 in o u t1 b e6 a m 4 8 beam 46 24.7-13.6 K - 0K.1 7 in 24.7-45.4 K K - 0 .1 7 in - 0b.1e a1 m 4 9 b eam 47 in o u t2 2 b eam 9 - 0 .5 7 in bea m 52 b e - 0 .2 1 a m4 in - 0 .5 1 - 1 .2 0 in in o u t3 b2 e a m beam - 40 0.8 18 5 in be a - 0 .3 2 m- 11 beam 1 a in .1 5 rm 01 in - 2 .3 1 3 o u t3b 1e a m 0 bea - 1 3.49 - 1m.716 -0in.8 in 0 in be 2 7 a in - 0 .3 8-m1 5 bea - 1 .8in.6361 inin -1 m8 a rm .4 o u bt3e0a-1m.8 3 3 4 -3 .0 15 be in 6 8 - 2a m.7 in 47 2 in in -b0e.4a 0m 2 7 be in am 34 -1 b e a m- 26 .0 6 in o u t2 arm .85 0 b ea i 6 -3 .2m n 43 8in - b0 e.4a4m- 25.2 9 in -3 be in -3a.2m .06 i n 23 i5 obuet2a 1m -32 1. 4 4 in b ea n m 36 -2 be - 0 .8 5- 2 .5 3 in in -2a m .4 5 in .7 92 5 be in o u t19 am 19 -1 be a m .8 9 -2 - 0. 43 in .1281 in in be am 37 -1 be a-1m .0 7 in .44 74 in

tie 3

36.7 K

99.3 K

27.4 K

24.6-29.6 K K

13

in

.6

-0

3 in

11

- 0 .3

- 0 .3 4 in a rch 9

a rch

33.7 K

721 K

60.8 K

632 K

in

in

5

7

.4

.8

a rm -0 .4 1 2 2 in

-0

-1

- 0 .4 3 in

o u t1 9

in

-1 a rm .8 5 4 in

in

- 0 .8 5

5

.8

-1

6

a rm

in

in a rm -1 .9 1 1 9 in

- 0 .4 0

- 0 .4 4

o u t2 0

- 0 .2 1 in o u t3 2

o u t2 1

- 0 .3a rm2 1in o u t3 1 3 -0 .8 7 - 0 .3 8 in in -1 a o u t3 0 rm 1 .4 4 in 5

- 0 .0 3 in

12 atier c2h 1 0 - 0 .3 4 - 0 .1- 10 .3in 5in in

4 ainr c h

in

o u t1 6

i

527 K 8.28 K 24.7 K 24.7 K

-21.1 K

Ks

- 0 .1 1 in o u t2 2

4 ti e

- 0 .0 3

si

-5.56 K

si

1 1.6

si 4 .3 5 K o u t1 0 si 5 .7 1 K o u t9

9 .0 0 K o u t8

7

si 1 2 .9 K

arm

Maximum Stress -fc (max) 44.7 Ksi 31.4 Ksi 18.1 Ksi 4.75 Ksi -8.58 Ksi

8 K - 8 .5 tie 1

0 .0 tie 2 in3

2 3 .4 1 7 .4 9 K s i .3 4 K s i4 .5 3 K s i ou ou oK s o u o o si i si K si in t2 6 t1 1 u t5i t1 4 u t1 2 u t1 3o u t1o 8u t2 4 s i K s 0 K s i K s i 9 .7 K 7 . 4 7 K 01 K2 .7 i 1 in 2 3 .2 Ks 3 .5 3 in 2 in in 2 2 3 1 5u t6 2in 9 5 1 0 3in87.8 1 12 o u t2o8u t2 o9 u t 2in5o1u6t2 in 2 1 .3 1 51 in 2 6 12 .9 in o in 4 K s i 3 .3 6K s iin58.9in 31 4K s i .1 4 .5K s 2 1 o u t1 o u t2 7 t1iin7 i 0 .0 3 K - ft - ft us Ks si si i i 1 5 .1 K is .3 K1 8. 8 1 6 .3 1 7 .7 K K s 10 0 .1 4 K 3 .9 5 K 9 .1 2 K 1 9 .07 .4K sK s 2 7 .9 o K K s i .7 i s i K s K 0 K 0 6 .1 0 .2 2 K 0 .1 5 0 .1 0K.8- ftK- - ft 1i718.0 .2.4s 2 .4 28 ft ft - ft a i s 7i 0i 0-K0K.6s.6 .0.4 5si i10K- .5 Ks i2s7i.8 s8.2i K0i 01s.4 s.63 si1i 10-K.50Ks.6 - ft .9i i221KKs Ki.0s0116i.616K0K.8 0sK.9 s i K1Ks K .9s9 i4K01Ks 7s i2Ki0sK0Ki .5 s91si01.4 6 .3K K- r m i K sK2i s2.3i K5 s3iKi2.1s.8i60si2.6 03K7.36.6sK5iK1sKs3Kis.5si i12 2.5 iK.2Ks619is.1 i i.5 - 5- 71 .6 Ki 1s50s.3 K12s0.9iK2K7s.1s1iKKi1.8-s2ftKi7.2sK - ft .2 7 K - ft s5 sis6Kii 3Ks i.5 3K K.3 0 8 s .6 5 i i .9 K s 0 3 .0 .7 i 4 1 3 5831 .4 K 1 3 7 s 3i -K0i s i .0 1 2 1 9Ks 0 K 7 K 0 0 .2 5 0 .7 4 2 s K 1 s i i 4 K K i i 0 0 s s i 9 5 .2 8 7 1K .0sd2i2ee- c0Ks K0K- ftK- ft- ft 4 K - ftKft0- ft.2 k8ede13aecmbcxk edkt2 cbkke1dd484a9ee7mcbk2edd851axee2t1 9d38ea3de8 ecmcbk d35 ct1 ccbk2ked6de35ae8exm xKkc.6t47bksdi42 a1c9cdmd1kbkeKe7e41cdc8a1d2kbekm7edc7ak1ebdm ecae5cbe 36d2ae63em - ft- ft - ft mccmbkk5e43dd6b8a7eee6mccakkd4edm78eb4xe41cet1 cdb5k1adk30e8ed8m dckd9xek84am e7e20 162dee9ae0Kcm 2kem c.5kskb6di399de7e44e1Kaecc.7 mxkkt3 et1 1c0b3cdk0de2k3.61 b7ecee6k7 k 6d84eam d 1cd5ce37a5kek24mK725- ft.4K K.8 1b1ekee58cdxcak9et5m6cdd6k1eb8d2ce4eka0c9m.3 e1c3dk1 d9kkce1d5145kced8290a7kce5m7kdcdde b e sbib0 0K.9s 8i -K0 .5 m ek-71.3 c615dcakb5kedm -acd714bcakme5ebke5m ar s 7ii s i -a21cm6k-32219167 K -b3be7dea7eamdcKmed4kdbecx4a85eekct96m3dca9k kedm 65Kem 1d5ce-35.7 s e6accmkkd353de83be d4e2K75cede5a40k6cecm e4kacexd79ckmdt1 61ea720cmkkbt1 43 i r 0 7 4 5 a 9 9 2 9 e K 3 e b K 4 .3 t1 m x e s b 9 e e d 5 3 a 6 8 e e .0 b e b 8 i a d e e K -50.4 K ex b 57.22K5 .7 K m 5 a m 3 2 .2 -189 K K2 .5s i.54 90K .8 154173 K K be 5 sK0i s.72 3 0K sKi1s0iK.9s 7i ecc3xkk3t1d54me904e2ccbk7ike3d5dYa9e1emccek6kxd6d6t6 0e2K.6c eski1ixd231t8 -i00.5 s 4k7i 8522d.3K02.0 Ke105.9c.0 sikk9i2d242Ks Ke5ssc0i ik1K020.2.0 s 3i 61K.3 K0.3s41K22i .1 i 59 2Ke0e1K0.1scc.2 Ks Kss6i -i 0K0.4 .2s.2i3-10KK.2s0s8i1.2 Ki s3 K20s.4.6 01K0sK.3 K.5--0ft02 .40ft .1 0s00204.5 2e a6K1 s.7 .8 4Ki312Ks 1is.3 Ki 9sbieK1as.2m0ib.8 5ss.3 i 0 5 K .1 s s .9 .2 1 i i 0 K K d s K e .9 .3 i 5 3 i d d K 3 i s c 4 K 0 3 .6 1 s d k e s e K 0 .3 b i 4 5 b K c c 0 1 i 0 0 i s 5 s K e .7 i e k k .4 i .1 .8 d s .3 K 2 2 i 3 1 .9 s t7 K a 1 c x 2 e s K e s i 4 0 0 4 m .5 54ei .0 2 cmkbkd45e2e 6 sK2is-6i01KK.1 1Ks7K0is0 sKi 9KKi sssKi iis i K 28 .3 i -Ks14isK.58-i.6 sK4.6i3sK9i0.2 .3 2 .108 1-.6 K.0is4.9s391i1Ki09.0K.9 i 0 bea 3K0.55 K0.2ss5ii100K1.3K.2 10Ks0.8 .0ssi965i00K.4 s s9i82i10KKK.0 .6sssi5ii 1KK2.0s.1 b 2e a m3b e a m 1 1d 90a5cmbkdde453eea01cmbkkde352ea346cmbkdde234eea81ccbmdkkde2e4ea3b7cme ad 1a 4ms2 ift.0KK 6-s2fti KKfts ift.8 KK0.1s.9 .5 s i101KK.8 1 i .4 7cdkdke31e4c23m -21.04.0 K0 -K se am K c 6 0 .6s si410i 1.2 d c 3 2s0.9i7 K22KsK.2 k k e 1 k 2 7 c 0 9 Ks.4 k 8 is0i 8K2 bKs 2 5 ss isi5i 02K0.0 1 e i - 1 - 7 - 69 8 .1 s i 0i 2K .2s i 7 K4 124 K 11710.9 sKsi 2 03i K.7 -277 K 5 .1 9 .0 K Kb e a m 5 5 .6s68i 0K2 .3 .5 s i102 KK.2ss5ii1 K.1s10 Z X 1i .4 .5 K s792i .2 K 0s24 i.8 Ks .73Ks1.0 5 iK2K ssK0ii sK s i i

0 .0 3 K - ft ft 02 K-0.0.0 5 K - ft K - ft K - ft K - ft - 0 .0 -30 .0 7 - 0 .0 7 23.1 K 7.04 K

o u t7 3 i rm Ks sia 1 7 .7 K .1 14 o u t4 9 i m Ks sai r 2 2 .1 K .7 25 o u t3 2 i m Ks a sr i 0 2 4 .6 K 5 .1 o u t1 8 i m Ks ar 2 i .6 2 4 .1 K s 3 i o u t2r m 1 Ks a 7 2 .2

3 in in.0 -5.56 K91.6 K8-0 3 .0 in 9-0 e4c k 7 .0 -0 i e 5nc kd7 - 0.01 d7 ck 120 beamK d24e in 3 07 a m .2 b e -0 1 3 8 in .0 a m -0

-4.53 in

- 2 .3 3 in

-3.15 in

be

-1.78 in

-48.1 K

16 i Ks a rm 8 7 .2 5 a rch a rch 7 K si 1 .1 4 1 .1 7 K s i

234 K -21.1 K

0 .1 1 in

o u t1 0 in

-0.41 in

be am 1 1 - 2 . 4 6 in be am 32 - 2 . 6 0 in

in

0.96 in

beam 26 - 2 . 5 9 in

in

4

Max = 0.96 in (in16) Min = -4.53 in (out27)

beam 14

.8

Local Displacement -dy 0.96 inches -0.41 inches -1.78 inches -3.15 inches -4.53 inches

K si 5 .6 .5 13 K s i 6 aa r c hh 8

in

- 0 .1 9 o u t9

110 K

in

- 0 .3 8 o u t8

- 0 .5 1 o u t7

in - 0 .4 6 ou t4

in

in - 0 .4 0 o u t3

in - 0 .1 6 o u t2

in

-48.1 K

6

-1

24.6 K

31.4 Ksi - 2 .6 8 in t5 o u t1 4 o u t1 2

0 .4

3

546 K

- 1 .7 4 in o u t1 1 o u

16

a rm

in

1

36.7 K

6

a rm

-21.1 K

- 0 .1 9 in out 9

0 .1 1 in

o u t1 0

in - 0 .3 8 o u t8

in - 0 .5 1 o u t7

- 0 .4 6 in

.8

0.90 ft-K/ft

-1

0.30 ft-K/ft

9

-0.30 ft-K/ft

a rm

in

5

n

-0.89 ft-K/ft

- 0 .4 0 in

8

.6

-1.49 ft-K/ft

Local Disp., All Members: Max 0.96 indy(in16) Min ==0.96 -4.53 (out27) -0.41inin in -1.78 in -3.15 -4.53 in

o u t4

2

-1

3i

.3

.0

-1

-1

in

All Elements: Max = 0.90 ft-K/ft (P14) Min = -1.49 ft-K/ft (P13)

o u t3

8

6

4 in -0.6

0 .4

a rm in

a rm

- 0. 16 in 1 ou t2 rm a

- 0 .3 0 o u t1

7 arm

16

Global Moment -Z -1.49 ft-K/m -0.89 ft-K/m -0.30 ft-K/m 0.30 ft-K/m 0.90 ft-K/m

Global Moment-Z

4 in - 0 .0 tie 1

2

-5.56 K

.8

a rm

5 a rch a rch 7 in - 0 .1 2 - 0 .1 2 in

-0

o u t2

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- 0 .3 0 o u t1

in - 00 ..11 22 in h6 aa rrcc h 8

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0 .0 3 K - ft K - ft - 0 0.0 2 .0 5 K ft K - ft K - ft K - ft - 0 .0 3 - 0 .0 7 - 0 .0 7 7.04 K 23.1 K

K - ft - 0 .0 2 0 .0 5 K.0 3 K - ft tie4 - 0 - ft

12 in in 2 .8 -0 112 K 172 K 2 in ch 5 - 0 .1 - 0 .1 a2 r in a rch 7 2 in h6 8 a rc a rc h -0 .1 - 0 .1 2 in

23.1 K

-48.1 K


55.2 K

23.1 K

K - ft K - ft - 0 0.0 2 - 0 .0 3 .0 5 K ft

172 K

0 .0

tie 4

in 0in in in 9 6in .1 -.90 4.32 --11.4 - 1 -.10 0in in 6 in .40 5.4 5u7 t12d e c k 6 d --12 -.8 d e c kt53u6t26d e c k 9 2dr emecx1okt4 1 7 .7 K1 5 8 K 7 e cmxokt3 9d 1e c k 7a1r me x1o a 6in in t3 - ft - ft-71.3 4 in 6 d5K e c k a er 69u 3 d e c k --12 -.9.60 9.4 in 0d e c k 1d e t4 8 1 .4d eK ck 9 .8 7 in- 1 .8 9 -in2 .2 5 -in 1ku 2d 4 in a r me x1oct2 3 in1in in 2 .4 6 -in2 - ft -.40 4.5 e c k --12.8 - 1 .7 -in0 .8 1- 1in.1 1 -in-10.5 6 .6 2 -in2 3d e in- 0 .4 91 - 2 .6 8 in .6 5 -2 -o0u.1t2 36 o u t1 o u t 5 ae rxmt1oc 5ku44t7d in.6 5 -2in e c --11.4 o u t1 40 in 8 in8in in in - 2 .7 7 -in3 .0 8 -in3 .2 4 -in3 .2 5 -in .58 k 5 d -.80 5.3 3 .2 2 .9 5 - in2 .4 .7 6.3-in28 .3ino u t1 2 - 2 .2d 3e cink d 1 0 in3 .0 6 in 307 K ea xr met1oc4uk56t8 0 -2 4 -2in d9e c k 8d4oeuct1k 634 6 9e c k 9d4e c k 8d e -in2 .7 - ft - 1 .2 8 c k 8d de 9 -2 9d5e c k 8 K - ft .1 in .4 3e c k - 1 6 .3 d e c k 9d 7ec k 9 6 k 7 d0 e c k in c k --01 .8 3 .6 2 3 in- 2 8 -1in 6 d 7 in9in in -50.4 K 3e c k o u t1 8 - 0 .8 2 in 7 d -.00 7.1 dec .00 .8 8 6 de e1oc 8 c - ft in-1 in-1 a er mx t1 0ku3 t9 k 8 d7 o u t2 4 - 3 7 7 K in 1 2 8d e 0 .2 2 K - 0 .1 7 - 0.in 51 in e c k .5 5 in.4-16 - ft - 1 .5 3 in c k --00 .4.4 8 2d e .0-1in6.0 K - ft 22 1ininin 2 5 .7 K - ft 9 0 .1 in ck - 0 .1 4 - 0 .8 in7-0-0 ainer mxot1 K - ft 8 6d 2 in 3 1u 2t1 2 010.9 K - 6 .0 0 0 .6 e c km 4 5in.5.6.491 142 K 117 K K - ft 0 .9 in 2 in 1 4 -1 .3 - ft 6 eina 8 d1 e-0 -27 in-02 .2in - 0 .2 7 6inin -1 d in 1 6 in 0 1 in c in b 5 d 5 K - ft 16 in ka8md.6.2 67 7 -0 9 in 1 0 1 in e c k in .6 0 in 8 Y X in -0 K -eftc k -35.7 5 4 6 in K - 1 .8 5 bine 7 5e inc k in .0 - 5 7 .6 3d -1 - 1 .7 8 3 5 3 K 5d3e 5 -0 154 K in e 3 2 8 .8 in 1 10 in in .5 - 2 .9 .5 8 .2 6 - 2 c 0 .4 5 - ft o-0ua t1 remx61t96 c k 5 0 5 K - ft K - ft in 1 in in .4 4 0 .3 9 k 3 6 5 in in-2 d4e .6 in -45 5 .1 -in7 1 .0 .0 in d e in -1 .0 -277 K in -0 ck 8 ck 6 .4 15 in in-0 5 - ft 47 4 4 Zin-2 .2 0 .0 3 K .0 - 0 -.10 .4 - 1 5 173 K de -1in in c k - ft - ft .0 1 .268in2oinuaet2 d5e c k o u t2 8 -1 .1 6 in c k 5 9 -2 K 2 114 5d .4 7 k 4 d8 e in -0in rxmt1 - 0 .0 7 6e 9 - 1in -0 2 d1 e ck .4 3 - 2in.5 c .3 ck 7.04 K .6 1 .8 6 3 4 - in 3 d3e 6 d1 4- o2inu.5t2 9 5d7 -in0 9- 2in.6 1 in .6 1 - 2in.4 7 - 2in.2 K - ft e c k 4 - 2 .2 c k 4 in 0e c k ec - 0 -.2 -00.3 - 0 .0 7 1.2.56in7 9in 7e d2e c k 3 0 in o u t2 5- 2 - 1 .9 9 in 4d9e c k 4d oin-0 aerx2mt17 k 3d7 k 2d inu .8t3 d5e c k 5d0e c k 4 1e c k 3d4e c k in e ck 6 1e c 1 0 .8 K 5 d8 e 5 in o udt2 3 .9 k 3 d in - ft - ft - 1 .1 c - 2 .4 3 in in-0 K - 2 c.3 9 1m 61 k 3d8e 2.64in4 1in -00.8 - 0 -.3 oinuet3 - 1 .7 0 in o u t6 axrt1 4 2d6e - 2 1 .8 ck 5 in-1 .3 219 K -189 K t1 5 0t2e c7k u t1 7 i-1n .4 u o 9 d - ft ec 6 in u - 5.63 ininuet3 cok 3 d o .8 3 0m 08 k 3d9e c k 6 - 0 .3 --118.3.01 in - 2 .2 32d5ine 0o in- axrt1 d0e c k 2 63i -1nin 2 4e c k 1 .7 0 Local Disp., dy 1e c k 2 d2 e c k 29xmd3t7e3 c k d 8 in- 1 o u t2 --24.1.5 aerx0mt62 d e c k 2x1dt8 4 in aer 0.38in8.9in9in in- 2 t e2r m9 -11.7 o u t1 - 0 -.4 in-2 .3 .1 3 -in2 inoinu a 1 9 5 in .1 .3 in K - ft ft 7-42 2in5.2 6 in-2 .3 3 -in21 .3inin6 in- 2 .3 83.3.8in K- 0 -.4-214.1.6 7 All Members: --21 - 0 .4 - 2 5 .4 - -115.8.8in - 0 .8 57.2 K Max = 0.96 in (in16) 124 K - ft -1 5 5 K

1

- 2 .5 3 in

-255 K

a rc

in

h1

- 0 .3

3i n

be

a

be am be -0 4 3 .0 a d e m-02 -0 4 in c k .20 .2 7 1

de m 4d6 in -0in c0 4 ec .0 -0 b e a dk.0e2 6 in1 8 k1 m 8 d 9e -0in.0 b e .5 2 01.0 c k 2 ck 1 a m -0in 4 in9b e in be 7 .1 -0 am 55 1 8 7 a in.0 be rch 1 a m 3 2 -104 K a m 2 -0 .0 in be 22 6 in tie 2 am 0 in -0 b e a m 1 2 9-0 .3 .0 9 - 0 .0 6 - 0 .0 4 i n in 4 in 8 in - 0 .1 1 in-173 K - 0 tie 1 .0 3 0 in i n

m 34

m- 3 3.28 - 3 .0 4 in 6 in m- 3 3 5 .2 2 in m3 - 2 .46 5 in bea m- 22 5 .7 9 in be a m1 - 1 .8 9 9 in be a m -22 1 .1 8 in bea m3 - 1 .0 7 7 in beam 4- 14 .4 7 in be a

bea

.2 9 in

b e a m -321.4 4 in

beam 8 - 3 .0 8 in -m2 .7 4 27 in

bea

bea

h5

beam 15 - 2 .3 0 in b e a- m1 .7 1 26 in

bea

b e a m -62 .0 6 in

b e a m- 25

beam 26 - 2 .5 9 in beam 14

beam 4 - 0 .5 1 in beam 4 0- 0 .8 5 in beam 1 0- 1 .1 1 in beam 3-91 .4 0 in bea m - 1 .85-631 .6in 1 in beam 33 - 1 .8 6 in beam 27

beam 9

a rc

2 in

-0 .1

h6

a rc

in

0 in beam 48 - 0 .1 -13.6 K 7 in beam 49

tie 3

- 0 .0 3

-206 K

3 in- 0 .0 17 -0 .34 in 91.6-0 K .0 8 ck 3 a rc h 10 9 inin d1 e6 ck7 a rc h 9 ck n0 .0 0 7 d4 e 9 i- 0in.0 e c k 1d 5e - 0 .0 1 in c k in in-0 .00in.0 2c k 7d5 -0e .35 e 1d4 .0 7 .0 4k 7d6 120 Kb e a m 2 4 ck -0 d3e i n in din07e c m 3 k0 1.2 7 .0 3 .0 5k 7 b e a d2e c -0 in0 5 din08e c 1 3183 .0ink 7 ck 1e b e -0a0.0m.06 d90ine c in k 1d in.0 7 2 3 ec 2 -0e c k a m .0 4 1d 0 in -1 in.2 d b e ck .5 2-0 2 89 6 in de .4 a -0m - 1 .4 -0 be 54 am be 51 a m - 2 .3 3 inin be 8 5 0.8 b ee aamm-11 1 in b - 2 .4 62 in .2 b e a m -23 2 - 2 .6 0 in

in 0 .4 in -1 6 2 0 ck .1 de in -1 5 2 ck de

45

5

in

-29.6 K

234 K

.8

ck

- 0 .1 2

a rch 7

-0.89 ft-K/ft -0.30 ft-K/ft

0.96 in -0.41 in -1.78 in -3.15 in

0.30 ft-K/ft 0.90 ft-K/ft

-4.53 in

0 .0 3 0K .1 0 K - ft - ft

3.61 K

0 .1 5 K - ft

-69.0 K

-1.49 ft-K/ft

110 K

-0

in

Min = -4.53 in (out27)

112 K

All Elements: Max = 0.90 ft-K/ft (P14) Min = -1.49 ft-K/ft (P13)

de

- 0 .1 2

a rch 8

Global Moment -Z Local displacement

Global Moment-Z

0 in -0 .1 2 in beam 46 -45.4 K - 0 .1 7 in beam 47 - 0 .5 7 in b e am 52 - 1 .2 0 in be a m 1 8

2 in

173 K

-48.1 K

The major structural components of the bridge are two forked compression arches at either end tied with cable stays. The cable stay bridge supports two sweeping decks which curve to orient someone walking toward the main avenues on either island. The arch has historical significance to Paris and the bridge is reminiscent of it. You enter the bridge though the arches which support half of each deck. As you cross the bridge, you move through an interior and exterior space defined by the cables.


The bridge acts as a viewport to Notre Dame Cathedral. The arches frame the monument and become a focus as you move west across the bridge. The arches themselves become a signifier of the bridge from down the avenues on Ile Saint Louis and Il de la Cite. At the western end of the bridge is a gathering space for onlookers to watch musicians performing.


dog-E park waste to green

energy

colored clean

frame

neutralize

clean H2O

pause

empt-Ease optimizing

green living

sun-e-scape

response

direct

acid rain

to shadow and sun


affect generate

pont de vue

filter

performance

teahouse

compost

relaxation

sweeping

structure

sound affect sound

waves

attract or repel

private

define


interior plan

top plan

front elevation

right elevation

left elevation

right elevation


This design is based off traditional elements of a Japanese teahouse. The plan follows a traditional four and a half tatami mat configuration which is nine feet by nine feet. The main strategy is to focus on the concept of the square which creates balance. The welded steel frame is divided into different sections of glass windows, large frosted glass panes, steel paneled windows and a copper picture recess—a significant component of a Japanese teahouse. The teahouse blends traditional with contemporary and is designed to be constructed in any setting, whether rural or urban. The teahouse provides a moment of pause for any environment.


dog-E park waste to green

energy

colored clean

frame

neutralize

clean H2O

empt-Ease optimizing

pause

green living

sun-e-scape

response

direct

acid rain

to shadow and sun


affect generate

pont de vue sweeping

structure

performance

compost sound affect sound

waves

attract or repel

filter

teahouse private

relaxation

define


The empt-Ease container is a designed counter top bin for compostable organics. The empt-Ease container addresses many of the inconveniences of an ordinary kitchen compost bin. Its design utilizes a scraper to quickly empty the container into your compost bin, reducing the amount of time hovering over decomposing food.


drain

scraper lock lid scraper

container


The empt-Ease operates with just one motion. A simple twist of the lid locks it into the scraper which also facilitates the opening and closing of the drain.

Lid Unlocked Drain Open

Locked With Scraper Drain Open


Locked With Scraper Drain Closed

Lid Unlocked Drain Closed

Lid Unlocked Drain Open


dog-E park waste to green

energy

colored clean

frame

neutralize

clean H2O

pause

empt-Ease optimizing

green living

sun-e-scape

response

direct

acid rain

to shadow and sun


affect generate

pont de vue sweeping

structure

performance

compost

sound affect sound

waves

attract or repel

filter

teahouse private

relaxation

define


Sun-e-scape is a leisure space defined by the shadows. The constant changing shadow on the ground evolves the space and becomes a dynamic playground.


The design was generated from a study model placed on the site. Over the course of the day, varying shadows were traced to create a pattern of the sun’s activity. The mapped shadows were the guidelines for the topography as well as the overhead structure of the site.


section A

section B

section B


section A


dog-E park waste to green

energy

colored clean

frame

neutralize

clean H2O

pause

empt-Ease optimizing

direct

acid rain

green living

sun-e-scape

response

to shadow and sun


affect generate

pont de vue sweeping

structure

performance

compost

sound affect sound

waves

attract or repel

filter

teahouse private

relaxation

define


The concept of Sound Affect came while visiting the site of Penn’s Landing, Philadelphia. I had meandered around the site, discovering quiet hidden streets and around corners to bustling restaurants. Sound has always been a directing force towards and away from particular places and events and was the inspiration for this project. The study of how sound affects behavior is fascinating. Different personality types are attracted to different types of sounds while others can be completely repelled.


RANGE

DECIBEL LE

ATTRACTIO

Park / Birds

DETERRANT

RANGE DECIBEL LEVEL ATTRACTION FACTOR DETERRANT FACTOR

Street Scenario A

Bar / Nightclub

conversation church bells park birds ice cream truck traffic very attracted interested neutral avoid repelled

Street Scenario B Siren / Alarm

bar argument conversation nightclub noisy restaurant

Street Scenario C

decibel level Reaction Factor

15 feet

range

siren traffic construction cat calls street vender argument traffic

This notation shows the attraction (blue) and deterrent (red) factor and decibel level of sounds commonly found on a street.

very attracted interested neutral avoid repelled

VERY ATTRACTED INTERESTED NEUTRAL AVOID REPELLED

PERSON 1 PERSON 2 PERSON 3 PERSON 4 RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL RECREATIONAL


STREET SCEN

ARIO A.

STREET SCEN

ARIO B.

STREET SCEN AR

IO C.

Walnut Str eet

eet

Str t n Fro

Survey of different sound types across East Philadelphia

Sound is metered on a range from pleasant and attractive to repulsive and deterring based on a general subjective scale. Each city sound was notated using blue and red curves representing the level of attraction / deterrence across the decibel range. A chain of interacting sounds demonstrates the sound experience someone has while walking down the street. Three Philadelphia streets were represented in this notation, then extruded and fitted with four distinct personality stereotypes displaying how different people have varying reactions to the same street.


Utilizing sound wave simulation software wave nodes were placed on the noisiest part of the site, the adjacent highway. As the nodes grew pools of interception occurred in which more nodes were placed. Eventually a field of interacting sound waves filled the site. The intercepting pools were split into two categories: harmonizing when the waves made a consistent pattern and erratic when the waves had an irregular pattern. The field of harmonizing and erratic patterns was the location for the program across the site. The organization is based on the correlating programs to each other and the specific sounds generated from the activities of the program. The field was converted into a moirĂŠ pattern which was stitched above or below the surface to create a structural system for the program.

This diagram is a survey of varying programs across the leisurescape, The programs are organized by their interactions with surrounding programs and activities, as well as general decibel factors produced during different seasons and times of day.

OFFICE SPACE WORKSHOPS BIKE/ RUNNING TRACK OFFICE SPACE CAFE WORKSHOPS MARKETBIKE/ RUNNING TRACK CINEMA CAFE PERFORMANCE SPACE MARKET CINEMA BAR PERFORMANCE SPACE RESTAURANT BAR OUTDOOR PERFORMANCE SPACE RESTAURANT VIEW OUTDOOR PERFORMANCE SPACE GALLERY VIEW GALLERY HOTEL HOTEL GREEN SPACE GREEN SPACE SPA SPA GYM GYM SPORT FIELDS SPORT FIELDS PRIVATE SPORT FIELDS PRIVATE SPORT FIELDS OUTDOOR PUBLIC SOUND

OUTDOOR PUBLIC SOUND ONLY INDOOR OR NO SOUND ONLY INDOOR OR NO SOUND


DAY

spring summer seasons

NIGHT

spring summer day

spring summer night

winter day

winter season

winter night

CINEMA

BAR

RESTAURANT

OUTDOOR PERFORMANCE PERFORMANCE SPACE SPACE

SPORT FIELDS PRIVATE SPORT FIELDSV

CAFE

BIKE & RUNNING TRACK

MARKET

VIEW

GREEN SPACE OFFICE SPACE GYM

WORKSHOPS

GALLERY

HOTEL

SPA


affect.


tceffa

GILLIAN RODALE STONEBACK / ASSOCIATE AIA /

LEED GA

GRStoneback@gmail.com / 610.390.0320 / 7008 NE Ronler Way, Apt 3238. Hillsboro, OR 97124


GRS Portfolio 0913  
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