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KENTUCKY 2018 GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE


m o r f s g n Greeti

KENTUCKY

VisitBerea.com Exit 77 or 76 off I-75 To customize your tour, contact Connie Mondine at 1-800-598-5263 or Connie@VisitBerea.com


CONTENTS 8 BOURBON 101 10

STUNNING STATE PARKS

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DOWNTOWN FUN

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RELIGIOUS BLUEGRASS ATTRACTIONS

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MEMORABLE MUSEUMS

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AFRICAN-AMERICAN HERITAGE ON THE COVER

PUBLISHED BY

Clockwise from the top: Courtesy Ark Encounter; National Quilt Museum photo by Lynda Self, courtesy Paducah CVB; courtesy Taylor Made Farm and Horse Country

NICHE TRAVEL PUBLISHERS 301 EAST HIGH STREET LEXINGTON, KY 40507 888-253-0455 WWW.GROUPTRAVELLEADER.COM

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KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM


Eastern Kentucky Pikeville/Pike County

ASHLAND, KY

• Paramount Arts Ctr. • Jesse Stuart Museum • Highlands Museum

PAINTSVILLE, KY

• Loretta Lynn’s Childhood Home • Mountain Homeplace • Van Lear Historical Museum

PRESTONSBURG, KY

• Mountain Arts Center • Jenny Wiley State Park • East KY Science Center

PIKEVILLE, KY • Hatteld McCoy Feud Tour • Dueling Barrels Distillery • Pikeville Cut-rough • Jenny Wiley eatre • East KY Expo Center

WWW.TOURPIKECOUNTY.COM


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H E Y,

want to personally invite you to visit Kentucky, the front porch of the South! The memories your group will make in the Bluegrass State will last a lifetime, and your trip will undoubtedly be looked back on fondly for years to come. We are home to some of the finest dining, arts, entertainment, history and outdoor adventure around, all done with that special Kentucky flair. The Kentucky Group Travel Guide will help you discover the many ways to explore the Bluegrass State. Experience the excitement and pageantry of the horse industry, and go behind the scenes to see how these majestic animals live on our iconic horse farms. Bourbon is more than a drink in Kentucky; it’s our heritage and an artisan experience waiting for you, whether it be at a distillery, a bourbon bar or a bourbon-themed hotel. Discover vibrant arts and music, and learn of our history, with visits to museums and memorials commemorating everything from the Civil War to bluegrass music to the one known as “The Greatest of All Time, Muhammad Ali.” Our charming small towns are an eclectic mix of beautiful historic architecture and revitalized energy, with shopping,

dining and entertainment. You can explore Kentucky’s diverse music history with a visit to the home places of the father of bluegrass music, Bill Monroe, or country music legend Loretta Lynn. Create your own works of art with a visit to Berea and see artisans working in their studios. Travel to the UNESCO Creative City Paducah to tour the National Quilt Museum, the largest museum in the world devoted to quilts and fiber arts. In Kentucky, “local food” isn’t a trend but a Y ’A LL! way of life that is evident in our agrarian roots and our artisan culture. Whether it be traditional fare or an inventive new take on an original, Kentucky’s culinary experience is like no other. We invite you to take a journey with us through Kentucky’s beautiful countryside enjoying all the flavors we have to offer in all regions of the state. Big cities are no longer the only places to grab great food. From traditional down-home Southern fare to upscale fine dining to street food and everything in between, there is a Kentucky restaurant or meal to fit your inner foodie. Are you looking to reconnect with nature? Kentucky has 17 resort state parks that offer lodging, recreation and access to some of the most picturesque locations in the country. Kentucky is also the perfect retreat for groups seeking adventure, home to Mammoth Cave, the longest cave system in the world, as well as thousands of miles of waterways and trails. The most adventurous groups will enjoy whitewater rafting at Cumberland Falls or rock climbing in the Red River Gorge. From all that we’re best known for – horses, bourbon and bluegrass, as well as our culinary delights and hospitality – you’ll find wonderful Kentucky travel itineraries for groups that will be unlike any other experiences. We can’t wait to have you in Kentucky, so give us a call and we can help plan that trip of a lifetime for your group!

Y O U R F R I E N D I N T R AV E L Kristen Branscum Commissioner Kentucky Department of Travel and Tourism 866-660-8747 www.kentuckytourism.com

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KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM


Detail: Kaleidoscopic Calamity by Margaret Solomon Gunn

Hundreds of Beautiful Quilts on Exhibit

Aisles of Fabrics, Machines & Quilting Supply Vendors

World-Renowned Quiltmaking Instructors

For more information, visit QuiltWeek.com

Fall Paducah, KY

Spring Paducah, KY

September 12–15, 2018 Schroeder Expo Center

April 18–21, 2018 Schroeder Expo Center

NATIONAL BRAND PARTNER


B O U R B O N H E R I TA G E C E N T E R

ADD KENTUCKY

BOURBON TO YOUR TRIP

K

entucky is the bourbon capital of the world, so it is impossible to talk about it without mentioning its signature spirit. Some believe that the corn-based product originated in Bourbon County, one of the oldest counties in the state. During the 1700s, farmers would ship barrels of whiskey marked with the Bourbon County stamp down the Ohio River for trade. Over the long journey, the oak wood barrels aged the whiskey, giving it that distinct amber color. Eventually, many buyers began calling it “bourbon whiskey” to distinguish it from the rye-based whiskey common in Pennsylvania and Maryland. Today, Kentucky produces 95 percent of the world’s bourbon whiskey. One of the best ways to experience this cultural heritage is by following the Kentucky Bourbon Trail, which represents trademark brands like Maker’s Mark, Woodford Reserve and Jim Beam. In the past five years alone, approximately 2.5 million visitors from around the world have traveled the Bourbon Trail, making it one of the state’s most vital industries. The distillery tours give guests an inside look at the craft of bourbon-making. As a guide leads the group through the production facility, participants learn about the history of the distillery and what makes its bourbon unique. Afterward, the group enjoys a complimentary bourbon tasting. Visitors can pick up their Bourbon Trail passports at their first distillery stop.

Courtesy Kentucky Bourbon Trail, Inc.

MUSEUM

M A K E R’ S M A R K

BOURBON HERITAGE CENTER AND THE EVAN WILLIAMS BOURBON EXPERIENCE

Owned by the award-winning Heaven Hill Distillery, the Bourbon Heritage Center in Bardstown explores the rich heritage of bourbon production in the Bluegrass. Groups can also learn about Heaven Hill’s flagship brand, Evan Williams, at the Evan Williams Bourbon Experience in Louisville’s historic bourbon district.

Courtesy Kentucky Bourbon Trail, Inc.

F O U R RO S E S

Courtesy Louisville CVB

www.heavenhilldistillery.com www.evanwilliams.com

BEHIND THE SCENES

JIM BEAM URBAN STILLHOUSE

Courtesy Four Roses

HARD-HAT TOUR AT BUFFALO TRACE DISTILLERY

During the hard-hat tour at Buffalo Trace Distillery, groups get to experience bourbon production up close as they delve behind the scenes of grain delivery, cooking, fermentation and distillation. The tour also passes through the E.H. Taylor Jr. Microstill, where the distillery’s renowned experimental batches are developed.

www.buffalotracedistillery.com

A B O U R B O N TA S T I N G P L AT E Courtesy Kentucky Bourbon Trail, Inc.

MIXOLOGY CLASS

VIP EXPERIENCE

HISTORIC TOUR

JIM BEAM URBAN STILLHOUSE

DINNER AT THE DISTILLERY AT MAKER’S MARK

WOODFORD RESERVE NATIONAL HISTORIC LANDMARK TOUR

Based in the heart of downtown Louisville, the Jim Beam Urban Stillhouse offers a new tableside cocktail experience where guests can expand their palate and acquire new mixology tips to take home. Parking is available at the Fourth Street Live parking garage.

www.jimbeam.com

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KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

Maker’s Mark Distillery is now featuring an exclusive Dinner at the Distillery experience. Guests arrive on the property in late afternoon to tour a special outdoor exhibition of Dale Chihuly art, and then sit down to enjoy a world-class dinner prepared by resident chefs Newman Miller and Alex Dulaney.

www.makersmark.com

At Woodford Reserve Distillery, groups can explore more than 200 years of history and architecture during the National Historic Landmark property tour. After the tour, visitors can stop at Glenn’s Creek Café for a bite to eat.

www.woodfordreserve.com

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM


FAMILY

FAVORITES GENERATIONS GATHER IN KENTUCKY’S STATE PARKS BY SAVANNAH OSBOURN

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KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM


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roups can experience a true getaway at one of Kentucky’s 49 magnificent state parks. Each park offers its own distinct qual-

ities, from lakeside views to caving adventures and towering natural stone arches. Whether visitors are avid hikers or prefer to admire nature from afar, they can all enjoy the comfort and modern amenities of state park lodges with nature right at their doorstep.

L A K E BA R K LE Y STATE R E SORT PA R K W E ST ER N K EN T UCK Y

Overlooking the sweeping, blue waters of Lake Barkley, Lake Barkley State Resort Park has one of the state’s largest and most impressive lodges, designed by acclaimed architect Edward Durell Stone. Constructed with cedar and Douglas fir, the lodge contains nearly three and a half acres of glass windows, providing great views in every direction. “We consider it to be one our crown jewels in the parks department,” said Gil Lawson, information officer for the Kentucky State Parks Department. The park is near the Land Between the Lakes National Recreation Area, a 170,000-acre strip between Lake Barkley and Kentucky Lake; there, visitors can hike, camp and perhaps catch a glimpse of one of the resident bison or elk.

A G RO U P R E N T S A H O U S E B O AT T O E N J O Y A R E L A X I N G D AY O N L A K E C U M B E R L A N D.

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM

Courtesy Kentucky Dept. of Travel and Tourism

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J E N N Y W I L E Y S TAT E R E S O R T PA R K Lake Barkley Lodge offers 120 rooms, four suites, nine cottage properties and a 78-site campground with access to bathrooms and showers. To spend an afternoon on the water, guests can rent a boat from the marina, which is less than a mile from Lake Barkley Lodge. Other amenities include an 18-hole golf course, horseback riding, racquetball, tennis, volleyball, trapshooting and nine miles of hiking trails, seven of them accessible to mountain bikers. “You walk out the back door and you’re right at the swimming pool and lake,” said Lawson. “Whether you’re there for business purposes or bringing your family to the lake, there are plenty of things to do.” The Windows on the Water restaurant earns its name by providing a panoramic view of the lake and wooded shoreline. The restaurant strives to use locally sourced meats and produce, serving traditional Kentucky fare like fried green tomatoes, catfish fillets and Kentucky hot browns. Groups planning a reception or a corporate event can take advantage of the park’s recently renovated 6,300-square-foot conference center. www.parks.ky.gov/parks/resortparks/lake-barkley

L A K E C U M B E R L A N D S TAT E R E S O R T PA R K

All photos courtesy Kentucky Dept. of Parks, except where noted

L A K E CU M BER L A N D STATE R E SORT PA R K SOUTHERN KENTUCKY

Every summer, thousands of water-sports enthusiasts flock to Lake Cumberland State Resort Park to enjoy activities like swimming, water tubing and fishing. Though it is not the largest lake in the state, Lake Cumberland’s expansive qualities make it a boating paradise. Near the marina, groups can lodge in one of Lure Lodge’s 63 rooms and 29 cottage properties. The lodge restaurant, Rowena Landing, features a sweeping view of the marina below, and guests can watch boats traveling back and forth from the docks as they eat their fill of savory Southern cuisine, like fresh biscuits, fried apples and tender country ham. The name Rowena derives from the local Rowena Ferry Crossing that existed prior to the construction of Wolf Creek Dam, which created the lake during the 1950s. For a change of pace from lake activities, groups can play shuffleboard, miniature golf or tennis. Others enjoy exploring the park’s nine miles of lush hiking trails or lounging in the lodge’s indoor swimming facility. Just down the road from Lure Lodge, the Pumpkin Creek Lodge provides a more intimate lodging space; it features 13 rooms, a central gathering area with a large stone fireplace and a short walking path down to the waterfront. www.parks.ky.gov/parks/resortparks/lake-cumberland

J EN N Y W ILE Y STATE R E SORT PA R K E A ST ER N K EN T UCK Y

Thanks to its proximity to Prestonsburg, Jenny Wiley State Resort Park is a popular attraction for locals and tourists alike. The park is named after an 18th-century frontierswoman who was famously abducted by Native Americans and kept captive for nearly 11 months

“ [NATURAL BRIDGE] IS A HIKER’S PARADISE BECAUSE THERE ARE SO MANY TRAILS AND INTERESTING THINGS TO VISIT.” — GIL L AW SON, K E N T U C K Y S TAT E PA R K S D E PA R T M E N T

Courtesy Kentucky Dept. of Travel and Tourism

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before escaping back home on foot. For a leisurely afternoon on the water, guests can rent pontoons or paddling equipment like canoes and kayaks from the marina. Families often stop by the park’s playground and picnic; outdoor enthusiasts gravitate toward the park’s 10 miles of hiking and mountain-biking trails. May Lodge was thoroughly renovated last year following a fire that occurred near the restaurant and lobby; it just reopened in June. Though the lodge’s 49 guest rooms were unaffected by the accident, the brand-new lounge area is much larger than the previous one and offers a great view of Dewey Lake. “You can stop in for a drink after spending a day on the lake boating or fishing,” said Lawson. “It’s very nice. The work allowed us to redesign that building and make it a little more customer friendly.” In the evening, visitors can grab a bite to eat at the Music Highway Grill and then close out the night with a musical under the stars at the Jenny Wiley Theatre, which hosts outdoor performances throughout the summer. Beginning each September, groups can take advantage of one of Jenny Wiley’s more unusual offerings: guided elk tours. Early in the morning, participants follow a resident park interpreter on a brief hike to common wild-elk locations, providing some rare photo opportunities. www.parks.ky.gov/parks/resortparks/jenny-wiley

LAKE BARKLEY LODGE

NAT U R A L BR I DGE STATE R E SORT PA R K E A ST ER N K EN T UCK Y

Conveniently located just off the Mountain Parkway, Natural Bridge State Resort Park is one of the state’s most distinctive parks, characterized by a 65-foot-tall and 78-foot-long natural sandstone bridge. To reach the arch, visitors can follow a half-mile trail from Hemlock Lodge. Wooden and stone stairways lead to the top of the bridge, where hikers can relish an unparalleled view of the Daniel Boone National Forest, especially in fall when bright reds and yellows cover the treetops. “It’s a hiker’s paradise because there are so many trails and interesting things to visit,” said Lawson. In addition to the park’s campground and 11 cottages, Hemlock Lodge provides 35 rooms with private balconies, which overlook a descending slope of trees that leads to a 60-acre lake. Guests can follow a short boardwalk down to this area to canoe in the lake or swim in the adjacent outdoor swimming pool. During the warmer seasons, weekly square dancing takes place at an event space near the lake known as Ho-Down Island. Meeting groups often make use of the 2,500-square-foot Woodland Center. Natural Bridge State Park offers the only sky lift in the Kentucky parks system, which celebrated its 50th anniversary this year. There WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM

Find sample group tour iteneraries at prestonsburgky.org/events/

Explore prestonsburg

expect the unexpected The secrets distilled from the hills of Kentucky. The magic of nature as elk roam the forest. The rush of the wind as you bike through the mountains. Feel it all, right here in the Star City of Eastern Kentucky.

#feeltheburg

MOONSHINE

Hideaway Tours

MUSIC

Mountain Arts Center & Loretta Lynn Homeplace

PRESTONSBURGKY.ORG

MOUNTAINS

Trails & elk tours

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

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are 19 miles of hiking trails in the park, and the neighboring Red River Gorge Geological Area offers hundreds of miles of trails through breathtaking and mountainous terrain, along with more than a dozen natural arches, though none as large as Natural Bridge. The park’s geological features lend the area to a variety of interesting nature programs throughout the year, such as a wildflower weekend in spring and a herpetology program where naturalists teach groups about native reptiles and amphibians. www.parks.ky.gov/parks/resortparks/natural-bridge N AT U R A L B R I D G E S TAT E R E S O R T PA R K

CU M BER L A N D FA LLS STATE R E SORT PA R K S OU T H ER N K EN T UCK Y

Cumberland Falls State Park is not only home to the largest waterfall in the state; it is also the only place in the Western Hemisphere where a regular moonbow appears. Weather permitting, the phenomenon occurs during the full moon each month when moonlight reflects through the mist of the falls to create a faint arch of light above the water. Groups can find updates about the best viewing dates and times on the park website. Visitors will hear the low rumble of water as soon as they park near the gift shop and visitors center by the river. Within a minute’s walk, C U M B E R L A N D FA L L S they can lean against the railing by one of the viewing decks and feel mist gushing from the 125-foot-wide natural treasure sometimes called the Niagara of the South. Less than a mile away down Cumberland Falls Road, DuPont Lodge is a beautiful, rustic building overlooking the Cumberland River and characterized by sturdy hemlock beams and stone fireplaces. Lodging options include 51 guest rooms, 25 cottages and a 50-site campground. The Riverview Restaurant seats up to 200 guests and features delectable menu items like bourbon-glazed salmon, barbecue pork chop sandwiches and Themes: Music | Visual & Performing Arts | Culinary | Local History & Culture sweet hush puppies. Among the park’s 17 miles of hiking trails, Moonbow Trail intersects with several notable backpacking trails in the Daniel Boone National Forest, and Eagle Falls Trail provides an excellent view of the falls from the opposite bank of the river. A few other popular park activities are rafting, horseback riding, tennis, shuffleboard and fishing. One of the area’s hidden gems is an old firelookout tower called the Pinnacle Knob Tower that is situated on the edge of the park. Guided tours are offered throughout the year; seasonal campout events, during which groups can spend the night in the tower under full view of the night sky, are also offered. www.parks.ky.gov/parks/resortparks/ cumberland-falls

Can you keep a secret? We specialize in custom Mystery Tours

Visit Owensboro | 1-800-489-1131 | visitowensboro.com

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NEW

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ACCESSIBILIT Y TOUR OPENS IN MAMMOTH CAVE In 2016, Mammoth Cave National Park opened an accessible cave tour through some of the most unusual areas in the world’s longest cave. During the two-hour experience, guests take an elevator 267 feet below ground where they can follow an accessible half-mile path to the Snowball Room as well as portions of the Grand Avenue Tour. Refreshments and accessible restrooms are available in the Snowball Room, which is named after the pale, rounded rock formations that cover the ceiling. In July, the park also began construction on a paved half-mile path to Echo River Spring, with plans to expand the Green River crossing parking lot at the Echo River Spring trailhead, adding an accessible picnic area and accessible bathrooms. The park aims to complete the project by 2018. www.nps.gov/maca

Courtesy Mammoth Cave National Park

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM

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GO METRO LET’S

THERE ARE HOTSPOTS IN EVERY KENTUCKY CITY BY SAVANNAH OSBOURN

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WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM


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ometimes the best way to experience the local flavor of a city is by wandering through its downtown area. Visitors will often pass a vibrant

spread of shops, art galleries and local eateries, and it is not always easy to know where to start. To help groups narrow these options, we have highlighted a few key downtown attractions among Kentucky’s most exciting cities.

FOU RTH STR EET LI V E L OUISV IL L E

Based in the heart of Kentucky’s largest city, Fourth Street Live is Louisville’s premier shopping, dining and entertainment complex. “We have multiple locations all under one roof. So if you go to one bar and then decide to go to a different one, it’s very convenient,” said Ashley Satterfield, marketing director of Fourth Street Live. During the day, groups can visit retail chains like Footlocker or T-Mobile, or grab a bite to eat from spots like Taipei Café and Smoothie King in the food court. Sit-down dining options include Guy Fieri’s Smokehouse, the Tavern on Fourth, the Gordon Biersch Brewery Restaurant, the Fudgery and the Hard Rock Cafe. Fourth Street Live is also well known for its vibrant night scene, which features everything from sports bars to upscale clubs and cocktail lounges, with popular venues like Howl at the Moon, the Jim Beam Urban Stillhouse and the Thirsty Peddler. Several of these establishments offer casual activities like pingpong, bowling, billiards and arcade games. www.4thstlive.com

L I V E M U S I C, T R E N D Y C U I S I N E A N D E N T E R TA I N M E N T O P T I O N S C A P T I VAT E D A I LY C RO W D S AT L O U I S V I L L E ’ S F O U R T H S T R E E T L I V E .

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM

Courtesy Fourth Street Live

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Experience Paducah Come be a part of our story and immerse yourself in Paducah’s new Signature Experiences exclusively for groups. Learn more at www.paducah.travel!

1-800-PADUCAH

PCVB-KYgrouptravelguide09-16.indd 1

9/16/16 4:45 PM

Belle of Louisville Riverboats INTRODUCING THE MARY M MILLER

N EW PORT ON T H E LE V EE N E W PORT

At Newport on the Levee, groups can stroll among signature attractions and restaurants while enjoying a full view of the Cincinnati skyline across the Ohio River. “To have a major entertainment facility on the riverfront is just wonderful,” said Julie Kirkpatrick, vice president of sales and marketing at Meet Northern Kentucky. Visitors of all ages are sure to find something fun and engaging to do in this eclectic hub. At Newport Aquarium, one of the area’s most beloved attractions, guests can see a 14-foot-long alligator, stroke stingrays in a touch pool and cross a suspended rope bridge above a shark tank. A few other popular attractions in the area are Gameworks, Axis Alley and AMC Newport. There are plenty of eateries from which to choose, such as Mitchell’s Fish Market, Dewey’s Pizza and Cold Stone Creamery. One of the local favorites is Tom+Chee, a restaurant that specializes is gourmet grilled cheese, tomato soup and salads. To reach downtown Cincinnati, groups can safely walk across the Newport Southbank Bridge, commonly known as the Purple People Bridge. Shuttle services run across the TaylorSouthgate Bridge by the Cincinnati Reds Baseball Stadium. Next summer, Newport on the Levee plans to open the giant Skywheel on the main platform that will offer a 360-degree view of the waterfront and downtown Cincinnati. www.newportonthelevee.com

NEWPORT ON THE LEVEE

BRUNCH, LUNCH, DINNER & SIGHTSEEING CRUISES Two & Three Hour Cruises • Great For Any Sized Group Seasonal Special Events • Motorcoach Parking Handicap Accessible • Inclusive Pricing

belleoflouisville.org | 502.574.2992 | @BelleLouisville 18

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

Courtesy Northern KY CVB

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM


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STINGRAY HIDEAWAY OPENS AT NEWPORT AQUARIUM L E X I N G T O N FA R M E R S M A R K E T

Courtesy Lexington Visitors Center

LEX INGTON

No matter how many times visitors wander through downtown Lexington, they are sure to stumble upon a local eatery or boutique they have never seen, tucked away on a side street or in a historic neighborhood. Among the over 100 established bars and restaurants near the Lexington Convention Center are Pies and Pints, Shakespeare and Company, School Sushi, the Buddha Lounge and the brand-new Latin-inspired eatery Corto Lima. Every Thursday evening from April to October, local vendors, craft brewers and musicians gather in Fifth Third Pavilion for a signature local event known as Thursday Night Live. “It’s a great place to mix and mingle with locals,” said Niki Heichelbech-Goldey, director of communications at the Lexington Visitors Center. The 21c Museum Hotel offers a free contemporary art gallery, and the bimonthly LexArts Gallery Hop draws thousands of art lovers to over 50 art venues across town. On Monday nights, locals flock to the Woodsongs Old-Time Radio Hour at the Lyric Theater, which presents some of the best musical talents in the country during a one-hour live radio show. Groups would be remiss not to visit the city’s historic bourbon distillery district, just a few minutes from downtown. www.visitlex.com

Last spring, Newport Aquarium opened a new tropical exhibit called Stingray Hideaway where guests can interact with two-dozen stingrays and other colorful fish up close. Inside a 40-foot-high atrium, the highlight of the attraction is a 17,000-gallon touch pool where children and adult guests can stroke the silky wings of three distinct species of stingrays as they glide past. Visitors can also venture into a 30-foot-long underwater tunnel to see the playful creatures swim overhead; the tunnel has a special viewing tube that pops up inside the pool. This development is the aquarium’s most ambitious expansion since the shark bridge opened in 2015. www.newportaquarium.com

Experience Frankfort Kentucky!

We are the essence of everything that makes Kentucky special. Visitfrankfort.com

Frankfort/Franklin County Tourist Commission 800-960-7200 • salesdirector@visitfrankfort.com

20 min. from Lexington • 45 min. from Louisville

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

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PIK E V ILLE

H I L L B I L LY D AY S

Courtesy Pike County Tourism CVB

Known as the home of the infamous Hatfield and McCoy feud, Pikeville offers a wide range of colorful festivals, restaurants and handcrafted products in its downtown area. To learn more about the Hatfield and McCoy feud, visitors can stop by sites such as the historic courthouse where the Hatfield family was put on trial for allegedly stealing a pig from the McCoy family. An Italian restaurant called Chirico’s Ristorante is located within the former McCoy family residence. The area offers some great dining options, like Bank 253, Bob’s Southern Smokehouse, Joyce’s Place and Blue Raven, which is recognized by Bon Appetit as an authentic Southern heritage restaurant. In April each year, over 120,000 people travel to Pikeville for Hillbilly Days, a three-day festival of mountain music, square dancing and comical hillbilly costumes. Later in the fall, a smaller event called Hatfield and McCoy Heritage Days takes place. Descendants of the two original families often attend to meet with visitors and answer questions. www.tourpikecounty.com

BOW LING GR EEN

Fountain Square Park is the highlight of Bowling Green’s charming downtown area. Encircled by quaint restaurants and boutiques, the F O U N TA I N S Q U A R E PA R K C O R S A I R D I S T I L L E RY park features a beautiful Romanesque fountain in an open, grassy area lined with park benches and mature trees. Many of the surrounding historic buildings have been lovingly restored over the years, creating Courtesy Bowling Green Area CVB Courtesy Bowling Green Area CVB a cozy, small-town atmosphere. “We have a really fun heritage walk around downtown if you’re interested in exploring the KENTUCKY history,” said Marissa Butler, marketing director ... at the Bowling Green Convention and Visitors Bureau. THE SIGHTS & SOUNDS OF GEORGETOWN. SCOTT COUNTY Micki’s on Main is a well-established bar lounge and restaurant on the square, which frequently hosts live music on weekends. Its neighboring sister restaurant, 440 Main, offers a more formal setting. Groups can stop by Candle Makers on the Square for a unique local souvenir, or sample a steaming mocha or chai tea latte from Spencer’s Coffee. The old Capitol Theater presents monthly events and shows, such as the Lost River Sessions concert series. Nearby, the Corsair Distillery specializes in experimental concoctions such as spiced rum, red absinthe, vanilla bean vodka and pumpkin spice moonshine. Tasting tours are available throughout the week. www.visitbgky.com

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avor

MALL TOWN CHARM. PURE SMALL

INTERSTATE

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tops for groups at the top of the state

Left to Right: Ark Encounter, Coppin’s at Hotel Covington, Braxton Brewing Co., Mac’s Pizza Pub, Marriott RiverCenter, Newberry Bros. Coffee & Prohibition Bourbon Bar, National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, Mainstrasse Village, Newport Aquarium, Cincinnati Zoo, Smoke Justis, New Riff Distilling, Hofbrauhaus Newport, Covington, BB Riverboats, Ark Encounter

#makeitNKY meetNKY.com


FAITH

ENCOUNTERS KENTUCKY HONORS ITS PLACES OF REVERENCE BY SAVANNAH OSBOURN


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entucky’s lush green hills and wooded escapes have drawn various religious groups over the years, from the innovative Shakers who

once populated Shaker Village of Pleasant Hill to the modernday Amish community of Marion. Some travelers seek spiritual respite at the beautiful Trappist monastery of Gethsemani near Bardstown, as well as at the full-scale replica of Noah’s Ark at Ark Encounter.

CR E ATION M USEU M A N D A R K ENCOU N TER

PET ER S BU RG

AND

W IL L I A M ST OW N

Opened in 2007, the Creation Museum has quickly established itself as one of Kentucky’s signature religious attractions. Based on the biblical Book of Genesis, the museum examines the nature of Earth’s origin from a creationist standpoint. Approximately 45 minutes away, the Ark Encounter displays a towering 510-foot-long timber ark that was built according to dimensions described in the biblical story of Noah and the flood. The ark spans roughly the length of one and a half football fields. Mark Looy, chief spokesperson for the attraction, described how he enjoys hearing the audible gasps on the shuttle when the ark comes into view. “It’s jaw-droppingly big,” said Looy. “And it’s even more impressive as you walk inside.” The gigantic timber structure contains three decks of colorful exhibits and educational videos, which can take up to three hours

G RO U P S F I N D A P R AY E R F U L R E T R E AT E X P E R I E N C E AT T H E A B B E Y O F G E T H S E M A N I.

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM

Courtesy Abbey of Gethsemani

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ABBEY OF GETHSEMANI

to explore. Afterward, guests can grab a bite to eat at the 1,500-seat buffet-style restaurant or stop by the Ararat Ridge Zoo next door to see exotic creatures like zebras, kangaroos and Tibetan yak. Plans are in the works to create a world city reminiscent of the diverse Middle Eastern culture in which Noah would have lived. www.creationmuseum.org www.arkencounter.com

A BBE Y

ARK ENCOUNTER

Courtesy Ark Encounter

Courtesy Abbey of Gethsemani

OF

GETHSEM A N I

T R A PPI ST

Nestled amid 1,200 acres of charming, wooded property near Bardstown, the Abbey of Gethsemani has been a staple of Kentucky culture and history for over 150 years. French Trappist monks founded the abbey in 1848 after fleeing political turmoil in Europe, making it the oldest abbey in the United States. Today, many people know the site as the former home of celebrated Kentucky author, poet and social activist Thomas Merton. In 1948, Merton penned his autobiography, “The Seven Storey Mountain,” considered one of the most influential spiritual works of the 20th century. Though visitors cannot enter the monastery itself, they are welcome to stop by the welcome center and the church, where a community Mass and other services are held throughout the day. At the welcome center, guests can watch a 35-minute film about Gethsemani’s monastic community, called “One Day,” and pick up a souvenir of homemade Kentucky bourbon fruitcake or salted caramel fudge, which the monks also sell online to support the abbey. Groups can pick up a map of the property at the welcome center to explore the surrounding trail system.

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KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM


According to Brother Luke, one of the abbey’s residents, a spiritual hunger and curiosity often draw people, especially those seeking a respite from their daily routines. www.monks.org

AMISH COMMUNITY M A R ION

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MARION

The first Amish settlement came to Crittenden County in 1977 and today holds more than 400 members. The community’s simple lifestyle is characterized by hard work and deep faith. Without modern distractions like phones and motorized vehicles, the Amish people focus on church, family and manual labor, maintaining a more direct connection with their community and surroundings. In addition to growing most of their own food, members of the community take great care in crafting quality products like furniture, cabinets and quilts, which can be found at home-based shops throughout the area. Groups can pick up a map at the Welcome Center and take a self-guided driving tour, stopping by local bakeries, produce shops and craft stores. “People are fascinated with the lifestyle,” said Michelle Edwards, director of the Marion Tourism Commission, adding that with Lake Barkley just 30 minutes away, many travelers pass through the area for an afternoon excursion. As a traditional community, there are no commercialized attractions for tourists such as Amish restaurants and horse-and-buggy rides; but visitors can have an authentic cultural experience and take home artisan products like fresh breads and handwoven rugs. www.marionkentucky.org/amish

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TWO OUTDOOR ADVENTURE OPPORTUNITIES COME TO EASTERN KENTUCKY In June 2016, Treetop Adventure opened at Levi Jackson State Park near London, offering outdoor enthusiasts two and a half hours of aerial treetop thrills. Participants can choose from five different obstacle courses that are color-coded according to difficulty. The tree platforms are connected by a variety of zip lines, wooden plank bridges and cables, each presenting its own challenge as guests make their way across. Visitors of all skill levels are welcome. Nestled amid the mountains of Kentucky and Virginia, Breaks Interstate Park opened a new set of climbing routes last year, with plans to integrate more in the future. Between 50 and 75 routes are now available along the park’s stunning sandstone cliffs. www.treetopadventureky.com www.breakspark.com

Take a tour of the Kentucky Cooperage just minutes from Maker’s Mark Distillery and see how the world’s finest bourbon barrels are crafted. www.visitlebanonky.com

270.692.0021

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

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ST. M A RY ’S C ATH EDR A L BA SILIC A OF T H E A SSU M P TION COV INGT ON

Inspired by the Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, France, St. Mary’s Cathedral Basilica of the Assumption is a stunning example of Gothic architecture. Designed by Detroit architect Leon Coquard during the early 1900s, the church was elevated to the rank of minor basilica by Pope Pius XII in 1953, making it one of only 35 minor basilicas in the United States. Visitors may recognize the circular Rose Window, visible above three arching doorways on the face of the building; the window was modeled directly on the iconic Rose Window of Notre Dame Cathedral. It is also hard to miss the 26 stone gargoyles perched along the basilica’s outer walls. Though arguably one of the most fantastical features of Gothic architecture, gargoyles serve a practical purpose by diverting rainwater from the church walls, with the mouth of the statue acting as a spout. “Photos do not do it justice,” said Julie Kirkpatrick, vice president of sales and marketing at Meet Northern Kentucky. “You have to see the sun hit the stained glass for yourself.” Groups are encouraged to take a guided tour of the basilica, which expounds upon the history of the artwork and the architecture and how the church has played a crucial role in the Covington community over the years. www.covcathedral.com

SHAKER VILLAGE

Courtesy Shaker Village of Pleasant Hill

S T. M A RY ’ S C AT H E D R A L

Courtesy Northern KY CVB

AMISH IN MARION

SH A K ER V ILL AGE OF PLE A SA N T HILL H A R ROD S BU RG

Courtesy Marion Tourist Commission

EXPERIENCE ~

Shaker Village of Pleasant Hill A Landmark Destination — The Historic Centre, The Farm & The Preserve

Old For Harrod State Park Costumed artisans, seasonal outdoor theatre, fort, museum & gift shop

• Beaumont Inn • Shaker Village • Bright Leaf Golf Resort • Over 300 affordable rooms just minutes SW of Lexington. • Olde Towne Distillery • Lemons Mill Brewery • Award-winning downtown • Unique shopping & dining • Year-round arts, cultural & music events. www.HarrodsburgKY.com • 800-355-9192

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KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

Once home to the third-largest Shaker community in the country, Shaker Village of Pleasant Hill spans 3,000 acres of charming bluegrass landscape. The property features 34 of the village’s original 260 structures, in addition to a restaurant, an inn, gardens and 37 miles of hiking trails through native prairies and woodland. The Shakers designed many characteristics of the buildings to embody their spiritual values. For example, the double doors and double staircases in some of the houses are meant to reflect the dual nature of relationships. “They merged their spiritual and physical worlds almost seamlessly,” said Aaron Genton, collections manager at Shaker Village. “The beautiful physical world they created wasn’t just meant to look pretty. They were trying to create a place where they could prosper spiritually.” Groups can partake in a variety of programs and events offered throughout the year, from dance demonstrations to horse-drawn-carriage rides and gardening classes. One of the current highlights is an exhibit called “Shaker Modern” that demonstrates how Shaker ideals and perspectives connect with the modern world. This year, Shaker Village plans to extensively renovate the Centre Family Dwelling and Meeting House. shakervillageky.org WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM


THINK

BIGGER Plan your visit at ArkEncounter.com Williamstown, KY (south of Cincinnati)


COMMONWEALTH

COLLECTIONS BY SAVANNAH OSBOURN

KENTUCKY REVERES ITS ERAS OF OLD


K

entucky’s finest museums explore a range of colorful subjects, from artisan quilt-making to regional caves and bluegrass music. Visitors

will discover both strange and wonderful artifacts throughout these galleries, among them a 19th-century mechanical model of the universe, the fiddle of bluegrass legend Bill Monroe and the last telephone owned by Adolph Hitler.

BLUEGR ASS MUSIC MUSEUM OWENSBORO

Rooted in the folk music of Appalachia, bluegrass music contains elements of Irish, Scottish and English traditional music. Like jazz, the genre is characterized by improvisation and complex chord transitions. It was first brought to the world stage during the 1930s by legendary fiddler Bill Monroe, who later became known as the Father of Bluegrass. Based in Owensboro, the International Bluegrass Museum and Hall of Fame is the only museum in the world dedicated to this eclectic genre. Though now located in the RiverPark Center complex, the museum plans to open its own 50,000-square-foot facility next summer. Once the new facility opens, guided tours will be offered daily. Groups can supplement their experience by scheduling a live performance from a local bluegrass band. As visitors explore the exhibits, they will learn about the history of bluegrass as well as the instruments that helped shape it. One of the prized artifacts on display is the first fiddle ever owned by Monroe. “Many people are familiar with the artists, but not a whole

L I N C O L N’ S WAT C H I S A F E AT U R E D AT T R A C T I O N AT T H E K E N T U C K Y H I S T O R I C A L S O C I E T Y I N F R A N K F O R T.

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM

Courtesy Kentucky Historical Society

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

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O L D S TAT E C A P I T O L

“THE MUSEUM’S MISSION IS TO HELP PUSH THE ENVELOPE ABOUT WHAT QUILTING IS. ” — F O WLER BL AC K, PADUCAH CVB

lot of people know about the history of the instruments, which came from all over the world,” said Katie Keller, marketing director at the museum. “The timeline is really neat because you see how immigrants influenced bluegrass.” Every Saturday night, the theater will host bluegrass jam sessions and concerts that will feature everything from traditional acts to more progressive groups that incorporate electric instruments and other genres like rock and roll. www.bluegrassmuseum.org

K EN T UCK Y HISTOR IC A L SOCIET Y

Courtesy Kentucky Historical Society

NEW

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FRANKFORT

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KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

HORSE COUNTRY EXPERIENCE LAUNCHES A local nonprofit called Horse Country Inc. launched in 2016 to represent over 35 of the state’s most distinguished horse farms, veterinary clinics and other equine destinations. To visit one or several of these sites, groups can hop on the Horse Country website and schedule an exclusive behind-the-scenes tour with the touch of a button. Horse-racing fans have never encountered a better opportunity to dive into the heart of horse country and meet some of the track’s greatest champions face to face. Many of these tours take groups through the stables, the breeding shed and other key areas of the farm while a guide discusses the history of the property. The experience typically lasts an hour and requires a moderate amount of standing and walking. www.visithorsecountry.com

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM

Courtesy Taylor Made Farm & Horse Country

Travelers can trace over 250 years of Kentucky history in the beautiful state capital of Frankfort, and the best place to start is with the Kentucky Historical Society historical campus, which comprises three landmark attractions located within a block of one another: The Thomas D. Clark Museum for Kentucky History, the Old State Capitol and the Kentucky Military History Museum. Groups can purchase one ticket to visit all three sites. According to Laurel Harper, director of marketing and communications for the Kentucky Historical Society, these museums enable visitors to experience the “breadth and depth of Kentucky history, and how much the state has contributed to [the] growth of the nation.” The Thomas D. Clark Center for Kentucky History takes visitors on a chronological journey through the state’s history, with more than 10,000 artifacts on display. In the Hall of Governors, guests can learn about Kentucky’s principal political leaders through interactive touch screens and videos, and in honor of Kentucky’s 250th anniversary of statehood celebrated throughout 2017. Nearby, groups can tour the historic Old Capitol, where famed legislators like Henry Clay, Isaac Shelby and Thomas Metcalfe met during the mid-1800s. The Kentucky Military History Museum, housed in an old state military arsenal, reveals the personal narratives of Kentuckian soldiers from the American Revolution to modern day. www.history.ky.gov


NATIONA L QU ILT M USEU M PADUCAH

One thing will quickly become clear to visitors as they examine the intricate and breathtaking quilts on display in Paducah’s National Quilt Museum: These are not the same kind of quilts their grandmothers used to make. The museum features some of the finest fiber art in the world, with works ranging from traditional quilt patterns to interpretive 3-D products hanging from the ceiling. “There’s controversy within the quilting world between the purist and modernists, but the museum’s mission is to help push the envelope about what quilting is,” said Fowler Black, director of sales at the Paducah Convention and Visitors Bureau. “It’s more than just art; it’s a way of telling a story.” To delve deeper into this art form, groups can sign up for an exclusive VIP tour called Creative Stitch. During this program, a museum guide takes the group behind the scenes of exhibits to view distinct quilting styles and fabrics. Participants then take this inspiration back to the classroom to design their own nine-patch quilts. Afterward, the museum frames the original quilt block so guests can proudly display it back at home. Black described how the male visitors are often surprised by how much they enjoy the experience. In fall and spring each year, over 30,000 quilters travel to Paducah from around the world to participate in QuiltWeek, a competitive fiberart event. www.quiltmuseum.org

I N T E R N AT I O N A L B L U E G R A S S M U S I C M U S E U M Courtesy International Bluegrass Music Museum

N AT I O N A L Q U I LT M U S E U M

Courtesy National Quilt Museum

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

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HI DDEN R I V ER C AV E A N D A M ER IC A N C AV E M USEU M

H I D D E N R I V E R C AV E

HORSE CAVE

Courtesy Hidden River Cave and American Cave Museum

HIGHLANDS MUSEUM

In the heart of downtown Horse Cave, Hidden River Cave has transformed over the past 30 years from an abandoned sewage dump to one of the most popular adventure attractions in southern Kentucky. “Hidden River Cave was once one of the most polluted caves in America,” said David Foster, executive director of the American Cave Museum. “We cleaned it up and restored it. Now, it’s the only place in the region where you can do a cave tour, zip lining and rappelling all in one location.” The guided cave tour takes groups through two subterranean rivers that flow more than 100 feet below ground. Along the way, visitors pass an early-1900s hydroelectric generator from the days when the cave supplied the local community with water and power. Cave tours include admission to the American Cave Museum, where visitors can learn about groundwater quality, cave wildlife, regional geology and more. The adventurous can try their hand at rappelling 75 feet from the mouth of the cave or zip lining 70 feet above the ground at 30 miles per hour. Hidden River Cave plans to expand the attraction over the coming year, extending the zip-line feature and adding an underground swinging bridge. www.hiddenrivercave.com

HIGHL A N DS M USEU M A N D DISCOV ERY CEN TER

Courtesy Highlands Museum and Discovery Center

ASHLAND

Birthplace of Beer Cheese

Group Culinary & Outdoor Adventures! • Beer Cheese Trail • Ale-8-One Tours • Harkness Edward’s Winery • Laura’s Hemp Chocolates

Hamon Haven Winery

• Creative Coffees Roastery Tour • Blackfish Bison Ranch • Bluegrass Heritage Museum • Holly Rood Historic Home

Coming 2018! Wildcat Willy’s Distillery LLC

Over 300 affordable hotel rooms only 15 min. E. of Lexington!

32

800-298-9105

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

tourwinchester.com

Based in Ashland, the Highlands Museum and Discovery Center explores the rich history and cultural heritage of eastern Kentucky, engaging visitors through interactive media, life-size replicas and more. In the Country Music Heritage Hall, groups will learn about Kentucky’s Country Music Highway, which commemorates local country stars such as Billy Ray Cyrus, Ricky Skaggs and Loretta Lynn. Ashland marks the second stop along the highway as the hometown of the Judds. Visitors can create their own music on the Karaoke Korner stage or through an interactive sound sculpture called the “Music Quilt.” The “School Daze” exhibit challenges guests to imagine life in the era of one-room schoolhouses, and an exhibit called “Extremes in Fashion” explores the evolution of fashion from tea gowns to wool swimsuits and miniskirts. Designed by the Space Science Program at Morehead State University, the Space Science Hall examines the field of aerospace and how scientists use technology like satellites. The military gallery contains one of the museum’s most fascinating artifacts: the last telephone owned by Adolph Hitler. www.highlandsmuseum.com

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM


KENTUCKY ARTISAN CENTER OPEN DAILY 9-6 SHOP ● DINE ● EXPLORE BUSES WELCOME BEREA EXIT

77

859-985-5448 www.kentuckyartisancenter.ky.gov

The Kentucky Artisan Center is an agency in the Tourism, Arts and Heritage Cabinet of the State of Kentucky Left to right: Stephen Rolfe Powell • Brook Forrest White Jr. Patrick Dougherty • Jennifer Lackey Moore


A

STATE OF

MANY

HUES

VISIT KENTUCKY’S AFRICAN-AMERICAN HERITAGE SITES BY SAVANNAH OSBOURN


O

ver the past two centuries, Kentucky has played a significant role in African-American history. It is the birthplace of

Abraham Lincoln, the man who freed more than 3 million slaves with the Emancipation Proclamation, as well as modern heroes like world-champion boxer Muhammad Ali. Travelers can delve into their inspirational stories and many others as they explore the following noteworthy sites.

HOTEL M ETROPOLITA N PADUCAH

During segregation, the Hotel Metropolitan served as Paducah’s only African-American hotel, housing world-famous musicians and entertainers such as Billie Holiday, Ray Charles and Tina Turner on the second floor of the modest, shotgun-style house. Though the historic treasure later fell into disrepair, a nonprofit called the Upper Town Heritage Foundation acquired the building during the 1980s and restored it for public viewing. “It’s the quintessential candidate for a hidden gem,” said Fowler Black, sales director at the Paducah Convention and Visitors Bureau. Visitors should prepare themselves for an immersive experience. From the moment they step on the porch, guests are transported to the early 1900s as Ms. Maggie Steed, the hotel hostess, cautiously answers the door. “If it’s a group of white folks, Ms. Maggie will turn around the open sign and say through the window, ‘Children, I can’t help ya; get back on the bus,’ and scold everybody about getting her in trouble with Jim Crow laws,” said Black.

G RO U P S C A N I M A G I N E L I F E D U R I N G S E G R E G AT I O N AT T H E H O T E L M E T RO P O L I TA N, O N C E T H E O N LY A F R I C A N - A M E R I C A N H O T E L I N PA D U C A H.

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM

Courtesy Hotel Metropolitan

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

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“IT’S REALLY ABOUT ONE PERSON’S LIFE AND HOW THAT PERSON FACED THE LOWS IN HIS LIFE”

THE COOKSEY HOUSE

JEANIE KAHNKE, MUHAMMAD ALI CENTER

Courtesy Western KY African-American Heritage Center

inspired many with his unapologetic pride in his abilities and beliefs. Born Cassius Clay, Ali changed his name after converting to Islam early in his career. When certain news outlets refused to recognize his new name and faith, he famously said, “I am America. I am the part you won’t recognize. But get used to me. Black, confident, cocky; my name, not yours; my religion, not yours; my goals, my own. Get used to me.” “It’s really about one person’s life and how that person faced the lows in his life,” Kahnke said. “It took a lot of conviction, perseverance and dedication.” www.alicenter.org MUHAMMAD ALI CENTER

Courtesy Muhammad Ali Center

After some coaxing, Ms. Maggie allows the visitors inside and begins showing them around the house, describing how she built it back in 1908, a time when not many black women could claim to own and operate their own establishment. She goes on to talk about everyday life in segregated culture and how even celebrated artists like Billie Holiday had nowhere else to stay in town but the Hotel Metropolitan. At the end of the tour, guests are treated to tea or coffee and a slice of Ms. Maggie’s chess pie. It is recommended to pair the experience with a visit to the Civil War Museum just two blocks down the road, which is housed in the former home of a Civil War general. Tours must be scheduled in advance. www.paducah.travel

M U H A M M A D A LI CEN TER LOUISVILLE

Many people know Muhammad Ali for his feats in the boxing ring, but at the Muhammad Ali Center in Louisville, groups also learn about his intellectual genius, his passion for social activism and his lifelong humanitarian efforts. “Since Muhammad passed away last year, it has raised global awareness about his legacy and what he meant to the nation, especially his home state of Kentucky. He never forgot where he came from,” said Jeanie Kahnke, senior director of public relations and external affairs at the center. Whether or not visitors are sports fans, the museum offers a thoughtprovoking glimpse into one man’s professional and spiritual journey. In addition to winning three national heavyweight championships, Ali 36

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

W E ST K EN T UCK Y A FR IC A N-A M ER IC A N H ER ITAGE CEN TER RUSSELLVILLE

Located in the historic Black Bottom District of Russellville, the West Kentucky African-American Heritage Center consists of six landmark buildings where visitors can learn the rich stories of the freed slaves who first developed the local African-American community. The largest of these buildings is the Neoclassical Bibb House, which belonged to early abolitionist and Revolutionary War veteran, Maj. Richard Bibb. Bibb freed 29 slaves during his lifetime and provided passage for several of them to travel to Liberia. His will ensured the freedom of his remaining slaves upon his death and gave them land on which to live. During the early 1900s, the Cooksey House was the home of schoolteacher Charles Cooksey for 40 years while he was working in the Colored Schools of Logan County. The Kimbrough House belonged to the first African-American in the country to serve on a jury, and the PayneDunnigan House pays tribute to Alice Allison Dunnigan, a civil rights activist and reporter who was the first black female journalist to serve as a White House press correspondent. As groups tour these buildings, they will learn the histories of former residents as well other African-Americans in the community, including soldiers who fought in the Civil War and local blues singer Mary Ann Fisher, also known as the “songbird of the South,” who sang alongside Ray Charles as his first female vocalist. Other exhibits explore harsh social realities such as segregated schools and the 1908 lynching from an oak tree of four innocent black men. “It’s the only exhibit in the entire South that deals with lynching,” said Michael Morrow, director of the museum.

www.slavery2freedom.com

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM


NATIONA L U N DERGROU N D R A ILROA D M USEU M

NEW

IN

KY

MAYSVILLE

When the National Underground Railroad Museum opened in Maysville in 1995, it was the first museum in the country dedicated to the secret network of safe houses known as the underground railroad, which helped runaway slaves cross the border to freedom during the 1800s. “This region was the last divider between slave and free,” said Crystal Marshall, one of the docents at the museum. “Once you crossed over into Ohio, you were in free territory. When people visit here, they can look across the river and see the short distance that separated someone from their destiny.” The museum resides in the historic Bierbower House, originally owned by Jonathan and Lucetta Bierbower. The couple moved to Kentucky from Pennsylvania during the 1830s and used their cellar to hide runaways until safe passage across the Ohio River could be guaranteed. “The house itself is the biggest artifact,” said Marshall. The upstairs area features exhibits and artifacts that shed light on the history of slavery in Kentucky, from records of African-American marriages to newspaper accounts of the abolitionist effort. As guests peruse these displays, they can learn about the methods and routes that abolitionists and runaway slaves used to evade capture. The museum is open for tours on Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays. Other visits can be arranged with notice. www.nurm.org

BILL MONROE MUSEUM BREAKS GROUND Not many musicians can claim that a whole genre of music is named after their band. This past spring, the city of Rosine broke ground for the upcoming Bill Monroe Museum, in honor of Grammy Award-winning musician Bill Monroe, also known as the Father of Bluegrass. Monroe founded the original bluegrass band during the 1930s, called the Blue Grass Boys, after his home state of Kentucky. During his 58-year performance career, Monroe helped define the eclectic genre he described as “blues and jazz” with “a high lonesome sound,” developing the classic five-piece ensemble of guitar, banjo, bass, fiddle and mandolin. He was later inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, and the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame, becoming one of only five artists to be recognized in all three. www.visitohiocountyky.com

“Making memories is our nature...” Henderson is framed by nature. The river rolls. The birds fly. With history and charm as its backdrop, Henderson inspires. Experience the muse of John James Audubon, W.C. Handy and others who turned life into beauty, art, commerce and success. Explore miles of riverfront parks, a vibrant downtown, beautiful wineries and the world’s largest collection of Audubon artifacts and art. Discover your nature at www.HendersonKy.org/group

1-800-648-3128 | abby@hendersonky.org

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

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“ T H E Y C A N LOOK ACROS S T H E R I V E R A N D SEE T H E SHORT DISTA NCE T H AT SEPA R AT ED SOM EON E F ROM T H E I R DE ST I N Y.”

BIERBOWER HOUSE

Courtesy National Underground Railroad Museum

CRYSTAL MARSHALL, NATIONAL UNDERGROUND RAILROAD MUSEUM

A BR A H A M LINCOLN BIRTH PL ACE NATIONA L HISTOR IC PA R K HODGENVILLE

The Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historic Park gives visitors the opportunity to learn more about Abraham Lincoln’s early life and upbringing. When groups arrive at the park, they can stop by the Visitors Center to watch a 15-minute orientation film as well as browse the bookstore and gift shop. K N O B C R E E K FA R M The highlight of the park is the First Lincoln Memorial, a beautiful Neoclassical building that marks the site where Lincoln was born in 1801. “A lot of people think the memorial is copied from the one in Washington, D.C., but it actually predates the Lincoln Memorial by 11 Courtesy NPS years,” said Stacy Humphreys, chief of interpretation and resource management at the park. Barton Distillery The memorial was designed by acclaimed architect John Russell Pope, who also produced the Jefferson Memorial in Washington and was often considered the last great Roman architect. Inside the memorial, visitors will find a replica of the small log cabin where Lincoln was born and raised. After groups exit the memorial, they may notice the Sinking Spring at the base of the stairs, which would have served as the Lincoln family’s primary water source. Nearby, a marker stands where a boundary oak tree once stood on the edge of the farm property. According to Humphreys, the park draws a surprising number of international visitors each year, many of whom are intimately familiar with Lincoln’s biography. “A lot of people are struck by his strength of character and the way he led the country through the Civil War,” she said. “Here you have a man who How does a place so small become the Bourbon Capital of was born in a log cabin and eventually occupied the White House. I think that resonates with people.” the World®? Start with the second-oldest town in Kentucky, add Groups can also stop by the Knob Creek Farm a plethora of bourbon-inspired restaurants and shops, sprinkle down the road, where Lincoln’s family lived durwith seven distilleries, and serve on a scenic countryside. ing his later boyhood years. A reconstructed cabin Visit Bardstown – the small town with big escapes. resides on the Knob Creek property as well. www.nps.gov/abli www.visitbardstown.com | 800.638.4877 38

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM


Shelbyville . Simpsonville . Kentucky Atmospheric Dining: Claudia Sanders Dinner House Boutique shopping and the only Outlet Mall in Kentucky Agritourism Tours Behind the scenes horse farm tours NEW: Ground to Glass Distillery Tour

Step on Guide Service Available

VisitShelbyKY.com

502.633.6388


Next time someone asks what you did last weekend, have a better answer. In Kentucky, you can enjoy amazing food, music, entertainment, horse racing, distillery tours and much more. All delivered with true Southern hospitality and charm. To learn more and see sample itineraries, visit KentuckyTourism.com.

Come experience what we’re famous for.

#travelky

2018 Kentucky Group Travel Guide  

With the 2018 Kentucky Group Travel Guide, you'll find ideas to treat your group to vibrant arts and music and explore the history, museums...

2018 Kentucky Group Travel Guide  

With the 2018 Kentucky Group Travel Guide, you'll find ideas to treat your group to vibrant arts and music and explore the history, museums...