Page 1

KENTUCKY 2019 GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE


M

RE

M E E T I N G S PA C E T H A N A N Y H O T E L I N K E N T U C K Y

Better order more name badges. With 53 meeting rooms, two ballrooms, an exhibit hall and 1,300 guest rooms, the Galt House can easily accommodate large groups and conferences. Start planning your next event at galthouse.com/meetings.


CONTENTS 8

SIGNATURE FLAVORS

10

THE BOURBON BOOM

18

MADE IN KENTUCKY

26

KENTUCKY’S MUSIC HERITAGE

34

SHOP THE BLUEGRASS

42

KENTUCKY OUTDOORS ON THE COVER

PUBLISHED BY

Clockwise from the top: A meal in Daniel Boone Country includes regional favorites such as soup beans, ramps and chow-chow relish. Photo courtesy KY Dept. of Tourism.

NICHE TRAVEL PUBLISHERS 301 EAST HIGH STREET LEXINGTON, KY 40507 888-253-0455 WWW.GROUPTRAVELLEADER.COM

4

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM


Discover Berea Folk Arts

To customize your tour, contact Connie at connie@visitberea.com

Natur

e

1-800-598-5263

Shopping

c

Musi

Rela

xing

g

in Din

Learni

ng

VisitBerea.com • Exit 76 or 77 off I-75

ts

Even

Histor Fun

y


T

H E Y,

he time to visit Kentucky is now! The memories your group will make and the stories you will hear, past and present, will last a lifetime. Bluegrass music, bourbon, pristine natural beauty and unique culinary flavors are all part of what makes everything “Better in the Bluegrass.” The Kentucky Group Travel Guide will help you discover the many ways to explore the Bluegrass State. Beautiful horse farms are everywhere, offering a behind-the- scenes look at raising, training and caring for these magnificent creatures — from thoroughbreds to American Saddlebreds. And, if you like sports, you can’t miss the greatest two minutes in sports — the Kentucky Derby that’s held the first Saturday in May. Get a taste of Kentucky through the unique flavors of our state. Local food isn’t a trend but a way of life that is evident in our agrarian roots and our artisan culture. Across the state, chefs are cooking regional favorites and putting their own spin on traditional dishes. From the traditional down home Southern fare to upscale fine dining to street food and anything in between, there is a Kentucky restaurant or meal to fit your inner foodie.

While you are here, you have to try one of our very special spirits: bourbon! With 95 percent of the world’s supply crafted in Kentucky, it is more than a drink here — it’s a lifestyle. Whether you are new to bourbon or an expert, whether you prefer your bourbon on the rocks or mixed, or if you want to eat your way through bourbon country, there is a bourbon experience waiting for you here. Our charming small towns are an eclectic mix of beautiful historic architecture and Y ’A LL! revitalized energy with shopping, dining and entertainment. Discover vibrant arts and music, and learn of our history with visits to museums and memorials commemorating everything from the Civil War to the athlete known as the “Greatest of All Time,” Muhammad Ali. Travel to the UNESCO Creative City Paducah to tour the National Quilt Museum, the largest museum in the world devoted to quilts and fiber arts. Visit the newly opened Bluegrass Music Hall of Fame and Museum or check out the hometown of Bill Monroe or Chris Stapleton. No matter your favorite tune, you can always find live music across Kentucky. Kentucky is also the perfect retreat for groups seeking adventure. We’re home to Mammoth Cave, the longest cave system in the world, as well as thousands of miles of waterways and trails. The most adventurous groups will enjoy whitewater rafting at Cumberland Falls, rock climbing in the Red River Gorge or admiring the breathtaking view from Natural Bridge. Kentucky has 17 resort state parks that offer lodging, recreation and access to some of the most picturesque locations in the country. From horses, bourbon and bluegrass to our culinary delights and hospitality, I know you will find wonderful Kentucky travel itineraries for groups that will be an experience unlike any other, because it’s always “Better in the Bluegrass!”

Y O U R F R I E N D I N T R AV E L Kristen Branscum Commissioner Kentucky Department of Travel and Tourism 866-660-8747 www.kentuckytourism.com

6

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM


JOIN OUR

BEER CHEESE

TABLE KENTUCKY’S FOODS DEFINE ITS CULTURE

F

rom Hot Browns to chow-chow and goetta, the Bluegrass State is full of memorable flavors. Groups touring Kentucky will find lots of distinctive foods to sample during their trips. Here are some of the signature dishes your travelers can enjoy in each region of the state.

WESTERN KENTUCKY BARBECUE BLUEGRASS, BLUES AND BARBECUE REGION

Maker’s Mark Distillery is now featuring an exclusive Dinner at the Distillery experience. Guests arrive on the property in late afternoon to tour a special outdoor exhibition of Dale Chihuly art and then sit down to enjoy a world-class dinner prepared by resident chefs Newman Miller and Alex Dulaney.

BEER CHEESE BLUEGRASS, HORSES, BOURBON AND BOONE REGION

GOETTA NORTHERN KENTUCKY RIVER REGION

H O T B RO W N

Invented by German settlers who settled in the greater Cincinnati area in the 1800s, goetta is a meat-and-grain sausage dish. Northern Kentucky celebrates its German connection during Goettafest. During the three-day weekend, visitors can enjoy entertainment and the beloved breakfast patty at Newport’s MainStrasse Village.

HOT BROWN

JAM CAKE

BOURBON, HORSES

AND HISTORY REGION After Louisville’s Brown Hotel first served an open-faced turkey sandwich with Mornay sauce and parmesan cheese, the Hot Brown became the go-to order for about 95 percent of the hotel restaurant’s customers. Groups can still order this signature sandwich at the Brown Hotel or at numerous restaurants in central Kentucky.

CHOW-CHOW RELISH

B U RG O O

DANIEL BOONE COUNTRY

The legacy of beer cheese began in the 1940s, when Clark County local Johnnie Allman reportedly first served his cousin’s sharp cheese recipe. Winchester and surrounding Clark County celebrate their role in inventing beer cheese by promoting the Beer Cheese Trail and hosting the annual Beer Cheese Festival. The Beer Cheese Trail consists of eight restaurants with local beer cheese recipes.

This Southern relish is prepared with cabbage, green tomatoes, bell peppers and a vinegar-based sauce served over soup beans in Daniel Boone Country. Also known as piccalilli, chow-chow offers a tangy Southern flavor. It features ingredients from Appalachian home gardens and is a staple of daily diets in the area.

HOMEGROWN MEALS

JAM CAKE

COUNTRY HAM

APPALACHIANS REGION

WESTERN WATERLANDS REGION

CAVES, LAKES AND CORVETTES REGION

Agritourism plays a key role in this south-central region of the state. Groups can sample their way through the area with local cheese from Kenny’s Farmhouse Cheeses, blackberry cobbler from Jackson’s Orchard or homemade ice cream from Chaney’s Dairy Farm.

8

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

Blackberry jam cake with caramel icing ensures that juicy summer blackberries last long into the fall and winter seasons. The dessert mixes blackberry jam, pecans, cinnamon, nutmeg and whiskeysoaked raisins. The region is also known for salmon croquettes, made by frying salmon patties dipped in egg and bread crumbs.

Photos courtesy KY Dept. of Tourism

Farmers from the western corner of Kentucky carried the tradition of smoking hams for generations. Award-winning country ham brands like Broadbent, Harper’s and Colonel Bill Newsom come from the region. Ham dishes in this area typically come paired with a side of homegrown vegetables like pole beans or sweet corn.

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM


KENTUCKY ARTISAN CENTER OPEN DAILY 9 - 6 SHOP ● DINE ● EXPLORE www.kentuckyartisancenter.ky.gov

BEREA EXIT 77 859-985-5448 The Kentucky Artisan Center is an agency in the Tourism, Arts & Heritage Cabinet of the Commonwealth of Kentucky

BUSES WELCOME!

“The Greatest “ by Augustin Zarate; “Noble Series” by Brook Forrest White Jr; “American Kestrel” by Jim Sams; Willow bark basket by Jennifer Zurick; “Art Pin” by Mark Needham; Glass by Stephen Rolfe Powell


PROOF ENOUGH KENTUCKY’S BOURBON WELCOMES GUESTS BY ELIZA MYERS FROM ACROSS THE WORLD

10

GROUP T HE

TRAVEL LE ADER

OCTOBER 2018


T

here are more barrels of bourbon than people in Kentucky. To say that

Kentuckians take bourbon seriously is an understatement.

Kentucky supplies 95 percent of the world’s bourbon.

Whether or not they enjoy the strong flavor of bourbon, many visitors include a bourbon tour on their itinerary to learn about its fascinating history and distilling process.

Bourbon companies continue to offer new options for tour-

ing groups. Some cities, such as Bardstown and Louisville, will welcome several new bourbon experiences, including new

distilleries, bourbon-themed exhibits and the new Kentucky Bourbon Trail Welcome Center.

In northern Kentucky, New Riff Distilling recently released

its flagship bourbon to complete its tasting experience. Other new

bourbon attractions include distilleries in Lexington and Pikeville.

With so much fresh bourbon buzz across Kentucky, even

veteran travelers to the Bluegrass State will find untried flavors to sip and savor.

BA R DSTOW N

The reason so many distillers chose Bardstown for their base of bourbon operations is simple: the water. Springs in the area were ideal for making whiskey, so over the years Bardstown has attracted several distilleries, among them Heaven Hill, the Barton 1792 Distillery and the Willett Distillery.

T H E N E W $24 M I L L I O N B A R D S T O W N B O U R B O N C O M PA N Y F E AT U R E S A D I S T I L L E RY, A W H I S K E Y L I B R A RY A N D A F U L L- S E R V I C E R E S TA U R A N T.

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM

Courtesy Bardstown Bourbon Company

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

11


B A R D S T O W N B O U R B O N C O M PA N Y

The distilleries keep coming: The Bardstown Bourbon Company opened in 2016, Lux Row Distillers opened this year, and the Kentucky Owl Park is slated for 2020. “We are called the bourbon capital of the world for a reason,” said Mike Mangeot, executive director of Bardstown/Nelson County Tourism. “There is so much going on here bourbon related recently.” The 2016 Bardstown Bourbon Company features a $24 million, 45,000-square-foot distillery in the Nelson County Industrial Park. In June, the facility also opened a whiskey library, a bar and a fullscale restaurant: Bottle and Bond. The restaurant serves seasonal local fare. Visitors can order from the restaurant’s extensive vintage whiskey collection, which includes some bottles that date back to the 1800s. The restaurant’s bar also offers wine, craft cocktails, craft beer and mocktails. A St. Louis company relocated to Bardstown in April to begin distilling Kentucky bourbon. Lux Row Distillers, owned by Luxco, opened an 18,000-square-foot facility to house twelve 8,000-gallon fermenters and to offer tours. Luxco’s whiskey brands — Ezra Brooks, Rebel Yell and Blood Oath — will eventually move production to the new facility. The Kentucky Owl Park will raise the bar for bourbon attractions with a planned $150 million lakeside complex with a distillery, a visitors center, a cooperage, rickhouses, a bottling center, a restaurant and a convention center. The 420-acre site will sit on a former quarry, which the company will transform into a freshwater lake and park. Plans also call for a vintage passenger train to run through the entire complex. www.visitbardstown.com

LOU ISV ILLE

Photos courtesy Bardstown Bourbon Company

Whisky Magazine

2018

DISTILLER of the Year

PLEASE DRINK RESPONSIBLY

Experience 200 years of spirit-making history and walk in the footsteps of bourbon legends at the world’s most award-winning distillery. Book a tour at BuffaloTraceDistillery.com/Visit-Us @BUFFALOTRACEDISTILLERY

12

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

@BUFFALOTRACE

113 GREAT BUFFALO TRACE, FRANKFORT, KY • 1-800-654-8471

During the 1700s, a section of Louisville’s Main Street housed so many bourbon distillers that the section earned the nickname Whiskey Row. After Prohibition, Louisville bowed out of the bourbon scene for many years. With several distilleries already open and more on the way, though, Louisville is filling its streets with distillers once again. The Rabbit Hole Distillery opened in May as a husbandand-wife-owned craft distillery in the trendy NuLu section of Louisville. The distillery now serves moonshine and will eventually produce bourbon and rye whiskey. On West Main Street, two historic buildings hold the Old Forester Distillery, which opened in June. The Old Forester is credited with creating the first bottled bourbon. The distillery will highlight the company’s heritage and demonstrate its bourbon-making techniques. “You can see the barrels being made,” said Katie Kubitskey, marketing communications manager for Louisville Tourism. “They char the barrels right in front of every group. The flames go up as they toast the barrels. You can’t see that anywhere else.” Slated to open later this year, Michter’s Micro-Distillery will operate inside the Fort WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM


HISTORY MY OLD KENTUCKY HOME STATE PARK B A R D ST OW N If re-enactors at My Old Kentucky Home State Park seem convincing, it’s because the park hires professional actors who also star in the park’s summer musical, “The Stephen Foster Story.” Charismatic guides tell stories and sing songs written by Stephen Foster, composer of the state song, “My Old Kentucky Home,” which was based on his time in Federal Hill. The scripted tours reveal fascinating details about the prominent Rankin family, who lived there, and Foster, the family’s most famous guest. The tours also touch on how Foster’s song influenced feelings about slavery at the time. Groups can add a culinary experience, such as a traditional mint julep demonstration. Interpreters start with fresh mint that grows in the on-site garden and then add house bourbon, spring water and a sprig of mint over crushed ice to finish the drink. Everyone sips the Kentucky cocktail before taking home a souvenir cup. www.parks.ky.gov/parks/recreationparks/ old-ky-home

Courtesy MOKH State Park

W INE COM E S F ROM G R APE S

BOURBON COME S FROM

BARDS TOW N

There’s no law that says bourbon has to be made in Bardstown, Kentucky. But once you tour our distilleries, walk our gently rolling hills and experience true Southern hospitality, you’ll start to get the sense that Bardstown was made for making bourbon. Get to know where the world’s finest bourbons are born at visitbardstown.com.

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

13


“ T H E Y CH A R T H E BA R R E L S R IGH T I N F RON T OF E V E RY GROU P. T H E F L A M E S G O U P A S T H E Y T OA ST T H E BA R R E L S. YOU C A N’ T SEE T H AT A N Y W H E R E E L SE .” —

KATIE KUBITSKEY, LOUISVILLE TOURISM

Nelson Building, known for its 1890s cast-iron architecture. Company officials hope the Louisville location will educate customers about one of the country’s first whiskey companies. With so many options, how will travelers choose where to begin their Kentucky bourbon journey? Opened in August, the Kentucky Bourbon Trail Welcome Center and Exhibit acts as the official starting place of the bourbon trail and offers a concierge service to help visitors navigate the state’s bourbon scene. The welcome center occupies a space on the first floor of the Frazier History Museum. The museum’s new permanent exhibit, “The Spirit of Kentucky,” offers hands-on exhibits that explain what factors in Kentucky’s water and climate make it an ideal place to distill bourbon. www.gotolouisville.com

DU ELING BA R R ELS BR EW ERY A N D DISTILLERY PIK E V IL L E

When Pearse and Deirdre Lyons, co-founders of Alltech, first emigrated from Ireland, they felt a close kinship with the hardworking people of Appalachia. Desiring to share this heritage with the world, they started construction of the Dueling Barrels Brewery and Distillery in Pikeville. Though Pearse passed before its completion, his son attended the June opening of the 30,000-square-foot facility to continue his father’s dream. One of the only distilleries to produce bourbon, moonshine, ale and beer, Dueling Barrels offers 45-minute tours about the processes behind the

O L D F O R E S T E R D I S T I L L E RY

By Kertis Creative, courtesy Louisville Tourism

14

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM


company’s spirits, as well as information on the history of the region. Guides known as “storytellers” greet groups in the welcome area. After a video about Alltech and the region, participants head to the distilling and brewing room for a 45-minute tour and tasting. Groups can sample moonshine made from a copper pot similar to the ones bootleggers once used in the nearby mountains. Tours explore Pikeville’s connection to the legendary Hatfield and McCoy feud, which inspired the name Dueling Barrels. Guides also tell stories about Appalachia’s role in the birth of bluegrass music and the development of moonshine. The site can produce up to 40,000 beer barrels and 2,200 whiskey barrels annually. In addition to original drink recipes, Dueling Barrels also brews widely known brands like Kentucky Ale and Pearse Lyons Reserve. www.duelingbarrels.com

TOUR STARTS AT 9 AM

JA M E S E . PEPPER DISTILLERY L E X INGT ON

The James E. Pepper distillery opened in Lexington in 1776 and had become something of an industrial giant in the city before fading into obscurity in the mid-20th century. In 2008, however, the brand was revived by Amir Peay, a Californian with an interest in bourbon. Peay first learned about the brand when he noticed the advertisement for James E. Pepper Whiskey on a 1910 boxing photo. After acquiring the brand, Peay underwent a decade-long distilling journey that led him to reopen the James E. Pepper Distillery in Lexington in July.

a well

crafted experience

Here in Shelbyville & Simpsonville, Kentucky you’ll find smalltown charm and Southern hospitality. -Book a Horse Farm Tour -Shop The Outlet Shoppes of the Bluegrass -Indulge at one of our Atmospheric Restaurants -Sample the spirits at Jeptha Creed Distillery -Check out deals at the Downtown Boutiques -Savor a cocktail with Bulleit Frontier Whiskey

J A M E S E . P E P P E R D I S T I L L E RY

www.VisitShelbyKY.com 502.633.6388 Located between Louisville and Lexington. Photos courtesy Lexington CVB

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

15


NEW RIFF DISTILLING

Peay stayed as close to the original brand as he could, with old bourbon recipes, original whiskey bottles, photographs and even pieces of the still. The distillery’s flag, not seen since its closing, now flies inside the visitors entrance. Peay’s love of the history of the brand can be seen in the memorabilia on display inside the distillery. Tours explain the fascinating history of the brand and the founder, James E. Pepper, once notorious for his wealth and horse racing. Though the new distillery won’t function on the mammoth scale of the original Pepper brand, a portion of the 1836 building that housed the last Pepper distillery can now produce about 33,000 cases a year, with room to grow. After tours, groups can sip on rye whiskeys, such as the Old Pepper Rye and the Henry Clay straight rye. In the future, bourbon made on-site will be available for tastings. www.jamesepepper.com

N EW R IFF DISTILLING BE L L E V U E

Photos courtesy New Riff Distilling

An impressive distillery and event space opened in northern Kentucky in 2014 with one thing in mind: anticipation. New Riff Distilling wanted its first official batch of bourbon to stand out in flavor, which is why the company waited four years for the whiskey to age before releasing it to the public. New Riff released its first bottles of bourbon to the public in September. The owner, Ken Lewis, envisioned New Riff as a fresh take on Kentucky bourbon. New Riff ’s just-released bourbon offers a rich flavor with an aroma of butterscotch, vanilla and some confectionary rye spices. The closest bourbon distillery to Cincinnati, New Riff offers three different tours to taste this new product. Groups can watch the company’s process up close. At one point, participants can dip their fingers into a fermenter to taste whiskey mash. “What’s nice about New Riff is that we are big for a little guy and little for a big guy,” said Hannah Lowen, vice president of operations for New Riff Distilling. “It’s an intimate experience, but we have a fermenter that is big enough for a wow factor. You can see every part of the process. We were built with tourism in mind.” The distillery’s Bonded Tour provides a firsthand look at the ins and outs of bourbon distilling. The Barrel Proof Tour takes groups to the West Newport Whisky Campus for a walk through the company’s barrel warehouses, which can hold over 20,000 barrels of whiskey. Inside, the Lab grants behind-the-scenes access that ends with a more thorough tasting session. www.newriffdistilling.com

When’s the last time the smell of smoke in your clothes brought back the memory of a perfect day? Your first time won’t be your last time.

It’s the timeless craft of a local cooperage that gives our town a certain something that other places can’t quite capture. To find out where you can see bourbon barrels being made, go to visitlebanonky.com.

16

18leto11595v1_GTL_Oct Ads_5x4.5.indd 1

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

8/31/18 9:00 AM

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM


BRING YOUR GROUP TO A CITY WHERE IT

POURS RAIN OR SHINE There’s a whole new group tour experience waiting for you in downtown Louisville, from the new gateway to the Kentucky Bourbon Trail® at the Frazier History Museum, to our nine urban Bourbon distilleries. Add our unique brand of Southern Hospitality, and it’s clear why Forbes named us one of the “10 Coolest U.S. Cities to Visit in 2018.” Because when you bring your group to Bourbon City, you get so much more than a tour. Learn more at GoToLouisville.com/Travel-Professionals

@GoToLouisville


A

GIFTED

STATE TAKE A PIECE OF KENTUCKY HOME

18

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

BY ELIZA MYERS

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM


B

ourbon-soaked chocolate, quilt patterns

and paintings of Kentucky scenery — products created in the Bluegrass State all have stories to tell.

Throughout Kentucky, groups can get locally made goods as

well as experiences or tours that showcase the crafting behind

them. Bourbon-related items from Bardstown come with talks

by master distillers about the history of bourbon. Fiber art gifts remind travelers of the singular art quilts on display in Paducah’s National Quilt Museum. And at the Kentucky Artisan Center,

visitors can purchase paintings, pottery and other artwork and hear stories from local artists that dreamed them up.

Groups taste delicious Kentucky products and see how they’re

made at places like the Ale-8-One Bottling Company and Haney’s Appledale Farm.

Travelers can discover Kentucky-made items while learning

behind-the-scenes stories about each at these five locations.

K EN T UCK Y A RTISA N CEN TER BER E A

Before buying local artwork, visitors can interact with artists during their creative processes at the Kentucky Artisan Center. Every Saturday, the center hosts demonstrations by Kentucky artisans so guests can interact with them. “The artist demonstrations allow travelers to realize there is a person behind the work,” said Gwen Heffner, curator and

G RO U P S C A N T RY H A N D S - O N A R T P RO J E C T S AT M A K E PA D U C A H.

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM

Courtesy Paducah CVB

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

19


KENTUCKY ARTISAN CENTER By Michael Matthews, courtesy Kentucky Artisan Center

KENTUCKY BOURBON MARKETPLACE

information specialist for the Kentucky Artisan Center. “That brings the process to life. We have educational handouts about the artist’s life and works at every demonstration.” The 15-year-old Kentucky Artisan Center is more than a shop with local products. It aims to educate visitors about its 800 featured artisans and the processes they used. While travelers browse through crafted glass, ceramics, metal sculptures, woodworks, jewelry, specialty foods and books, they learn about the artists from informational displays and knowledgeable staff. Groups can also schedule food tastings, book signings and musical performances. “We are one of a handful of artisan centers in the country,” said Heffner. “There is something for everyone here. We have $2 magnets up to $2,000 sculptures. There are some real one-of-a-kind pieces of art as well as things that can be reproduced like photographs. We feature the whole range of creative work.” The site also displays approximately five rotating gallery exhibits a year that focus on a specific artist or theme. Groups can schedule gallery talks to learn more about the chosen works. Directly off Interstate 75, the shop works well for groups seeking either a quick break or a longer educational experience. Workshops that teach a specific artform can allow visitors to learn enviable skills such as basket weaving. The Artisan Cafe and Grill offers Kentucky favorites such as Hot Browns, fried catfish and bourbon bread pudding. www.kentuckyartisancenter.ky.gov

K EN T UCK Y BOU R BON M A R K ETPL ACE

Courtesy Visit Bardstown

B A R D ST OW N

John Prine

The Everly Brothers

Legends of Thumbpicking

Merle Travis

Jim Walker

CENTRAL CITY TOURISM OFFICE tourismdirector@centralcityky.com

270-754-9603

200 North First Street • 9 am - 4 pm • Mon - Fri 20

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

Husband and wife Howard and Dee Dee Ford Keene saw a hole in Bardstown’s bourbon experiences. The Bourbon Capital of the World didn’t offer one nondistillery experience that could teach guests about bourbon, sell bourbon-themed gifts and offer bourbon tasting samples. To change that, they opened the Kentucky Bourbon Marketplace. Though the shop recently sold to David Erickson and Stephen Vittitow, guests can still receive an education on bourbon before shopping and sipping. The site can set up demonstrations with master distillers to talk about this history of bourbon-making. Sampling drinks at the site’s Bourbon Tasting Bar also allows guests to try bourbons from various distilleries without visiting each one. The bar offers 120 brands of bourbon and several original cocktails. The Bardstown Bubble cocktail became the official drink of the 2016 Kentucky Bourbon Festival. At the boutique shop, groups can hunt for bourbon-themed apparel, gourmet foods, cakes, barrelheads, jewelry and accessories. Bourbon balls remain a favorite gift, since even those who don’t like the taste of straight bourbon can appreciate the subtler taste when combined with chocolate. WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM


HISTO RIC KENTUCKY MOUNTAIN HOMEPLACE STA FFOR D SV IL L E Instead of imagining 1800s Appalachia by looking at artifacts, guests can relive the experience at Mountain Homeplace near Paintsville. On a typical visit to the 27-acre living-history museum, groups can smell bread baking in a wood-burning stove, listen to baby goats bleating and watch chickens roaming free. Draft horses loosen soil and pull wagons to give rides. Re-enactors in period attire demonstrate skills once commonplace, such as quilting and forging horseshoes. The site’s five historic structures include a blacksmith shop, a home, a one-room schoolhouse, a church and a barn. During tours, guides share details about day-to-day existence in Appalachia. One story explains the practicality of placing a washstand near the back door so that the stand’s mirror will catch the

Courtesy Mountain Homeplace

light from the door and the nearby window, saving 15 to 20 minutes of lamp oil a day. For a more comprehensive explanation of the history, guests can wander through the Museum of Appalachian History. The attached gift shop sells regional arts and crafts. www.paintsvilletourism.com

tops for groups at the top of the state

Pictured: Ark Encounter, Coppin’s at Hotel Covington, Braxton Brewing Co., BB Riverboats, Mac’s Pizza Pub, Marriott RiverCenter, Newberry Bros. Coffee & Prohibition Bourbon Bar, National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, Creation Museum, Newport Aquarium, Mainstrasse Village, Cincinnati Zoo, Smoke Justis, New Riff Distilling, Hofbrauhaus Newport, Covington, Devou Park, Montgomery Inn

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM

meetNKY.com

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

21


“ T H E Y A R E CH A L L E NGED T O DE SIGN A N D BU I L D T H E I R OW N QU I LT BLOCK ... M A N Y T Y PE S OF GROU P S H AV E DON E T H IS A S A WAY T O E NGAGE I N T H E A RT OF QU I LT I NG.” —

L AURA OSWALD, PADUCAH CONVENTION AND VISIT ORS BUREAU

N AT I O N A L Q U I LT M U S E U M S I G N AT U R E E X P E R I E N C E

“They have bourbon-related products of all kinds,” said Mike Mangeot, executive director of Bardstown/Nelson County Tourism. “It’s everything you can think of bourbon themed, from boxer shorts to baseball caps.” www.kybourbonmarketplace.com

NATIONA L QU ILT M USEU M PA DUC A H

Travelers get to tap into their own creativity to create personalized quilts at the National Quilt Museum. The Museum Experience program lets guests experiment with precut fabrics in a variety of colors. Guides walk them through the process of designing the block, quilting it and framing it. In the end, participants take home a work of fiber art they made themselves. “The experience starts with a VIP white-glove tour and then heads into the museum’s classroom,” said Laura Oswald, director of marketing for the Paducah Convention and Visitors Bureau. “They are challenged to design and build their own quilt block. That has been an incredibly successful way to share the quilting experience with people who are not quilters. Many types of groups have done this as a way to engage in the art of quilting.” In the National Quilt Museum’s shop, visitors can browse fiber art made locally and internationally. Fiber-art-themed earrings, postcards, quilt books and other souvenirs reflect the talent on display in the museum. The shop offers other Kentucky-crafted products as well.

Courtesy Paducah CVB

22

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM


Travelers can see fiber art in numerous other places across the UNESCO Creative City at several art shops. A favorite for groups is Ochre, where fiber artists work on quilts with landscape scenes and embroidered sayings. The Art Guild of Paducah and the Bricolage Art Collective also sell fiber art and works from local artists. Ceramics, woodworking and paintings are some favorite types of art represented at these two shops. For another hands-on experience, groups can turn to Make Paducah, founded by mural artist Kijsa Housman. Housman leads art demonstrations, such as ornament-making, for participants of all skill levels. “In addition to Housman’s mural work, she is very popular on Etsy,” said Oswald. “She has all types of artworks in her shop, including pillows, chalkboards and all kinds of things that are perfect for gift giving. She has turned her Etsy presence into a physical space.” www.paducah.travel

A LE - 8 -ON E BOTTLING COM PA N Y

BRICOLAGE ART COLLECTIVE

M A K E PA D U C A H

W INCH E ST ER

For a ginger and citrus soda celebrated across Kentucky, guests can pop open an Ale-8-One inside the factory that has mixed the drink for 90 years. The beverage was developed in the 1920s, and today, Ale-8-One is one of the country’s oldest family-owned soft drink companies. The drink is carried throughout Kentucky and Indiana, as well as parts of Ohio, Tennessee and Illinois. The name originated from Photos courtesy Paducah CVB

Birthplace of Beer Cheese harkness edward’s vineyard

Group Culinary & Outdoor Adventures! • Beer Cheese Trail • Ale-8-One Tours • Creative Coffees Roastery Tour • Mt. Folly Farm, home of Laura’s Hemp Chocolates Interstate access, affordable hotels & only 15 min. to Lexington’s WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM restaurant & distillery district and 25 min. to The Kentucky Horse Park.

blackfish bison ranch

• Harkness Edward’s Winery • Hamon Haven Winery • Blackfish Bison Ranch • Bluegrass Heritage Museum • Holly Rood Historic Home

800-298-9105

tourwKENTUCKY inchester.com 23 GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE


ALE-8-ONE

Courtesy KY Dept. of Tourism

H A N E Y ’ S A P P L E D A L E FA R M

a regional naming contest. The slogan “A Late One” referred to the beverage as the latest trend in soft drinks. Groups can book factory tours by appointment on Thursdays and Fridays. The tour begins with a video that relates the history of Ale-8. Guides then lead guests through several production areas to see the work that goes into each bottle. Participants receive a free bottle so they can taste the original blend of ginger and a hint of citrus. The drink has a smooth taste with less bite than a typical ginger soft drink. In the on-site gift shop, visitors can purchase more bottles to take home, as well as other Ale-8-themed items, including T-shirts, bottle openers and drinkware. The shop sells other Kentucky-made products as well, such as barbecue sauce and salsa. The company also participates in annual events, among them the Winchester Pioneer Festival and the Beer Cheese Festival. It donates to more than 900 organizations statewide. www.ale8one.com

H A N E Y ’S A PPLEDA LE FA R M NA NC Y

Courtesy Haney’s Appledale Farm

What began as a roadside fruit stand has evolved into a 450-acre farm and market staple in south-central Kentucky. Haney’s Appledale Farm started in the late 1800s under the name Cloverdale. When Lawrence and Oreida Haney inherited the farm in 1944, they thought the name didn’t suit their business as apple farmers, so they changed it to Appledale. Five generations later, the Haney family still owns the farm, which now grows more than 25 varieties of apples, as well as 10 varieties of peaches, pears and nectarines, on more than 70 acres. The business also runs a certified Farm Bureau Roadside Market and pie shop. xhibits Groups can schedule tours of the apple farm, market and pie shop. They will hear stories from the family and see how they run such an extensive operation. In season, participants can pick their own produce and enjoy slices of freshly baked apple pie. The farm’s freshly pressed apple cider is another farm favorite. Jams, jellies, sauces, salsas, sorghum and apple butter all make excellent gifts or treats to enjoy later. The farm also sells other local goodies, such as gourmet cheese, candies and honey. In addition to food, the farm store sells memorabilia from the nearby Mill Springs Battlefield, locally made homemade toys, cookbooks and local crafts. The farm is near Lake Cumberland, which offers boat rentals and the Lake Cumberland State Resort Park. www.haneysappledalefarm.com

Experience Muhammad Ali’s GREATNESS

W hile e xploring o ur AWArd-Winning e COME VISIT

144 North Sixth Steet Louisville, KY 40202

FOLLOW US

CONTACT US 502.584.9254 MUHAMMAD

FOR MORE INFO

alicenter.org

24

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

!

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM


Detail: ZAINA’S STARBURST by Qurrat Thakur

PADUCAH, KENTUCKY SPRING PADUCAH, KY

Schroeder Expo Center April 24–27, 2019 Hundreds of Beautiful Quilts on Exhibit

FALL PADUCAH, KY

Schroeder Expo Center September 11–14, 2019

Aisles of Fabrics, Machines & Quilting Supply Vendors

World-Renowned Quiltmaking Instructors

For more information, visit QuiltWeek.com

NATIONAL BRAND PARTNER


UNMISTAKABLE

MUSIC

BLUE SKIES, BLUE MOON AND BLUEGRASS BY ELIZA MYERS

26

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM


B

luegrass music is among Kentucky’s greatest cultural legacies. Musicians

from Kentucky played key roles in craft-

ing the trademark sounds of bluegrass

so easily recognized today.

Groups can learn about how immigrants from England,

Scotland and Ireland helped shape bluegrass music at one of

Kentucky’s music museums. The Bill Monroe Museum, the Bluegrass Museum Hall of Fame and the Kentucky Music Hall of Fame and Museum delve into the roots of Kentucky

bluegrass, its talented musicians and its far-reaching influences.

Music fans can hear performances at the state’s many music

venues, which play traditional bluegrass as well as other genres, such as gospel, country, jazz and pop. Travelers sit back and

enjoy the sounds of the region and beyond at the Paramount Arts Center, the Renfro Valley Entertainment Center and the Mountain Arts Center.

BILL MON ROE M USEU M RO SIN E

When Bill Monroe formed the Blue Grass Boys band in 1938, no one imagined he would birth a new genre of music. The group booked a regular spot on the Grand Ole Opry with its fast tempos, experimental style and instrumental virtuosity, signature elements that would become defining characteristics of bluegrass music. Monroe’s stardom and eventual influence earned him the moniker “The Father of Bluegrass.”

M U S I C L O V E R S F RO M A RO U N D K E N T U C K Y F L O C K T O H E A D L I N I N G C O N C E R T S AT T H E PA R A M O U N T A R T S C E N T E R I N A S H L A N D.

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM

Courtesy Paramount Arts Center

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

27


B I L L M O N RO E M U S E U M

Courtesy Ohio County Toursim Commission

PA R A M O U N T A R T S C E N T E R

A museum dedicated to his life and legacy opened in 2018 in Rosine, his hometown. The Bill Monroe Museum features memorabilia from his life, such as the last car he drove, the porch swing from his Tennessee cabin and the last mandolin he ever played. The museum also features awards and other exhibits from his long-lasting career as a recording artist and performer at the Grand Ole Opry. He remains the only person to be inducted into halls of fame that honor bluegrass, country and rock ’n’ roll. The museum sits across the street from the Rosine Barn Jamboree, which plays live bluegrass music every Friday night. Groups can listen to modern takes on Monroe’s musical stylings and visit the nearby Bill Monroe Homeplace. Guided tours of the homeplace reveal how the Monroe family of eight children worked at the farm without the aid of machinery. Restored in 2001, the home holds family belongings, early-20thcentury furnishings and rare photographs of Monroe. The family’s cemetery plot lies just down the road. “Rosine is a music attraction itself,” said Jody Flener, executive director of the Ohio County Tourism Commission. “Everything works together to retrace Bill’s life. When groups come, we can arrange for musicians to play at all the places they visit. We also arrange a special guided tour with storytelling. We have people in Rosine who knew Bill that can tell stories about him.” www.visitohiocountyky.com

By Angy Hall Ross, courtesy Paramount Arts Center

We are: Rich in Kentucky history and culture We are: The hub of Bourbon Country We are: “Event”ful We are: Full of small-town charm and southern hospitality We are: Kentucky Distilled Your Group’s Kentucky Experience awaits! Minutes from Lexington, Louisville, & the Ark Encounter. Visitfrankfort.com Frankfort/Franklin County Tourist Commission 800-960-7200 • salesdirector@visitfrankfort.com

28

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

PA R A MOU N T A RTS CEN TER ASHL AND

In 1971, the future didn’t look good for the Paramount Arts Center. The theater was built in 1931 as one of the first transitional theaters to show “talking pictures,” but its gorgeous Art Deco designs were hidden under layers of paint, dust and an oily residue from the coal furnace used to heat the theater. However, not long after its 1971 closing, a foundation was formed to save the theater and return it to its former grandeur. Today, groups can see the theater much as it appeared on its opening night, with sizable copper and glass chandeliers, gold-leaf details and decorative murals of 16th-century theatrical characters. “The way the building has been restored is just beautiful,” said Melanie Cornelison-Jannotta, artistic director of the Paramount Arts Center. “You can see Art Deco decorations throughout the whole building. The experience feels as if you were going back in time and watching a show from the 1930s. Yet we have high-tech equipment that allows us to bring in so many performances that we weren’t able to do before the renovation.” Groups can arrange an architectural tour of the building to hear the stories behind its Aztec, Egyptian and geometric designs. Afterward, groups can watch a performance in the intimate WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM


1,421-seat theater. From touring Broadway productions to a local inhouse theater performances, the theater features a variety of regular acts. The theater also features a regular lineup of Christian, country music, jazz and bluegrass concerts. Staff from the Paramount Arts Center regularly accommodate groups with specialized tours and experiences. For example, ghostly tales from the historic building have led to several paranormal tours for interested groups. www.paramountartscenter.com

K EN T UCK Y M USIC H A LL FA M E A N D M USEU M

K E N T U C K Y M U S I C H A L L O F FA M E A N D M U S E U M

OF

R EN FRO VA L L E Y EN T ERTA IN M EN T CEN T ER MOU N T V ER NON

Loretta Lynn’s purple sequined gown, the Osborne Brothers’ banjo and Dwight Yoakum’s skintight jeans have all been known to inspire conversation. The Kentucky Music Hall of Fame and Museum seeks to tell the stories of the state’s impressive contributions to all musical genres at Mount Vernon’s Renfro Valley, the “Country Music Capital of Kentucky.” “I think it’s really surprising to people how many musicians, broadcasters and managers were from Kentucky,” said Avery Bradshaw, director of the Kentucky Music Hall of Fame and Museum. “People really do learn a lot here. One example is that two of the Backstreet Boys are from Kentucky. That’s one thing a lot of people don’t know.” Courtesy KY Music HOF

Corbin Loves Company! S

urrounded by the beauty of the Appalachian Mountains, Corbin is located in the outdoor adventure mecca of Kentucky, and is the perfect destination for your next group tour. Conveniently located off of I-75 at exit 25 by the shores of the beautiful and pristine Laurel Lake, Corbin is home to the Cumberland Falls, Daniel Boone National Forest, the Original KFC, Sanders Park, and the 7,000 seat Corbin Arena which hosts a variety of entertainment and different shows. Corbin is home to a host of locally owned restaurants who can accommodate large groups and satisfy any pallet. Whether you enjoy history, outdoor adventure or shopping and culinary treats, Corbin, KY can offer a variety of itineraries for your group! We cannot wait to see you … Corbin Loves Company!

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM

www.corbinkytourism.com 606-528-8860

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

29


“PEOPL E LOV E T H E V E RY F R I E N DLY AT MOSPH E R E H E R E . W E H AV E BE AU T I F U L SCE N E RY W I T H T H E MOU N TA I NS I N V I E W. T H E R E IS A R ICH TA L E N T F ROM E A ST E R N K E N T UCKY.” — CL AY T ON CASE,MOUNTAIN ART S CENTER

Exhibits highlight the careers of Kentucky natives Billy Ray Cyrus, the Judds, John Michael Montgomery and Rosemary Clooney, among others. Groups visiting the museum first listen to a presentation about the museum and its induction process. The museum can arrange a live music performance before groups explore the exhibits. Guides walk with the visitors to answer questions and add interesting information to exhibits. One exhibit follows a timeline of Kentucky’s evolving musical history that reaches from the 1750s to the present. The entryway to the building once served as John Lair’s horse stables. Renovators spent time converting the structure into a museum to preserve the memory of Lair, who founded Renfro Valley when, in 1939, he began broadcasting his own radio program to promote Kentucky bluegrass music. Nearby, the Renfro Valley Entertainment Center features regular live bluegrass, gospel and country music. Two theaters offer musical entertainment every weekend from April through December; recent acts there have included the River City Boys, David Church and Trace Adkins. The complex also houses a shopping village for music-themed and locally made items. www.kentuckymusichalloffame.com www.renfrovalley.com

MOU N TA IN A RTS CEN TER PR E ST ON S BU RG

K E N T U C K Y M U S I C H A L L O F FA M E A N D M U S E U M

Each summer and holiday season, bluegrass, gospel, rock and country songs ring out during Billy Jean Osborne’s Kentucky Opry Courtesy KY Music HOF

… e l l i e to Paints v m o c l

P Country Music Highway. Home to Loretta Lynn

aintsville is located in the heart of the US 23

and Crystal Gayle, a visit to Paintsville would not be complete without a tour of “Butcher Holler.”

W e

Visit the US 23 Country Music Highway Museum which features 14 exhibits displaying memorabilia about the many country music stars who call Eastern Kentucky their home. Bring your dancing shoes and join us for live bluegrass music during Front Porch Pickin’ every Thursday at 7pm. Step back in time at the Mountain HomePlace, an 1850’s Appalachian working farm. Tour the grounds and view the double-pen cabin, one-room school, blacksmith shop, church, farm animals, and much more. Centered between two deep mountain lakes, Paintsville offers beautiful mountain vistas and small town hospitality at its best.

OF

30

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM


at the Mountain Arts Center. The variety show draws from the talented musicians of the area to entertain in the same vein as the Carolina Opry. Groups enjoy the in-house productions that change each year with new themes. Last year, the production’s theme was “Coming Home.” Loretta Lynn’s mountain homeplace provided the backdrop. When groups arrive, local comedian Freddie Goble, known as Munroe, gets them laughing right from the start. From there, group leaders can choose from various options, among them a meet-andgreet with the cast, tours of the facility and a performance. Besides the Kentucky Opry, the center also offers several other acts, such as Broadway productions and headliner concerts, throughout the year. “People love the very friendly atmosphere here,” said Clayton Case, executive director of the Mountain Arts Center. “We have beautiful scenery with the mountains in view. There is a rich talent from eastern Kentucky. We know a lot of folks that went from here to Nashville to find fame. There are so many stars from eastern Kentucky.” www.macarts.com

M O U N TA I N A R T S C E N T E R

Photos courtesy Mountain Arts Center

BLU EGR A SS M USIC H A LL OF FA M E A N D M USEU M OW EN S BORO

At the Bluegrass Music Hall of Fame and Museum, groups can make their own music, even if their members have never touched an instrument. “We offer a Saturday Lesson music program where there is a large supply of instruments on hand,” said Carly Smith, marketing Photos courtesy Mountain Arts Center

KENTUCKY

S

avor ...

THE SIGHTS & SOUNDS OF GEORGETOWN.

MALL TOWN CHARM. PURE SMALL

SCOTT COUNTY

– Equine Activities –

• Minutes from the Kentucky Horse Park • Old Friends Retired Thoroughbred Farm • Group Horseback Riding

– Picturesque Downtown – • Specialty Shops • Antiques

• Scott County Arts and Cultural Center • Cafes and One-of-a-kind Restaurants • Georgetown and Scott County Museum

– Other Charming Attractions –

• Toyota Motor Manufacturing, KY, Inc. Tour • Golf • Country Boy Brewing • Bourbon 30 Spirits • Ward Hall • Yuko-En Japanese Friendship Garden • Nearby Wineries and Bourbon Distilleries • Close proximity to the Ark Encounter

and Keeneland Race Course

INTERSTATE

64

INTERSTATE

75

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

31


director of the Bluegrass Music Hall of Fame and Museum. “Our instructors can lead group music tutorials. They can pull people out of the crowd and place an instrument into their hands. You can have a band of novices who have never played an instrument before cobble together a song.” Originally called the International Bluegrass Music Museum, the rebranded museum will reopen in the fall in a new space a few blocks away. The move will allow for more exhibit space, a full-size concert theater, an outdoor concert space and a restaurant. The $15.3 million venue will host regular concerts, as well as the hall of fame itself, with inductees chosen by the International Bluegrass Music Association. The museum will showcase recorded interviews with hundreds of bluegrass musicians and industry members at interactive kiosks. “There is plenty to learn about how the music started, but you can also experience it,” said Smith. “We plan to mix it up with the artists we feature. We’ll feature any music with roots in bluegrass, which encompasses more Americana genres. You’ll see some country and all kinds of genres we can tie in because they are all related to each other.” www.bluegrassmuseum.org

Y O N D E R M O U N TA I N S T R I N G B A N D

HISTORIC B L U E G R A S S M U S I C H A L L O F FA M E A N D M U S E U M

Photos courtesy Bluegrass Music HOF

FALL in love with

Grant County! GRANT COUNTY IS HOME TO:

• The Ark Encounter • Lake Williamstown & Williamstown Marina • Events: Country Christmas - Dec. 1 • 35 min. south of Cincy/45 min. north of Lexington

visitgrantky.com 1-800-382-7117

32

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

CATHEDRAL BASILICA OF THE ASSUMPTION COV INGT ON With 82 hand-poured stained-glass windows from Munich, Germany, the Cathedral Basilica of the Assumption is among the most beautiful churches in the country. The 24-footwide, 67-foot-tall window on the north transept of the basilica is one of the largest stained-glass windows in the world. Two rose windows mimic the dazzling colors and design of those of the Notre Dame Cathedral. Built in 1895, the ornate Gothic Revival basilica combines styles from 13th-century Europe with local materials such as limestone. Interior murals depict biblical scenes. Guided tours detail the challenges of constructing this ambitious church and why, in 1915, church officials eventually abandoned long-held plans for two additional towers. www.covcathedral.com

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM


UNDERGROUNDADVENTURE ADVENTURE PARK PARK UNDERGROUND

THEWORLD’S WORLD’S ONLY ONLY UNDERGROUND UNDERGROUND THE ZIPLINE ADVENTURE! ADVENTURE! ZIPLINE hard at at work work hard Featuringsix sixziplines ziplines&&two two Featuring suspensionbridges, bridges,MEGA MEGAZIPS ZIPS isis suspension sureto toget getyour yourheart heartracing racingand and sure adrenalinepumping! pumping! adrenaline

new attractions attractions new coming in in 2019! 2019! coming

THRILLING ATTRACTIONS ATTRACTIONS FOR FOR ALL ALL AGES! AGES! THRILLING

MEGA MEGA

BIKES BIKES BIKE PARK BIKE PARK

Action-packed Action-packed 320,000square square 320,000 feetofofexciting exciting feet MTBtrails, trails, MTB jumps,tracks, tracks, jumps, andpumps pumpsfor for and skilllevels! levels! allallskill

Seatedhistorical historical Seated tourperfect perfectfor forall all tour ages!Learn Learnabout about ages! theCavern’s Cavern’srole roleas as the ColdWar Warfallout fallout aaCold shelter,geology, geology, shelter, history,&&MORE! MORE! MEGA history, MEGA

E-BIKES E-BIKES ELECTRIC BIKE TOUR

Mega Quest Quest offers offers up up Mega to two two hours hours of of fun fun & & to excitement featuring featuring excitement two levels levels and and 76 76 two challenge elements elements challenge and two two mini mini and ziplines! ziplines!

ELECTRIC BIKE TOUR

Seethe theCavern Cavern up up See close&&personal personal in in close oursmall smallgroup group our electricbike biketour! tour! electric Ourcomfortable comfortable MEGA Our MEGA MEGA fat-tire bikesrequire require MEGA TRAM fat-tire bikes QUEST TRAM minimal minimalpedaling. pedaling. QUEST HISTORICAL TOUR ROPES CHALLENGE COURSE HISTORICAL TOUR ROPES CHALLENGE COURSE

WWW.MEGACAVERN.COM WWW.MEGACAVERN.COM

877-614-MEGA(6342) (6342) || 1841 1841TAYLOR TAYLOR AVE AVE || LOUISVILLE, LOUISVILLE, KY KY 40213 40213 877-614-MEGA


STORIED

STOREFRONTS

LOCAL SAYS IT ALL IN THESE KENTUCKY COMMUNITIES BY ELIZA MYERS

34

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM


S

hop in Kentucky and you’ll come home with more than gifts. Wandering through stores

in the Bluegrass State can offer a peek into the heart of the city.

At a favorite local bakery in Danville, visitors can discover a tra-

ditional Appalachian bread. In Louisville, chocolate shops showcase the work of pastry artists. The Bowling Green Farmers Market

offers interactive group demonstrations to enhance the shopping experience.

In historic towns like Midway and Maysville, a downtown shop-

ping excursion also provides a way to admire the interesting architecture of buildings that house local businesses. Much of the charm of a city comes from shopping experiences authentic to the area.

These towns allow groups to learn about Kentucky by engaging

in some retail exploration.

DA N V ILLE

From 1785 to 1792, Kentucky officials met in a series of conventions in Danville that ultimately led to Kentucky’s separation from Virginia. Kentucky owes its existence to Danville, which served as the state’s first capital; the state’s first constitution was also signed there. Groups can discover this history at the Constitution Square Historic Site, an open-air museum that celebrates the early history of Kentucky. The Gift Shop at Constitution Square features history-inspired gifts, such as history books, historic Danville photo prints and CDs with music composed during the early 1800s. Danville’s shopping options don’t end in the past. The town prides itself on its moniker, “Where Preservation Meets Progress.”

T R AV E L E R S E N J O Y S H O P P I N G I N S T O R E S H O U S E D IN DANVILLE’S HISTORIC DOWNTOWN BUILDINGS.

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM

Courtesy Danville-Boyle Co. CVB

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

35


“ W E NO T ON LY WA N T T O PR E SE RV E OU R H IST ORY, BU T W E WA N T T O M A K E H IST ORY. W E’R E V E RY M UCH A N A RT- F R I E N DLY COM M U N I T Y. YOU’L L F I N D A RT E V E RY W H E R E .” — JAMEE PEYTON, DANVILLE-BOYLE COUNTY CONVENTION AND VISITORS BUREAU

“Our history is what draws people,” said Jamee Peyton, assistant director of the Danville-Boyle County Convention and Visitors Bureau. “We not only want to preserve our history, but we want to make history. We’re very much an art-friendly community. You’ll find art everywhere. You’ll go into someone’s shop and find local art there.” Groups often start at the Constitution Square Historic Site, then move on to tour the quaint and historic downtown. Many first stop at Burke’s Bakery, a Kentucky institution that is featured in travel magazines such as Delta Sky. The bakery is known for salt-rising bread, a traditional Appalachian bread, as well as doughnuts and gingerbread men. Shoppers can pick up a caramel treat at Cerci on Main or get healthrelated items at Plank on Main and a handbag at A&L Accessories. Travelers also enjoy touring downtown’s local pubs, microbreweries and historic landmarks. www.danvillekentucky.com

LOU ISV ILLE

ART CENTER MARKET

At Louisville’s Butchertown Market, an 1800s meatpacking facility is now a one-stop shop for locally made products and cuisine. The Butchertown Market houses chic boutiques, bourbon-themed shops and the city’s first brandy distillery: Copper and Kings. “Louisville Tourism can arrange champagne or mimosa drinks to welcome groups to Butchertown and elevate the experience,” said Katie Kubitskey, marketing communication manager for Louisville Tourism. “Groups that set it up can also see how an on-site chocolatier at Cellar Door Chocolates makes chocolate, from the bean to the bar.”

Courtesy Danville-Boyle Co. CVB

Creativity. Heritage.

Experience.

Creativity is the common thread that connects people from around the world to Paducah, Kentucky’s rich American heritage and globally-celebrated culture. Create an itinerary with our collection of new and immersive tours, performances and hands-on Paducah Signature Experiences exclusively for groups!

Paducah Signature Experience: “A Creative Stitch” at the National Quilt Museum

36

PCVB-HALFpg-GROUPTRVL.indd 1

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

For more event planning and group-friendly resources, visit Paducah.travel/groups 1-800-PADUCAH 9/10/18 10:57 AM

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM


The gourmet chocolate shop takes scheduled groups to its kitchen to demonstrate chocolate-making and offer samples. The quirky shops continue from there, with locally crafted jewelry at Work the Metal, bourbon-smoked spices at Bourbon Barrel Foods and handcrafted lotions at Moss Hill. The Butchertown Market sits within the larger Butchertown Historic District, which includes the 1866 St. Joseph Catholic Church. Greek Revival homes and shotgun houses in the area put the neighborhood on the National Register of Historic Places. “We also like to recommend Outlet Shoppes of the Bluegrass,” said Kubitskey. “They will send a shuttle to your hotel for free and take you to the shops. It is the opposite shopping experience of Butchertown Market. It has brand-name items.” Groups can arrange a wine and appetizer reception before meandering through the 366,750-square-foot shopping center. Groups can schedule a fashion presentation for VIP access and insider tips. Most groups opt for the raffled $100 gift card, a branded tote bag, a coupon book and swag from various retailers. Shoppers can save up to 70 percent on designer brands such as Gucci, Polo Ralph Lauren and Saks Fifth Avenue Off 5th. www.gotolouisville.com

BOW LING GR EEN

Groups can add a little fire to their shopping excursion at the SoKY Marketplace. Bowling Green’s indoor farmers market offers exclusive group cooking experiences, such as a bananas Foster demonstration.

OUTLET SHOPPES OF THE BLUEGRASS

Courtesy Louisville Tourism

DOWNTOWN BOWLING GREEN

Courtesy Bowling Green Area CVB

CELEBRATE AT OUR HAUS!

HOFBRÄUHAUS NEWPORT OFFERS A TRULY UNIQUE EXPERIENCE WITH A FUN AND FRIENDLY ATMOSPHERE AND OUR AWARD-WINNING STAFF THAT HELPS MAKE YOUR EVENT A STRESS-FREE CELEBRATION. Our full-service restaurant specializes in traditional Bavarian dishes as well as American favorites. We offer customizable menus for every type of event and private dining spaces that can accommodate as many as 300 people – including a lovely outdoor dining area. We also feature an on-site brewery where we craft our world famous biers, as well as conduct brewery tours upon request. Full-Service Bar | Live Entertainment | Free Parking | Handicap Accessible CONVENIENTLY LOCATED MINUTES FROM DOWNTOWN CINCINNATI, CALL US TODAY TO SCHEDULE YOUR SPECIAL EVENT!

NEWPORT BREWERY & RESTAURANT

KENTUCKY WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM 3RD & SARATOGA AT THE LEVEE | 200 EAST 3RD STREET, NEWPORT, KY | 859-491-7200 | HOFBRAUHAUSNEWPORT.COM | KMASLIN@HOFBRAUHAUSNEWPORT.COM GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

37


M AY S V I L L E

Other options include a local baker showing how to make toaster pastries or cinnamon apple chips. Even without the added interactive experience, groups love browsing the farmers market products, which include soaps, breads and seasonal items. Groups interested in shopping Bowling Green’s downtown should start at Fountain Square Park. “Our downtown has a lot of locally made items, which people like because you can’t just get them at any shop,” said Beth Noffsinger, public relations manager for the Bowling Green Area Convention and Visitors Bureau. “The heart of downtown is historic Fountain Square Park. The park is a great place to stop and take a break for a while. If you wanted, you could grab carryout from a restaurant and stop there to eat.” From the park, visitors can easily walk to other shops, like Barbara Stewart Interiors, for jewelry, furnishings and other items. Candlemakers on the Square pours candles on-site and offers locally produced art. Art also lines the walls at the Love Art Gallery and the Pots Place Gallery, which sells work from eight local potters. After a day’s shopping, visitors can stop for a treat at Mary Jane’s Chocolates. Or if bourbon sounds more appealing, Corsair Distillery offers tours and tastings for up to 15 people. www.visitbgky.com

Courtesy Maysville-Mason Co. CVB

38

GROUP T HE

TRAVEL LE ADER

OCTOBER 2018


HISTORIC

M AYSV ILLE

Historic Maysville is packed full of charm, history and local retail. The town sits on the banks of the Ohio River. “You can walk our whole area in a three-block radius,” said Lacey Holleran, tourism director for the Maysville-Macon County Convention and Visitors Bureau. “That includes our floodwall murals, our museums and our historic architecture, which is amazing for a town of our size. You can spend from a half day to a full day exploring the short block radius.” Along brick-lined streets, guests will find art galleries, antiques, restaurants and general stores. The Eat Gallery looks like a diner from the outside; inside is a beautiful jewelry store. Downtown also features Elementz, a rustic-yet-modern home goods shop. The Kentucky Gateway Museum Center’s shop offers several distinctive Maysville souvenirs. Groups also enjoy touring the museum to discover the city’s intriguing past. Its Kathleen Savage Browning Miniatures Collection depicts the history of the town’s founding in intricate, tiny detail. The city also nurtures artists with several art-themed shops, photography studios and the Ohio River Valley Artist Guild. The Maysville Visitors Center sells Maysville-themed items. Groups staying for the evening can watch a performance at the Washington Opera Theatre, the fifth-oldest continuously running theater in the country. www.cityofmaysville.com/tourism-department

WICKLIFFE MOUNDS STATE HISTORIC SITE W ICK L IFFE

When people see Wickliffe’s mounds along a bluff on the Mississippi River, many questions arise: What purpose did the mounds serve? Who built them? Wickliffe Mounds State Park attempts to answer those questions with a site that re-creates what life was like for prehistoric Native Americans. Re-enactors demonstrate activities such as stonegrinding corn, making clay pots and throwing spears, and offer guests the opportunity to join in on the action. Visitors can see several remaining mounds, including one that stands 10 feet above ground. Guests can even walk inside a mound, since the museum sits in an excavated mound. www.parks.ky.gov/parks/historicsites/ wickliffe-mounds

From Riverfront to Broadway Ashland showcases natural beauty, engaging activities and authentic experiences all centrally located off I-64 & Kentucky’s Country Music Highway. Downtown Riverfront • Paramount Arts Center • Highlands Museum & Discovery Center • Floodwall Murals • Ashland’s Historical Tour • Central Park • Specialty and Antique Shopping

VisitAshlandKy.com 800.377.6249 GROUPTRAVELLEADER.COM

Affordable Accommodations

Over 850 Rooms Delta by Marriott - Newly Remodeled in downtown Ashland

GROUP T HE

TRAVEL LE ADER

39


MI DWAY

M I D WAY

During the railroad heyday of the 1930s and 1940s, up to 30 trains a day rumbled through the middle of Midway, a town halfway between Lexington and Frankfort. Though the passenger trains dwindled over time, freight trains still chug through downtown several times a day. Midway’s railroad past has led to a downtown full of architectural gems. Shoppers can enjoy this ambiance while ambling past numerous local shops. The town sits in the Woodford County Midway Historic District and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Visitors can relive the past at Fisher’s Antiques and Yeagers Antiques. The Back Room features modern home accessories, and the Midway Boutique Kentucky offers clothing, equine-themed gifts and University of Kentucky apparel. Midway also honors the artists of the area at the Damselfly Studio Gallery and the Kennydid Gallery. For a local treat, shoppers can stop by Kentucky Honey Farms or the Railroad Drug and Old Time Soda Fountain. Darlin’ Jeans Apple Cobbler Cafe dishes out more filling fare inside a renovated barley mill. The Historic Midway Museum Store showcases distinctive gifts, including jewelry, home accessories, Kentucky crafts and Keeneland apparel. The shop sits in a Victorian building with Italianate details from the 1880s. Groups can revel in the store’s shopping options and learn about its fascinating history. www.meetmeinmidway.com

Courtesy Historic Midway Museum Store

Explore. More.

40

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM


HISTO RIC KENTUCKY FORT BOONESBOROUGH STATE PARK R ICH MON D One of America’s first folk heroes, Daniel Boone, founded Fort Boonesborough in 1775. Boone faced Kentucky’s wild frontier to construct the state’s second-oldest European-American settlement. Fort Boonesborough State Park re-created much of the original working fort with cabins, bunkhouses and furnishings. Seasonally, resident artisans offer demonstrations for a taste of Kentucky pioneer life. Recovered saddle buckles, cooking utensils and animal bones found at the original fort are on display in the fort’s museum. Visitors begin tours with a short film about Boone and Fort Boonesborough’s exciting past before visiting the cabins and listening to interpreters describe 18th-century life. Weavers, soapmakers, spinners and woodworkers explain the various skills needed to survive.

Courtesy Fort Boonesborough State Park

Also within the park, the Kentucky River Museum offers exhibits on how the Kentucky River influenced the area’s commerce and development. Each September, the fort re-enacts the 1778 Siege of Boonesborough, when the Shawnee Native Americans tried to capture the fort. www.parks.ky.gov/parks/recreationparks/ fort-boonesborough

What’s more Kentucky than

Bluegrass, Bourbon & Barbecue? Owensboro is the perfect recipe for groups! VISITOWENSBORO.COM WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

41


BRING YOUR

PADDLE SPEND SOME TIME IN KENTUCKY’S OUTDOORS BY ELIZA MYERS

42

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM


W

hether under the ground creeping along a cave wall or above a

gorge zipping over trees, groups will find awe-inspiring outdoor

adventures in Kentucky. The state’s diverse environments and abun-

dant resources have led to a wide range of outdoor activities for ambitious thrill-seekers and quiet nature lovers alike.

Mammoth Cave National Park is the state’s crowning jewel,

boasting the longest cave system in the world. Even though more than 365 miles of the five-level cave system is mapped, explorers continue to locate new caves.

The adventures continue aboveground with horseback rides, elk

viewing and zip lining through a rocky gorge. The state also has

1,900 miles of designated navigable waterways, the most for any state in the continental U.S.

Groups with a variety of ages and activity levels can find outdoor

activities to fit their needs in the Bluegrass State.

C AV ING IN M A M MOTH C AV E MAMMOTH CAVE

Holding lanterns in their hands, travelers at Mammoth Cave feel enveloped in a limestone labyrinth and transported to another time. The nostalgic Violet City Lantern Tour and Star Chamber experiences both offer lantern-lit tours with tales of the cave’s earliest explorers.

S H E LT O W E E T R A C E A D V E N T U R E R E S O R T TA K E S G RO U P S RAFTING ON THE CUMBERLAND RIVER.

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM

Courtesy Sheltowee Trace Adventure Resort

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

43


The rugged Violet City Lantern Tour navigates steep hills through some of the cave’s most massive and oldest passageways. The milder Star Chamber offers two miles by flickering flame past cavern dwellings once used to house tuberculosis patients. Groups can find everything from wheelchair-accessible tours to the belly-crawling Wild Cave Tour. The two-hour Domes and Dripstones, the most popular tour, showcases some of the most dramatic cave features. The shorter Frozen Niagara Tour touches on some of the same features but lasts only a little over an hour. Designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site, the cave is “grand, gloomy and peculiar,” as it was described by Stephen Bishop in the early 1800s. Most tours set aside a time to switch off all the lights to demonstrate the utter darkness of the cave. With the lights off, visitors can’t even see their own noses. The park accommodates all sizes of groups, including ones with some members who don’t wish to travel underground. Forested hills and hollows encompass more than 52,000 acres for guests to explore on the surface. “Mammoth Cave is a great gathering spot for groups,” said Molly Schroer, management assistant at the Mammoth Cave National Park. “There are a lot of activities to do underground and aboveground. We have many hiking trails, canoe rentals, a horse rental operation and bike trails. We also have a lodge here, so you can also easily eat nearby and spend the night.” www.nps.gov/maca

ZIP LIN ING AT R ED R I V ER G ORGE C A M P T ON

Happy screams ring out over Red River Gorge as travelers zip over the rock formations of this scenic area near Campton. The attraction is just outside Daniel Boone National Forest, which preserves approximately 29,000 acres of the Red River Gorge canyon system. The surrounding wilderness offers breathtaking panoramas, especially while zooming above the overlooks at up to 55 miles per hour. “You are zip lining through the trees, so it sometimes looks like you are going to run right into them,” said Joyce Belcher, executive director of the Cliffview Resort and Red River Gorge Zipline. “On the long zip lines, you will zip above the gorge. You will see the rock formations. It is beautiful scenery.” Participants who weigh between 70 and 250 pounds can go on the two- to three-hour tours. Guides lead groups down all five zip lines. The first stretches for 300 feet. The distances increase as the tour progresses until the final zip, which spans 1,900 feet. Groups cross four canopy bridges as they walk from one zip line to the next. The final two zip lines, known as Dual Racing Zips, allow participants to race two at a time across the canyon. Staying at the nearby Cliffview Resort earns groups a discount. The resort allows easy access to the surrounding hiking, rock climbing and geologic wonders of Red River Gorge. www.redrivergorgezipline.com

Kentucky’s

LINCOLN MUSEUM Visit historic downtown Hodgenville to experience Lincoln’s life and legacy. The collection features life-size dioramas, Civil War memorabilia, a unique artwork collection, and gift shop. Group Rates • Motorcoach Friendly Guided Tours by Appointment ADA Compliant

OPEN YEAR ROUND 66 Lincoln Square • Hodgenville, KY 42748 (270) 358-3163 www.lincolnmuseum-ky.org

44

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM


PA DDLING W I T H SH ELTOW EE TR ACE A DV EN T U R E R E SORT COR BIN

Half your travelers love the idea of rafting next to a giant waterfall; the other half find it terrifying. Not to worry: Sheltowee Trace Adventure Resort (STAR) in Corbin offers the perfect compromise. Part of the group can raft through whitewater rapids, and the other members can take a leisurely ride aboard the Cumberland Star Riverboat. The 65-foot, double-decker riverboat f loats through Lake Cumberland for a relaxing journey. After the more adventurous group has ventured down the Cumberland River, the 100-passenger boat picks up the tired rafters. Then the entire group can reunite for a meal onboard the vessel. The whitewater rafting trip begins at the base of Cumberland Falls, a powerful waterfall known as the Niagara of the South. After participants see the water pounding down into the river from the base of the falls, the raft continues down the river on Class III rapids. The trip works well for beginning rafters and children ages 6 and up. “Some groups come back year after year,” said Dania Egedi, general manager of STAR. “We really try to experience the river and not just get down it. We let people out at a rock where they can jump in. We also stop and swim through some rapids, which is a neat experience.” STAR offers groups many more rafting options, such as canoe and kayak trips down the Cumberland and Big South Fork rivers. The Big South Fork River draws many paddlers because of its striking views

M A M M O T H C AV E N AT I O N A L PA R K

Courtesy NPS

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

45


R E D R I V E R G O RG E Z I P L I N E T O U R S

Courtesy Red River Gorge Zipline Tours

of cliff lines and enormous boulders. Both rivers offer chances to see wildlife, especially blue herons, eagles and deer. The options continue from there to land adventures including zip lines, a climbing wall, geocaching, bike rentals and hiker shuttles. STAR can function as a one-stop shop with lodging and catered dining options. The wide range of accommodations includes rustic camping, resort cabins and covered wagons converted into bedrooms with electricity, heating and air conditioning. www.ky-rafting.com

HOR SEBACK R I DING W I T H W HISPER ING WOODS R I DING STA BLE S G EORG ET OW N

JENNEY WILEY S TAT E R E S O R T PA R K

WHISPERING WOODS R I D I N G S TA B L E S

Courtesy Whispering Woods Riding Stables

46

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

Jessi Wilbers relies on jokes to calm the nerves of anxious riders at Whispering Woods Riding Stables in Georgetown. “I’ll say to them, ‘Have you all ridden before? No? Me neither,’” said Wilbers, lead trail guide and promotional manager for Whispering Woods Riding Stables. “They love that one. Rides here are like real trail riding that you would do with a group of friends. We talk and hang out. When we take beginners, I help them with the turns and remind them what do.” Horseback-riding beginners and seasoned riding veterans alike enjoy riding through the 250 acres of trails and forests at Whispering Woods. Guides explore trails based on the preferences and comfort levels of the riders.

Courtesy Jenny Wiley State Resort Park

WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM


“We don’t go the same way over and over like some places,” said Wilbers. “With kids, I go on straighter paths. With more experienced riders, I won’t stay on the trail at all. Larger groups that need two trail guides can divide into beginner and experienced teams, so some can ride at a faster pace if they want to. The woods offer numerous ways to reach the same destination, so guides can make sure the group meets up at the end despite taking routes with varying degrees of difficulty. Groups can choose from 50-minute to 90-minute rides. Guides assign horses to participants based on weight and rideability. Riders receive a helmet, a saddlebag for storage and a horseback-riding lesson. During the ride, groups can spot foxes, raccoons, possums and other wildlife. Guides lead groups to a flat, open area for a photo shoot before heading back. www.whisperingwoodstrails.com

ELK TOU R S AT J EN N Y W ILE Y STATE R E SORT PA R K PR E ST ON S BU RG

When daylight breaks over the mountains and an elk bugle pierces the air, bleary-eyed travelers not accustomed to the early hour perk up quickly. Groups agree to these tours starting at 5:30 a.m. because they expect something incredible. They find that memorable experience on an elk tour at Jenny Wiley State Resort Park in Prestonsburg. “We get a lot closer to these elk than just viewing round dots on

the side of a hill,” said Trinity Shepherd, park interpreter for the Jenny Wiley State Resort Park. “People can see them with the naked eye. The elk are usually around 100 yards or closer.” After a 150-year absence, elk were reintroduced to Kentucky in 1997; the elk now number 10,000. The tours shuttle guests to see the area’s largest elk herds, which reside on privately owned lands normally closed to the public. Set tours run from September through March, though the park will arrange additional dates for interested groups. In addition to the early morning tours, the park offers an evening tour that concludes at dark. Both tours include a meal as part of the package. Discounts are available to groups also staying at the park’s lodge. As guides search for elk, they share information on creatures and how they relate to the area’s history, culture and ecosystems. “It’s not just an elk tour,” said Shepherd. “There is so much more. In the mid-1800s, we didn’t take care of this resource. We were not good stewards of the land. To have these animals back, as well as white-tailed deer and turkeys, is a great testament to conservation efforts. You used to have to take a plane to go see them. To be able to see elk in this state is not something to be taken lightly.” www.parks.ky.gov/parks/resortparks/jenny-wiley

Harrodsburg brings together group experiences that are both unique and memorable. It’s no wonder its been honored with accolades including:

· Named one of Smithsonian Magazine’s “20 Best Small Towns to Visit”

· Named one of BBC NEWS Magazine’s “Five Hidden US Travel Destinations”

Group-friendly activities & adventures with over 300 affordable rooms just minutes SW of Lexington

HarrodsburgKy.com • 800-355-9192 WWW.KENTUCKYTOURISM.COM

• Award-winning Downtown • Unique Shopping/ Dining • Year-round arts, cultural & music events

KENTUCKY GROUP TRAVEL GUIDE

47


Is It Any Surprise Horses In Kentucky Hold Autograph Sessions? Kentucky Makes Legends

BetterInTheBluegrass.com

2019 Kentucky Group Travel Guide  

Your complete guide to group travel in Kentucky. The 2019 issue includes trip ideas for culinary and bourbon experiences, music heritage, ma...

2019 Kentucky Group Travel Guide  

Your complete guide to group travel in Kentucky. The 2019 issue includes trip ideas for culinary and bourbon experiences, music heritage, ma...