Issuu on Google+

Neighborhood Conservation Plan Woodbury, New Jersey


Acknowledgements MAYOR

Brian Bosworth, Administrator

Harry R. Riskie

John Leech, Secretary Mark Shoemaker, Solicitor

CITY COUNCIL

J. Timothy Kernan, Planner

Francis I. Connor

Fralinger Engineers, Engineer

Lester Lockman Danielle Carter

CLIENT TEAM

C. Barry Sloane

Harry R. Riskie, Mayor

Gwendolyn Joyce Brown

Ronda Abbruzzese, Economic Development Director

William H. Fleming

Patty Elkis, Associate Director of Planning, DVRPC

Heather S. Tierney

William H. Fleming, City Council

Harry E. Trout

Karl Kinkler, Administrator

Thomas B. Louis

Robert Law, CFO, Deputy Administrator Heather S. Tierney, City Council

PLANNING / ZONING BOARD

Harry E. Trout, City Council

John Belko, Chairman Robert Langi, Vice Chair Mark Meagher

All who volunteered their time and opinions in stakeholder interviews, meetings, and public workshops.

John Pafumi Joseph Di Martile David White Thomas Haase, 1st Alternate Joseph Palimeno, 2nd Alternate Ryan Lange, 3rd Alternate Charles Mattern, 4th Alternate Harry R. Riskie, Mayor Francis I. Connor, Councilman

This project was funded through a Transportation and Community Development Initiative (TCDI) grant from the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission (DVRPC).


Table of Contents

Part II Neighborhood Conservation Plan

Part I Process

INTRODUCTION 1 GEOGRAPHY OF PLAN AREAS

2

PURPOSE + SCOPE OF PLAN

8

PUBLIC PROCESS – VISIONING WORKSHOP

10

PUBLIC PROCESS – WALKING TOURS

16

PUBLIC PROCESS – SUMMARY

16

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

23

CITY + NEIGHBORHOOD HISTORY

28

DEMOGRAPHICS 31 NEIGHBORHOOD NEEDS + CHALLENGES

34

COMMUNITY VISION + GOALS

40

PLAN RECOMMENDATIONS

42

IMPLEMENTATION 61 IMPLEMENTATION MATRIX

62


List of Figures Figure 1.1: Overview of Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan Study Areas. 1 Figure 1.2: Typical dwelling units in North Woodbury 2 Figure 1.3: Walnut Street Elementary School 2 Figure 1.4: Underwood Memorial Hospital 2 Figure 1.5: Zoning map of North Woodbury, with neighborhood area outlined. 3 Figure 1.6: A typical dwelling in West Woodbury 4 Figure 1.7: Woodbury Junior/Senior High School 4 Figure 1.8: Woodbury Creek Park 4 Figure 1.9: Zoning map of West Woodbury, with neighborhood area outlined. 5 Figure 1.10: A typical single-family dwelling in East + South Woodbury 6 Figure 1.11: The northern entrance to Wing-Dickerson Park 6 Figure 1.12: Pocket park at intersection of South and East Barber Streets 6 Figure 1.13: Zoning map of East + South Woodbury, with neighborhood area outlined. 7 Figure 1.14: Proposed commuter rail line running through Woodbury. 8 Figure 1.15: Broad Street District Revelopment Area 9 Figure 1.16: Community members working during the Public Workshop to identify issues, opportunities, and their visions for their neighborhoods. 11 Figure 1.17: Map depicting where workshop participants live (blue dots) and work (red dots) in relation to the three neighborhoods. 12 Figure 1.18: Issues and Opportunities diagrams for North Woodbury, based on public feedback. 13 Figure 1.19: Issues and Opportunities diagrams for West Woodbury, based on public feedback. 14 Figure 1.20: Issues and Opportunities diagrams for East + South Woodbury, based on public feedback. 15 Figure 1.21: Neighbors and members of the project team facilitating the North Woodbury Walking Tour. 17 Figure 1.22: North Woodbury Walking Tour Route and Stops 17 Figure 1.23: West Woodbury Walking Tour Route and Stops 17 Figure 1.24: East + South Woodbury Walking Tour Route and Stops 17 Figure 2.1: Overview of Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan Study Areas. 22 Figure 2.2: North Woodbury Neighborhood Area 24 Figure 2.3: West Woodbury Neighborhood Area 25 Figure 2.4: East + South Woodbury Neighborhood Area 26 Figure 2.5: Overview map of goals and major recommendations in the Plan. 27 Figure 2.6: Woodbury High School, c. 1919 - courtesy Sands and Turner, Woodbury: Images of America 28 Figure 2.8: Stokes Grocery on Broad Street - courtesy Sands and Turner, Woodbury: Images of America 28 Figure 2.7: Employees in front of G.G. Green’s laboratory in 1873 - courtesy Sands and Turner, Woodbury: Images of America 28 Figure 2.9: Sanborn 1886 map of Woodbury. Development is clustered along Broad Street, except in East Woodbury, where it reaches the train tracks. 28 Figure 2.10: Sanborn’s 1915 map of Woodbury. Development has moved beyond from Broad Street in all directions. 29 Figure 2.11: Stores on Broad Street between Curtis Avenue and Centre Street, c. 1954. - courtesy Sands and Turner, Woodbury: Images of America 29 Figure 2.12: Broad Street between Centre Street and Aberdeen Place, c. 1954. - courtesy Sands and Turner, Woodbury: Images of America 29 Figure 2.13: “Courthouse Intersection” c. 1900. - courtesy Sands and Turner, Woodbury: Images of America 29 Figure 2.14: Underwood Hospital c. 1920. - courtesy Sands and Turner, Woodbury: Images of America 29 Figure 2.15: A 1923 advertisement for Budd Brothers Construction Company. - courtesy Sands and Turner, Woodbury: Images of America 30 Figure 2.16: Homes on West Street in the Glover District, 1914. - courtesy Sands and Turner, Woodbury: Images of America 30 Figure 2.17: A residence on Delaware Street between Harrison Street and Lupton Avenue. A parking lot now sits on the site.- courtesy Sands and Turner, Woodbury: Images of America 30 Figure 2.18: The Henry Clay Foote home at 42 East Centre Street, pictured in 1880. - courtesy Sands and Turner, Woodbury: Images of America 30 Figure 2.19: The home at 37 East Centre Street, which would see later conversion to apartments and a doctor’s office. - courtesy Sands and Turner, Woodbury: Images of America 30 Figure 2.20: City-wide demographics 31 Figure 2.21: Neighborhood-specific demographics 33 Figure 2.22: Typical conditions along Tatum Street looking North towards Hessian Avenue. 34 Figure 2.23: Edge of parking lot on the southern side of West Packer Street. 34 Figure 2.24: Typical medical office along Broad Street. 34 Figure 2.25: Bird’s-eye view of the Walnut Street School and playground. 35 Figure 2.26: Semi-detached homes along Logan Street. 36 Figure 2.27: Edge of the former laundry site with the neighboring residential area. 36 Figure 2.28: Warning sign for drivers heading south on Lupton Avenue towards West Street. 37 Figure 2.29: Muddy, unpaved pathway adjacent to the creek in Woodbury Creek Park. 37 Figure 2.29: Typical large-format home in East Woodbury, originally designed as a single-family household. 38 Figure 2.30: Typical home in the neighborhood south of Carpenter Street. 38 Figure 2.31: Attached row-housing in East Woodbury. 38 Figure 2.32: Improvements to Railroad Avenue will need to be made in the future to handle an increase in traffic from the train station. 39 Figure 2.33: Lack of pedestrian access to the park at the intersection of South and East Barber Avenue. 39 Figure 2.34: The transition area between Underwood Memorial Hospital and the North Woodbury neighborhood area. 42 Figure 2.35: North Woodbury summary diagram of recommended physical improvements. 43 Figure 2.36: Landscaping serving as a buffer between parking lot and sidewalk along a right-of-way. 44 Figure 2.37: Detached garage behind principle building, typical of North Woodbury. 44 Figure 2.38: Bump-out on a residential street - courtesy fhwa.dot.gov. 45


Figure 2.39: Raised crosswalks provide cues for drivers to slow down, and create a safer crossing for pedestrians. Figure 2.40: Sharrow marking on a street - courtesy timesunion.com. Figure 2.41: Crosswalks on roads intersecting Broad Street. Figure 2.42: Potential future park site on West Packer Street. Figure 2.43: Pedestrian and automobile access to Walnut Street School Figure 2.44: Prioritized site for redevelopment at Salem and Glover Streets Figure 2.45: Example of allowable densities in the Live/Work Transect Zone, which encompasses the former laundry site. Figure 2.46: Prioritized site for redevelopment on Broad Street between West Center Street and West Barber Avenue Figure 2.47: Conceptual scheme of the redevelopment. Figure 2.48: West Woodbury summary diagram of recommended physical improvements. Figure 2.49: Detached garages behind principle buildings, typical of West Woodbury. Figure 2.50: Additional stop signs create three-way intersections at Glover and High Streets and Glover and West Street, allowing for safer traffic patterns. Figure 2.51: The proposed street cross-section for Downtown Broadway incorporating a 5 foot bike lane in either direction, as proposed in the Redevelopment Plan. Figure 2.52: A proposed extension and new pedestrian access to Woodbury Creek Park. Figure 2.53: Pocket park on Delaware Street: First Phase Figure 2.54: Pocket park on Delaware Street: Second Phase Figure 2.55: New infill single-family home in South Woodbury, with a garage emerging from the front of the structure. Figure 2.56: A more typical home in the neighborhood, with a detached garage behind the principle structure. Figure 2.57: West Woodbury summary diagram of recommended physical improvements. Figure 2.58: The St. Patrick’s School site, a 5-acre site where potential new development could include community open space. Figure 2.59: The current lack of a buffer zone between residential and commercial uses in South Woodbury. Figure 2.60: “Bike loop” connecting neighborhood amenities to downtown. Figure 2.61: Example of planned downtown Woodbury wayfinding signage, a template that could be used to potentially expand into the neighborhoods. Figure 2.62: Crosswalks, curb cuts, and signage increase pedestrian connectivity between the pocket park, Wing Dickerson park, and the greater neighborhood. Figure 2.63: The intersection at Cooper Street and Railroad Avenue. Figure 2.64: Dog park - courtesy reddogcincinnati.com. Figure 2.65: Community center - courtesy jra-architects.com. Figure 2.66: Historic marker.

45 46 46 47 47 48 48 48 48 49 50 50 51 52 53 53 54 54 55 56 56 57 58 58 59 59 59 60


This page intentionally left blank.


Neighborhood Conservation Plan Woodbury, New Jersey

Part I: Background + Public Process


Part I: Background + Public Process INTRODUCTION 1 GEOGRAPHY OF PLAN AREAS

2

PURPOSE + SCOPE OF PLAN

8

PUBLIC PROCESS – VISIONING WORKSHOP

10

PUBLIC PROCESS – WALKING TOURS

16

PUBLIC PROCESS – SUMMARY

16


North Woodbury

Broad Street Redevelopment Plan Area

K AVE

RED BAN

DELA

Potential Station Area

WAR

BR

OA

DS

T/

RT

45

E ST

Potential Station Area

COO

PER

E

45

AV

MAN

TUA

PIKE

SA

LEM

/ RT

West Woodbury

ST

Figure 1.1: Overview of Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan Study Areas.

East + South Woodbury 0

Feet

1,000


Background + Public Process

INTRODUCTION Communities are not static; neighborhoods are always changing, evolving, and growing or shrinking. Growth and change may originate in the communities themselves, or it may originate at the periphery, with resultant effects on neighboring areas. This is part of a natural process. Communities tend to adapt to these changing circumstances and thrive over the long-term, both in terms of demographic as well as physical changes. However, some changes are not always desired, and identifying the important aspects of a neighborhood’s character and a plan to conserve that character allows change to occur in a sustainable way. The goal of neighborhood conservation is not to preserve a neighborhood in time, but to allow for a community to evolve in a direction desired by the community while conserving those aspects the community deems essential to the neighborhood’s character. The Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan (NCP) will act as a guide and implementation plan to chart the course for future improvements in three neighborhoods (North, West, East + South) in Woodbury that are likely to experience the impacts of growth and development in both the near and long-term (figure 1.1). The NCP will identify existing concerns as well as future recommendations for each of the three neighborhoods and provide a plan for three specific areas that can be addressed by the City and the community: 1) Land Use + Community Form, 2) Circulation + Mobility, and 3) Public Amenities + Infrastructure. The three neighborhoods were chosen for this plan because of their proximity to the Broad Street Redevelopment Plan area and the two potential light-rail stations of the planned Glassboro-Camden Line. It is expected that these elements will spur growth and development in and around the Broad Street district in Woodbury, and that the town should plan for the effects of development on the surrounding neighborhoods now to address both present and future needs in these neighborhoods.

GmD

Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 1


Background + Public Process

GEOGRAPHY OF PLAN AREAS The NCP focuses on three neighborhoods adjacent to and overlapping areas of anticipated growth and change. The following descriptions delineate the boundaries and areas of likely nearby development that could influence the neighborhoods in the future. NORTH WOODBURY

Figure 1.2: Typical dwelling units in North Woodbury

The North Woodbury neighborhood area, for the purposes of this plan, is roughly bounded by the municipal boundary and Hessian Avenue to the north, the municipal boundary and Tatum Street to the west, Packer Street to the south, and the edge of the residential neighborhood nearest Broad Street to the east. The Redevelopment Plan intersects this neighborhood area’s eastern and southern boundaries. This neighborhood is not overlapped by a historic district. The lots in this area outside of the Redevelopment Plan area are zoned R-35 Residential and R-60 Residential (figure 1.5). This neighborhood is characterized by its collection of two to three story homes fronting along the street, with prominent open or enclosed porches at the front and parking either on-street or accessed through private drives and garages located behind the primary structure (figure 1.2). The housing stock and street layout dates to the early twentieth century, and was originally advertised as a neighborhood having a “homey home” feel with walkable streets, close-knit single-family dwellings, and access to transit, shopping, and amenities.

Figure 1.3: Walnut Street Elementary School

Though the neighborhood layout resembles the gridded street pattern typical of older walkable communities, in actuality most streets in the neighborhood only run along the northwest – southeast axis. With the exception of Cherry Street that connects Chestnut and Walnut Streets, the only north-south streets in the neighborhood are Tatum Street and Broad Street, limiting the options for travel within the neighborhood. Currently, the sole open space/recreation area in the neighborhood is the playground on the northern side of the Walnut Street School. The School is the primary institutional presence in the neighborhood, and a destination for many of its youngest residents (figure 1.3).

Figure 1.4: Underwood Memorial Hospital

South of this neighborhood is Underwood Memorial Hospital and a growing concentration of related medical/office uses (figure 1.4). One of the two new train stations along the Glassboro-Camden line may be located near the intersection of Red Bank Avenue and the railroad right-of-way. North Woodbury is expected to see new growth at its edges in the years to come principally from these two factors, as well as commercial revitalization and growth along Broad Street.

2 | Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan

GmD


Background + Public Process

R60 - Residential

R35 - Residential

Redevelopment Plan Area

Figure 1.5: Zoning map of North Woodbury, with neighborhood area outlined in red.

GmD

0

Feet

500

Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 3


Background + Public Process

WEST WOODBURY The West Woodbury neighborhood area, for the purposes of this plan, is roughly bounded by Delaware Street to the north, the lots fronting on the western side of Jackson Street with the exception of the West End Elementary School to the west, an alternating boundary along the railroad right-of-way, Logan Street, and Penn Street to the south, and the edge of the residential neighborhood nearest Broad Street to the east.

Figure 1.6: A typical dwelling in West Woodbury

The Redevelopment Plan intersects this neighborhood area’s eastern boundary along Lupton Avenue, Glover Street, and Lincoln Streets. The Historic District intersects this neighborhood area primarily by the lots fronting onto Delaware Street and the lots fronting onto High Street. The lots in this area outside of the Redevelopment Plan area are zoned R-15 Residential, R-35 Residential, R-60 Residential, and contains both PO-1 and PO-2 Professional Office District Overlays (figure 1.9). This neighborhood is characterized by an eclectic mix of architectural styles and predominantly single-family homes fronting along the street, with leafy streets shaded by both street trees and trees on private lots (figure 1.6). A small collection of duplex housing was built along Logan Street in the late twentieth century, and some of the larger homes in the neighborhood have been converted to either multi-family dwellings within the neighborhood, or professional offices located primarily in the stately large-lot homes along Delaware Street.

Figure 1.7: Woodbury Junior/Senior High School

The neighborhood is laid out in a grid pattern emanating from and connecting to Broad Street, Delaware Street, and Salem Avenue. Some streets, such as Jackson and Lupton/Glover Streets, act as parallel circulation routes to Broad Street when congestion or construction impedes travel on Woodbury’s primary arteries. This neighborhood sits adjacent to Woodbury Junior-Senior High School (figure 1.7), the athletic fields in West Deptford across the creek, and Woodbury Creek Park (figure 1.8). There currently is no public open space/ recreation space within this neighborhood.

Figure 1.8: Woodbury Creek Park

To the east of this neighborhood area is downtown Woodbury, the historic commercial core and principal traffic artery. This neighborhood is also within walking distance of many small businesses and major institutions, such as City Hall, the High School, the Justice Complex, and the Gloucester County administrative offices. One of the two new train stations along the Glassboro-Camden line may be located near the intersection of Centre Street and Railroad Avenue. This neighborhood is expected to see some spillover from the Redevelopment Plan area as revitalization along Broad Street occurs and when the light-rail line becomes operational.

4 | Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan

GmD


Background + Public Process

R60 - Residential

PO1 - Professional Office Overlay

Historic District R35 - Residential

Redevelopment Plan Area R15 - Residential

PO2 - Professional Office Overlay Figure 1.9: Zoning map of West Woodbury, with neighborhood area outlined in red.

GmD

0

Feet

500

Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 5


Background + Public Process

EAST + SOUTH WOODBURY The East + South Woodbury neighborhood area, for the purposes of this plan, is roughly bounded by Cooper Street to the north, the edge of the residential neighborhood nearest Broad Street to the east, and the railroad right-of-way to the south and east.

Figure 1.10: A typical single-family dwelling in East + South Woodbury

The Redevelopment Plan covers the majority of this neighborhood area, overlapping with the neighborhood north of Carpenter Street and west of Railroad Avenue. The Historic District intersects this neighborhood area north of Hopkins Street to Cooper Street. The lots in this area outside of the Redevelopment Plan area are zoned R-15 Residential (figure 1.13). This neighborhood is one of the oldest residential areas in Woodbury, characterized by a strong collection of historic homes and a rich and diverse cultural background. The area reflects a range of housing types, including single-family detached, single-family attached, and multi-family housing (figure 1.10). A number of the units along Cooper Street have been converted to professional office uses. The neighborhood is laid out in a predominantly northwest to southeast grid pattern, connecting Railroad Avenue to Broad Street. Carpenter Street, Railroad Avenue, South and East Barber Avenues are the primary arteries connecting the neighborhood and the proposed rail station to Broad Street and Cooper Street.

Figure 1.11: The northern entrance to Wing-Dickerson Park

This neighborhood contains Wing-Dickerson Park (figure 1.11), a large, newly renovated public park with basketball, tennis courts, passive green space, and two playground areas, as well as a small pocket park where South and East Barber Avenue intersect (figure 1.12). This neighborhood is likely to see the most immediate effects of the introduction of rail-service in Woodbury when the southern station is operational, and may experience some of the greatest changes through the Redevelopment Plan. At the same time, this is one of the oldest areas in Woodbury, and new development and growth from the train station, the downtown, and through implementation of the Redevelopment Plan will have to strike a balance between new growth and conservation of neighborhood character.

Figure 1.12: Pocket park at intersection of South and East Barber Streets

6 | Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan

GmD


Background + Public Process

Historic District

Potential Station Area

Redevelopment Plan Area

R15 - Residential

Figure 1.13: Zoning map of East + South Woodbury, with neighborhood area outlined in red.

GmD

0

Feet

500

Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 7


Background + Public Process

PURPOSE + SCOPE OF PLAN

Camden

Collingswood

Gloucester City

Audubon

Mount Brooklawn Ephraim

The push for a renewed commuter rail stretching into South Jersey and Maple Shade connecting to Philadelphia and Camden has a long history, though a concrete plan for a commuter rail line was only formulated in the past decade. The initial step of the most recent process, an Alternatives Analysis for the rail alignment, was completed in 2009. The chosen alternative connected many of Gloucester County’s historic towns and communities to Camden and Philadelphia by running largely along an existing rail alignment. Eleven stations were proposed in Gloucester County, two of which are in Woodbury (figure 1.14). The first will be potentially located proximate Haddonfield to downtown near the original station platform near Cooper Street and Railroad Avenue. The second will be potentially located near Red Bank Avenue and the growing Medical/Hospital area.

In anticipation of the effects of light-rail service on the City’s downtown business district, Woodbury’s Planning/Zoning Board recommended Runnemedethat the Downtown Business District be designated an area in need of Location of Voorhees Somerdale under the Local Redevelopment and Housing Law, N.J.S.A. redevelopment proposed 40A:12A-1 et. Seq. (“the “LRHL”). The Redevelopment Plan was adopted in stations in 2010 and created a long-term framework for the revitalization of downtown Woodbury Woodbury and Broad Street, and to prepare the Broad Street business district for the future effects of a major new transit connection (figure 1.15).

National Park

Westville

Woodbury

Bellmawr

Lindenwold

Deptford

Wenonah

Mantua

Pitman

The Neighborhood Conservation Plan process was initiated to assist those residential blocks that will potentially be impacted by Redevelopment Gloucester Township Plan implementation and the introduction of light-rail service. However, the NCP is not a “preservation” initiative and does not seek to seal off the neighborhood from change. The goal of neighborhood conservation is to allow evolution and change to proceed in a sustainable way that is desired by the community. The NCP will be largely based on input from residents Washington Township and City officials, and will identify current and potential issues in the three residential neighborhood areas that can be addressed to reinforce existing Winslow communities while mitigating future points of conflict. The concerns will be based around three focus areas focused on future implementation of the plan:

Glassboro Monroe

Elk

Figure 1.14: Proposed commuter rail line running through Woodbury.

8 | Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan

GmD


Background + Public Process

Land Use + Community Form: Addresses issues such as zoning, density, scale, and buffers. The NCP recommendations in this section could be implemented if integrated into the City’s Master Plan or Master Plan Reexamination and adopted into the City’s Zoning Ordinance. Circulation + Mobility: Addresses issues such as pedestrian access and sidewalks, traffic calming, and wayfinding. The NCP recommendations in this section could be implemented if integrated into the City’s Master Plan or Master Plan Re-examination and subsequently integrated into the Capital Improvements Plan. Public Amenities + Infrastructure: Addresses issues such as parks, playgrounds, gateways, stormwater, and utilities. The NCP recommendations in this section could be implemented if integrated into the City’s Master Plan or Master Plan Re-examination and subsequently integrated into the Capital Improvements Plan. These focus areas were chosen so that the public and City officials could concentrate on areas that promised significant benefit to the community and that could be implemented through the normal Master Planning process in the near future.

Figure 1.15: Broad Street District Revelopment Area

GmD

Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 9


Background + Public Process

PUBLIC PROCESS – VISIONING WORKSHOP To form the basis of the Plan, a series of public workshops were held in order to identify the community’s current issues, concerns, goals, objectives, and long-term visions for their neighborhoods. The first was held at Woodbury Junior-Senior High School on January 24, 2012. The purpose of this workshop was to introduce the scope and purpose of the project to the community, and then to lead small groups through a series of interactive workshops to identify the issues and opportunities in their neighborhoods. Approximately 77 members of the community attended the event and participated in the interactive workshops, many of whom were also present at the public workshops for the Redevelopment Plan. A majority of the attendees were residents of the neighborhood areas. Following the introductory presentation, participants were asked to join a small group for the workshop portion of the meeting based on which neighborhood they were interested in. Each group was given a large map of the neighborhood area and markers to write and draw their ideas directly onto the map. Members of the project team rotated between groups around the room to assist groups and keep discussions within the scope of the project when needed. These small groups were asked to spend about 45 minutes discussing a series of pre-prepared questions related to the topics of land use + community form, circulation + mobility, and public amenities + infrastructure. Groups were asked to both write down the points that emerged from their discussions, and to illustrate them on the maps of each neighborhood provided. To conclude the meeting, each group identified their top 3 big ideas for the neighborhood’s future, and gave a 5 minute presentation of their big ideas to the rest of the room. Following this meeting, Group Melvin Design compiled each group’s response by topic area and neighborhood to aggregate the public’s feedback. This feedback, along with notes and illustrations that accompanied the small group maps, was compiled into three diagrammatic maps for each neighborhood showing the issues and opportunities identified in the workshop. The following photographs (figure 1.16) and overall municipal map (figure 1.17) represent the workshop participants and where participants live or work in Woodbury. The next three maps (figures 1.18-1.20) illustrate the public comments from the workshop for each neighborhood.

10 | Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan

GmD


Background + Public Process

Figure 1.16: Community members working during the Public Workshop to identify issues, opportunities, and their visions for their neighborhoods.

GmD

Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 11


Redevelopment Plan Area

Trolle

Re

r

te Sta

EXIT 24B Ma

Pilgrim

an

Ru n

rd

He ss ia n

Edwin

Wo

gton

Washin

da

gto

hit ne y

Win

ds

Ka

the

be

rt

or

rin

e

le

y

n

NORTH

Ro ute

re

nc

e

Sta

t

te

Ab be t

Fo rd

Flo

Ed ge w

Taft

oo d

cK

n

45

in

vo

M

De

Ma y

Gil

Ta tu m

Ga rre tt

Vivian

vin

ln

W

wis Le

e Elbern

my de

Co

a

Lafayette Linco

n

eli

Lin

a Ac

EXIT 22

Yale

rio

Co on Wils

ne odla

h

Edg

en P ed

hig

r ve

rga

Ve

Purit

hly

c Bir

on

rd

Le

ut

Av

rva

Do

lin

F

der

EXIT 24A

old

Vic to

ry

Sain tM

I-295

land

ve Cle

Ha

Clea rbro ok

Bert ha

Rile y

Pa rk

Lesh

er

Wa rren

Storrie

atth ew S

Raphael

I- 295

k ran

Sny d

oo

Ellw

n

Frontage

ail

A tso

er

M

s tkin

Wa

EXIT 23

Harp

nn Ha

r Mille

O

ble

aln

nial Colo

sure Trea

Jeff ers on

n

Am

W

oc

Background + Public Process

law

n

ett

ieg le Sp

Ge

ian

ke La

od

er

nr Lle

Wo

org

ia

Lin c

Hess

df

Bro ad w

r

Ga t

we

ay

ew ay

y

Bre

Burk

n

oln

r

Girard

eto

Je ff

nc

zie

ew ood

er

n

Pri Cro

le

Cr es c

C

e

Braun

Riggins

n lde Wa

ple

ard

lly Ke

Golf

M

e

i Naom

yla nd

Essex

Hudson 4th

4th

Cypress

Calumet

Barlow

2nd

er op

Co

e ain

M

w rlo

ow

Central

Ba

Indian

n

Jessup

or

ills

W

dr Re

n

kth

rd

GmD

us

ndid

Asam

Ra

c Bu

ya

Tan

Ma

Ca

g rin

Hic

Poplar

n

ga

Lo

ple

Elm

Sp

ry

ko

w

ado

Me

Ple

m

Grisco

! (

s

re

Ay

Quail

r

Maple

Merce

Ivy

Maple

Beech

nd

hla

Hig

Glassboro

Cherry

West Jersey

Oak

Mill

y

t on

Spruce

lly

lle

rm

Wilson

Ho

Va

Ac

Ma

ard

12 | Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan

nt

ac

Redwood

Figure 1.17: Map depicting where workshop participants live (blue dots) and work (red dots) in relation to the three neighborhoods. Cedar

rim

ple

Lincoln

Holly

er

Isz

od

ers

d

M ck

lo

m

He

Harding

wo

Shiv

Bud

Ve

Lak

rry

be

se

Ro

ou

en

rib Ca

e

an tic

bury

od

Wo

rra

y

rd Wa

rse

Elm

Hesters

Je

n Morga

tt

Penn

ton

ce

Gan

n

kso

Eric

ision

Pine

Gre

ia gin

ar

M

er

yd

Sn

Na

n Pri n

ree

Vir

dy

An

erg

ain

Manor

Div

Ev

M

Lafayette

s

er Croth

Family

Reid

a as

art Stew

Wo odla nd

Gre ree n

r rbe Ba

ook

Stonybr

om

sc Gri

gs

Kin

nd

Nila

W

ck mlo He

us

e

W

Pop

velt Roose

G Lau rel

lid

Railr oad

Fra nkli n

s

Burho olme lme

ells

eg Ma

rt

Mullr

nd dla oo

n Unio

a

on

Le

e

lle

y hle

Va

Ma

ell w

Stua

er

ay

Le ed

ad ilro

Ra

Maple

Tw

om Hil

rd

nt

od sid e

lso n

l

d

oo

ha

Wo

Ne

rd

Hu

All en

Bro Allle l ns le

Alle

n

Ma

He nd rys

ad

Ru sse ll Linc

Glove r

oln

rris

Euc

rris on Ha pt on

Spri ng

Lu

is

er

Dav

a

Mo

ke La

Railroad

Belle vue

nc

Lyman

rpe nte r

R 649 er C

Ca

3 66

S Barb

lem

Packa

Spru ce

CR

Jack son

lla ce

od

! (

Wa

Bla

by

Lind

Holroyd Holro d

Cu rtis

wo

oo pe r

Ce ntr e

r be

Co urt lan d

Lakebridge

oll

EAST C

st

Ne wto n

Carson

Meadow

Rug

We st

e

Kn

Warn

De law are

rto n

Sa

stw

orter

ton Wa shin g

45 NJ

Woo d Ne

w

Horace

Hun ter

Ab erd Ho ee pk n ins

1 55 CR

ers rso on

ham

Meh

he rry C

mbia Colu

Am n Unio

Girard

all wo

Mo

r

te

as

m

ac

M

bridg

rtis

Pe nn

Em

ood

CR 644

nk E Red Ba

Trow

ar

an Bowm

an

Westw

re

Peterson

EB

sc

t

Wic

k

Fr an ce s

Re dB an k

o dre d ws

Cu

Que

Log

en

Da

Sm

An

Hig h

d hil

th

oll

Pinecre

My rtle rt

en

Ro

Pa ck er

kson

Drisc

3 CR 55

ce

dric

reen Everg

WEST

Prin

M

re

an

s Child

Dre

eric

rren Morris

Essex

Bria rhil l

King

a

Hen

! (

High

g ar

h

tion

old

Wa

xel

de rw oo d

Park

ux

Edit

Sta

Da

dla

oo

W

Hann

Myrtle

W Un

le

ss

k

ing

yrt

aln ut

Oa

Hard

M

W

n

Bay

son

are

He

Ch es tn

t

re

te

ar

C

Edith

ut

Pa ge

de rw oo d

Hud

law

stn ut

Cra mm er

Un

s

Du bo is

he

Oakside

Grant

kin

re en

rlo w

t

G

De

r

t

Edit h

lnu

Ba

ose

Ro

Wa

y

ad

Sh

Fishe

tt

Sh ield s

Ba nk Re d d

oo

t

n Gra

lt ve

at

h

k

tw

sex

ac

a

n

r Pa

Broad Street Redevelopment Plan Area

e Ch

iew

th

Pe oli

nto

er

Lipp inco

Ca rte r

W

Ste t

se

dle

Cli

m

en

g rlin

ou

er

Ma

gn

m

Fish

Dicke rson

y

Riverv

Su

ress

Ly nn

M

O

Pix

64 2

Prog

nd

la ak

ea

Cr

tory Vic

ing

do wc

ro ft

Lanc

in Po

C R

Gr

rke r Ha

ÂŚ 295 t

n ow

ss ia n

La w nt on

ac e

He


Background + Public Process

Broad Street Redevelopment Plan

Figure 1.18: Issues and Opportunities diagrams for North Woodbury, based on public feedback.

GmD

0

Feet

500

Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 13


Background + Public Process

Broad Street Redevelopment Plan

Figure 1.19: Issues and Opportunities diagrams for West Woodbury, based on public feedback.

14 | Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan

0

Feet

500

GmD


Background + Public Process

Broad Street Redevelopment Plan

Figure 1.20: Issues and Opportunities diagrams for East + South Woodbury, based on public feedback.

GmD

0

Feet

500

Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 15


Background + Public Process

PUBLIC PROCESS – WALKING TOURS Following the analysis of public commentary from the first public workshop, it was clear that while the public was able to give us a broad sense of the issues and opportunities in their neighborhoods, it was still unclear as to what some of the specific issues were. For example, the North Woodbury neighborhood groups identified Tatum Street as having issues with pedestrian comfort, lighting, and speeding, though it was unclear what the optimal solution would be for this issue, as it was unclear who the users of Tatum Street were, and how they used that street. In order to learn more about the topics addressed in the first workshop, the second public workshop consisted of a series of walking tours with residents and members of the local community that investigated many of the issues previously identified by the community during the first public workshop (figure 1.21). The walking tours were held on three week-day evenings in mid-March, and were open and advertised to the general public and to attendees from the previous workshop. Each Walking Tour participant was given a map with a pre-determined tour route (figures 1.22-1.24) and a comment form corresponding to tour stops. At each ‘stop’ along the tour, the major issues and big ideas from the first public workshop were summarized for the group, and where appropriate, follow-up questions were asked of Walking Tour participants for further clarification. This process allowed the team to experience the issues and opportunities in the neighborhoods with residents first-hand, providing a much clearer picture of specific points raised during the first public workshop, while also bringing new issues to light. For example, it was much easier to observe the lighting issues of a street when walking that same street with residents late in the evening near sunset. The Walking Tours also gave interested residents more time to discuss neighborhood issues and opportunities with the project team, and gave some a chance to meet new friends and neighbors in their community.

PUBLIC PROCESS – SUMMARY The public workshop and walking tours yielded both neighborhood-level and site specific community analysis of the issues, opportunities, and visions for the North, West, and East + South communities of Woodbury. These comments, once aggregated, formed the basis of the Goals, Objectives, and Implementation Strategies of the Plan Recommendations and Implementation sections for each of three neighborhoods.

16 | Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan

GmD


Background + Public Process

Start of Tour Tour Stops

Direction of Walk

Direction of Walk

Neighborhood Study Area

Neighborhood Study Area

Neighborhood Study Area

Redevelopment Area

Redevelopment Area

S

St ckso n

t

re

el St

dS

1

l

Potential Station Location

nk Fra

dS

t

4

e

Av

ce

St

E Barber Ave

Ca

5

Pen

St

n St

Ch

nte

r St

n St

Sa

5

A

nA

ve

Ave

Pike

lem

Loga

oad

lso

Ma ntua

en

St

6

ve

Ne

Gre

4

3

rpe

t

5b

lan

Linco

Glo

Sa

ln St

ver St

Mor

ris St

S Ja

St ad

t

St

Railr

St

S

nP

lla

urt

lem

st

Ave

St

2

Wa

tS

Figure 1.22: North Woodbury Walking Tour Route and Stops

NEIGHBORHOOD WALKING TOUR - North Woodbury

Figure 1.23: West Woodbury Walking Tour Route and Stops

City of Woodbury Gloucester County, New Jersey

City of Woodbury Gloucester County, New Jersey

GmD

ve

hS

4b

Bro

Da

yS

t

er

rA

Co

Hig

We

St

tre

t

5a

ck

kS

en St

St

tS

err

Oa

Que

rbe

Pike

e

Ba

Ma ntua

St tum Ta

7

er

r Ave

lnu

Pa

4a

S Barbe

tnu

roa

6

ins

ve

es

pk

A er

Wa

W

Ave

3

Ch

Ho

3

Av

2

S

SB

Ha rris o

St

St

1

t

arb

ss

eS

t

e

ee

t

Av

e

Sprin

High

Av

Ab

erd

ntr

EB

He

Ce

dS

ins

Edith

is

7

ll S

g St

W

W

bo

t

SB roa

atk

Du

nS

2

ve

rtis

sse

Ave

S Ja

Park

n St

tA

Cu

en

Lup ton

W

en

ckso n St

vis St

erso

sc

nS

t

rto

op

EC

t

Mo

Co

Historic District

St

1 S Da

Dick Cre

are

Laur

law

e

Redevelopment Area

Woo

De

Ave

Ave

ess Av

Myrtle

Ru

Progr

Historic District

d St

Direction of Walk

id St

S #

Eucl

ill Ln

Ave

Briarh

oad

Tour Stops

en

Start of Tour

Railr

S #

Gre

ve

dry

A

He n

n

l

ia

sP

ss

Le ed

He

lin St

Tour Stops

ns Ln

Start of Tour

Alle

S #

sC t

Figure 1.21: Neighbors and members of the project team facilitating the North Woodbury Walking Tour.

O

0

125

250

Feet 500

NEIGHBORHOOD WALKING TOUR - West Woodbury

Figure 1.24: East + South Woodbury O Walking Tour Route and Stops

City of Woodbury Gloucester County, New Jersey

O

0

125

250

Feet 500

NEIGHBORHOOD WALKING TOUR - East Woodbury

0

125

250

Feet 500

Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 17


This page intentionally left blank.


Neighborhood Conservation Plan Woodbury, New Jersey

Part II: Neighborhood Conservation Plan


Part II: Neighborhood Conservation Plan EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

23

CITY + NEIGHBORHOOD HISTORY

28

DEMOGRAPHICS 31 NEIGHBORHOOD NEEDS + CHALLENGES

34

COMMUNITY VISION + GOALS

40

PLAN RECOMMENDATIONS

42

IMPLEMENTATION 61 IMPLEMENTATION MATRIX

62


Neighborhood Conservation Plan: Executive Summary

North Woodbury

Broad Street Redevelopment Plan Area

K AVE

RED BAN

DELA

Potential Station Area

WAR

BR

OA

DS

T/

RT

45

E ST

Potential Station Area

COO

PER

E

45

AV

MAN

TUA

PIKE

SA

LEM

/ RT

West Woodbury

ST

Figure 2.1: Overview of Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan Study Areas.

22 | Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan

East + South Woodbury 0

Feet

1,000

GmD


Neighborhood Conservation Plan: Executive Summary

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan (NCP) is intended to serve as a guide and roadmap for projects and policy changes to help conserve neighborhood character as the Redevelopment Plan is implemented for the Broad Street district and when the Glassboro-Camden Line arrives. The NCP focuses on three neighborhood areas (North, West, East + South) chosen for their proximity to areas of future potential growth and development and provides recommended strategies for each neighborhood in the categories of 1) Land Use + Community Form, 2) Circulation + Mobility, and 3) Public Amenities + Infrastructure (figure 2.1). Organizing the recommendations into these three categories will assist the City in implementing the recommendations of the NCP within the Master Planning process, and within updates to the Capital Improvement Plan and Zoning Ordinance. The creation of an NCP now allows the community to address current neighborhood issues while reinforcing the positive aspects of the community, and provides the City with a tool to help neighborhoods prepare for the future effects of redevelopment. The needs, challenges, vision, and recommendations of the NCP were informed by a comprehensive public process and the consultant’s expertise and research. The public process involved a public workshop session held on January 24, 2012, followed by three neighborhood walking tours to observe issues voiced during the public workshop in mid-March. The results of the public process were analyzed and combined with the consultant’s research and analysis to produce the plan recommendations in this document (figure 2.5). The following is a summary of the goals and objectives for each neighborhood.

GmD

Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 23


Neighborhood Conservation Plan: Executive Summary

NORTH WOODBURY Land Use + Community Form Goal: Foster a “village” atmosphere by maintaining the character of the residential neighborhood. The following objectives are recommended to achieve this goal: Objective A: Soften the transition between the residential neighborhoods and the hospital.

T/

RT

45

Objective B: Allow for reasonable improvements to property by ensuring zoning regulations are consistent with the community’s vision.

BR

OA

DS

Circulation + Mobility

K AVE

RED BAN

Potential Station Area

Figure 2.2: North Woodbury Neighborhood Area

Goal: Create safer, enhanced connections for kids, pedestrians, and cyclists throughout the neighborhood. The following objectives are recommended to achieve this goal: Objective A: Make Tatum St. safer for kids, pedestrians, and cyclists. Objective B: Create safer pedestrian routes throughout so that kids can better navigate the neighborhood. Objective C: Improve circulation patterns around the Walnut Street School. Public Amenities + Infrastructure Goal: Provide recreational space in the neighborhood that is easily and safely accessible for all users. The following objectives are recommended to achieve this goal: Objective A: Create new recreational spaces and enhance access to existing open space for users of all ages.

24 | Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan

GmD


Neighborhood Conservation Plan: Executive Summary

WEST WOODBURY

DELA

WAR

Land Use + Community Form

E ST

RT

45

Goal: Stabilize neighborhood character at the edges, and fill in the gaps with appropriate development. The following objectives are recommended to achieve this goal:

OA

DS T/

Objective A: Promote high quality development at key sites along the neighborhood’s edges.

BR

Objective B: Allow for small-scale infill development compatible with neighborhood character.

Objective B: Improve pedestrian and bicycle mobility conditions throughout the neighborhood.

TUA

Objective A: Improve traffic circulation and pedestrian conditions along Lupton Ave/Glover St.

LEM

SA

E

AV

MAN

Goal: Improve traffic patterns, bicycle, and pedestrian conditions to foster streets that serve all users. The following objectives and strategies are recommended to achieve this goal:

PIKE

Circulation + Mobility

Figure 2.3: West Woodbury Neighborhood Area

Objective C: As the business district grows, update parking, wayfinding, and circulation systems to accommodate the needs of businesses and residents. Objective D: Improve traffic circulation and pedestrian conditions along Jackson St. Public Amenities + Infrastructure Goal: Improve the quality of public and recreational space in the neighborhood. The following objectives are recommended to achieve this goal: Objective A: Increase the amount of shade trees on sidewalks, and ensure the right types of trees are selected. Objective B: Improve access to Woodbury Creek Park from the neighborhood. Objective C: Create smaller neighborhood-serving parks and maintain existing open spaces.

GmD

Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 25


Neighborhood Conservation Plan: Executive Summary

EAST + SOUTH WOODBURY

CO

OP

ER

ST

BR

OA

DS T/

RT

45

Land Use + Community Form

MAN

TUA

PIKE

Potential Station Area

Figure 2.4: East + South Woodbury Neighborhood Area

Goal: Preserve the character and form of the existing neighborhoods while allowing for balanced growth that meets the needs of current and future residents. The following objectives are recommended to achieve this goal: Objective A: Maintain existing neighborhood character between Broad Street and the railroad. Objective B: Allow for market flexibility in determining rental/ownership, development type mix, and in encouraging redevelopment. Objective C: Buffer residential neighborhoods from commercial strip development in south Woodbury. Circulation + Mobility Goal: Create strategies to embrace traffic between the railroad and Broad St. as an asset, while making it easier for pedestrians and cyclists to safely access neighborhood amenities. The following objectives are recommended to achieve this goal: Objective A: Create safer pedestrian and bicycle routes to neighborhood destinations. Objective B: Improve signage + circulation for visitors. Objective C: Improve parking and traffic conditions near the train station. Public Amenities + Infrastructure Goal: Create a vibrant public realm that reflects the character of the neighborhood and the connection to downtown and the railroad, and increase access to community facilities and open spaces. The following objectives are recommended to achieve this goal: Objective A: Improve and expand access to open space and recreation facilities. Objective B: Add excitement and aesthetic enhancements to neighborhood streets connecting the railroad to Broad Street. Objective C: Incorporate public art, neighborhood character details into the landscape.

26 | Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan

GmD


WOODBURY NEIGHBORHOOD CONSERVATION PLAN Summary Map of Goals, Objectives, and Implementation Strategies - DRAFT 5.22.12 Neighborhood Conservation Plan: Executive Summary North Woodbury Land Use + Community Form GOAL: Foster a “village� atmosphere by maintaining the character of the residential neighborhood. Circulation + Mobility GOAL: Create safer, enhanced connections for kids, pedestrians, and cyclists throughout the neighborhood. Public Amenities + Infrastructure GOAL: Provide recreational space in the neighborhood that is easily and safely accessible for all users.

Medical-Hospital Zone Athletic Fields

West Woodbury Land Use + Community Form GOAL: Stabilize neighborhood character at the edges, and fill in the gaps with appropriate development. Circulation + Mobility GOAL: Improve traffic patterns, bicycle, and pedestrian conditions to foster streets that serve all users. Public Amenities + Infrastructure GOAL: Improve the quality of public and recreational space in the neighborhood.

Figure 2.5: Overview map of goals and major recommendations in the Plan.

GmD

East + South Woodbury Land Use + Community Form GOAL: Preserve the character and form of the existing neighborhoods while allowing for balanced growth that meets that needs of current and future residents. Circulation + Mobility GOAL: Create strategies to embrace traffic between the railroad and Broad Street as an asset, while making it easier for pedestrians and cyclists to safely access neighborhood amenities. Public Amenities + Infrastructure GOAL: Create a vibrant public realm that reflects the character of the neighborhood and the connection to downtown and the railroad, and increase access to community facilities and open spaces.

0

Feet

1,000

Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 27


Neighborhood Conservation Plan

CITY + NEIGHBORHOOD HISTORY

Figure 2.6: Woodbury High School, c. 1919

Founded in 1683, Woodbury was established by Quakers fleeing religious persecution in England. Henry Wood and his family, sailing further down the Delaware River from newly christened Philadelphia, ventured three miles up the Pesczackasing Creek to establish the hamlet, whose name is a combination of the family name and their parish home of Bury, England. Construction of the old King’s Highway (later Broad Street) thirteen years later accelerated commercial activity, replacing the creek as the thoroughfare for transportation of goods and attracting business from all over southern New Jersey. Having experienced considerable growth by the mid-19th century, Woodbury, formerly a part of Deptford Township, was incorporated as a separate and sovereign municipality and borough in 1854, and in 1871, an independent city. Woodbury saw considerable economic growth between 1880 and 1900, spearheaded by G.G. Green’s laboratory at Broad and Cooper streets, which became known as “drugstore corner” and developed medicine sold worldwide (figure 2.7). Concurrently, trolley service established in 1894 complemented the horse-and-buggy as an essential travel mode and accelerated growth. The commercial district on Broad Street has traditionally contained a diverse mix of businesses, including banks, theaters,

Figure 2.7: Employees in front of G.G. Green’s laboratory in 1873

Figure 2.9: Sanborn 1886 map of Woodbury. Development is clustered along Broad Street, except in East Woodbury, where it reaches the train tracks.

Figure 2.8: Stokes Grocery on Broad Street

28 | Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan

GmD


Neighborhood Conservation Plan

clothing stores, barber shops, jewelry stores, shoe stores, hardware stores, hotels, restaurants, meat markets, bakeries, grocery stores, a farmer’s market and Mom and Pop establishments (figures 2.8-2.12), the latter of which would become obsolete after the late 1930’s with the opening of Acme’s first self-service supermarket in New Jersey. During this time, most establishments remained open for business in the evening hours on Friday and Saturday. Throughout, Woodbury’s prominent residents constructed many lavish homes, and development eventually spread to the surrounding farmland. Census records reveal sustained growth until the 1960’s, when Woodbury reached its peak of just under 12,500 residents. Since then, the city’s population has remained above 10,000 people. Woodbury has served as the government seat of Gloucester County since 1787. “Courthouse intersection” (figure 2.13) at Broad and Delaware Streets has been the site of a number of public buildings since, including the first courthouse, demolished in 1887, and its predecessor, the current 90-foot structure which fronts Woodbury Junior/Senior High School (figure 2.6). Underwood Hospital was established in 1915 just north of this intersection, before relocating to its current location at Broad and Red Bank Avenue (figure 2.14). It remains the largest county employer to this day.

Figure 2.11: Stores on Broad Street between Curtis Avenue and Centre Street, c. 1954.

Figure 2.12: Broad Street between Centre Street and Aberdeen Place, c. 1954.

Figure 2.10: Sanborn’s 1915 map of Woodbury. Development has moved beyond from Broad Street in all directions. Figure 2.13: “Courthouse Intersection” c. 1900.

Figure 2.14: Underwood Hospital c. 1920.

GmD

Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 29


Neighborhood Conservation Plan

NORTH WOODBURY The earliest development in North Woodbury occurred along Chestnut and Cherry Streets, just off Broad Street by 1902. The neighborhood saw a development boom in the 1920’s when the Budd Brothers developed a 60-acre tract known as the Old Homestead Farm into single-family homes (figure 2.15). The smallest lots, at 6,500 square feet, contained homes that sold for $4,300, while the largest went for $7,000. This was part of an overall housing boom on the west side of Broad St, which also saw development of large tracts off of Delaware Street. WEST WOODBURY

Figure 2.15: A 1923 advertisement for Budd Brothers Construction Company.

Lying just west of early commercial development on Broad Street, contiguous residential development wouldn’t reach the neighborhood until 1890. At this time, Centre Street accommodated residences to Harrison Street, as did lots between German (now Barber) Avenue and High Street east of Glover Street (figures 2.16-2.17). Residential development would extend to Jackson on High Street by 1902, and at the southern extent of the neighborhood, along Salem Avenue to Glover Street. EAST + SOUTH WOODBURY

Figure 2.16: Homes on West Street in the Glover District, 1914.

Figure 2.17: A residence on Delaware Street between Harrison Street and Lupton Avenue. A parking lot now sits on the site.

The northernmost section of East Woodbury is part of the historic district, much of the development of which occurred in the late 19th century. After purchasing and refurbishing the Newton Hotel at the corner of Delaware and Broad, Mahlon Newton turned to developing real estate across the street, mostly along Curtis and Newton Avenues, directly south and north of Cooper Street, respectively. By 1886, all of Cooper Street between Broad and Euclid Streets was developed with single family homes. Both sides of Centre Street and the southern side of Hopkins Street were also developed by this time (figures 2.18-2.19), although the neighborhood wouldn’t approach the current housing density until after Curtis Street and Aberdeen Place were constructed, by 1902 and 1908, respectively. Development reached South Woodbury only slightly later, and by the turn of the century residential development had occurred along German (now East Barber) Avenue and Carpenter Street. This neighborhood has a rich legacy as an African-American enclave within Woodbury, continuing to this day.

Figure 2.19: The home at 37 East Centre Street, which would see later conversion to apartments and a doctor’s office.

Figure 2.18: The Henry Clay Foote home at 42 East Centre Street, pictured in 1880.

30 | Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan

GmD


Neighborhood Conservation Plan

DEMOGRAPHICS In 2010, Woodbury’s population was 10,174, a slight 1.3% decrease from 2000, but reflective of the population total since 1980. While not as pronounced a difference as ten years ago, there were more females than males living here (52% of the city) and they were living longer, making up 70% of the 75 year and above age cohort. The city has seen an increase in racial and ethnic diversity in the past ten years, and is now approximately two-thirds white and one quarter black. Additionally, the Hispanic population grew by over 250% since 2000, to one in ten Woodbury residents in 2010.

Racial/Ethnic Composition of Woodbury Source: U.S. Census 2000

Native American 0.2% Two or more races 1.8%

Asian 1.0%

Hispanic (of any race) 3.9%

Other race 0.1%

Black or African American 22.1% White 70.8%

Occupationally, Woodbury saw large increases in those working in the professional, healthcare support, and sales sectors, while the largest decrease occurred in building and maintenance jobs. 58% of housing units were owner-occupied in 2010, down slightly from 2000, while the vacancy rate rose from 6% to 8%. Adjusted for inflation, the median home value increased 52% to $188,500, while household income rose 7% to over $58,000 in 2010. This is largely a reflection of a decrease in those earning $15,000 to $40,000 and an increase in the $40,000 to $100,000 bracket. However, earners at the bottom and top of the income bracket increased and decreased respectively, although the number of families living in poverty decreased from 11% to 8% in ten years. This was accompanied by overall educational increases that reflect national trends, although slightly behind those of Gloucester County as a whole. Finally, while the median home value increased by over 50%, this was not on pace with either the national (68% increase) or Gloucester County median, where home values doubled.

2010

Asian 1.2%

Native American 0.1% Two or more races 2.8%

Hispanic (of any race) 10.7%

Black or African American 23.8%

Other race 0.1%

White 61.2%

Median Home Value Source: U.S. Census, ACS $236,900

2010 Age Distribution for Woodbury Source: U.S. Census 85 years and over 75 to 84 years

20062010 Avg.

65 to 74 years 55 to 64 years

$188,500

45 to 54 years 35 to 44 years

$123,844

25 to 34 years

$118,200

18 to 24 years 15 to 17 years

2000

10 to 14 years 5 to 9 years 800

600

400

200

Females

Under 5 years Persons

200

400 Males

600

800 Woodbury

Gloucester Co.

Figure 2.20: City-wide demographics

GmD

Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 31


Neighborhood Conservation Plan

NORTH WOODBURY This neighborhood is majority white (73%) and female (51%). The median age is less than the city’s by two years at 35, while the average household size is larger than Woodbury’s (2.67 persons compared to 2.38 in the city). 66% of households are families, and 43% are married couples. Median home value mirrors that of Woodbury at $189,401, and is comprised of mostly 3 to 4 bedroom dwellings built between 1940 and 1969, with a presence of newer homes built within the last 15 years. 74% of housing units are owner-occupied, and there exists a similar 7% vacancy rate to the city as a whole. WEST WOODBURY West Woodbury mirrors North Woodbury in many ways. 76% of residents are white and 52% are female. It is slightly older, with a median age of 38 years, and households are slightly smaller, with a 2.52 average. 68% of households are comprised of families, and 47% are married couples. The median home value in West Woodbury is the highest of the three neighborhoods, at $231,967, and is comprised of mostly 3 to 4 bedroom dwellings mostly built between 1940 and 1969. 73% of housing units are owner-occupied, and only 6% are vacant.

Median Home Value, 2006-2010 5-year average (in 2010 dollars)

32 | Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan

$189,401

$231,967

$200,795

$188,500

North

West

East + South

Woodbury

GmD


Neighborhood Conservation Plan

EAST + SOUTH WOODBURY This neighborhood displays marked demographic differences from the other two in the plan. An approximate equal number of whites and blacks reside here (45% and 43%, respectively), and 15% of the population is Hispanic. East Woodbury accounted for over half the overall rise in the city’s Hispanic population between 2000 and 2010. The neighborhood mirrors Woodbury’s 37-year median age and 52% female composition, and most closely reflects the city’s average household size, at 2.34 persons per household. Of these, a majority (54%) are non-family, and only 20% of the neighborhood’s households are headed by a married couple. Similar to the other neighborhoods, the median home value is greater than that of the city, at $200,795. These are comprised of mostly 1 to 2 bedroom dwellings, most of which were built between 1940 and 1969. Unlike the city overall, where a majority of housing units are owner-occupied, 70% of units in East Woodbury are rental, and 10% are vacant.

Figure 2.21: Neighborhoodspecific demographics Sources: U.S. Census and American Community Survey

Percentage Non-Hispanic White

Housing Tenure: Rent vs. Own 68%

North

West

East + South

Woodbury

GmD

26% Rent

27% Rent

70% Rent

42% Rent

74% Own

73% Own

30% Own

58% Own

North

West

East + South

Woodbury

73%

39%

61%

Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 33


Neighborhood Conservation Plan

NEIGHBORHOOD NEEDS + CHALLENGES Existing neighborhood conditions were collected from a number of sources, including research and analysis of existing conditions and neighborhood zoning regulations, interviews with City officials, and an extensive public outreach process that involved a public workshop and three guided neighborhood walking tours. The following is a summary of the major issues and opportunities in each of the neighborhood areas. NORTH WOODBURY

Figure 2.22: Typical conditions along Tatum Street looking North towards Hessian Avenue.

Figure 2.23: Edge of parking lot on the southern side of West Packer Street.

Land Use - The North Woodbury neighborhood is proximate to the Medical/ Hospital area along Broad Street and Red Bank Avenue, and near the proposed site of the northern train station of the Glassboro-Camden Line. The current residential zoning is largely reflective of the existing community character. The few differences that exist between conditions on the ground and the existing code include narrower lot widths and shallower setbacks on the ground than allowed by right in some cases, but do not deviate enough and are not problematic enough to warrant suggesting a change in the zoning. During meetings with zoning officials from the City and community members, it was clear that no major land use conflicts concerning the residential zones existed. Community members were more concerned with ensuring that reasonable improvements to property would be allowed and that the zoning code was navigable for residents. Community members also expressed their desire that the edge of the hospital area be softened where it meets the residential neighborhood as the hospital and related medical uses grow (figures 2.23-2.24), and wanted to see more commercial/ professional development on the neighboring portion of Broad Street. Tatum Street - Improving conditions on Tatum Street was a primary concern for community members. Other than Broad Street, Tatum is the only north-south street that links the various blocks and destinations of the neighborhood together. As such, it is a primary pedestrian route in the neighborhood used most heavily by children walking to the Walnut Street Elementary School and between friends’ homes in the neighborhood. Tatum is a long, straight street running almost a mile in length, with only two stop signs along its length at Dubois and Progress Avenues between the northern border of the municipality at Hessian Avenue and Red Bank Avenue (figure 2.22). Additionally, pedestrian lighting along Tatum Street is insufficient, especially recognizing that this street provides an important link to the elementary school and the adjoining playground.

Figure 2.24: Typical medical office along Broad Street.

34 | Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan

GmD


Neighborhood Conservation Plan

Parents in this neighborhood typically advise their children to walk along Tatum Street instead of Broad Street, so it is critical that pedestrian conditions along Tatum Street be improved. The configuration of Broad Street is less of a concern for residents, with the exception of the intersection with Park Street, where the lack of a traffic light and ability to make left turns onto Broad Street is an issue. Walnut Street School - The Walnut Street Elementary School is a major institutional presence in the neighborhood, and contains the sole playground in the neighborhood area. Concerns from the community include ensuring that there are safe streets surrounding the school, that parking and traffic conditions are adequate, and that the playground is maximized as an important community asset. Open Space - With the exception of the playground at the Walnut Street Elementary School (figure 2.25), there are no recreational amenities in this neighborhood. One of the issues identified by the community is that there are no destinations, save for private homes, for kids from the neighborhood to walk to. Neighborhood residents would like to see a new recreational space and better lighting throughout the neighborhood so that recreational spaces can be accessed safely.

Wa

t St

C

he

rry

St

lnu

Ch

Ta t

um

St

Playground

est

nut

St

Figure 2.25: Bird’s-eye view of the Walnut Street School and playground.

GmD

Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 35


Neighborhood Conservation Plan

WEST WOODBURY

Figure 2.26: Semi-detached homes along Logan Street.

Figure 2.27: Edge of the former laundry site with the neighboring residential area.

Land Use - The West Woodbury neighborhood area is proximate to downtown and likely to experience some effects from implementation of the Redevelopment Plan. The current residential zoning in the neighborhood is largely reflective of the existing community character, though some properties in this area were observed to have larger accessory garages than is allowed by code. Additionally, some semi-detached units exist in this neighborhood (figure 2.26), most notably along Logan Street at the southern section of this neighborhood. Such units are not permitted under the existing code. The majority of the larger lots and homes along Delaware Street have been converted to professional offices with parking in the rear. The historic district intersects this neighborhood along High Street, from Broad Street to Jackson Street. Residents expressed both a desire for new development at key sites abutting their neighborhood in the Redevelopment Plan area, as well as some concern regarding spillover effects as the downtown grows. The former laundry site at Salem Avenue and Glover Street (figure 2.27) and the block facing Broad Street between West Centre Street and West Barber Avenue were both expressed as sites of particular interest for prioritizing redevelopment. Both sites front on major commercial corridors, while backing up directly on the residential neighborhood. Context-sensitive development of both of these sites is a concern so that new mixeduse or non-residential development provides a reasonable transition to neighboring residences. Parking Impacts - Though the availability of on-street parking in the neighborhoods is not currently an issue, residents were concerned about the possibility of future spillover parking from Broad Street through implementation of the Redevelopment Plan. Neighbors are particularly concerned with future on-street parking needs on High Street and West Barber Avenue, both of which are proximate to Broad Street and potential future areas of redevelopment, and the need for more on-street parking along Wood Street near the high school and the entrance to Woodbury Creek Park. Residents are interested in the possible future use of parking permits for non-commercial streets and signage to direct shoppers to public parking lots and businesses off Broad Street.

36 | Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan

GmD


Neighborhood Conservation Plan

Roadways - During the public workshop and walking tour, Lupton Avenue / Glover Street arose as the primary roadway of concern to neighborhood residents. This street is unique in that it provides a direct link between Salem Avenue and Delaware Street, running parallel to Broad Street through the residential neighborhood. This however was not always the case. Glover Street used to run from Salem Avenue to High Street, where it terminated. Similarly, Lupton Avenue used to run from Delaware Street to West Barber Avenue where it terminated. Later, the portion of the block of High Street separating these two was acquired to connect the two streets, resulting in the slight jog of the street at its intersection with High Street. Though this increased connectivity in the street network is a positive, traffic calming measures along the length of the street and improved intersections at West Street and High Street are of particular concern to residents (figure 2.28). Similarly, Jackson Street, which also runs parallel to Broad Street further into the neighborhood, was also identified as needing traffic calming measures.

Figure 2.28: Warning sign for drivers heading south on Lupton Avenue towards West Street.

Residents also identified the desires to see a bike lane on Broad Street, which at this time consists of four travel lanes and two parking lanes. Under a plan by NJ DOT currently beginning construction, Broad Street is being reconfigured to have two parking lanes, two travel lanes, a dedicated turning lane, curb bump-outs at intersections, and bicycle lanes in either direction. Open Space - Though there is no public park within the West Woodbury neighborhood area, the neighborhood is proximate to Woodbury Creek Park, which links to athletic fields, trails, lakes, and is part of the Woodbury Creek watershed. Residents expressed that they would like to see improved maintenance of existing parks, and improved access to Woodbury Creek Park from the West Woodbury Neighborhood. As part of this effort, residents also expressed a desire to see an increase in the amount of finished path in the park (figure 2.29) and for possible expansion of the park westward towards I-295. In general for the neighborhood, residents also expressed their desire for improved maintenance of existing sidewalks throughout the neighborhood and the provision of a dense shade tree cover with appropriate street trees.

GmD

Figure 2.29: Muddy, unpaved pathway adjacent to the creek in Woodbury Creek Park.

Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 37


Neighborhood Conservation Plan

EAST + SOUTH WOODBURY

Figure 2.29: Typical large-format home in East Woodbury, originally designed as a single-family household.

Figure 2.30: Typical home in the neighborhood south of Carpenter Street.

Figure 2.31: Attached row-housing in East Woodbury.

Land Use - The East + South neighborhood area sits directly between the site of the future downtown train station and Broad Street, and is anticipated to see the most potential growth due to the introduction of passenger rail service and implementation of the Redevelopment Plan. The portion of this neighborhood north of Carpenter Street is within the Redevelopment Plan area, and the lots fronting on either side of Aberdeen Place north to Cooper Street are within the historic district. Throughout the public process, it was evident that a tension existed between future growth and development and existing neighborhood character in terms of scale, preservation, and use. Particularly in the historic district, residents would like to see improved enforcement of district standards, preservation of single-family homes, and better maintenance of rental properties. Higher density development in the historic district through implementation of the Redevelopment Plan is also a concern to residents, as some feel this could dramatically alter the existing character of the neighborhood. However, residents also believe that the neighborhood will need to adapt to the demands of the housing market in order to thrive in the future. The most current census data shows that 70% of units in the neighborhood are rental properties. Additionally, 54% of households are non-family. Though many residents would like to see properties in the neighborhood remain as single-family homes, they also express that this should happen only if it is economically viable and does not stunt growth (figure 2.29). Wellmaintained multi-family rental or owner-occupied units are not necessarily seen as a detriment to the neighborhood, however, regular property maintenance and enforcement of existing standards is needed for these and single-family units in the northern section of this neighborhood area. Though single-family homes are the predominant building type in this neighborhood, a small collection of semi-detached and row homes exist as well (figure 2.31) The portion of this neighborhood south of Carpenter Street has recently seen some new infill development in the form of new single-family residences. However, the placement of garages attached to and in front of the principal structure is not consistent with existing neighborhood character (figure 2.30). No standards for the placement of garages on the lot relative to the main house exist in the zoning code to address this. Additionally, this section of the neighborhood sits directly adjacent to the C-2 commercial zone, an area characterized by a collection of car dealerships along Route 45. There is little to no buffering between the dealerships and residential homes, and inconsistent and unspecified buffer dimensions for this type of use.

38 | Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan

GmD


Neighborhood Conservation Plan

Circulation - Many of the issues related to traffic circulation relate to future anticipated needs once rail service arrives in Woodbury. Residents recognize there will be positive aspects to increased traffic, as one neighbor put it during the public workshop, “embrace traffic, its people coming into your town� (figure 2.32). In order to accommodate this increase in traffic without negatively impacting the neighborhood, residents feel that the intersection of Railroad Avenue and Cooper Street should be improved to be able to better handle increased traffic, where it is currently difficult to turn left from Railroad Avenue onto Cooper Street. Residents also thought that parking should be balanced to encourage more people to walk rather than drive to this train station. Additionally, residents feel there is an existing need for safer biking conditions within the neighborhood. Open Space - This neighborhood area contains Wing-Dickerson Park, one of the largest public parks in Woodbury and is centrally located within the heart of the neighborhood. This park was recently renovated adding athletic courts and site improvements, and also contains some space for passive recreation as well as a playground for kids and families. Residents expressed however that better access needs to be created for pedestrians to access the park (figure 2.33), and expressed a desire for another park or community center that could serve the City year-round and provide activities during winter.

Figure 2.32: Improvements to Railroad Avenue will need to be made in the future to handle a projected increase in traffic from the train station.

Figure 2.33: Lack of pedestrian access to the park at the intersection of South and East Barber Avenue.

GmD

Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 39


Neighborhood Conservation Plan

COMMUNITY VISION + GOALS

Pedestrianfriendly streets

A vision statement is a vivid description of a desired outcome, or series of outcomes, that helps to paint a mental image to encourage and inspire. A vision statement for a neighborhood conservation plan illustrates the collective ideal of the plan participants and the community. The vision builds a specific idea of how a place will look, feel, and operate in the future. From this statement, projects and strategies can be tested for their ability to fulfill the vision. The following vision statement is divided into three parts, one for each neighborhood of the plan. These visions were derived from the public participation process conducted for this plan. NORTH WOODBURY

Access to open space

Containing the community anchors of Underwood Memorial Hospital and Walnut Street School in addition to a network of open space, North Woodbury has developed into a more connected, pedestrian-friendly neighborhood. The hospital is buffered by green space and a network of sidewalks that enhance the pedestrian experience. The community vision correlates with clear, readily accessible zoning regulations, which provide for sustainable building practices. The pedestrian experience has improved dramatically, most notably on Tatum Street, which now features a dedicated bike lane and enhanced crosswalks and bump-outs at key intersections. It is also a safe thoroughfare for pedestrians, with improved sidewalks and abundant lighting. Circulation around Walnut Street School has also been enhanced through special signage, parking restrictions, and one-way streets. Along Broad Street, crosswalk and traffic light additions have created a safer, more connected experience for pedestrians. Finally, open space amenities have been augmented through the addition of a park on West Packer Street, a connective corridor between the neighborhood, athletic fields, high school, and downtown, and improved lighting throughout. WEST WOODBURY The neighborhood has complemented and accommodated development along Broad Street while better utilizing its potential for open space access and recreation. West Woodbury now enjoys redevelopment on the former laundry site and on the block between West Centre and West Barber Streets, all constructed with sustainable building practices. Street improvements throughout the neighborhood acknowledge increases in automobile presence while maintaining and improving the pedestrian experience. Sidewalks and roads previously in poor condition have been improved, and key north-south roads running parallel to Broad Street have clear visual and infrastructural elements to make the environment safer for cars and pedestrians. Automobile spillover into the neighborhood from new

40 | Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan

GmD


Neighborhood Conservation Plan

development on Broad Street is mitigated by shared lots and the institution of parking permits for residential areas contiguous with Broad Street. West Woodbury is now a bicycle-friendly community, anchored by a bike lane on Broad Street. Finally, West Woodbury’s residents are enjoying access to improved open space. Woodbury Creek Park is accessible by new entrances in the neighborhood. An informed public facilitates the flourishing of tree planting in the neighborhood and enjoys the benefits of a more complete tree canopy. Finally, vacant, undevelopable land throughout the neighborhood is turned over to pocket parks, augmenting West Woodbury’s green space amenities.

Maintain neighborhood character

EAST + SOUTH WOODBURY East Woodbury experiences a renaissance spurred on by the extension of light rail through Gloucester County. At the same time, the historic character of the existing neighborhood is maintained as educated homeowners comply with historic district requirements which are duly enforced. Redevelopment in the area is seamless, with guidelines in place to accommodate single-family and multi-family homes as well as a redevelopment of St. Patrick’s School to include community open space. The neighborhood now enjoys safer pedestrian and bicycle access. The parks in the middle of the neighborhood are more connected through pedestrian-friendly signage and crosswalks. A bike loop circumscribes the neighborhood, connecting residents to amenities from Broad Street to the train station. Connections are further enhanced through the addition of east-west brick walkways with added lighting and tree cover. Wayfinding and historic district signage further augments the pedestrian experience, while automobile circulation is aided by a new traffic light and turning lane at Railroad Avenue and Cooper Street. Open spaces have seen the addition of amenities such as lighting, benches, a dog park, and community center, and Wing-Dickerson Park is now outfitted to host special events.

GmD

A new community center

Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 41


Neighborhood Conservation Plan

PLAN RECOMMENDATIONS The purpose of creating the Neighborhood Conservation Plan for Woodbury was to provide a road-map of projects and policy changes to accomplish the vision outlined by the community. Using the input from the community and the consultants’ experience and research, the team sought to present recommendations with specific implementation strategies for use by the City of Woodbury to accomplish the goals and objectives of the for each neighborhood. The recommendations are organized by neighborhood, and by the categories of land use + community form, circulation + mobility, and public amenities + infrastructure. Each section begins with summary presentation of recommended physical improvements presented as a diagram over the map of the neighborhood area (figures 2.35, 2.48, and 2.57). This is followed by a written description of the goals and objectives for each category recommended to achieve the community’s vision. This section corresponds to the Implementation Matrix included in this document. NORTH WOODBURY I.

LAND USE + COMMUNITY FORM

t St

Ta

tu

m

St

lnu

C he

Wa

rry

St

The goal related to land use + community form of the North Woodbury neighborhood area is to foster a “village” atmosphere by maintaining the character of the residential neighborhood. The following objectives and strategies are recommended to achieve this goal:

kS

Br

t

St

St

Oa

ker

d

ac

oa

WP

Figure 2.34: The transition area between Underwood Memorial Hospital and the North Woodbury neighborhood area.

42 | Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan

GmD


Neighborhood Conservation Plan

Evaluate a left-turn lane and traffic light at Park + Broad Street

Make Tatum Street safer for kids, pedestrians, and cyclists by adding crosswalks, striping, pedestrian lighting, controlling speed and vehicle-type access, and prioritizing street maintenance

Add dedicated bike lanes or sharrows, accompanied by signage

Encourage connectivity among neighborhoods and nearby commercial areas through the use of crosswalks

Improve lighting around and in the playground

Reinstate parking restriction to ban parking on the south side of Chestnut Street

Add raised crosswalks and neckdowns at Chestnut and Walnut Street around the Walnut Street School Create a public recreation space on W Packer Street Add raised crosswalks and neckdowns at Chestnut and Walnut Street around the Walnut Street School

Introduce special signage, such as “Children at Play�

Develop a long-term pedestrian link from North Woodbury with the athletic fields, High School, and downtown

Examine making some streets around the Walnut Street School one-way

Improve buffer standards for the Medical-Hospital Zone

Figure 2.35: North Woodbury summary diagram of recommended physical improvements.

GmD

0

Feet

200

Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 43


Neighborhood Conservation Plan

A. Soften the transition between the residential neighborhoods and the hospital.

Figure 2.36: Landscaping serving as a buffer between parking lot and sidewalk along a right-of-way.

Figure 2.37: Detached garage behind principle building, typical of North Woodbury.

Underwood Memorial Hospital is located just south of the North Woodbury neighborhood area, and is surrounded by a modest but growing cluster of related medical office uses. Many of these uses are located along Broad Street extending north from the hospital, with some related structures, parking lots, and commercial development extending west of Broad Street abutting the neighborhood. Currently, the block between Oak Street and West Packer Street serves as a transition zone between the Medical/ Office Zone and the neighborhood. Neighborhood residents expressed their desire that as the hospital and related uses grow and develop that a “soft� transition is maintained between these uses and the residential neighborhood (figure 2.34). Some protections already exist in the current zoning code, most notably some of the conditional height restrictions for buildings within a certain distance of a residential district, with a height limit of 35 feet for structures within 50 feet of a residential district, and a height limit of 50 feet within 100 feet of a residential district. To complement these standards, provisions should be adopted into the zoning code to require enhanced buffer standards between hospital/ medical uses and the surrounding residential areas. Buffers in walkable, urban areas such as Woodbury need not focus solely on the separation of uses, but may instead focus on the conservation of a vibrant, walkable mixed-use environment that complements a variety of uses. A minimum buffer of 10 feet should be introduced for medical and related uses that abut a public right-of-way that consists of a combination of landscaping, shrubs, or fencing but must provide a sidewalk along a street right-of-way (figure 2.36). This will assist in guiding future development to be compatible with the walkable, porous nature of the community along the southern side of West Packer Street. Additionally, buffer space mid-block could be used to provide pedestrian passageways to increase walkability between uses in the neighborhood. B. Allow for reasonable improvements to property by ensuring zoning regulations are consistent with the community’s vision. The existing character of land use and form within North Woodbury is relatively consistent throughout the neighborhood, and is consistent with current zoning regulations. Residents expressed that they would like to be assured that reasonable improvements to their property could take place under the current code, and felt intimidated by the process and complexity of existing zoning regulations. To encourage better building practices, Section 202-81.6: Green Design Standards, should be updated to allow for additional uses such as porous pavement, roof-mounted solar panels, and solar panel installation over parking lots. By allowing these

44 | Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan

GmD


Neighborhood Conservation Plan

upgrades, neighbors can make reasonable improvements to property that are consistent with the existing form of the neighborhood, and provide features that will assist in reducing stormwater issues and reduce energy bill for homeowners. A majority of homes in the community have prominent front porches or entryways facing the street and detached garages located behind the principal building. Recent infill construction in several parts of Woodbury has resulted in more suburban-style housing with attached garages located prominently at the front of the principal structure. The current code (Section 202-77) should be revised to require that attached garages be placed at the side of or behind the principal building, and a minimum of 20 feet behind the principal building’s street frontage (figure 2.37). Additionally, this section should be revised to require that detached garages sit behind the principal building. Current provisions in the code are vague on how attached garages should be treated, as they indirectly reference an exception for accessory structures that are an integral structural part of the main building. Additionally, a user-friendly card should be prepared for property owners with a quick reference to information regarding city services such as trash pick-up, tax, water, sewer bill due dates and the City’s web address. The rear of the card should have a quick reference guide to zoning regulations. This card should also be available online on the City’s website. Community members expressed some confusion regarding zoning rules and procedures during the public process, and a user-friendly format would be helpful to informing residents regarding City services.

Figure 2.38: Bump-out on a residential street.

Figure 2.39: Raised crosswalks provide cues for drivers to slow down, and create a safer crossing for pedestrians.

II. CIRCULATION + MOBILITY The goal related to circulation + mobility of the North Woodbury neighborhood area is to create safer, enhanced connections for kids, pedestrians, and cyclists throughout the neighborhood. The following objectives and strategies are recommended to achieve this goal: A. Make Tatum St. safer for kids, pedestrians, and cyclists. Tatum Street straddles the border of Woodbury and West Deptford, and is the single parallel route in the neighborhood to Broad Street. Additionally, Tatum Street leads to the Walnut Street School, Underwood Memorial Hospital, Woodbury Creek Park, the Junior-Senior High School, and the athletic fields surrounding the High School and the park. Tatum Street provides an important and singular connection for pedestrians in the neighborhood, and upgrades are needed to enhance this street. Stop signs and stop lines, lane striping, regularly spaced street trees, and crosswalks that are highly visible through the use of material changes or paint color are recommended as visual cues to slow vehicles and make drivers more

GmD

Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 45


Neighborhood Conservation Plan

alert. Additionally, pedestrian-level street lighting should be added to ensure the street is safe for pedestrians in the early morning and evening. Raised crosswalks and bump-outs at the intersections of Chestnut and Walnut Street may be strategic interventions to ensure safe pedestrian crossing conditions on Tatum Street near the Walnut Street School (figures 2.38-2.39). A bike lane or shared automobile/bike travel lane (sharrow) accompanied by bike signage should be added to this corridor, potentially as part of a larger citywide mobility plan (figure 2.40). The City should also ensure enforcement of existing speed limits and prioritize the maintenance and upkeep of sidewalks on Tatum Street.

Figure 2.40: Sharrow marking on a street.

B. Create safer pedestrian routes throughout so that kids can better navigate the neighborhood. Some pedestrian enhancements should also be made to Broad Street to encourage safer and greater connectivity throughout the neighborhood. Many parents told us that they tell their children to walk along Tatum Street because they believe Broad Street is not as safe for pedestrians. This does not have to be the case; greater connectivity between and among the neighborhoods and nearby commercial areas can be encouraged through the provision of well-maintained crosswalks across east/west streets parallel to Broad Street (figure 2.41). Residents also expressed a desire to see a leftturn lane and traffic light at Park and Broad Street. The City should evaluate the need for this in the future, and certainly once the Glassboro-Camden Line has been introduced.

Du

bo

He

ss

est

nut

ve

St

St

G

t

St

tS

re en

lnu

Br

Wa

oa

d

St

C

he

rry

St

Ch

is A

C. Improve circulation patterns around the Walnut Street School. Community members felt that circulation patterns around the Walnut Street School could be improved, especially in the mornings during drop-off times. The City should examine the feasibility of making certain streets around the school one-way, either permanently or just during school hours, to improve traffic circulation and safety for pedestrians and kids in the area (figure 2.43). Additionally, community members were concerned that allowing parking on the southern side of Chestnut Street created a dangerous condition given the proximity to the school and playground. Neighbors worried that the presence of parked cars presented a danger wherein children might dart out from behind

Figure 2.41: Crosswalks on roads intersecting Broad Street.

46 | Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan

GmD


Neighborhood Conservation Plan

parked cars into the flow of traffic. The City and the school should work together to evaluate either permanently removing on-street parking from a section of this street, or simply restricting on-street parking during school hours. III. PUBLIC AMENITIES + INFRASTRUCTURE The goal related to public amenities + infrastructure of the North Woodbury neighborhood area is to provide recreational space in the neighborhood that is easily and safely accessible for all users. The following objectives and strategies are recommended to achieve this goal: A. Create new recreational spaces and enhance access to existing open space for users of all ages.

WP

ac

ker

St

Figure 2.42: Potential future park site on West Packer Street.

The North Woodbury neighborhood lacks publicly accessible open space within the neighborhood and within walking distance for pedestrians, with the exception of the playground at the Walnut Street School. The Walnut Street School’s playground may need additional lighting around its entrance to make evening play safer. Lighting should have appropriate shielding from neighboring homes, be of a pedestrian-scaled height of roughly 12 feet, operated on timers if needed, and be of an appropriate brightness for the context of the neighborhood.

lnu

est

St

St

nut

he rry

Wa

Ch

C

To add needed open space and to provide a transition between the hospital area and the residential neighborhood, a public recreation space should be created, potentially on Block 87, Lots 25, 26, and 26.01, which is currently a vacant lot (figure 2.42). New open space could consist of programmatic aspects such as a dog park, playground, basketball court, or as passive recreation space for the neighborhood. Additionally, creating an improved linkage to Woodbury Creek Park, the Junior-Senior High School, and the surrounding athletic fields over the long-term would make these valuable open space amenities more accessible to residents of North Woodbury.

tS

t

Figure 2.43: Pedestrian and automobile access to Walnut Street School

GmD

Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 47


at

kin

sA

ve

Edith

Neighborhood Conservation Plan Du

bo

He

ss

WEST WOODBURY

Loga

er S

tn

ut

St

St

er ry St

St

um

Ta t

e

45

e

Pa

St

The Redevelopment Plan includes the two sites mentioned by the public as priorities for redevelopment. The first, the former laundry site at the W intersection of Salem Avenue and Glover Street, is in the Live-Work Transect, Re dB an which is intended to serve ask Ava e primarily urban residential district with accommodation for some small scale neighborhood commercial functions nk Ave E Red Ba (figures 2.44-2.45). This zone is purposed to act as a transition from the Downtown Transect zone to lower density residential zones at the periphery. A minimum parcel or tract size of one acre is required for redevelopment, and the site itself is roughly 1.12 acres in size and meets tract size requirement. Because of the former use of this site, brownfield remediation may be an issue here. The City should actively pursue a redeveloper for this site. Ste Tra

nsf

Figure 2.45: Example of allowable densities in the Live/Work Transect Zone, which encompasses the former laundry site.

wa

rt L

St od St ar

eS

t

N

rris o

nS

t

Figure 2.46: Prioritized site for redevelopment M on Broad Street between WestortoCenter Street nS t and West Barber Avenue all

lid

Euc

In addition to targetedNewredevelopment at key sites near the neighborhood, ton Ave Section 202-81.6: Green Design Standards, should be updated to allow for Co additional uses such as porous pavement, roof-mounted solar panels, and op er St solar panel installation over parking lots to allow reasonable improvements to property that help manage stormwater and lower energy bills while maintaining the character of the neighborhood. Co

t

un ty Co Fa urt mily s

dS

Lu p

ton

sb Ch yte urc rian h

W

Ba

rbe

Ve Bu rizo ild n ing

rA

ve

Ce

ntr

Ab

erd

hS

st

ee

Ho

pk

ins

St t 48 | Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan P Lo rop Po cati ose d lic e S on fo ta tio r n

klin

St

S

eS

t

nP

l

ve

t

Figure 2.47: Conceptual scheme of the redevelopment. We

Pa Ga rkin ra g ge

He nd

rys

Ct

K Me emb th le Ch od urc ist h

SB roa

Ru sse ll S t

Ha

e Av

Pre

e

St

law

yH

dA

De

ak

St

t

roa

sS

ers

Bro ad

ew

Cit

Pl w

dr

od

Ne

An

wo

Rail

all

orm

Additionally, the community would also like to prioritize the block of Broad Street between West Centre Street and West Barber Avenue for redevelopment (figures 2.46-2.47). This site is within the Downtown Transect zone, and is intended to serve as the primary shopping, professional office, medical, cultural and entertainment district of the City, and is purposed to consist of mixed-use buildings up to five stories in height with active ground floor commercial uses that support a full spectrum of community needs, as well as upper floor residential and commercial uses. A minimum tract Hu nte size of 80,000 square feet is required for redevelopment, which can be r St accomplished at this site with parcel assemblage. The City should actively pursue a redeveloper for this site.

Wo Sm

Gr ee

ak

nS t

Sta te

Ro ut

ck er A. Promote high quality development St at key sites along the neighborhood’s edges. O

Figure 2.44: Prioritized site for redevelopment at Salem and Glover Streets.

Hig

ve

Ch

Glo v

s St Mo rri

es

is A

Da re The goal related to land use + community form of the West Woodbury St neighborhood area is to stabilize neighborhood character at the edges, and fill in the gaps with appropriate development. The following objectives W aln ut St and strategies are recommended to achieve this goal:

v mA

e

Sal

Ch

IV. LAND USE + COMMUNITY FORM

t

n St

t

ver St

W

Phase 2

GmD Phase 1


Neighborhood Conservation Plan

improve access to Woodbury Creek Park by exploring the possibility of adding additional pedestrian access to Woodbury Creek Park at Delaware Street, North Davis Street, and Briarhill Lane

Create a pocket park on the existing parking lot of Delaware Street and Lupton Avenue, utilizing the grass setback on Delaware in the short-term and the entire lot in the long-term Evaluate the need for additional crosswalks on Delaware Street to provide access to Woodbury Creek Park from Lupton Avenue

Improve traffic circulation and pedestrian conditions along Jackson Avenue and Lupton Avenue/Glover Street by adding stop lines, lane striping, and crosswalks Prioritize adding a bike lane to Broad Street

Introduce 3-way stops at Lupton Avenue + High Street and Lupton Avenue + West Street

Actively pursue redevelopment on the block of Broad Street between West Centre Street and West Barber Avenue Install a bike parking facility on east side of Broad Street just south of Barber Avenue

If parking from commercial businesses along Broad Street begins to spill onto adjacent streets, create system of parking permits for residential blocks close to Broad Street

Actively pursue redevelopment at the old laundry site at Salem Avenue and Glover Street

Figure 2.48: West Woodbury summary diagram of recommended physical improvements.

GmD

0

Feet

200

Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 49


Neighborhood Conservation Plan

B. Allow for small-scale infill development compatible with neighborhood character.

Figure 2.49: Detached garages behind principle buildings, typical of West Woodbury.

A majority of the homes within the West Woodbury Neighborhood area either are served only be on-street parking or are served by accessory garages located behind the principal building, with prominent porches and entryways fronting on the street. The current code (Section 202-77) should be revised to require that attached garages be placed at the side of or behind the principal building, and a minimum of 20 feet behind the principal building’s street frontage (figure 2.49). Additionally, this section should be revised to require that detached garages sit behind the principal building. Current provisions in the code are vague on how attached garages should be treated, as they indirectly reference an exception for accessory structures that are an integral structural part of the main building. V. CIRCULATION + MOBILITY The goal related to circulation + mobility of the West Woodbury neighborhood area is to improve traffic patterns, bicycle, and pedestrian conditions to foster streets that serve all users. The following objectives and strategies are recommended to achieve this goal: A. Improve traffic circulation and pedestrian conditions along Lupton Ave/ Glover St. Lupton Avenue and Glover Streets form an important parallel route to Broad Street that cuts through the residential neighborhood. This street is used by both neighborhood residents and drivers avoiding Broad Street, and may be used more often as a result of traffic being diverted off of Broad Street during street maintenance or construction. Intersections should have clear stop lines, lane striping, and crosswalks that are highly visible

Figure 2.50: Additional stop signs create three-way intersections at Glover and High Streets and Glover and West Street, allowing for safer traffic patterns.

50 | Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan

GmD


Neighborhood Conservation Plan

to serve as visual cues for traffic calming. Additionally, the intersections of Lupton Avenue and High Street and Lupton Avenue and West Street have configurations that can be confusing to drivers, and would be improved by introducing all-way stops at both (figure 2.50). B. Improve pedestrian and bicycle mobility conditions throughout the neighborhood. Pedestrian and bicycle conditions could be improved by upgrading the conditions of sidewalks in poor condition throughout the neighborhood, and the City should address this through a city-wide campaign to notify property owners of especially dangerous sidewalks and curbs, and the steps necessary for repairs. Additionally, priority should be given to adding a bike lane to Broad Street. Currently, work is beginning on an NJ DOT project to restructure Broad Street, with bike lanes planned for the cross-section. The City should ensure that this is provided in the right-of-way (figure 2.51). C. As the business district grows, update parking, wayfinding, and circulation systems to accommodate the needs of businesses and residents. As the Broad Street business district grows, and implementation of the Redevelopment Plan occurs, parking from commercial businesses along Broad Street may begin to spill over onto adjacent residential streets. Additionally, neighborhood businesses off of Broad Street may need enhanced signage and shared parking lots with Broad Street businesses that are convenient and easy to locate for customers. A Parking Authority or Parking Utility should be created to address parking needs associated with redevelopment, and to facilitate public/private partnerships to create parking schemes to improve circulation and generate revenue. Either an authority or utility can be created by resolution or ordinance. Figure 2.51: The proposed street cross-section for Downtown Broadway incorporating a 5 foot bike lane in either direction, as proposed in the Redevelopment Plan.

12’

6’

PEDESTRIAN REALM

8’ P

5’

11.5’

11’ 60’ CARTWAY 96’ RIGHT-OF-WAY

GmD

11.5’

5’

8’ P

6’

10’

12’ PEDESTRIAN REALM

SETBACK

Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 51


Neighborhood Conservation Plan

D. Improve traffic circulation and pedestrian conditions along Jackson St. Jackson Street also focuses as a parallel route to Broad Street that cuts through the neighborhood, though is less heavily trafficked as it is further west of downtown Woodbury. Jackson Street does however pass by several neighborhood churches as well as the West End Elementary School, and intersections should have clear stop lines, lane striping, and crosswalks that are highly visible to serve as visual cues for traffic calming, as on Lupton Avenue / Glover Street. These improvements might be necessary in the short-term as a result of channelization on Broad Street and traffic being diverted to parallel streets. Additionally, speed limit machines may be helpful to reduce speeding, as well as improved speed limit enforcement. VI. PUBLIC AMENITIES + INFRASTRUCTURE The goal related to public amenities + infrastructure of the West Woodbury neighborhood area is to improve the quality of public and recreational space in the neighborhood. The following objectives and strategies are recommended to achieve this goal: A. Increase the amount of shade trees on sidewalks, and ensure the right types of trees are selected. Important to residents was the provision and expansion of the shade tree canopy that covers many sidewalks throughout the neighborhood. In addition to adding trees, appropriate types of shade trees should also be selected. City Council should recreate the Shade Tree Commission, with financial provision in the budget for education. This component may include providing educational materials and resources for homeowners to help them select and replace missing or dead street trees with an appropriate replacement. Figure 2.52: A proposed extension and new pedestrian access to Woodbury Creek Park.

52 | Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan

GmD


Neighborhood Conservation Plan

B. Improve access to Woodbury Creek Park from the neighborhood. West Woodbury’s connections to the Woodbury Creek Park system should be expanded to provide residents with better access to the park. Additionally, the boundaries of the park may be expanded westward possibly as a trail connection or easement (figure 2.52). Pedestrian access to the park could be added at Delaware Street, North Davis Street, and Briarhill Lane. This project may be part of a larger city-wide mobility plan to guide pedestrian and bicycle improvements throughout the City. C. Create smaller neighborhood-serving parks and maintain existing open spaces. There are opportunities to create smaller neighborhood-serving parks and small open spaces to bring public space directly to the neighborhood. For example, a pocket park could be created at the existing parking lot at Delaware Street and Lupton Avenue in two phases. The first phase might involve creating a park in the grass setback on Delaware Street in the shortterm in collaboration with the County (figure 2.53). The second phase may involve the removal of the existing park and expanding the whole site into a park (figure 2.54). In other areas of the neighborhood, the City could identify and inventory small vacant parcels for acquisition and dedication to the neighborhood, the City, open space or community organizations that are unlikely to be developed. Strategic locations for acquisition could be decided through the framework of a city-wide mobility plan.

ton

St

rriso

nS

t

Figure 2.53: Pocket park on Delaware Street: First Phase

GmD

la De

De

la

t

Ha

Ave

re

nS

re

rriso

wa

Ha

Lup

Ave

St

ton

wa

Lup

Figure 2.54: Pocket park on Delaware Street: Second Phase

Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 53


Neighborhood Conservation Plan

EAST + SOUTH WOODBURY VII. LAND USE + COMMUNITY FORM The goal related to land use + community form of the East + South Woodbury neighborhood area is to preserve the character and form of the existing neighborhoods while allowing for balanced growth that meets the needs of current and future residents. The following objectives and strategies are recommended to achieve this goal: Figure 2.55: New infill single-family home in South Woodbury, with a garage emerging from the front of the structure.

Figure 2.56: A more typical home in the neighborhood, with a detached garage behind the principle structure.

A. Maintain existing neighborhood character between Broad Street and the railroad. This neighborhood has the largest concentration of properties in the historic district of any of the three neighborhood areas in this plan. Additionally, the area of the historic district is expected to see growth and development pressures from the both the introduction of the train station and implementation of the Redevelopment Plan. Residents are concerned that current property maintenance standards are not being adequately enforced both inside and outside of the historic district, and to better educate residents and property owners, the City should prepare a one page flyer with information on property maintenance standards followed by increased enforcement. This flyer should be distributed to homeowners and community groups and also be made available online at the City’s website. Similarly, the City should work with the Historic Preservation Commission to create design guidelines for recommended and not recommended improvements to property within the district. These standards should take into account the higher-density mixed-uses allowable uses within the overlapping Downtown Transect zone to ensure design features on new structures are compatible with the existing context in the future. To conserve the existing community character south of Carpenter Street within the neighborhood of South Woodbury zoned R-15 Residential, the current code (Section 202-77) should be revised to require that attached garages be placed at the side of or behind the principal building, and a minimum of 20 feet behind the principal building’s street frontage. Additionally, this section should be revised to require that detached garages sit behind the principal building. Current provisions in the code are vague on how attached garages should be treated, as they indirectly reference an exception for accessory structures that are an integral structural part of the main building. This neighborhood has several vacant lots that could see new infill development in the future, and has seen two new single-family homes built in the past ten years with garages prominently fronting the street (figures 2.55-2.56).

54 | Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan

GmD


Neighborhood Conservation Plan

Implement a “bike loop” around the neighborhood that connects the residential area to neighborhood amenities and the downtown Evaluate the need for a traffic light and left turn lane at Railroad Avenue and Cooper Street to service traffic from the new train station.

Target redevelopment for the Saint Patrick’s School site that includes community open space

Prioritize new street tree planting on sections of streets without overhead utility wires

Enhanced pedestrian lighting

Add pedestrian lighting at the entrance of an around Wing-Dickerson Park, and use as a location of special events to raise its visibility in the neighborhood

Introduce a minimum buffer standard of 10-20 feet that may betweeen residential neighborhoods and commercial strip development

Add stop signs and crosswalks to connect Franklin Street to the park entrance on South Barber Avenue, and Carpenter Street to the southern park entrance

Figure 2.57: West Woodbury summary diagram of recommended physical improvements.

GmD

Add aesthetically-pleasing fencing along railway as a buffer, such as a low brick wall Add benches to the triangular park at the corner of East and South Barber Avenue

Brick walkways along Railroad Avenue and Centre Street leading to Broad Street Add parking for the train station at Green Avenue

Improve pedestrian connections by adding crosswalks, curb cuts, and signage between Franklin Street, the pocket park at the corner of East and South Barber Avenue, and Wing Dickerson Park

Add stop signs and crosswalks on East Barber, South Barber, and Railroad Avenue to calm traffic Add a neighborhood dog park at either Wing-Dickerson Park or an existing, underutilized vacant parcel in the neighborhood

0

Feet

200

Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 55


Neighborhood Conservation Plan

B. Allow for market flexibility in determining rental/ownership, development type mix, and in encouraging redevelopment.

Figure 2.58: The St. Patrick’s School site, a 5-acre site where potential new development could include community open space.

Figure 2.59: The current lack of a buffer zone between residential and commercial uses in South Woodbury.

Over time, the East + South neighborhood area has transitioned from majority single-family housing to an eclectic mix of owner and renter occupied properties, and some professional offices near Cooper Street. Though many community members expressed a desire to see more singlefamily owner-occupied properties in the neighborhood, they agreed that they would rather let the real estate market dictate a healthy rental/ ownership mix rather than have vacant or underutilized properties. A current program exists to help convert formerly single-family properties that have been turned into apartments back to their original use, and the idea of a program to guide the conversion of single-family to multi-family properties was discussed. However, because that option may only be desirable for a few underutilized single-family properties in the neighborhood, it is advised that the current practice of allowing such conversions to happen only through the normal zoning variance procedures is advised to provide limitations and firm review of any such conversions. The Saint Patrick’s site along Cooper Street across the railroad tracks was identified by community members as an area where they would like to see the City prioritize redevelopment. This site is ideally situated near the proposed train station location, and is large enough at 5 acres to accommodate a mix of programming. The community highlighted that they would like to see a redevelopment program that includes community open space. The City should work with Saint Patrick’s to create a Redevelopment Plan that achieves this objective (figure 2.58). C. Buffer residential neighborhoods from commercial strip development in south Woodbury. The South Woodbury neighborhood backs up onto the C-2 commercial zone along Mantua Pike / Route 45. The block between Nelson Avenue and Railroad Avenue has a lot owned by a car dealership that backs up directly onto the residential neighborhood. Currently, there is no buffer provided between the storage lot for cars and the neighboring residences. Section 202-60 to 63 of the code should be updated to add a minimum buffer standard of 10-20 feet that may consist of trees, landscaping, shrubs and fencing. Currently, there is no dimensional requirement for a buffer, and/ or enforcement of current requirements may need to improve in this area (figure 2.59).

56 | Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan

GmD


Neighborhood Conservation Plan

VIII. CIRCULATION + MOBILITY The goal related to circulation + mobility of the East + South Woodbury neighborhood area is to create strategies to embrace traffic between the railroad and Broad St. as an asset, while making it easier for pedestrians and cyclists to safely access neighborhood amenities. The following objectives and strategies are recommended to achieve this goal: A. Create safer pedestrian and bicycle routes to neighborhood destinations.

Co

op

er

St ad Bro

Ce

ntr

Euc

lid S

t

The introduction of passenger rail service and implementation of the Broad Street Redevelopment Plan will undoubtedly result in an increase in traffic, both from vehicles and pedestrians in the East + South Woodbury neighborhood area. This increase in traffic however can be embraced as an asset to the community rather than a detriment. The City should work with the County to secure necessary permits or funding for improvements, such as adding crosswalks, curb cuts, and signage, to the intersection of Franklin Street with South and East Barber Avenue in order to create safer connections to the northern entrance of Wing-Dickerson Park from the neighborhood. Additionally, the City should strive to create similar connections across Carpenter Street to the park’s southern entrance (figure 2.62). Figure 2.60: “Bike loop” connecting neighborhood amenities to downtown.

St

eS

E

Rai

lroa

dA

ve

t

e

Av

r St

e

GmD

nte

er Av

rpe

er

rb Ba

S Barb

Ca

Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 57


Neighborhood Conservation Plan

27”

Neighborhood-wide improvements might include a “bike loop” around the neighborhood that connects the residential blocks to neighborhood amenities and the downtown utilizing Railroad Avenue, Carpenter Street, Centre Street, and both South and East Barber Avenue connecting to Broad Street and Cooper Street to Euclid Street. This should be performed in the context of a larger city-wide mobility plan, and will help decrease reliance on automobiles once the downtown train station is operational (figure 2.60). 401/2”

B. Improve signage + circulation for visitors.

Materials

Sign: 1” thick aluminum construction Lettering & Banding: Paint or high intentsity vinyl Pole: 4” thick aluminum or stainless steel construction

Colors

Black (C 0, M 0, Y 0, K 100) Grey (C 0, M 0, Y 0, K 80) White (C 0, M 0, Y 0, K 0)

Lettering

Font: High Tower Text Regular

GROUP

DESIGN

White (C 0, M 0, Y 0, K 0)

nk

lin

St

Figure 2.62: Crosswalks, curb cuts, and signage increase pedestrian connectivity between the pocket park, Wing Dickerson park, and the greater neighborhood.

Ba

rb

er

Av

e

All en

sL

n

E

Fra

CLEAR HEIGHT: 7’

Figure 2.61: Example of planned downtown WOODBURY Woodbury wayfinding WAYFINDING SIGN #1 signage, a template that could be used to potentially expand into the neighborhoods.

An additional component of a city-wide mobility plan of special interest to East + South Woodbury is the expansion of a planned downtown wayfinding signage program to direct residents and visitors to amenities, historic landmarks, bicycle routes, and parking in the neighborhoods (figure 2.61). Residents of East + South Woodbury take pride in the rich history and assets of their neighborhood, though have pointed out that some of these assets melvin are not adequately recognized or maintained. This step would complement pedestrian, bicycle, and automobile circulation improvements and should be part of a larger city-wide mobility plan to determine the locations to highlight in the expanded wayfinding program and to determine the number and placement of signs necessary for each location.

rber

S Ba Ave

Car

pen

58 | Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan

ter S

t GmD


Neighborhood Conservation Plan

C. Improve parking and traffic conditions near the train station. Once the train station becomes operational in Woodbury, parking needs and vehicle circulation will need to be addressed with a projected increase in automobile traffic in the area. In the short-term, the City may choose to investigate the option of adding a traffic light and left turn lane to Railroad Avenue at Cooper Street (figure 2.63). A traffic light at this intersection is a current issue of concern for the community, but will need further study in order to examine its feasibility given its proximity to the railroad crossing, roughly 50 feet from the intersection. Once ridership is projected and station areas are in the conceptual design phase, a comprehensive traffic study should be completed with the goal of reducing reliance on automobiles at the southern station to encourage more users from the downtown and neighborhood to walk to this station rather than drive. Community members also expressed an interest in adding more station parking along Green Avenue, however, this step may not be necessary as there is already an excess of parking here, and may not be advisable given the community’s objective of encouraging walking to and from the station.

Figure 2.63: The intersection at Cooper Street and Railroad Avenue.

IX. PUBLIC AMENITIES + INFRASTRUCTURE The goal related to public amenities + infrastructure of the East + South

Figure 2.64: Dog park.

Woodbury neighborhood area is to create a vibrant public realm that reflects the character of the neighborhood and the connection to downtown and the railroad, and increase access to community facilities and open spaces. The following objectives and strategies are recommended to achieve this goal: A. Improve and expand access to open space and recreation facilities. Wing-Dickerson Park is a valuable asset to the community and neighborhood, and one of the larger public parks open spaces in Woodbury. As such, this park should be a major component of accomplishing the objective of improving and expanding access to open space and recreation facilities in the neighborhood. For safer access during the evening, pedestrian-level lighting should be added at the entrance of and around the park, and should be accompanied by improved crosswalks, sidewalks, and access points by adding curb cuts mid-block at park entrances connecting to neighborhood streets and crosswalks. The program for this park may also be expanded, with the addition of a neighborhood dog park at either Wing-Dickerson Park or at an existing, underutilized vacant parcel in the neighborhood (figure 2.64). A new programmatic element such as a dog park should integrate additional community input as part of the process. Additionally, the park should continue to be used as a

GmD

Figure 2.65: Community center.

Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 59


Neighborhood Conservation Plan

place for special events to raise its visibility within the neighborhood. Current special events, such as the Juneteenth celebration, bring neighbors out to the park, and the addition of other annual events year-round may help introduce more residents to the park (figure.

Figure 2.66: Historic marker.

In addition to adding crosswalks and curb cuts to connect Franklin Street to the northern entrance of Wing-Dickerson Park, benches should be placed at the triangular open space at the intersection of South and East Barber Avenue to enhance this area as a passive open space. Residents also expressed they would like to see a second community park or community center, especially one that could be used during the winter months (figure 2.65). To accomplish this, the City should seek funding sources in the form of grants, find a non-profit to partner with, and should determine specific programmatic needs. B. Add excitement and aesthetic enhancements to neighborhood streets connecting the railroad to Broad Street. With the introduction of the train station, east-west streets connecting the train station to Broad Street are likely to become important linkages in the overall downtown. Residents would like to see these streets enhanced with improved pedestrian lighting on east-west streets connecting the train station to downtown, new street tree plantings on sections of streets without overhead utility wires, and brick walkways in the sidewalk along highly trafficked points of Railroad Avenue and Centre Street. Aesthetic treatments should also be designed to respect and enhance the historic district. C. Incorporate public art, neighborhood character details into the landscape. Residents would like to see more incorporation of the arts into the public realm of the neighborhood. As part of this objective, the City should work with area historians, interested residents, and the Greater Woodbury Arts Council to add historic markers and plaques in important areas throughout the neighborhood (figure 2.66). This step could be accomplished as part of a larger city-wide mobility plan to link points of interest to pedestrian and bicycle pathways. Additionally, when the train station is in the conceptual design phase, the City should work with the station operator/developer to add aesthetically pleasing fencing, such as a low brick wall, along the railway as a buffer.

60 | Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan

GmD


Neighborhood Conservation Plan

IMPLEMENTATION In order to implement the recommendations of this plan, the City must take an active role in implementation. To assist in prioritizing the objectives of this plan, each implementation strategy is assigned additional action steps that may be necessary for completion, some of which are consolidated over multiple related strategies. In addition, each strategy was assigned a priority level of high, medium, or low based on feedback from the community and the client team reviewing the project. The Implementation Matrix in the following pages is organized by neighborhood and focus area (Land Use + Community Form, Circulation + Mobility, and Public Amenities + Infrastructure). The Implementation Matrix details the specific steps necessary to accomplish the recommendations of the Neighborhood Conservation Plan.

GmD

Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 61


Neighborhood Conservation Plan

IMPLEMENTATION MATRIX North Woodbury (1 of 3)

I. LAND USE + COMMUNITY FORM

GOAL: Foster a "village" atmosphere by maintaining the character of the residential neighborhood. Objectives A. Soften the transition between the residential neighborhoods and the hospital.

Implementation Strategies

Action Type

Funding

Introduce a minimum buffer standard of 10 feet that may 1 consist of trees, landscaping, shrubs, fencing, and/or sidewalks for the Medical-Hospital Zone.

2. Ask for recommendation/approval of the Planning & Zoning Board for this amendment.

Encourage and/or incentivize additional sustainable building practices to augment existing green design 1 standards, such as allowing for porous pavement, roofmounted solar panels, and solar panel installation over a parking lot.

Amendment to Zoning Code

N/A

Prepare a user-friendly, two-sided card given to property owners. Provide information on trash pick-up, tax, water, sewer bill due dates and the City's web address. The rear 3 Customer Service of the card should have a quick reference guide to zoning regulations. This card should also be available online on the City's website.

2. Ask for recommendation/approval of the Planning & Zoning Board for this amendment.

HIGH

MED - HIGH

1. Review with the Property Committee of City Council. 2. Ask for recommendation/approval of the Planning & Zoning Board for this amendment.

HIGH

1. Review with the Property Committee of City Council.

Require that attached garages be placed at the side of or behind the principal building, and a minimum of 20 feet 2 behind the principal building's street frontage. Additionally, require detached garages to sit behind the principal building.

62 | Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan

Priority

1. Review with the Property Committee of City Council.

Require that Medical-Hospital Zone buffers that are 2 adjacent and parallel to the street right-of-way incorporate sidewalks. B. Allow for reasonable improvements to property by ensuring zoning regulations are consistent with the community's vision.

Action Steps 1. Review with the Property Committee of City Council.

2. Ask for recommendation/approval of the Planning & Zoning Board for this amendment.

LOW

1. Consult with appropriate City departments to develop the content of the info card. Local

2. Seek the assistance of a student, intern, or graphic designer to prepare a user-friendly presentation of the information.

HIGH

GmD


Neighborhood Conservation Plan

North Woodbury (2 of 3)

II. CIRCULATION + MOBILITY

GOAL: Create safer, enhanced connections for kids, pedestrians, and cyclists throughout the neighborhood. Objectives A. Make Tatum St. safer for kids, pedestrians, and cyclists.

Implementation Strategies

Action Type

Funding

1. Coordinate with West Deptford to develop an engineering study to identify improvements and seek permitting.

Add traffic control measures in the form of stop signs and stop lines, lane striping, regularly spaced street trees, and 1 crosswalks that are highly visible through the use of material changes or paint color.

Evaluate the location, design, and spacing of pedestrianlevel street lights to ensure adequate coverage for safety. 2 Prioritize Tatum Street as it is a common route for children. In general, street lights are recommended to be spaced at least 85 feet on center.

3

Action Steps

Priority

HIGH

2. Seek funding and/or place in City's capital improvements budget.

Municipal Partnership / Funding

Local, West Deptford

1. Coordinate with West Deptford to develop an engineering study to identify improvements and seek permitting.

HIGH

2. Seek funding and/or place in City's capital improvements budget. 1. Coordinate with West Deptford to develop an engineering study to identify improvements and seek permitting.

Add raised crosswalks and neckdowns at Chestnut and Walnut Street around the Walnut Street School.

HIGH

2. Seek funding and/or place in City's capital improvements budget. Utilize speed limit machines that inform drivers how fast 4 they are going through the neighborhood and enforce posted speed limits.

Enforcement

N/A

1. Coordinate with Woodbury and West Deptford Police Departments.

LOW

1. Create a city-wide mobility plan to coordinate pedestrian, bicycle, and other mobility improvements for a citywide system. Add dedicated bike lanes or shared automobile/bike 5 travel lanes (sharrows) to the Tatum, accompanied by bike signage.

Mobility Plan

Federal, State, DVRPC, Non-profit, 2. Plan should include jurisdictions, acquisitions, funding sources, or Local construction details, and prioritization

HIGH

3. Develop this strategy as part of the mobility plan.

6 B. Create safer pedestrian routes throughout so that kids can better navigate the neighborhood. 1

Prioritize the maintenance and upkeep of sidewalks on Tatum Street.

Encourage connectivity between and among neighborhoods and nearby commercial areas through the provision of well-maintained cross-walks across east/west streets parallel to Broad Street.

Customer Service

Local

1. Address within a city-wide campaign to notify homeowners of dangerous sidewalks and curbs, and steps necessary for repairs.

MED

1. Create a city-wide mobility plan to coordinate pedestrian, bicycle, and other mobility improvements for a citywide system. Mobility Plan

Federal, State, DVRPC, Non-profit, 2. Plan should include jurisdictions, acquisitions, funding sources, or Local construction details, and prioritization

MED

3. Develop this strategy as part of the mobility plan.

Restrict on-street parking on the south side of Chestnut 2 Street to create a safer environment for children using the Walnut Street School playground.

3 C. Improve circulation patterns around the Walnut Street School.

GmD

Evaluate a left-turn lane and traffic light at Park and Broad Street.

Examine the feasibility of making certain streets one-way, either permanently or just during school hours, to improve 3 traffic circulation and safety around the Walnut Street School.

Enforcement

Local

1. Choose between three initial steps: Remove on-street parking between Cherry Street and Tatum Street; Remove on-street parking between Broad Street and Tatum Street or; Restrict on-street parking between Tatum Street and Cherry or Broad Street during school hours.

Traffic Engineer Analysis

Local

1. No immediate action recommended unless warranted by accident or measured danger.

Traffic Engineer Analysis

LOW

1. Partner with the Walnut Street School to address circulation concerns/needs. Local

MED 2. Conduct a feasibility study if deemed warranted by the City and the school.

Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 63


Neighborhood Conservation Plan

North Woodbury (3 of 3)

III. PUBLIC AMENITIES + INFRASTRUCTURE

GOAL: Provide recreational space in the neighborhood that is easily and safely accessible for all users. Objectives A. Create new recreational spaces and enhance access to existing open space for users of all ages.

Implementation Strategies Create a public recreation space on West Packer Street 1 (dog park, playground, basketball court, etc.) for the neighborhood.

2

Action Type

Capital Improvements

Improve lighting around and in the playground to allow safe use and access all day.

Funding

Public/Private, Local

Local

Action Steps

Priority

1. Seek public/private partnership or easement to access land. LOW 2. Develop a program/concept for the site. 1. Coordinate with Walnut Street School.

LOW

1. Create a city-wide mobility plan to coordinate pedestrian, bicycle, and other mobility improvements for a citywide system. Develop a long-term pedestrian plan to link North 3 Woodbury with the athletic fields, High School, and downtown.

Mobility Plan

2. Plan should include jurisdictions, Federal, State, DVRPC, Non-profit, acquisitions, funding sources, construction details, and prioritization or Local

HIGH

3. Develop this strategy as part of the mobility plan. This particular strategy, as it covers a larger area, may have multiple phases.

64 | Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan

GmD


Neighborhood Conservation Plan

West Woodbury (1 of 3)

IV. LAND USE + COMMUNITY FORM

GOAL: Stabilize neighborhood character at the edges, and fill in the gaps with appropriate development. Objectives A. Promote high quality development at key sites along the neighborhood's edges.

Implementation Strategies

Action Type

Funding

Priority

1. Issue a Request for Proposals. Actively pursue redevelopment at the old laundry site at 1 Salem Avenue + Glover Street. Pursue Redevelopment

Redeveloper

Encourage and/or incentivize additional sustainable building practices to augment existing green design 3 standards, such as allowing for porous pavement, roofmounted solar panels, and solar panel installation over a parking lot. Require that attached garages be placed at the side of or behind the principal building, and a minimum of 20 feet 1 behind the principal building's street frontage. Additionally, require detached garages to sit behind the principal building.

2. Select a Redeveloper and enter into negotiations that may include terms of any tax exemptions/abatemnets, financing, and.or property acquisition. 3. Sign and execute a redeveloper agreement setting forth the roles and responsibilities for completing the redevelopment project.

Actively pursue redevelopment on the block of Broad 2 Street between West Centre Street and West Barber Avenue.

B. Allow for small-scale infill development compatible with neighborhood character.

Action Steps

HIGH

HIGH

1. Review with the Property Committee of City Council.

Amendment to Zoning Code

N/A

2. Ask for recommendation/approval of the Planning & Zoning Board for this amendment.

HIGH

1. Review with the Property Committee of City Council. 2. Ask for recommendation/approval of the Planning & Zoning Board for this amendment.

LOW

West Woodbury (2 of 3)

V. CIRCULATION + MOBILITY

GOAL: Improve traffic patterns, bicycle, and pedestrian conditions to foster streets that serve all users. Objectives A. Improve traffic circulation and pedestrian conditions along Lupton Ave/Glover St.

B. Improve pedestrian and bicycle mobility conditions throughout the neighborhood.

Implementation Strategies

Add stop lines, lane striping, and crosswalks that are highly 1 visible through the use of material changes or color at existing and new stop sign locations.

2

Introduce an all-way (3-way) stop at Lupton Ave + High Street and Lupton Ave + West Street.

1

Improve conditions of sidewalks and roads in poor condition throughout the neighborhood.

2 Prioritize adding a bike lane to Broad Street. C. As the business district grows, update parking, wayfinding, and circulation systems to accommodate the needs of businesses and residents.

D. Improve traffic circulation and pedestrian conditions along Jackson St.

GmD

If parking from commercial businesses along Broad Street 1 begins to spill onto adjacent streets, create system of parking permits for residential blocks close to Broad Street.

Action Type

Funding

Traffic Engineer Analysis / Funding

Local

Priority

HIGH

2. Seek funding and/or place in City's capital improvements budget. 1. Evaluate by a traffic engineer and add to capital improvements budget if agreed upon.

MED

Customer Service

Local

1. Address within a city-wide campaign to notify homeowners of dangerous sidewalks and curbs, and steps necessary for repairs.

HIGH

State Partnership

State

1. Work with NJ DOT to ensure bike lanes are added to the street cross-section of Broad Street.

HIGH

1. Create a parking authority to readily address parking needs associated with redevelopment.

HIGH

2. Parking authority should facilitate a public/private partnership to create parking schemes to improve circulation and generate revenue.

HIGH

1. Evaluate by a traffic engineer and add to capital improvements budget if agreed upon.

MED

1. Coordinate with Woodbury Police Department.

HIGH

Create Parking Authority

Local

Work with neighborhood businesses off of Broad Street to 2 create a plan for better signage and shared parking lots. Add stop lines, lane striping, and crosswalks that are highly Traffic Engineer 1 visible through the use of material changes or color at Analysis / Funding existing and new stop sign locations. Utilize speed limit machines that inform drivers how fast 2 they are going through the neighborhood and enforce posted speed limits.

Action Steps 1. Develop an engineering study to identify improvements and seek permitting.

Enforcement

Local

N/A

Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 65


Neighborhood Conservation Plan

West Woodbury (3 of 3)

VI. PUBLIC AMENITIES + INFRASTRUCTURE

GOAL: Improve the quality of public and recreational space in the neighborhood. Objectives A. Increase the amount of shade trees on sidewalks, and ensure the right types of trees are selected. B. Improve access to Woodbury Creek Park from the neighborhood.

Implementation Strategies

Provide educational materials and resources for 1 homeowners to select and replace missing or dead street trees with an appropriate replacement.

Action Type

Funding

Recreate Shade Tree Commission

Local

Mobility Plan

Create a pocket park on the existing parking lot at Delaware and Lupton; Utilizing the grass setback on Delaware in the short-term and the entire lot in the longterm.

Priority

3. Develop this strategy as part of the mobility plan. This particular strategy, as it covers a larger area, may have multiple phases.

County Partnership / Funding

HIGH

HIGH

Federal, State, 2. Plan should include jurisdictions, DVRPC, Non-profit, acquisitions, funding sources, or Local construction details, and prioritization

Explore the possibility of adding additional pedestrian 2 access to Woodbury Creek Park at Delaware Street, North Davis Street, and Briarhill Lane.

1

2. Include educational budget to address tree selection, planting, etc. in the Commission's budget. 1. Create a city-wide mobility plan to coordinate pedestrian, bicycle, and other mobility improvements for a citywide system.

Explore the possibility of extending Woodbury Creek Park 1 to the City Limits or I-295, possibly as a trail connection or easement.

C. Create smaller neighborhood-serving parks and maintain existing open spaces.

Action Steps 1. Through City Council action, recreate Shade Tree Commission.

County, Local

1. Work with the property owner, Gloucester County, to create a shortterm park design/program for the existing grass setback.

HIGH

HIGH

2. Long-term, evaluate converting the entire lot into a public park when feasible. 1. Create a city-wide mobility plan to coordinate pedestrian, bicycle, and other mobility improvements for a citywide system.

2

Identify small vacant parcels for acquisition and dedication to the neighborhood, the City, open space or community organizations that are unlikely to be developed.

Mobility Plan

2. Plan should include jurisdictions, Federal, State, DVRPC, Non-profit, acquisitions, funding sources, construction details, and prioritization or Local

HIGH

3. Develop this strategy as part of the mobility plan. This particular strategy, as it covers a larger area, may have multiple phases.

66 | Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan

GmD


Neighborhood Conservation Plan

East + South Woodbury (1 of 3)

VII. LAND USE + COMMUNITY FORM

GOAL: Preserve the character and form of the existing neighborhoods while allowing for balanced growth that meets the needs of current and future residents. Objectives A. Maintain existing neighborhood character between Broad Street and the railroad.

Implementation Strategies

Educate homeowners and community groups about 1 property maintenance standards and follow with increased enforcement.

Require that attached garages be placed at the side of or behind the principal building, and a minimum of 20 feet 2 behind the principal building's street frontage. Additionally, require detached garages to sit behind the principal building.

3

Provide better education and enforcement of historic district requirements.

Action Type

Customer Service

Funding

Local

Action Steps 1. Create a 1-page flyer that can be made available from various locations throughout the town.

Priority

HIGH

2. Make flyer available online through the town's website 1. Review with the Property Committee of City Council. Amendment to Zoning Code

Enforcement / Customer Service

N/A

Grants, Local

2. Ask for recommendation/approval of the Planning & Zoning Board for this amendment. 1. Work with the City's Historic Preservation Commission to create design guidelines for recommended/not recommended improvements in the district.

LOW

LOW

2. Consult the US Secretary of the Interior's standards for historic properties for guidance. B. Allow for market Evaluate applications for single-family to multi-family flexibility in determining dwellings on a case-by-case basis through the existing rental/ownership, 1 variance procedures to allow the planning/zoning board development type mix, to have firm oversight over any such conversions. and in encouraging redevelopment. 2 C. Buffer residential neighborhoods from commercial strip development in south Woodbury.

GmD

Target redevelopment for the Saint Patrick's school site that includes community open space.

Enforcement

N/A

Pursue Redevelopment

Redeveloper, Local

1. Coordinate with Planning/Zoning Board.

LOW

1. Work with Saint Patrick's to create a redevelopment plan that achieves the vision of Saint Patrick's and the community.

LOW

1. Review with the Property Committee of City Council. 1

Introduce a minimum buffer standard of 10-20 feet that may consist of trees, landscaping, shrubs, and fencing.

Amendment to Zoning Code

N/A

2. Ask for recommendation/approval of the Planning & Zoning Board for this amendment.

HIGH

Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 67


Neighborhood Conservation Plan

East + South Woodbury (2 of 3)

VIII. CIRCULATION + MOBILITY

GOAL: Create strategies to embrace traffic between the railroad and Broad St. as an asset, while making it easier for pedestrians and cyclists to safely access neighborhood amenities. Objectives A. Create safer pedestrian and bicycle routes to neighborhood destinations.

Implementation Strategies

Action Type

Funding

Priority

HIGH 2. Seek funding and/or place in City's capital improvements budget. County Partnership / Funding

3

Action Steps 1. Partner with the County to secure necessary permits and/or funding.

Improve pedestrian connections by adding crosswalks, curb cuts, and signage between Franklin Street, the 1 pocket-park at the corner of East & South Barber Ave, and Wing Dickerson Park at the northern park entrance, and across Carpenter Street. County, Local

Add stop signs and crosswalks on East Barber, South Barber, and Railroad Ave to calm traffic.

1. Partner with the County for further study to see if this meets necessary traffic standards. LOW 2. If so, seek permits, funding, and/or place in City's capital improvements budget. 1. Create a city-wide mobility plan to coordinate pedestrian, bicycle, and other mobility improvements for a citywide system.

Implement a "bike loop" around the neighborhood that connects the residential area to neighborhood amenities 2 and the downtown utilizing Railroad Ave, Carpenter, and both South and East Barber Ave and connecting to Broad and Cooper Ave.

Mobility Plan

2. Plan should include jurisdictions, Federal, State, DVRPC, Non-profit, acquisitions, funding sources, construction details, and prioritization or Local

HIGH

3. Develop this strategy as part of the mobility plan. This particular strategy, as it covers a larger area, may have multiple phases. B. Improve signage + circulation for visitors.

1

1. Integrate as a component of a citywide mobility plan.

Expand planned wayfinding signage program to direct people to amenities and parking. Mobility Plan

2

C. Improve parking and traffic conditions near the train station.

Add pedestrian signage that addresses historic landmarks, amenities, and key pedestrian and bike routes.

2. Identify locations to highlight in Federal, State, DVRPC, Non-profit, expanded wayfinding program. or Local 3. Determine the number and placement of signs necessary for each location.

Reduce reliance on cars and promote walking at the 1 southern station by providing more parking at the northern station, less at the south. 2 Add parking for the train station at Green Ave. DRPA Partnership Evaluate the need for a traffic light and left turn lane at 3 Railroad Ave and Cooper Street to service traffic from the new train station.

68 | Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan

DRPA, Grants, Local

LOW

MED

1. Complete a comprehensive traffic study once DRPA is in the conceptual design phase for the station areas and ridership for each station is projected.

HIGH

2. Work with DRPA to address community goals for traffic circulation and parking.

LOW

LOW

GmD


Neighborhood Conservation Plan

East + South Woodbury (3 of 3)

IX. PUBLIC AMENITIES + INFRASTRUCTURE

GOAL: Create a vibrant public realm that reflects the character of the neighborhood and the connection to downtown and the railroad, and increase access to community facilities and open spaces. Objectives A. Improve and expand access to

Implementation Strategies Add pedestrian lighting at the entrance of and around 1 Wing-Dickerson Park. Add benches to the triangular park at the corner of East 4 and South Barber Ave.

Action Type

Funding

Funding

Local

County, Local

Add a neighborhood dog park at either Wing-Dickerson 3 Park or an existing, underutilized vacant parcel in the neighborhood.

C. Incorporate public art, neighborhood character details into the landscape.

HIGH LOW

Grants, Non-Profit, Local

Use Wing-Dickerson Park as a location for special events to raise its visibility in the neighborhood.

Community Partnership

6

Create a second community park or community center that could be used during the winter months.

Non-profit Partnership / Funding

1

Add enhanced pedestrian lighting on east-west streets connecting the neighborhood to downtown.

2

Add brick walkways along Railroad Ave and apply same material treatment on Centre St leading to Broad St.

Recreate Shade Tree Commission

1

Add aesthetically pleasing fencing along the railway as a buffer from the railroad tracks, such as a low brick wall.

DRPA Partnership

LOW - MED 2. Place in capital improvement program.

LOW

Non-Profit, Local 2. City should work with Greater Woodbury Arts Council, which already coordinates some events here. 1. Seek funding sources in the form of Non-Profit, Grants, grants and find a non-profit to partner Local with and determine programmatic needs.

2. Seek funding and/or place in City's capital improvements budget. Local

Prioritize new street tree planting on sections of streets without overhead utility wires.

1. Work with the community to design/program the park.

1. Periodically evaluate the programming to make sure its meeting the neighborhood's needs.

Funding

3

HIGH 2. Place in capital improvement program.

County Partnership / Funding

B. Add excitement and aesthetic enhancements to neighborhood streets connecting the railroad to Broad Street.

1. Coordinate with neighbors / local community organizations.

Priority

1. Partner with the County to secure necessary permits and/or funding.

Improve crosswalks, sidewalks, and access points by 2 adding curb cuts mid-block to Wing-Dickerson Park from the surrounding neighborhood.

5

Action Steps

HIGH

1. Through City Council action, recreate Shade Tree Commission. 2. Include educational budget to address tree selection, planting, etc. in the Commission's budget.

DRPA, Grants, Local

LOW

1. When the train station is in the design phase, the City should voice buffering concerns with the station developer and suggest design solution.

HIGH

HIGH

1. Integrate as a component of a citywide mobility plan.

2

GmD

Work with area historians, interested residents, and the Greater Woodbury Arts Council to add historic markers and plaques in important areas throughout the neighborhood.

Mobility Plan

2. Identify locations to highlight in Federal, State, DVRPC, Non-profit, expanded wayfinding program. or Local 3. Determine the number and placement of signs necessary for each location.

HIGH

Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 69


Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan