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THE ESSENTIAL GUIDE 2013


TIMINGS NUMBERS & CHIPS ■ Key Timings 6.30am – First Park and Ride Buses leave all sites for the Start 7.00am – Baggage Lorries open 7.00am – Changing tents, toilets and concessions open 7.30am – Music commences from entertainment stage 8.15am – Warm up around the stage 8.30am – Runners assemble in Start Corrals 8.30am – The Grand Hotel Mini Mile Races Start on Hove seafront 9.00am – Gun goes off for the Marathon Start! Good Luck – we wish you a wonderful race day experience.

■ Race Number Please ensure that you complete the medical details on the back of your race number and attach it to the front of your running top with the safety pins provided. The medical information on the back is extremely important and will be used by our medical team, should you feel unwell whilst running. Please check that your running number matches the number on your kit bag sticker; if it does not please contact Sports Systems on 01737 814844. The coloured strip on your race number relates to the predicted finishing time you stated when registering and in turn the start corral you should line up in on race day; the 2

corral will be clearly marked by colour. Please note: your race number cannot now be changed. The timing chip is also attached to the back of your number, please do not remove this. You must not under any circumstances give your race number to anyone else. Amongst other potential problems, doing so may cause problems of identification for the event medical services in the case of any accident or injury. Any attempt to do so will result in immediate disqualification of the individual(s) concerned and ejection from the event. ■ Timing Chip Every runner will be chip timed and we are pleased to announce that in 2012 we will be using a new chip timing system which is attached to the back of your race number. This minimizes the risk of chips becoming loose on your laces and avoids the need for chip collection at the Finish. The chip will be detected as you cross the Start and Finish lines, when your time and race number will be recorded automatically. If you are unable to run on race day please return your race number to us in the postage paid envelope. Results will be on our website and iPhone app shortly after the race.


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BEFORE & DURING Pre-Event preparation ■ Food and Drink Getting the balance between the right amount and the right type of food will improve your performance and endurance. As you get closer to the day, the proportion of carbohydrates you eat will need to increase and the amount of protein decrease, so that you can build up the glycogen stores that are essential for endurance events. You may have heard the term ‘carbo-loading’ this is what you are advised to do in the few days leading up to the event. Carbohydrates, such as pasta, rice, bread and potatoes provide your body with energy, which will help you complete the 26.2 miles on race day. Plan out exactly what you are going to eat the night before and for breakfast on race morning. ■ The right Kit .It’s important that you have a proper pair of running shoes, which have been fitted specifically for you and your running style. You shouldn’t however buy new shoes just for the day; you need to wear them in during a few of your longer runs to make sure they are comfortable. Having a technical running top is also advised because it will draw sweat away from the body, making running more comfortable. It will also help to avoid painful chafing!

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■ Plan your journey in advance Don’t wait until the morning of the event to decide how you are getting to the Start and always have a backup plan. It is advised that you check with National Rail for train times or book your place on our Park and Ride Scheme. ■ The night before It is advised that you have everything you need ready the night before, so on race morning you are fully prepared and can set off stress free! Pin your race number to your running top (while wearing it), and pack anything else you need in your kit bag, with the number sticker provided attached.

During the race ■ Start slowly and pace yourself The worst thing you could do on the day is speed off over the start line and then find you have no energy left for the second half of the race. The best advice is to pace yourself. It’s better to reserve your energy and run slower in the first half of the race so you have enough much needed energy to complete the second half of the race. I am sure you have all heard of the dreaded ‘wall’, but by running conservatively in the first half, you can help yourself in avoiding late race fatigue. Please do not sprint for the Finish; this is where you will be the most tired and vulnerable. ■ Stay hydrated, but don’t over drink The right amount and right type of fluid is important. Dehydration or lack of water is an obvious problem if you don’t drink enough. However drinking too much can actually dilute the salts in your body and lead to water intoxication (hyponatremia) and indeed quite serious illness. You should rehearse your fuel requirements, especially in the weeks before the event, being aware that you may need to adjust the types and amounts of fluids if it is a particularly warm day. Drinking little and often is the key. We strongly advise you to avoid alcohol the night before because this can also lead to dehydration. ■ Split it up! The thought of running 26.2 miles would scare anyone, so try not to think of it as one long distance. Why not divide the race into sections and then mentally tick them off as you go past. If you're local and know the area then you could use The Pavilion, The Brighton Marina, Rottingdean, The Brighton Pier, Hove Lawns, Shoreham Harbour, King Alfred and The Peace Statue as your landmarks. If you’re not local then split the race up by distance i.e. 5 miles, 10 miles, 15 miles etc, or by time – 1 hour, 2 hours, 3 hours and so on. Stay positive and think about how far you’ve come rather than how far you still have to go! 5


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DOCTOR’S ORDERS Brighton Marathon Medical Director, Dr. John Smith

We all know the enjoyment and health benefits achieved when running becomes part of your life. I know that there is no better feeling than running a marathon, with all the excitement and pressure of the big day, but it is essential that you are prepared for the event and that your training programme is sensibly structured to help you achieve the dual goals of completing the Marathon while improving your health and wellbeing . An excellent overview of medical information for runners can be found by clicking here The Basics: Are you fit to take part? If you have any background medical conditions such as cardiac problems, asthma or diabetes for example, it is essential that you check with your medical advisors whether there is any absolute medical reason why you should not run a long distance event or train for it. Please remember that you may need to make adjustments to your medication or treatment when increasing the distances run and it is essential that you don’t forget the basics of your medical treatment regime. Do you need to modify any of your medical treatment regimes either to train or to run on the day? Although we cannot advise individually, please ensure you notify us if you have a medical condition. We also especially request that you give full details of any medical problems, medication and contact details on the back of your running number, should we need to treat you during the race.

If you have previously encountered any significant medical problems for example with heat or hydration issues , while taking part in a Marathon it is especially important that you check with your medical advisers and/or a sports physician whether or not you should take part in a marathon . Review Whether or not you have a medical problem, it is important that you regularly carry out your own medical risk assessment about your ability to train and take part. Every day you need to decide whether you are fit to train. It is essential that you do not run if you are ill or have recently been ill. For example you should not run if you have a viral infection; even a bad cold can cause severe problems with your cardiovascular system and heart. Coming up to the day, one of the bravest decisions any runner has to make is not to run in the marathon if they have been unwell. If you find yourself in this dilemma, no matter how hard you have trained, despite how much money you have raised in sponsorship or how much you have been looking forward to the 15th April, it is essential for your own health and safety and indeed for that of others, that you do not run if you are unwell or unfit in any way. This is a very important point and the marathon organisers are very aware of how painful a decision this might be, that they have made it clear to me that if anyone does withdraw before 5pm on April 13th because of medical reasons that they will be guaranteed a

*place in the 2013 event. * A Doctor’s note confirming that you are unfit to take part may be required. Fuelling Up By now you will already be aware that you need to have adequate amounts of fuel on board to enable you to run regularly. It is essential that you pay attention to the quantity and indeed type of fuel you use before, during and after training and especially on the day of the race. Getting the right balance, in the type and amount of fluid you drink, is critical for performance and safety. Click here for more information. There are many good sources of information on diet, nutrition and food balance, however everyone is different and it is essential that you rehearse this during your training programme, in the weeks before the race. Do not try some new food or fluid the night before the event. On the Day A lot of the race will be along Brighton seafront and that the wind chill factor and weather will have a significant effect on the day. Look out for weather forecasts in the week before the marathon and look for updates from the Marathon team on the website. In summary, please do take care and listen to your body. If you are feeling unwell before the race don’t run and if you become unwell during the race, please stop and seek medical advice at the nearest aid station. 6


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PACE CHART The chart below shows the approximate time of when you can expect runners to pass each mile, based on their estimated ďŹ nish time. All distances given in miles .

Mile number and road location

Time road closes on race day

Elite runner expected mile timings 3 hours

Runners expecting to finish in 4 hours

Runners expecting to finish in 5 hours

Runners expecting to finish in 6 hours

Runners expecting to finish in

Time road reopens on race day

Mile 1

Preston Park

07:00:00

09:05:00

09:06:52

09:09:09

09:11:27

09:13:44

10:15:00

Mile 2

St Peters Church

07:00:00

09:10:00

09:13:44

09:18:18

09:22:54

09:27:28

10:15:00

Mile 3

North Laine

07:30:00

09:15:00

09:20:36

09:27:27

09:34:21

09:41:12

11:15:00

Mile 4

The Level

07:30:00

09:20:00

09:27:28

09:36:36

09:45:48

09:54:56

11:15:00

Mile 5

Lower Rock Gardens

07:30:00

09:25:00

09:34:20

09:45:45

09:57:15

10:08:40

11:15:00

Mile 6

Brighton Marina

07:30:00

09:30:00

09:41:12

09:54:54

10:08:42

10:22:24

13:30:00

Mile 7

Roedean School

07:30:00

09:35:00

09:48:04

10:04:03

10:20:09

10:36:08

13:30:00

Mile 8

Beacon Hill

07:30:00

09:40:00

09:54:56

10:13:12

10:31:36

10:49:52

13:30:00

Mile 9

St Dunstans

07:30:00

09:45:00

10:01:48

10:22:21

10:43:03

11:03:36

13:30:00

Mile 10

Roedean School

07:30:00

09:50:00

10:08:42

10:31:30

10:54:03

11:17:20

13:30:00

Mile 11

Brighton Marina

07:30:00

09:55:00

10:15:34

10:40:39

11:05:57

11:31:04

13:30:00

Mile 12

Royal Crescent

07:30:00

10:00:00

10:22:26

10:49:48

11:17:24

11:44:48

13:30:00

Mile 13

The Hilton Brighton Metropole

07:30:00

10:05:00

10:29:18

10:58:57

11:28:51

11:58:32

16:00:00

Mile 14

Grand Avenue

09:00:00

10:10:00

10:36:10

11:08:06

11:40:18

12:12:16

15:00:00

Mile 15

New Church Road

09:00:00

10:15:00

10:43:02

11:17:15

11:51:45

12:26:00

15:00:00

Mile 16

Boundary Road, Portslade

09:00:00

10:20:00

10:49:54

11:26:24

12:03:12

12:39:44

15:00:00

Mile 17

New Church Road

09:00:00

10:25:00

10:56:46

11:35:33

12:14:39

12:53:28

15:00:00

Mile 18

Church Road

09:00:00

10:30:00

11:03:38

11:44:42

12:26:06

13:07:12

15:00:00

Mile 19

Kingsway and Wharf Road

09:00:00

10:35:00

11:10:30

11:53:51

12:37:33

13:20:56

15:00:00

Mile 20

Basin Road South

09:00:00

10:40:00

11:17:22

12:03:00

12:49:00

13:34:40

16:00:00

Mile 21

Shoreham Power Station

09:00:00

10:45:00

11:24:14

12:12:09

13:00:27

13:48:24

16:00:00

Mile 22

Basin Road South

09:00:00

10:50:00

11:31:06

12:21:18

13:11:54

14:02:08

16:00:00

Mile 23

Hove Promenade

09:00:00

10:55:00

11:37:58

12:30:27

13:23:21

14:15:52

16:00:00

Mile 24

Hove Promenade

09:00:00

11:00:00

11:44:50

12:39:36

13:34:48

14:29:36

16:00:00

Mile 25

Peace Statue

07:30:00

11:05:00

11:51:42

12:48:45

13:46:15

14:43:20

16:00:00

Mile 26

Brighton Pier

07:30:00

11:10:00

11:58:34

12:57:54

13:57:02

14:57:04

16:00:00

Closed

11:11:00

12:00:00

13:00:00

14:00:00

15:00:00

22:00:00

Mile 26.2 Madeira Drive

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■ Sections The Brighton Marathon Essential Guide 2013, will have sections covering: Runners: All key race day information, tips and logistics Spectators: Viewing points, maps Exhibition: Stand guide and event timings Charity: Emotive stories ■ Readership The Brighton Marathon 2012 Final Instructions was read by double the number of entrants to the race, showing that the viewing audience was not only runners but friends and family too. Unique Page Views were over 200,000.

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