Page 1


Editorial

May 2015

T

A festive weekend

his month Groove covers three important cultural festivals in Seoul: the Lotus Lantern Festival, commemorating Buddha’s birthday; the Seoul Jazz Festival, featuring acclaimed musicians from all over the world; and the Hae Bang Chon Festival, an independent music extravaganza that celebrates its 10th anniversary this year. By chance, they all take place during the same holiday weekend (May 23 to 25). There are plenty of activities to choose from, and we hope our readers will experience the very best that the city has to offer. Our cover story tells an expat success story: the Hae Bang Chon Festival and how it has evolved over the past decade. When Lance Reegan-Diehl established the festival in 2006, it was a relatively small gathering of expat musicians. Now it’s one of the largest independent music festivals in the world — a testament to the power of perseverance and hard work. This year’s festival will start on the Friday night (May 22), and continue through Saturday. “The festival has grown into a bit of a subculture folk event,” Reegan-Diehl told Groove recently. “It is unique, and I have over the years made friends with key people in the Yongsangu (district office) and the Yongsan police, who help me a great deal. While I can’t name them, I would like to thank them very much. This fest would not continue without this help.” As the festival grew bigger, Reegan-Diehl explains, he faced more and more pressure from the authorities over legal questions. Although he’s a permanent resident of Korea, many

O n t h e C O V E R

May 2015

Cover design by Seong-eun Park This month we celebrate the 10th anniversary of one of the few festivals founded and operated by expats in Korea. Kudos to Lance Reegan Diehl, the man who made it happen.

guest workers also take part in the festival. He had to spend more of his time addressing complaints about crowd control, and keeping performers safe from the threat of prosecution or deportation. “Something I learned years ago,” he says. “Keep the performance inside, and it is OK. … Anyone can perform inside their friend’s pub for free, without visa worries or entertainment permit worries. But put a performance on a balcony or out in public, and suddenly it is ‘permit, visa violation, immigration. etc.’” The festival is taking another step forward as the organizers reach beyond the expat community and look toward Korean music fans for support. “The website is being converted over to two languages,” says Reegan-Diehl. “I built the website; my colleague is finishing the hangul today. … Also we are getting the Korean story (to) Korean reporters to see what we can get happening by way of community involvement all across the board.” Overall, Reegan-Diehl says he’s happy with the way the festival has turned out. “The maturing of the fest into a 10-year event has indeed been a rocky road,” he says. “There were many points it may have been canceled or not held. I even had to call (the 2011 fall fest) ‘Happy Music Night.’ … However, it did still happen. I left town to perform for the U.S. Air Force that weekend. I suppose in 10 years, one fest out of the past 24 being messed up is not too bad at all.” We agree. Happy anniversary!


ISSUE

103

MAy 2015

What ’ s in thi s iss ue WELCOME

COMMUNIT Y

04 EDITORIAL

20 The Lotus Lantern Festival,

A festive weekend

12 KEY PEOPLE

Meet Groove’s editorial team and a few of our talented contributors

14 WHAT’S ON

Festivals, concerts, happy hours, networking and events for every day of the month

16 THE NEWS

Vloggers take over as Korea’s newest idols, Parents protest decision to strip special school of elite status, 3 Pakistanis became Korean through fraud

INSIGHT

30 Death, Taxes, Housing, and

6

www.groovekorea.com May 2015

Birthplace Get the legal advice you need with our new bi-monthly legal column

Lending a Helping Hand at the Lotus Lantern Festivities Buddha’s birthday brings lanterns, floats and an unforgettable parade to the Jonggak area.

23 A Community Haven:

The Itaewon Global Village Center Next in the Global Village series, a closer look at the activities and events on offer at Itaewon’s multi-cultural center

24 Remembering the Korean War

FOOD AND DRINK

32 Mix and Malt

Hyehwa hipster hangout with a great patio

34 CIURI CIURI

Sunny Sicilian trattoria in Hongdae

35 A Day at Daehajeong

Get the f*** outside and eat in nature Korea style

Almost 60 years after the official end of the Korean War, museums around the country prepare to remember the heroes on Memorial Day

36 Funky Taphouse

26 TEDxSeoul: Spreading

37 The Truth About Lie, Lie, Lie

Give up the funk with 15 beers on tap

Everyoneís Ideas Ever fancied yourself speaking on that famous circular red carpet? TEDxSeoul invites innovative speakers and audience members to share the spotlight.

Affordable and authentic banh mi

28 Seoulís Stitch N Bitch Brigade

Recipe: Taking the outdoors indoors! Hassdog Sausage Bake Have a cookout when there’s no out available

Share crafts and conversation at this fortnightly meet in Jonggak and make a few friends along the way.

29 Fashion For The 21

Century Gentleman Byungmun Seo talks about his vision for his self-named fashion label and look for the 21st century gentleman. st

38 Grocery Find

I can has Hassdog?

39 Southside Parlor

Cocktail Hour Lone Star version of a British summer classic Restaurant Buzz The roving Moroccan sandwich and the arancini trend


ISSUE

103

MAy 2015

What ’ s in thi s iss ue ENTERTAINMENT

TRAVEL

40 Celebrating A Decade

54 Fighting for the Freedom of Cuba

of Hae Bang Chon HBC turns ten. Details of all things HBC Fest as well as stories from stalwarts and newbies about their Fest experiences.

A Korean photographer looks back on her trip to Cuba

44 Theatre of Blood

60 New Frontiers

An insight into performing Shakespeare’s most savage play.

45 The Sweet Summer Sounds of Jazz

Whether piano, trumpet or saxophone, get a dose of the soulful sounds of Jazz as the festival returns for its ninth triumphant weekend.

46 Taipei’s Doom-Pop Duo

Comes to Korea Taiwan’s Dronetonics debut in Seoul with some dark synth-pop and we quiz them about music scenes and their oblivion jingles.

8

www.groovekorea.com May 2015

48 Something Wicked This Way Comes Fetish-inspired performance artist Alexandra Le Cann talks about what she does and why she does what she does.

52 MOVIES

At the Box Office”Mad Max: Fury Road” “While We’re Young”. Out on DVD “A Hard Day” and “No Tears for The Dead”

SPORTS

for the Seoul Gaels Seoul Gaels have been going from strength to strength since 2002, and with a new season just underway, offer a packed season of both sporting and non-sporting events for both genders and all age groups.

66 Gearing up for the Summer

62 A Different Kind of Spin

65 SOUL OF SEOUL

The Korea Ultimate Players Association (KUPA) discuss Ultimate on the peninsula.

Luc Tremblay of Seoul Cycle talks getting a ride, heading along the Han River and cycling in the metropolis.

What does the future hold for FC Seoul?

64 Ready, Steady, Puck!

Terry Clark talks to the Seoul Chiefs about the club’s development and the joys of hockey in South Korea.

65 Who will challenge

for the K-League title? K-leaguefootball.com looks at the main matches over the coming months

68

GROOVE LISTINGS

70 MAPS


KOREA 5th floor, Shinwoo Bldg. 5-7 Yongsan 3-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul, Korea.

Contact info (010) 5348-0212 / (02) 6925-5057 Advertising ads@groovekorea.com General inquiries info@groovekorea.com EDIT O R I A L

Community naheen madarbakus naheen@groovekorea.com Insight anita mckay anita@groovekorea.com FOOD & DRINK joe mcpherson food@groovekorea.com ENTERTAINMENT stewart mcfeat stewart@groovekorea.com TRAVEL eileen cahill eileen@groovekorea.com SPORTS liam ring liam@groovekorea.com A R T & DESI G N

ART DIRECTOR seong-eun park sam@groovekorea.com PHOTO DIRECTOR dylan goldby photo@groovekorea.com W R ITE R S & C O NT R I B UT O R S

hallie bradley, simon slater, sam mardini, Steve price, bourie, andy hume, tom birner, robbie nguyen, sue ahn, caroline mahon, christine pickering M A R KETIN G & A D M INIST R A TI O N

CFO steve seung-jin lee MARKETING DIRECTOR peter chong ACCOUNTING yi-seul oh WE B & M O B I L E

himes design www.himesdesign.com finch professtional services www.finchproservices.com P U B L ISHE R

sean choi sean@groovekorea.com Special thanks to Ms. Sophie Yang at Seoul Cultural Global Center

To contribute to Groove Korea, email submissions@groovekorea.com or the appropriate editor. To write a letter to the editor, email editor@groovekorea.com. To have Groove Korea delivered to your home or business, email subscribe@groovekorea.com. To promote your event, email events@groovekorea.com. To advertise, email ads@groovekorea.com. The articles are the sole property of GROOVE MEDIA CO. Ltd. No reproduction is permitted without the express written consent of GROOVE MEDIA CO. Ltd. The opinions expressed in the magazine are not necessarily those of the publisher.

Š

All rights reserved Groove Korea Magazine 2015


Hallie Bradley Hallie Bradley has

Luc Tremblay Luc Tremblay comes from the icy snowy land of Northern Ontario. When he’s not chasing the dream he can be found cycling, after which you can catch him drinking a few beverages and dancing some new steps. If you see him on the trail, give him a high five or better yet join him for some Seoul Cycling at www. SeoulCycle.com.

Robert “Bob” Kienzle Robert “Bob” Kienzle has an M.A. in Communication, teaches university English and business courses in Seoul, and does consulting, training, and material production for multinational companies. Bob likes exploring new cultures by plane and new mountains and beaches by motorcycle.

12 www.groovekorea.com May 2015

Yoki Suhyun Jeong Yoki Suhyun Jeong was raised in Seoul and studied photography in Tokyo before going on to work for a Tokyo-based design magazine and a Korean-Japanese cultural magazine. Her work has been exhibited in Japan and Australia, and she has traveled to 24 countries so far. She spent eight years in Japan and now lives on Jeju Island.

lived and worked in Korea for over eight years. She runs the blog The Soul of Seoul and the newly launched The Soul of Seoul Tours as well as curating for the Crazy Multiply Art Collective. She enjoys townie festivals with good food and listening to her guitarist husband jam.

Stewart McFeat Stewart McFeat is from Glasgow, Scotland and has a background in radical European philosophy. He see-saws between the oddball and evenball parts of the culture industry. In the term “artsy-fartsy” he considers himself to be the letter “f”.

Naheen Madarbakus-Ring Naheen has divided the last twelve years between Japan, Korea and the UK and traveled to about 30 countries in-between. When not on a beach, she enjoys discovering new restaurants around the city, walks by the stream or catching up on Gordon Ramsay cookery shows. Naheen is Groove Korea’s Community editor.


Dr. Kim’s Skin Laser & Esthetic Clinic offers a comprehensive array of services for medical skin disorders and cosmetic dermatology. Dr. Kim treats patients of all ages and manages a multitude of conditions. ACNE · ACNE SCAR · ROSACEA · ATOPY · SKIN ALLERGY NONSURGICAL SKIN TIGHTENING LARGE PORE · FRECKLE · MELASMA · DARK SPOTS MOLES · DARK CIRCLE · HAIR REMOVAL · TATTOO REMOVAL · WHITENING WRINKLE · BOTOX · FILLER · MESOTOXIN · AQUA SLIM SPA · LIPO LASER ADIPO- TOLYSIS · MEDICAL SKIN CARE

Dr.Kim’s Skin Laser & Esthetic CLINic (은피부과) Schedule your appointment to experience the difference. Seoul Kangnam, Chungdam-dong 85-2 (02) 546-3322 www.eunskin.com MON-FRI 10:30 a.m. - 6 p.m. THU 2 p.m. - 8 p.m. SAT 10:30 a.m. - 2 p.m. LUNCH 12:30 p.m. - 2 p.m.

Line Bundang

Galleria intersection

Apgujeong Rodeo Stn. EXIT 4

Cannon

Dr.Kim’s Skin Laser & Esthetic Clinic (은피부과)

Bluemoon jazz

Adidas SC Bank

Hak-dong intersection


MON

T UE

5

M AY

W hat’ s O N WED

THU

FRI

1

q

It’s the fight of the century!

Floyd Mayweather Jr. vs Manny Pacquiao May 3; 1 PM on SBS and SBS sports channel.

4

5

7

SPO (Seoul Philharmonic Orchestra) outdoor concert @ Children’s Grand Park. Free concert.

Esio Trot Accidental Love

14

BIPAF (Busan Int’l Performing Arts Festival) May 1-10; www.bipaf.org

20 21 Seoul City Wall Walking Tour

Marronnier Park Hyehwadong; 9:30 am

14 www.groovekorea.com May 2015

25

Chuncheon Int’l Mime Festival May 24-31

28

Spy

PENTATONIX ‘The on my way home tour’

29

@ Olympic Park

Hongdae LIVE CLUB day!


G am es i n M AY KBO League game schedule

(schedules for Jamsil, Mokdong and Sajik only) SAT

MAY

S UN

1-3

2

Nexen vs. LG Jamsil

MAY

5-7

LG vs. Doosan

Samsung vs. Nexen

Hanwha vs. Doosan

KIA vs. Nexen

LG vs. NC

Nexen vs. Lotte

Jamsil

Mokdong

SK vs. Lotte Saji k

MAY

Paul McCartney live in Seoul

@ Jamsil Sports Complex

9

8-10

Jamsil

Mokdong

MAY

12-14

Jamsil

S aj ik

MAY

15-17

LG vs. SK Jamsil

MAY

19-21

Samsung vs. Doosan

LG vs. Nexen

KIA vs. Lotte

SK vs. Doosan

NC vs. Nexen

LG vs. Lotte

Jamsil

Mokdong

Saji k

MAY

Seoul Players Glengarry Glen Ross by David Mamet May 9-17; www.seoulplayers.org

22-24

Jamsil

Mokdong

Saji k

MAY

16

26-28

LG vs. KT Jamsil

MAY

29-31

LG vs. Samsung Jamsil

Hanwha vs. Lotte S aj ik

K League schedule Lotus Lantern Festival May 15-17

23

K League Challenge

(schedules for Jamsil, Suwon, Ansan, Anyang, Goyang and Bucheon games only) M AY

24

2

K League Classic

(schedules for Seoul, Suwon and Jeonju stadiums games only) M AY

Suwon FC vs. Seoul E-Land Suwon

2

M AY

3

Seoul Jazz Festival

@Olympic Park / May 23-25

HBC Festival 10 year anniversary

Goyang Hi FC vs. Bucheon FC Goyang

M AY

5

Ansan Police FC vs. Sangju Sangmu FC Ansan

9

M AY

10

May 22-24

16

13

Suwon Bluewings vs. Jeju United FC Suwon FC Seoul vs. Jeonnam Dragons Seoul

M AY

23

Bucheon FC vs. Ansan Police FC Bucheon

Jeonbuk FC vs. Incheon Utd Jeonju Suwon Bluewings vs. Seongnam FC Suwon

M AY

M AY

30

Jeonbuk FC vs. Suwon Bluewings Jeonju M AY

M AY

Suwon FC vs. Goyang Hi FC Suwon

FC Seoul vs. Sungnam FC Seoul

Ansan Police FC vs. Daegu FC Ansan

31

FC Seoul vs. Ulsan Hyundai Seoul

FC Anyang vs. Bucheon FC Anyang

Idina Menzel live in Seoul

@ Olympic Park

Seoul E-Land vs. Gangwon FC Jamsil Goyang Hi FC vs Sang ju Sangmu FC Goyang M AY

16

Seoul E-Land vs. Chung ju Hummel FC Jamsil Ansan Police FC vs. Goyang Hi FC Ansan

M AY

23

Seoul E-Land vs. Chung ju Hummel FC Jamsil Bucheon FC vs. Kyeongnam FC Bucheon

M AY

24

FC Anyang vs. Ansan Police FC Anyang

Suwon FC vs. Gangwon FC Suwon

Seoul E-Land vs. Suwon FC Jamsil

FC Anyang vs. Daegu FC Anyang

M AY

30


N ati onal Ne ws

All stories are culled with consent from Korea JoongAng Daily’s website and edited by Groove Korea for length and clarity. The opinions expressed here do not necessarily represent those of Groove Korea. — Ed.

In association with May 2015 / www.koreajoongangdaily.com

Vloggers take over as Korea’s newest idols

16 www.groovekorea.com May 2015

V

ideo bloggers - or vloggers - have become so popular in Korea that K-pop stars and TV channels are now jumping on the self-broadcasting bandwagon. Vlogging is a practice in which an individual uploads videos they shoot of themselves onto the Internet. Along with its rising popularity, a number of vloggers are making a high income from independent broadcasting online. One is 24-year-old female YouTube superstar known as “Yangdding.” The vlogger became famous after uploading videos of herself narrating over the top of computer games she was playing. Yangdding first started broadcasting games as a hobby when she was in high school and became a full-time vlogger five years ago. She currently earns 40 million to 50 million won ($36,500 to $43,600) per month. The Internet mogul, who defined vlogging as a combination of writing, producing and hosting, runs eight different channels under the nickname “Yangdding’s Private Lives” on YouTube. Yangdding is dubbed the “president of elementary school kids” because of her popularity. She has 300 million subscribers on her YouTube channel and six billion accumulated views on her videos, even exceeding those on famous girl group 4minute’s YouTube channel. “Dae-Library,” a 37-year-old YouTube star, first started off vlogging about computer games but expanded his range to running diverse programs with themes such as cooking. His monthly income from YouTube runs from 20 million to 30 million won ($18,200 to $27,400). Out of the top 30 YouTube videos that earned the highest views in Korea, those by five vlogging superstars such as Yangdding, Dae-Library and Crocodile were included in the list. Korean vloggers mostly upload their content to video platforms such as YouTube and Afreeca TV. Most of the content is related to eating, cooking and playing games, subjects that have been less common in traditional media output. Major Korean broadcasting companies are now producing vlog-style Internet shows as a result of the popularity of the phenomenon. For example, MBC produced the “My Little Television” program as a pilot to test the public’s response before turning it into an actual program on the TV channel. The show features six entertainers, including host Kim Gura; girl group AOA member Cho A;

and chef Baek Jong-won. While broadcasting the live vlogs simultaneously in separate rooms of the same house the stars communicated directly with fans through online chats that could be seen below the videos on screen. The Internet program, whose survival was dependent on how many hits it got, pitted the celebrities’ segments against each other and had chef Baek as the final winner for his cooking section. In the final episode he received a 17 percent share of the ratings compared to the other stars with 26,227 views.

The boy band FTIsland started vlogging in March through Afreeca TV. The vlogs were intended to promote the boy band’s new album, which will be released in March, but the group members showed more honesty in them than they tend to do in traditional media, earning a positive response from viewers. Jung Yong-hwa, the lead singer of the popular boy band CNBlue, also hosted his own vlog series, “Jung Yong-hwa’s Hologram,” which consists of four episodes. Along with the rising popularity of vlogging, online platforms using the same blueprint as YouTube, which supports independent broadcasters by sharing ad profits with them, are also gaining spotlight as popular business models. Korean entertainment and media company CJ E&M has formed partnerships with around 280

vloggers who run various programs on themes ranging from games to beauty to cooking under the name “Creator Group.” The company also opened a professional studio for the vloggers at the end of last year. In addition, Afreeca TV has formed partnerships with 40 vloggers, while the platform Treasure hunter has created an alliance with highly popular vloggers such as Yangdding and Eve, who is referred to as one of the four goddesses of Afreeca TV. These types of platforms are receiving spotlight internationally as well as domestically, with global media enterprises competing against each other to take over sites that have potential growth. These larger companies aim to use the platforms to target young people, who prefer short videos that deal with topics such as daily life, games, pets, beauty and sports. Walt Disney Company acquired Maker Studio for $5 billion dollars last year, a platform that had formed partnerships with more than 50,000 individual broadcasters at the time of purchase. Warner Bros., on the other hand, invested in YouTube multichannel Machinima, which focuses on gamers and their audience, while DreamWorks acquired Awesomeness TV, a media and entertainment company, in 2013. “We are working on creating a digital media that can supplement traditional media in a collaborative effort with vloggers,” said Oh Jin-sae, a manager at CJ E&M. According to a survey commissioned by Variety, a weekly American entertainment trade magazine, on “The Five Most Influential Figures” among American teenagers aged between 13 and 19 last July, YouTube stars ranked in the top five, pushing celebrities aside. YouTube channels run by elementary school students who are dubbed as kid creators are also receiving popularity. “Kids and teenagers in Korea are showing a positive response towards individual broadcasters such as Yangdding,” said Lim Sung-hee from SK Planet, a Korean corporation that manages digital content and marketing. According to Lim, online video-sharing platforms, which are currently in a starter phase in Korea, will be expanded. “The rising popularity of vloggers and video-sharing networks will decisively affect the viewership of programs run by Korea’s major broadcasting companies,” she added.


Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center

계명대학교 동산의료원

116 years of history The first hospital in Daegu Established in 1899 by an American medical missionary Practicing domestic and international medical volunteer activities for over a Century. ● Leading hospital in attraction of international patients Best Institute Award for attracting International Patients from the Korean Ministry of Health and Welfare in 2010 ● Leading Medical Center in daegu medical tourism ● Specialized Medical Centers : Cardiovascular Center, Cerebrovascular Center, Cancer Center, Digestive System Center, Sleep Center, Obesity and metabolic Surgery Center.

New hospital under construction

Specialized International Healthcare Center ● Affiliated with International SOS ● Language services in English, Chinese, Japanese, and Russian ● Convenient and professional service with the following international insurance companies for direct billing system : Tricare Overseas Program, AETNA International, BlueCross Blueshield,CIGNA International, Foreign Service Benefit Plan, GeoBlue

56 Dalseong-Ro, Jung-Gu, Daegu TEL 053-250-7303 www.dsmc.or.kr


N ati onal Ne ws

In association with

Parents protest decision to strip special school of elite status

A

group of parents are protesting the Seoul Metropolitan Office of Education’s decision to strip their children’s school of its status as an elite institution. The parents of students who attend Seoul Foreign Language High School have been holding a protest against the education authority’s announcement that the institution could lose its position as a special-purpose high school. Special-purpose high schools were established to educate students considered to have potential. Foreign language high schools, science high schools, sports schools and arts schools are classified under this category. After conducting a general assessment on three special-purpose middle schools and 10 special-purpose high schools in Korea’s capital, the education office announced on April 2 that the school would be stripped of its elite status. It said that the school did not meet the requirements of the assessment. Out of the 10 high schools, Seoul Foreign Language High School is the only one that might be demoted. Parents participating in the demonstration said it does not make sense to downgrade the school, which has recorded the highest rate of college entrants in linguistics, liberal arts and

Parents of students attending Seoul Foreign Language High School protest on Monday against the Seoul Metropolitan Office of Education’s announcement that the institute will likely lose its status as a special-purpose high school after it failed a general assessment. The school will present its plan to fix problems at a hearing slated for this month. The protest will last until the hearing opens.

social science majors among the six foreign language schools in Seoul over the last four years. As other foreign language schools run classes for science majors and medical schools, they say it is unfair to strip the school of its status as it is located in northern Seoul, which has relatively poor educational facilities compared with the city’s southern region.

After holding a hearing in April, the Seoul education authority will determine whether to strip the school of its status or not. During the hearing, the school will present a plan to address the problems brought to light in the assessment. The Education Ministry will make the final decision on whether to approve the withdrawal.

3 Pakistanis became Korean through fraud

18 www.groovekorea.com May 2015

T

hree men from Pakistan have Geum, who was struggling to raise her twin been arrested on allegations daughters after a divorce. Lee offered to pay they acquired Korean citizen- Geum’s monthly rent in exchange for a fake ship through sham marriages, marriage, and the two tied the knot in August 2001. Seoul police said on April 14. Lee gained Korean citizenship in August The three Korean women involved in the scheme have been booked without physical 2005 and divorced Geum seven months later. After their 2006 divorce, Lee tried to perdetention. Officers from the Seoul Metropolitan Police suade his ex-wife to marry his 38-year-old Agency’s international criminal investigation Pakistani friend so he could also get Korean team said the case dates back to 1999, when citizenship. That plan was aborted when that a 51-year-old Pakistani identified as Lee ar- friend got involved in immigration trouble rived in Korea on a tourist visa and was ille- and was deported. Lee then shifted his focus to his 24-yeargally employed at a manufacturing plant in old son and 31-year-old nephew, who were Geumcheon District, southwestern Seoul. That’s where Lee met his coworker, a in Seoul on a language program. The suspect 47-year-old Korean woman surnamed offered Geum money for her twin 21-year-

olds to marry his son and nephew so they could obtain citizenship. To facilitate that process, Lee gave up his son for adoption and had his brother adopt him. The marriages proceeded. The plot came to light when one of Geum’s twins called the police to file a complaint against her husband, Lee’s son, for sexual assault. Police officers said her decision to come clean was backed by Geum. “Putting aside the fact that she needs money, I think Geum came to realize she could no longer put her daughter’s future at risk,” said a police officer, who asked for anonymity because the case is still ongoing. The police will broaden their investigation to track down similar cases, the officer added.


Edited by Naheen Madarbakus-Ring (naheen@groovekorea.com)

C OMMUNI TY

C omm u nit y Ch es t

Story and photos by Hallie Bradley

The Lotus Lantern Festival Celebrate Buddha’s Birthday in style at the biggest street festival in the capital

G

rab your camera for some beautifully colorful and cultural lantern illuminations. The highlight of this month is the Lotus Lantern Festival in commemoration of Buddha’s birthday on May 16th-17th. Lanterns will be strung along the streets with participants marching down the roads of Jongno. Here are the main events to look out for:

20 www.groovekorea.com May 2015

Eoulim Madang The kick-off celebration of the parade takes place in Dongguk University’s stadium with all the groups, revving up for the long walk ahead. Most groups dress to impress in traditional Hanboks and the Buddhist monks in attendance wear their own traditionally simplistic attire. Dancers get everyone in the spirit by moving and grooving with about a thousand other people. Guaranteeing a range of different costumes, beautiful lanterns and musical instruments, there may even be an opportunity to pick up one of the free lanterns passed out to spectators. Where: Dongguk University Stadium, (Dongguk University Station, Line 2, Exit 6) When: May 16th from 3:30pm ~ 6:00pm

Lantern Parade About 300,000 people gather to witness in the beauty that is the Lotus Lantern Parade. Over 100,000 lanterns ranging in shape from tigers, elephants and birds alongside lotus flowers and mythical creatures light up the streets and night sky. Participants sporting small hand held lantern designs line the streets to catch a glimpse of the larger floats. People begin lining the street and finding seats along the parade route 30-60 minutes in advance. Although seats are provided along the route, the ones nearer Jonggak are the first to go. Grab a seat near the end of the route to have a good chance of getting a parade lantern. Where: From Dongdaemun and to Jonggak Transport: Dongdaemun Station (Line 1, Exit 9 & 10), Jongno 5-ga Station (Line 1, Exit 1, 4, 5 & 8), Jongno 3-ga Station (Line 1, 3 and 5, every exit), Jonggak Station (Line 1, every exit). When: May 16th from 6:00pm ~ 9:30pm


C OMMUNI TY

Tents line the street in front of Jogyesa Temple and offer ample opportunities to get hands-on experience to make traditional Korean Buddhist crafts or eat delicious dishes. Try your hand at making lotus lanterns, Buddhist prayer bead bracelets, traditional Korean dolls or decorate clay bowls and plates. Visitors can also spend time with Buddhists from Tibet, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Japan, Taiwan and Cambodia coming together to share their ceremonies, have discussions and conduct meditations. Where: In front of Jogyesa Temple, Jonggak Station (Line 1, Exit 2) and Anguk Station (Line 3, Exit 6) When: May 17th from 12:00pm ~ 6:00pm

Hoehyang Hanmadang To wrap up the parade, participants and spectators fill the Gwanghwamun Plaza for a huge dance party under a shower of flower petals. The laughing, dancing and singing lasts for 90 minutes in the spirit of dedicating one’s merit to others. People are pulled into circles to swing around, linking arms to shoulders to form long trains that zig-zag through the crowds. It’s probably the largest block party in Korea and you’ll want to be a part of it. Where: Gwanghwamun Plaza, Gwanghwamun Station (Line 5, Exit 2, 3, 4 & 7) When: May 16th from 9:30pm ~ 11:00pm

Yeongdeungnori On Sunday, there is also an evening mini parade that loops around the block after the festival’s main cultural events. The parade culminates in the final celebration, or Yeongdeungnori where dancers take to the stage and musicians beat drums until the street of spectators erupts into one more final dance party which is as beautiful but much more intimate than the night before. Where: In front of Jogyesa Temple, Jonggak Station (Line 1, Exit 2) and Anguk Station (Line 3, Exit 6) When: May 17th from 7:00pm ~ 9:00pm

May 2015 www.groovekorea.com 21

MORE INFO Hallie Bradley writes on her travels in Korea, daily life, the culture and traditions in her blog, The Soul of Seoul. www.thesoulofseoul.net.

Edited by Naheen Madarbakus-Ring (naheen@groovekorea.com)

Traditional Cultural Events Day


C omm u nit y Ch es t

Edited by Naheen Madarbakus-Ring (naheen@groovekorea.com)

C OMMUNI TY

Story and photos by Hallie Bradley

Lending a Helping Hand at the Lotus Lantern Festivities Ever wondered how festivals run so smoothly? Hallie Bradley gives us an insight into being a volunteer

B

22 www.groovekorea.com May 2015

e on the lookout for foreigners participating in events at this year’s Lotus Lantern Festival. Aside from walking in the parade, giving directions on Cultural Events Day and dancing in the streets, a group of around 150 volunteers go through a rigorous month and a half of education classes in preparation to help visitors at the festival. Weekly classes on Buddhism help these supporters complete a fairly new program (currently in its third year) to help the influx of foreigners coming to enjoy the festival and get a better understanding of Buddha’s birthday celebrations. Two years ago, I partook in the first year of the program that seeks to give volunteers a deeper understanding of the cultural and religious relevance of the popular Spring festival. Not only were we tasked with learning about Korean Buddhism and etiquette in weekly classes, but we were also taught routines for a flash mob and for the end of parade dance party.

A group of around 150 volunteers go through a rigorous month and a half of education classes in preparation to help visitors at the festival. Overall, everyone agreed the experience was a positive one. Though at times we felt that the classes didn’t

provide enough information, we also realized that the history of Korean Buddhism is long and it was impossible to learn everything in just six weeks. We danced together, prostrated together, silently ate at the temple together and meditated together. The weekend of the We danced festival, we were given our Hanbok shirts and together, with our teams went prostrated to our designated areas together, silently to volunteer. My team ate at the temple started at Dongguk University and walked together and the route of the parade meditated stopping periodicaltogether. ly to obtain feedback through surveys from people in the crowds. Unfortunately, the biggest complaint from the teams was that the police, not knowing who the volunteers were, kept telling them to stand with the spectators. However, a combination of Hanbok shirts and lanyards around their necks saying “Volunteer” will hopefully distinguish their participation more easily this year. The festival has a multitude of groups MORE INFO that come together to volunteer and Hopeful participants can get involved with this group do everything from maintain the lines next year by checking out their website or Facebook during the parade, pick up trash, feed page. The group provides opportunities to learn the hungry mouths of both fellow volabout Korean Buddhism and partake in temple stay unteers and visitors, help with crafts programs for free throughout the year as well as the for the young (or young at heart) and opportunity to volunteer during the Lotus Lantern just about anything else that you could Festival in the spring. think of. The festival is largely volFree unteer-based and that’s important to www.cham.me remember when you’re enjoying the Cultural Exchange and Volunteer in Korea beautiful scenes this year.


C ommu nit y C hest

The Itaewon Global Village Center

T

Story by Naheen Madarbakus-Ring / Photos Courtesy of Itaewon Global Village Center

he Itaewon Global Village Center (IGVC) is a community center full of surprises in the heart of Seoul. Ready to take you away from the hustle and bustle of the vibrant shopping and energetic entertainment district below, this fifth floor cove offers a hideaway of activities, social opportunities and volunteering projects. Having opened its door in 2009, the IGVC is one of seven centers around Seoul offering a primary program of activities aimed at the expat community. For those requiring legal advice, free service is available covering potential issues ranging from housing disputes to divorce proceedings. Katherine Corteza, the center manager, asks if those needing advice could send an initial email outlining the problem by the preceding Friday, then a drop-in appointment or electronic response can be arranged. Additionally, the popularity of the center’s Korean Language program has prompted demand for language exchange sessions. The service caters for all nationalities, inviting Spanish, Chinese and Russian exchanges, alongside the more common English and Korean collaborations. Katherine explains the program’s simplicity as language exchange partners make requests to the center who then match up potential candidates to meet at the IGVC which can often result in long-term friendships as well. Away from Itaewon, the center also coordinates monthly volunteering sessions, at the Yongsan Center for the Disabled, the Yongsan Senior Welfare Center and the Young Nak Aenea’s Home for Children. Each month, the cen-

ter leads a 6-10 strong volunteering group for one hour sessions in each location, to aid the residents in completing projects, day-to-day tasks or simply chat. Katherine explains how these long running volunteering projects are integral to the center’s community ethos and is always looking to welcome new members. In addition, IGVC are also interested to hear from potential Volunteer leaders who would liaise and coordinate with other members on the monthly meets to help serve the local organisations. The Itaewon center also offers a varied cul-

Class at a Glance… (all taking place at the Itaewon Global Village Center) Volunteering Activities (Free)

Monthly Events

Monthly Events Najeon Jewelry Box Making Class Fri 15th May - 10am-12pm 20,000 won a class

Yongsan Senior Welfare Center Weds 20th – 1pm- 2pm

Afternoon Art Class for Kids: Framed Carnation Flowers Fri 8th – 3.30pm – 5pm 7,000 won

Korean Flower Arrangement Class Fri 15th May - 2pm-4pm 9,000 won a class

Young Nak Aenea’s Home Thurs 21st – 2pm-4pm

Real Estate Seminar Fri 29th - 10am-11.30am Free

Hanji Craft Class (Wall Mirror) Fri 22nd May: 2pm – 4pm 16,000 won a class

MORE INFO Events are mainly free. However fees for some classes range between 5,00020,000 won. Check the website or Facebook page for more details. 5f Hannam Building, 737-37 Hannam-dong, Yongsan-Gu, Seoul 140-893 Subway: Itaewon Station (Line 6, Exit 2) 02-2199-8883~5 / 02-796-2460 www.global.seoul.go.kr/Itaewon itaewon@sba.seoul.kr www.facebook.com/Itaewonglobalvillage 9am-6pm (lunch break 12pm-1pm). Open Monday to Friday, except Public Holidays.

May 2015 www.groovekorea.com 23

Yongsan Center for the Disabled Korean Cooking Class: Fri 8th - 2pm-4pm Osambulgogi and Janchiguksu Fri 1st 10am-12pm 12,000 won a class

tural program, changing activities each month. May brings a full Friday program of classes including Korean cooking, Art classes, Jewelry Box making, Flower Arrangement and Hanji Craft sessions. As most classes take place at the center’s 20-person seminar room, Katherine stresses that pre-registration for most classes is highly recommended. The IGVC is a multicultural and thriving center waiting to serve. Whether it’s to meet new friends, practice a language or volunteer in the community, the Itaewon Global Village is ready to make Seoul your home from home.

Edited by Naheen Madarbakus-Ring (naheen@groovekorea.com)

Make the Itaewon Global Village Center (IGVC) your home away from home by getting involved with the full community program of activities available

C OMMUNI TY

A Community Haven:


Edited by Naheen Madarbakus-Ring (naheen@groovekorea.com)

C OMMUNI TY

Story by Naomi Blenkinsop / photos courtesy of The War Memorial of Korea

Remembering the Korean War

Hyeonchung-il is Korea’s National Memorial Day to commemorate those who lost their lives in the Korean War

24 www.groovekorea.com May 2015

K

orea’s Memorial Day (Hyeonchung-il) is an annual holiday on June 6th, giving Koreans and all those residing in South Korea the opportunity to commemorate those who died in service during the Korean War. An estimated three million soldiers and civilians – mainly Koreans but also foreign military- died during service. Memorial Day was declared an official holiday in 1956, not long after the Korean war ended. Every year, thousands of Koreans come out to honor those who were killed or went missing during the conflict. A growing number of expats have also started to participate in the events held on this day with several places encouraging visitors to pay homage to these brave soldiers. The largest ceremony on Memorial Day is held at the National Cemetery in Seoul. Families visit relatives who died during the Korean War, leaving chrysanthemums and sometimes makgeolli, rice cakes and apples as offerings for their deceased relatives. At 10 a.m., ten minutes of silent prayer is observed, ushered in by sirens that ring throughout the country as the South Korean flag is kept at half-mast for the remainder of the day.

The War Memorial of Korea in Seoul has three floors filled with historical relics and collections from the Korean War. An outdoor exhibition displays some of the vehicles, aircraft and artillery which were employed during the war. The Children’s Museum (just east of the War Memorial) also arranges a themed contest with visitors invited to either

Every year, thousands of Koreans come out to honor relatives, civilians and soldiers who were killed or went missing during The Korean War. write or draw about what this holiday means to them (winners are announced a month later). There will also be face painting and a separate contest for children. A little further afield and a half or full day DMZ tour could help you learn more about the ongoing issues between the North and

South. Although the conflict hasn’t officially ended, various tours offer access to visit numerous sites such as Freedom House, Bridge of No Return and the 3rd Infiltration Tunnel amongst others. In Busan, the United Nations Memorial Cemetery is the only one of its kind in the world. The cemetery contains the graves of the UN soldiers who died during the Korean War, with 2,300 graves split between 22 sites according to nationality. A Wall of Remembrance also has approximately 40,000 names of all the foreign casualties, killed or missing. Near Mount Apsan in Daegu, the Nakdonggang Victory Memorial Hall was specifically built in 1979 to commemorate the victorious veterans of the Nakdong River battle which helped to save the lives of many civilians in the city. This museum has an interesting collection of exhibits from both the modern Korean military and the Korean War with an outdoor area displaying artillery, aircraft and equipment which was used in the war. Memorial Day in South Korea is an opportunity to not only honor those who died serving the Korean peninsula, but also to learn more about the history of this great country. Make it something to remember this year.


FRIDAY

MAY

Korean Cooking Class: Osambulgogi and Janchiguksu 10am-12pm / Cost: 12,000 won Ewha Women’s University. (Sign up with Itaewon Global Village) itaewon@yongsan.go.kr

TED

SUNDAY

MORE INFO: War Memorial of Korea 29,Itaewon-ro,Yongsan-gu,Seoul The War Memorial of Korea 140-021 Subway: Samgakji Station lines #4 and #6 (Exit #12) Namyeong Station line #1 Bus: 149, 150, 151, 152, 500, 501, 502, 504, 506, 507, 605, 750A, 750B, 751, 752, 110B, 730, 421, 6001. Check http://www.seoulcitybus.com for more details. www.warmemo.or.kr 09:00 ~ 18:00 (Last Wednesday of every month :09:00 ~ 20:00) Closed every Monday Free MORE INFO: DMZ Museum DMZ Museum, Myeongho-Songhyeon-ri, Hyeollae-myeon, Goseong-gun, Gangwon-do Getting there: by car or group tour by prior reservation through a travel agency. www.dmzmuseum.com/museum/kor/ 033-681-0625 09:00-17:00 (Closed Mondays) Admission: Adults 2,000won / Teenagers 1,400won / Children 1,000won MORE INFO: UN Memorial Cemetary 93, UN Pyeonghwa-ro, Nam-gu, Busan, 608-812, ROK Subway: Daeyon Station (line 2) exit 3 (15 minute walk) Bus: from Busan Station take 134 (get off at UNMCK bus stop) www.unmck.or.kr 082-51-625-0625 09:00-17:00 (October-April) 9:00-18:00 (May-September) Free MORE INFO: Nakdonggang Victory Memorial Park Mountain 227-1,Daemyeong 9-dong, Namgu, Daegu, Korea Subway: Anjirang Station line 1 Bus: 300, 410, 410-1, Dalseo 4, Dalseo 4-1. Get off at Apsan Part St. www.nakdongwar.or.kr 082-053-621-9880~1 10.00-17.00 (Open everyday/ Closed when raining) Free

MAY

3,17,31

Stitch n Bitch Meet 2.30pm / Cost: Free De Lambre Coffee Shop Jongno-gu Jongno 2-ga 75-8

Korean Calligraphy 12.10pm-1.00pm Cost: 5,000 won per class 5th floor, M-Plaza Building, 27 Myeong-Dong 8-gil, Jung-gu, Seoul Pilates 2pm-2.50pm and 3pm-3.50pm Cost: 5,000 won 5th floor, M-Plaza Building, 27 Myeong-Dong 8-gil, Jung-gu, Seoul

05 MAY

16,17

04 MAY

Traditional Knots 2.30pm-4.30pm / Cost: 5,000 won a class 5th floor, M-Plaza Building, 27 MyeongDong 8-gil, Jung-gu, Seoul

Korean Flower Arrangement Class 2pm-4pm / Cost: 9,000 won Itaewon Global Village, 5f Hannam Building, 737-37 Hannam-dong, Yongsan-Gu, Seoul 140-893

MAY

EVERY MONDAY

CLASS

CLASS

WEEKEND

02

CLASS

CLASS

EVERY TUESDAY

MAY

Edited by Naheen Madarbakus-Ring (naheen@groovekorea.com)

TEDxSeoul Salon 1.00pm-5.00pm (approx. – check website before) Cost: 15,000 won Seoul NPO Center 39, Namdaemun-ro 9-gil, Jung-gu, Seoul

SATUrday

C OMMUNI TY

01

CLASS

FRIDAY

15 MAY

FESTIVAL

Lotus Lantern Festival All day events / Cost: free Jogyesa Temple / Jonggak Station / Gwanghwamun Plaza

EVENT

MAY

20 May 2015 www.groovekorea.com 25

Seoul City Walk 9.30am-11.30am Cost: Free but pre- register at http://goo.gl/forms/B7nNT9fKRf Meeting at Marronier Park, (Hyewha Station, Line 4, Exit 2) Senior Welfare Center: Volunteer Hour 1pm-2pm Cost: Free but sign-up prior to the session http://global.seoul.go.kr/Itaewon Itaewon Global Village, 5f Hannam Building, 737-37 Hannam-dong, Yongsan-Gu, Seoul 140-893

wednesday


Edited by Naheen Madarbakus-Ring (naheen@groovekorea.com)

C OMMUNI TY

Neig hbor hoo d Wat c h

Story by Naheen Madarbakus-Ring / Photos courtesy of TEDxSeoul

TEDxSeoul: Spreading Everyone’s Ideas

Find yourself on that famous circular red carpet or just come to be inspired

26 www.groovekorea.com May 2015

W

hen the name TED is heard, two things usually spring to mind. One is that of a talking teddy bear which Seth MacFarlene surprisingly made into a likeable movie. The other is the collection of innovative talks which are available from www.ted.com online, any place, any time. So, everyone has heard about the teddy bear, but what do we really know about TED Talks? TED has been a non-profit online platform devoted to spreading ideas since 1984. Initially focusing on talks relating to Technology, Entertainment and Design (hence TED), nowadays a broader range of topics to include Science, Business and even global issues appeal to a wider audience. Available in more than 100 languages, TED’s mission is to help share ideas globally, make them accessible and encourage others to talk. Regionally, independent TEDx events are also organized in countries all around the world to encourage communities to gather for local events using the established American TED Talks guidelines. South Korea has many regional TED branches nationwide but one of the more established regional licensees is

TEDxSeoul, an active TED group which have been organizing talk events in the capital since 2009. The 12-strong core team consist of volunteers based in Seoul who make the talks happen. Licensee Jooyong Moon is the current head organizer who coordinates his team of translators, speaker curators and system managers to produce events inviting speakers to talk on that famous circular red carpet. TEDxSeoul has already organized numerous events since establishing with many more planned. Annual TEDxSeoul conferences are held in the fall with an expected 200+ audience attending the full-day schedule of TED Talks. Smaller, more intimate TEDxSeoul Live and TEDxSeoul Salon events take place more frequently around different venues in the city and are geared towards attracting innovative speakers with ideas to share. The most famous speaker at TEDxSeoul to date was novelist Young Ha Kim (the author of “I Have A Right To Destroy Myself”) presenting his ideas on how to “Become An Artist: Right Now” which has already reached nearly 1.5 million views. Although the talk was given in Korean and now has online translation in many other languages available, there is a mis-

conception that TEDxSeoul is only for Korean speakers. Indeed, being famous or speaking in Korean is not a pre-requisite to get under the TEDxSeoul spotlight. Whether a performer, pioneer or professor, TEDxSeoul provides a mixed platform to express what one has to say. As a non-profit organization, self-promotion is not allowed and life stories will not be accepted; talks should be innovative, enlightening and inspiring TED’s ideas that show creativity mission and originality. The orga- is to help nizers prefer not to give share ideas designated topics to avoid globally, talks from being tailored, make them accessible instead hoping to encourand age honest and genuinely encourage interested multi-lingual others to and multi-cultural appli- talk. cants to the stage. The procedure to become a speaker is easy: write an initial script of the talk (no longer than 18 minutes) and send it together with a proposal outlining intended visual aids, props or materials needed to the TEDxSeoul team who will then be in contact with initial feedback. If the talk is accepted, speakers are invited to work


THURSDAY

For those not wanting to appear on the red carpet just yet, audiences are welcome to attend monthly events. Held at different venues across Seoul, TEDxSeoul Salon are more intimate affairs with 30-50 people in the audience. A chosen theme each month synchronizes the collection of talks in this smaller, safer space as speakers present more casually from their audience seat. This is a more interactive affair which encourages Q&A from the audience, and with no stage involved, creating less of a barrier between the speaker and attendees. This smaller event attracts a mixture of multi-lingual speakers and is recommended for a more personal TED experience. The TEDxSeoul Live events focus on a two and a half hour run of exclusive screenings of TED Talks from TED Conferences, before they are available online to everyone else. All talks at TEDxSeoul Live events are in

MAY

21

CLASS

Young Nak Aenea’s Home 2pm-4pm / Cost: Free but sign up prior to the session http://global.seoul.go.kr/Itaewon Itaewon Global Village, 5f Hannam Building, 737-37 Hannam-dong, Yongsan-Gu, Seoul 140-893

CLASS

Hanji Craft Class: Wall Mirror 2pm-4pm / Cost: 16,000 won Itaewon Global Village, 5f Hannam Building, 737-37 Hannam-dong, Yongsan-Gu, Seoul 140-893 FRIDAY

29 MAY

FRIday

MAY

22

SEMINAR

Real Estate Seminar 10am-11.30am / Cost: Free Itaewon Global Village, 5f Hannam Building, 737-37 Hannam-dong, Yongsan-Gu, Seoul 140-893

May 2015 www.groovekorea.com 27

MORE INFO Events are organized throughout the year. Tickets to attend costs between KRW 5,000-20,000. Applying to become a speaker is free. Check Facebook page for more details. Next Event: TEDxSeoul Salon. May 2nd 2015 (roughly 1:00-5:00PM, Cost is 15,000won) at the Seoul NPO Center, 39, Namdaemun-ro 9-gil, Jung-gu, Seoul May Event: TEDxSeoul Women Live. Saturday May 30th 2015 - (Check Facebook Page for details) Speaker application: contact@tedxseoul.com Audience application: www.facebook.com/tedxseoul Contact Info: contact@tedxseoul.com www.facebook.com/tedxseoul

Edited by Naheen Madarbakus-Ring (naheen@groovekorea.com)

TED’s mission is to help share ideas globally, make them accessible and encourage others to talk.

English and venues are arranged into designated ‘screening’ and ‘speaking’ areas so attendees can decide during breaks (while enjoying refreshments) whether to discuss the talk just viewed or to continue watching the next talk. TEDxSeoul Live events tend to be more informal than conferences and are a great opportunity to meet like-minded TED enthusiasts. TEDxSeoul Conferences are the biggest annual event, with a schedule packed with talks and simultaneous interpretation planned. Talks are given in every language so attendees are provided with audio devices to hear the talk in your chosen language. The next one is planned for the Fall and information will be made available on the TEDxSeoul social media websites as details are confirmed. Audience members for all events attract a mixture of Korean, English and multi-lingual speakers and is open to everyone. Applying to the events is easy through TEDxSeoul’s Facebook page with tickets costing around KRW5,000 for Live and Salon events and KRW20,000 for conferences. TEDxSeoul welcomes speakers or audience members from all multi-cultural backgrounds. Diversity is encouraged with a mixture of speakers from all countries and provides designated TEDxSeoul Live events screenings exclusively in English. The TED Talks stage offers a recognized space for expressing one’s opinions in what aims to be a cultural and innovative atmosphere for Koreans and Expats from any country. If you are a potential speaker with a new idea or perspective on any topic, then TEDxSeoul can offer a workable platform to reach out to a widespread audience using the famous TED Talk formula. If attending a talk is more preferable, then TEDxSeoul has a full schedule of events that welcomes everyone. Ultimately, TEDxSeoul is here to help individuals share their innovative, inspiring and enlightening ideas between communities. Now that’s an idea worth spreading.

C OMMUNI TY

together with the team, participating in face-to-face meetings, liaising through numerous emails and practice a full dress rehearsal before the recording. Preparation time varies from speaker to speaker with a minimum period of 2-3 weeks needed before the scheduled talk is developed and polished from its initial proposal to get to the TED Talk stage. The benefits of presenting are numerous. The process includes working with the experienced TEDxSeoul team to develop your talk, as they advise on visual materials and presenting techniques and offer speakers invaluable exposure of presenting on camera while working with a production team. Whether for the love of public speaking, the experience of TED, or simply to boost that resume, the team are ready and waiting.


28 www.groovekorea.com May 2015

Edited by Naheen Madarbakus-Ring (naheen@groovekorea.com)

C OMMUNI TY

Neig hbor hoo d Wat c h

Seoul’s Stitch N Bitch Brigade

Julie Walters Explains What Really Goes On Behind SnB Doors… Story and photos by Julie Walters

W

hen I arrived in Korea four years ago, I only had my sister and her promise that, “the best thing I did when I was in Korea the first time was join this group.” Not having anything better to do my first jet-lagged Sunday in Korea, I followed my sister to that week’s location for my first ever Stitch and Bitch or S&B gathering. When people hear the words “stitch and bitch,” they can sometimes be taken aback by the latter word. The term has been used since World War Two, reintroduced by a crafting book series of the same name, inspiring crafters to meet up in global meets not only in Korea but also the USA and Spain to talk about life in general. Seoul’s group has been around since 2005, founded by a Canadian named Kristin Nelson. Starting with meets in her apartment, the group then moved to a coffee shop near Itaewon. Dedicated to crafters of all abilities, it is a time to come together, get help and talk. Ranging from absolute beginner to the extremely talented crafters, members crochet, knit, cross-stitch, and sew, offering unlimited types of “stitching” in a get together to share their love of the craft while chatting.

Right now, S&B meets every other week at DeLambre, a coffee shop in Jonggak. Rebecca, Rita, Jenny, Renee, Jessica, Lisa, Amanda, Amy and myself form our core group, meeting to teach our own specific crafts. Rebecca and Amanda crochet; Jenny, Rita, Renee, and Lisa all knit; Jessica is sewing a blanket made out of hexagons; Amy cross-stitches; and I crochet, knit, and cross-stitch. A typical Sunday afternoon starts with casually meeting within half an hour of the actual 2.30pm starting time. The fifth floor of DeLambre has a bigger meeting space for us to take up two tables, drop off our belongings and settle in before our designated coffee bearers head downstairs with our orders.

While this is in motion, the crafters pull out their projects. With coffee at the ready, we then spend the next several hours talking, crafting, and occasionally, doing school work. Conversations and seating tends to shift a lot, especially when someone needs help on a project. We do not really have any specific topics that we talk about at our meetings; we chat, we craft, and have a lot of coffee and snacks in between before heading out to eat dinner together in the surrounding area. Outside of the coffee shop, we occasionally shop at Dongdaemun’s excellent crafting center, and get yarn, beads, and other crafting items. During holidays, we sometimes meet at a stitcher’s house, and just form a good support network for each other so nobody gets too lonely, being away from home.

Joining is easy with information found on our website. After a quick email, join the next meeting by bringing your own materials, and a volunteer (usually my sister Jenny who is the best knitting teacher out there!) will help new-comers. There is no obligation to show up each meet either: if you are too busy to come, then join us the next time. Although we mainly tend to be English speaking crafters, any one is welcome and we are sometimes even joined by Korean enthusiasts – we are simply excited to share our love of the craft. If someone is interested in learning a new craft, or simply wants someone to craft with, this is the place to do it. The ladies of S&B are pretty amazing, and are a great support system for those far away from home, on top of being knowledgeable about their crafts. Stitch and Bitch has become a major focal point of my time in Korea, and it could be yours too. I have met a core group of ladies that I have cried with, laughed with, stitched with and bitched with during my time in Korea, giving me support in difficult times, in projects and in life. So, now is the time to pick up those knitting needles, that sewing needle, that crochet hook, or whatever it is you do, and come to Jonggak to meet some new friends.

MORE INFO Free! Crafters must bring their own materials to the meeting, though. May 3rd, 17th and 31st and every other Sunday. De Lambre Coffee Shop Jongno-gu Jongno 2-ga 75-8 Jonggak Station (Line 1, Exit 12) It is located right outside of exit 12; walk a few steps, and look to the right. There is a tiled, elevator entrance. We are normally located on the fifth floor. www.seoulsnb.blogspot.kr seoulsnb@gmail.com


Story by Naheen Madarbakus-Ring / photos courtesy of Byungmun Seo

F

resh from the catwalk in Italy, Byungmun Seo sits happily (albeit a little jetlagged) in his studio. The Korean-based fashion designer has been busy this year with numerous European fashion shows showcasing his latest “Glitch Of The I” menswear collection. Having caused quite a stir with international stockists on the Generation Next runway at Seoul’s fashion week in March, he talks excitedly about the upcoming collection and his fashion vision. The London College of Fashion graduate has not looked back since his debut collection “Series” in 2012. Developing five collections in just three years has been a tall order but one which has kept his designs evolving. Establishing the brand direction, Seo describes his self-named label as “a luxurious and exclusive look to create very distinctive and somber clothes to clad a twenty-first century gentleman”. Seo’s experimental style focuses on the construction of garments using the simple concept of silhouettes. By this, he explains how he combines different materials (such as leather and wool) to create a unique usage with the fabric. His experimental choices mean such contrasts are not usually seen (let alone sewn) together in the fashion world but it’s a challenge the designer hopes to conquer. Currently experimenting with untraditional mono-mache (the tougher material often used on car seat upholstery), Seo’s vision is to produce an unusual outer finish but create a comfortable fabric inner lining as he explains this experimental approach is key to structuring his designs saying “I like to play with the material’s volume”.

The latest collection comprises of double layered materials and angled zips. Divided into high end and casual lines, he explains “I want to be distinctive from others and I think of my label as my outlet to be a free designer”. Currently selling in 12 cities across Europe, America and the Middle-East, Seo has also branched out in Asia with stockists in Japan and soon, Harvey Nichols in China, with his casual range available in multiple label stores around Korea. Seo finds his biggest challenge as a designer being time management, especially when producing two complete collections a year. “I always see a different color, style and design every season“, resulting in the ambitious designer constantly looking for new perspectives and patterns. The designer’s modest approach to fashion brings his own fashion vision to a collection which he wears himself. With distinct individuality in each of his garments, Seo states “my own voice has been put into my designs and now people can start to hear us”.

Seo’s experimental style focuses on the construction of garments using the simple concept of sil houettes

Byungmun Seo MUST HAVE item!

Byungmun Seo’s signature pleated sleeve bomber jacket is from the label’s casual range. Available in black, grey and silver, the sleeves have been pleated to add volume and flexibility for the wearer. A spring/summer best-seller, this waterproof jacket is casual, comfortable and matches most everyday outfits. Available at a retail price of $800.

May 2015 www.groovekorea.com 29

More Info “The Glitch Of The I” collection is available directly from the showroom. 3F 653-26 Hannam-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul, 140-887, South Korea Itaewon station (Line 6, Exit 4) 02-2231-0599 www.byungmunseo.com info@byungmunseo.com Mon-Fri: 10am – 7pm

Edited by Naheen Madarbakus-Ring (naheen@groovekorea.com)

Byungmun Seo shares his fashion vision and his latest collection

C OMMUNI TY

Th e 2 1 s t

Fashio n F or Cen t u ry G ent l eman


30 www.groovekorea.com May 2015

Edited by Anita McKay (anita@groovekorea.com)

I N S I G H T

Death, Taxes, Housing,

&


Story by Darren Bean / Illustration by Patrick Volz

f you are a non-Korean employee mak- seonjeok), and overseas-born Koreans as well. How? Foreigners can be residents for tax purposing less than 46 million won ($42,235) per year, and pay rent (wolse), then this column es (different from being a resident for visa purposes) might be worth 40 percent of your rent. I but cannot, ever, be heads of household (HOH). To apologize for leading with a clickbait teas- be a HOH you must have a national registration er but the rest of this is about taxes. I can’t number, not a foreigner identification number. imagine anybody would actually want to read it Even though both serve the same purpose, you must have the former, and be HOH, to claim a rent otherwise. Non-Koreans have long been able to enjoy a flat deduction. The National Tax Service has pointed out that tax rate of about 15- 18 percent. The current flat tax rate is 18.7 per cent (including local taxes) and has foreigners can enjoy a “cash receipt” deduction for been extended to 2016. This is great news for the rent paid, but this is not the same as the rent deupper crust; above 46 million won, as without the duction. The rent deduction applies regardless of flat rate, tax gradually increases from 24 percent to what percent it is of your income, whereas receipts 38 percent, a savings of between 6 percent and 20 (including the cash receipt) can only be deducted percent. Electing for the flat tax wipes out most de- over a certain percentage of income. Summarized ductions, but generally it’s the best option, particu- again, it’s better, tax-wise, to be a rich foreigner in Korea than to be a poor one. larly at higher income levels. If you would like to attempt to claim the renter’s When tax law offers a choice, it typically operates in a “choose your own adventure” kind of tax deduction, you will need: (1) a copy of your lease way: either A or B. Both have benefits and costs. with the registration (hwakjeong ilja) and your sigBut here, it’s not the end of the story. Non-Koreans nature, and (2) proof of payment, such as receipts, have a slightly modified choice: flat tax, with no bankbook or transfer record copies (tongjang / deductions, or graded tax—like Koreans—with few- naeyok). As the law is written you should not be er deductions. Wealthy expats pay less, while less able to claim the deduction, but some people have wealthy ones, including most teachers and laborers, reported being able to do so. The deduction has some limits (maximum 50 percent of your rent or actually pay more. Why? Because “foreigners are different,” I would 300,000 won). If you are one of the many who, after a visit to the guess. Maybe lower taxes encourage elites to come and contribute to Korea’s economy; however, de- NTS, cannot enjoy that deduction despite electing bate about the best tax policy is well beyond the for graded (not flat) tax treatment, you can email scope of this article. And it doesn’t explain why two koreantaxissue@gmail.com. To be clear, I’m not blaming the National Tax Serpeople who otherwise have the same status under the tax code (graded tax status) have different de- vice. The NTS doesn’t write the law— they adminductions when paying the same tax. And while it ister it. Congress-people and presidential staffers may be true that, in theory, anyone can become (and, most likely, their interns) draft the law. Personally, I’ve been fortunate enough to see a Korean citizen, the truth is that nearly all Korean citizens are Koreans born in Korea. Hence, the NTS correcting my mistakes, helping to search for distinction between citizen and non keeps the de- my deductions, and generally assisting the taxpayduction from “typical” expats, Chinese-Koreans (jo- er as well as the tax collector.

May 2015 www.groovekorea.com 31

Darren Bean is a California attorney residing in Seoul. This column is not legal advice, no attorney-client relationship is formed by this column, and no course of action should be taken or refrained from based on this column.

Edited by Anita McKay (anita@groovekorea.com)

Birthplace I

I N S I G H T

&

Four things that cannot be changed


Mix and Ma l t Edited by Joe McPherson (food@groovekorea.com)

F o r

A l

F r e s c o

M

ix and Malt, located in a quiet nook of otherwise bustling Hyehwa, attracts the occasional pair of yuppies and the usual passel of yapping girls with yapping dogs. It is a two-story, open air venue that seems to sell itself on an indolent charm revealed in its extremely slow service and a free and available Playstation for interested patrons. It has a diurnal wholesomeness that is shouldered by a resident golden retriever named Louie, who loses his novelty at about the same time he drools all over your fried calamari. Distributed between pop-up books for the kiddies and drunks are giant teddy bears littered throughout the upstairs terrace along with a stuffed and bespectacled Santa. It is mid-afternoon, the sky is a dust-weakened shade of blue, and atop the table sits a lesser-known William Styron novel and an absurd cocktail I normally wouldn’t buy – an 11,000 won Singapore Sling; tall, sweet, perspiring, and not quite as good as the strawberry mojito (also 11,000 won) which sloshes warmingly around my guts. The aforementioned calamari, which ends up being a little soggier than I like, is nonetheless munched alongside a tall, cool 5,000 won glass of Bud (their cheapest beer). It is accompanied by two sauces, both watery in texture yet dry in flavor, the standard marinara and some sort of blue cheese something-or-other. I also try a very good if pricey (15,000 won) Cobb salad, which is glutted with fresh-tasting ingredients and delicious homemade ranch sauce.

32 www.groovekorea.com May 2015

Tim e s


Edited by Joe McPherson (food@groovekorea.com)

The owner, who is also named Louie and speaks perfect English, brings me a complimentary Bloody Mary because another cocktail I had an eye for was unavailable. After a few sips I reaffirm that I hate Bloody Marys and can only guess at its quality, but I can say it was a nice and hardly necessary gesture. The drink has a loamy bite to it that seems on the mark, and comes with a peculiar mini-BLT harpooned on a bamboo knot as a garnish, which is so good I order it in its usual form. Maybe that’s their hope for the garnish, the sneaky bastards. The larger BLT is the best bit of food I try, a simple, well-proportioned, nostalgia-tickling sandwich with crunchy and extra bacon, fresh firm tomatoes, crisp lettuce and just the right amount of mayo, served up with fat fluffy potato wedges (as was the calamari) for a more-than-fair price of 10,000 won. As the enormous patio falls in shadow, I wind things down with a steaming, sobering mug of 2,900 won Americano, which is that price before 7 p.m. Mix and Malt is the sort of place you spend a day at rather than an hour. It’s a little fluffy (read: pleasant) for my temperament, and I leave around nightfall, so I’m not sure how it works as a bar, but as a restaurant/coffee shop, the atmosphere, the cozy chairs, the board games and Playstation and at least some of the food, make it a nice enough way to pass an afternoon.

Ambience Food Service Value Score

May 2015 www.groovekorea.com 33

MORE INFO: Mix and Malt 3 29-gil, Changgyeonggung-ro, Jongno-gu walk out of Hyehwa Station exit 4 and turn left. Walk to the end of the street until you get to a traffic light. You’ll see a Starbucks and Dunkin Donuts across the street. Mix & Malt is behind the Starbucks. 02-765-5945


a

h

E

C IU R I C IURI

St o

Photos by J

ry

by S

ra

Bringing Sicily to Seoul

e dg

on

Yu and Joe M Ph er c

so n

34 www.groovekorea.com May 2015

Edited by Joe McPherson (food@groovekorea.com)

FOOD & DRINK

as

A

s dusk is setting, Ciuri Ciuri is about to experience its usual exodus of foreigners and local Koreans whose ears have picked up on the presence of a Sicilian restaurant in Seoul. “One of the only Italian-operated and owned restaurants in Korea. I don’t have a Korean partner. We are the first specific region restaurant,” Enrico Olivieri tells me as he puts out his cigarette. Calm and collected, for him this is just a typical Saturday evening. “It’s usually about this busy. Most people who come in make a reservation first.” Indeed, as we well saw, every customer was asked first, “Do you have a reservation?” It’s not exactly a pristine palace of Italian finery with deep candlelight casting shadows on the wall. It has the cozy feeling of a trattoria, with bright, brilliant colors bouncing off the walls and wherever you dart your eyes you can always find a small token of Sicilian culture. “Fine dining is more French style,” Enrico explains. “If you go to Rome or Milan you can spend 30-50 euro and get a decent meal. Korea needs this kind of home-style, trattoria type of restaurant.” He speaks the truth. A lot of the Italian joints in Korea have adopted a notion of needing to be classy, intimate and quiet, when the truth is that restaurants back on the homefront in Italy are anything but! One thing is certain, whether served by candlelight or served in friendly company, the centerpiece of Italian dining is always food. Ciuri Ciuri thrives on its Sicilian menu. “We have to twist our recipes according to the ingredients we can find here to make the recipes as authentic as possible. For instance we have a Sicilian pizza recipe. Usually Caciocavallo cheese is used but here we have substituted it for a similar cheese.” Not just pizza, but also pasta, sausages, salads and some of the harder-to-get items like Arancine also dwell within the walls of Ciuri Ciuri.

“Sicily is not a small island. It’s quite big,” Enrico says with a gesture. “A lot of meat, sausages and also wild pork because they have a lot of mountains as well. Middle East Arab influence over the centuries has impacted food in that region.” The aroma of Ciuri Ciuri is distinctly not of this region, not at all. The smells lifting from the kitchen are doughy and seasoned, strongly drifting into the nostrils of all who enter the little establishment. While the diners enjoy the comfortable, lightweight atmosphere, the kitchen tells a different story. As I watch Enrico and his wife, Fiore, hard at work, the sense of responsibility to the preparation of the food dawns on me. As I take my first bite of the Ragu Arancine, it all materializes into reality. The golden crisp, so light to the touch, gives way to a hearty, saffron-infused meaty center. Appetizers should really be called appeteasers, since after I finished off that Arancine, the schedule that was hovering in the back of my mind dissolved into nothingness. The only schedule that mattered to me then was, “When’s the next dish coming?” MORE INFO: Ciuri Ciuri 314-3 Sangsu-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul 02-794-9996 www.ciuriciuri.co.kr

Ambience Food Service Value Score


Weather’s nice. Eat on a mountain, dammit!

FOOD & DRINK

A Day at Daehajeong

S

Story and photos by Robert “Bob” Kienzle

ing chicken parts out of soup, but the chicken is tender enough to get the meat from the bone. I decided to abandon my clean hands and clean khaki pants. They were going to need to get some orange if I was going to finish everything. It was laundry day anyhow. After a while, my lady laid down on the motorcycle jackets and fell asleep to the sound of hypnotic waterfalls. I continued and made plans for the rest of the day. Ui-dong has a funky café called Sanullim near the bottom of the mountain. Doseon Temple wasn’t far away, either. I figured I could get third “wow” from the lady to complete the trifecta. Daehajeong is located at 291 Ui-dong in Ganbuk-gu, Seoul. If you don’t have 2 or 4 wheels available, take a taxi from Suyu Station for around 7,000 won. Many buses go to Ui-dong including buses 120, 130 and 144 from Suyu Station and buses 151 and 152 from Hyehwa Station. The restaurant is 1.5 kilometers up the Ui-dong mountain road, or you can call them at 02-9034757, and they will pick you up at the bottom in their van. The owner speaks some English if needed.

Ambience Food Service Value Score

May 2015 www.groovekorea.com 35

We looked at the menu. The main options were different bulgogi options, tojong dak baeksook (chicken soup) and tojong dak bokeumtang (spicy chicken soup), duck dishes and a dog meat soup for the adventurous eaters. We opted for the tojong dak bokeumtang for 59,000 won, dotorimuk (spicy salad with acorn jelly) for 15,000 won and a couple of sodas. It was lunchtime, and I was transporting precious cargo. While waiting for the food, we walked the grounds between the trees and boulders. The summer hadn’t brought out the local tourists yet, and we were one of two tables booked. Picnic table after picnic table lined the creek, some covered with open air tents, some uncovered. Thursday’s rain water was running over the path and cutting off the top section of tables, but it made for fresh waterfalls. A knee-high pool of water collects for wading in hot weather. The waiter returned with the dortorimuk and six standard Korean side dishes. My lady explained the dortorimuk best, “This is easy to find in Korea, but it’s hard to find prepared and spiced correctly. This is excellent. Wow.” The second time she said that word let me know the night would go well, too. I found the dortorimuk spicier than other restaurants’ versions of this dish. It was great, but some foreign tongues may not want to dance so close with that devil. About fifteen minutes later, the tojong dak bokeumtang arrived on a portable butane stove. An orange sea filled with chicken, potato, cucumber and veggies started bubbling. The stove was fired up, even though the chicken was ready to eat. We dug in. It was spiced just right, less than the dortorimuk, and just enough to warm up the air. Small bones are slightly annoying when eat-

Edited by Joe McPherson (food@groovekorea.com)

aturday was supposed to be full of rain, but it wasn’t. I grabbed the lady, the helmets, and hopped on the motorcycle to Ui-dong, a mountain neighborhood on Bukhansan not far from Suyu Station. Our destination was Daehajeong, a restaurant at the very end of Ui-dong’s mountain road. I’d been there before, but my lady hadn’t. She was in for a surprise. We got off the bike and were led down the rocky steps, over a creek on handmade wooden bridges and to our outdoor picnic table next to a couple of small waterfalls. “Wow,” she said, and I knew the rest of the day would go well after that single word.


Edited by Joe McPherson (food@groovekorea.com)

FOOD & DRINK

Story and photos by Charlotte Hammond

Funky

Taphouse Gotta have that funk

36 www.groovekorea.com May 2015

A

nyone who’s budget traveled in Southeast Asia will likely dodge any establishment named “Funky,” and yet Funky Taphouse, the latest joint to enter Gangnam’s small craft brew scene, offers a modern, sparse interior leaving the drug rugs and Bob Marley to Rainbow, the nearby hookah haven. Funky offers 15 beers on tap to be had alone or with its menu’s varied pub grub dishes. The in-house brews, by local brewer Phillip Rankmore, are tart, hop-heavy offerings. IPA lovers will have their needs met with the “Phil” So Good IPA and the tangier Galaxy IPA (each 8,500 won). The Pacific Ale (6,500 won) washes down a bit too easy. Local brews like 7Brau Imperial IPA and Maloney’s Southie Irish Red as well as imports are included in Funky’s generous tap rotation. If you’re there to eat, veer from the limp pizzas and try the toothsome and tasty arancini or the fried chicken with balsamic. Funky Taphouse, just off the quieter side of Gangnam Station at exit 5, offers a rare escape in an area desperately lacking a subdued place to grab a good beer and a bite. MORE INFO: Funky Taphouse 1327-23 Seocho-dong, Seocho-gu 02-588-4156 facebook.com/funkytaphouse


The Truth About

Edited by Joe McPherson (food@groovekorea.com)

S P O I LER ALERT – i t ’ s t h e b á n h m ì

Story by John Redmond / Photos by Joe McPherson

Lie, Lie, Lie W

MORE INFO: Lie, Lie 227-5 Yeonnam-dong, Mapo-gu To get there, go out of Hongdae exit 3. Plunk “툭툭누들타이” into your Naver Maps. Lie, Lie, Lie is located in the alley behind and is adjacent the venerable Coffee Libre.

May 2015 www.groovekorea.com 37

hile it may be difficult to trust a place called Lie Lie Lie, those on the hunt for authentic bánh mì sandwiches should head over to the bohemian streets of Yeonnam-dong for something approaching the truth of this Vietnamese street food staple. There are four sandwiches on offer for 5,500 won each: cold cut, BBQ pork, grilled chicken and a vegetarian option with fried tofu, each served on a resilient, crunchy baguette and nestled with a mixture of refreshing vegetables, piquant chili sauce and as much cilantro as your heart desires. A mild, creamy chicken liver pate, an essential part of authentic bánh mì, can and should be added for 500 won extra. Vietnamese coffee, limited seating and an open air setting contribute to the legitimate vibe. For those with mighty appetites, note that portion sizes are modest. Consensus at my table was that one and a half sandwiches could sate a modest appetite. However, at Kimbap Cheonguk prices, these bánh mì are still a great value.


Story and photos by Natalie Ler-Davies

Grocery Find FOOD & DRINK

S

pring brings comfortable weather and it’s time to think about enjoying the outdoors. Food always brings people together and these are a few that come to mind. Hassdog in Kyungridan is the new dog in the block and is known for its delicious juicy hotdogs served straight from the hot grill but did you also know they have fresh sausages for sale? Available for purchase are Cajun Hot Spice (pork&beef), Italian Fennel (pork) and Bratwurst Wisconsin Style (pork&beef). Each of them are made from 95% meat and then finished with 5% selected spices to make them 100% damn delicious. MORE INFO Find Hassdog at 305-3 Itaewon-2dong, Yongsan-Gu www.facebook.com/Hassdog Each packet contains 3 sausages @W13,000/pack

Recipe

Story and photos by Natalie Ler-Davies

Taking the outdoors indoors!

Hassdog Sausage Bake Hassdog sausages are made with very thin casing, therefore lots of care is needed when cooking them.

Pan-frying

Method

Poaching

2. Chop the carrots and pumpkin into cubes and place in a baking pan. Drizzle olive oil, grind up a good amount of pepper and salt and give them a good toss around. Place in the oven and bake for 45min. Those without an oven can pan fry them until cooked through. Set aside to cool down..

Fry the sausages on low-medium heat for 3-4 minutes, then raise the heat to medium-high for another 5 minutes. Make sure it’s cooked through before eating. *Cooking at high heat will cause casings to burst and result in burnt sausage that isn’t cooked through.

38 www.groovekorea.com May 2015

Add 80g of salt & 5g of black pepper to 1 liter of water. Bring to 70 degrees Celsius (in case of no cooking thermometer: boil, then reduce heat to low/medium), and poach for 8-10 minutes. Then pan fry on both sides (no added oil necessary) for 3 to 4 minutes on low to medium heat. *Poaching above 80 degrees Celsius can cause fresh sausage to burst and result in a dry, crumbly texture. Absolutely DO NOT poach in boiling water.

Ingredients

9 Hassdog Sausages (3x of each flavour) 1 whole Kobacha (sweet pumpkin) 4 medium carrots A bunch of wild garlic Olive Oil Salt and Pepper

side onal es her> i t p O < refr salad ed ium 4x matoes, s tom e ring eappl n i p 4x

1. Preheat the oven at 180degC.

3. Chose option 1 or option 2 for cooking the sausages and leave aside to rest.

4. Slice the tomatoes and pineapple into bitesize pieces, place in a bowl and set aside.

5. Serve up spoonfuls of roasted veges sprinkled with some finely chopped wild garlic (only the green part) and some sausages and enjoy! Serves 2 hungry people or 4 friends!


Story by Robbie Nguyen / Photos by Joe McPherson

2.5oz Texas White Pimm’s .5oz mint syrup .25oz lemon 6 blackberries 6 cucumber slices 2 lemon wheels 2 spearmint sprigs Grapefruit-ginger soda

E

1 spearmint sprig (for garnish) 1 lemon wheel (for garnish)

Restaurant Buzz

verything is bigger in Texas, and this Texas remix of a Pimm’s cup represents the Lone Star State proudly. Grapefruit, Texas’ signature citrus, leads the charge on the tastebuds. Flanked by mint, blackberries, cucumbers, lemon and house-made Pimm’s, this is the perfect fruity, botanical and refreshing libation for some front porch sipping. The ginger provides a nice finishing kick. The cocktail’s purple color pays homage to the late Pimp C. UGK would be proud.

Finds from the Restaurant Buzz Facebook group Story by Joe McPherson

Buzzies have been excited that Simon Rhiti is back with his legendary Moroccan sandwiches at JR Pub in Itaewon – likely under the head scratching misnomer of “Beef Sandwich.” He just moved over from a short stint at a new restaurant called KOBA, which decided to Koreanize his food (adding fruit, balsamic squiggles, etc.) I don’t get the arrogance of some Korean restaurant owners who want to trash other food cultures like that. Back in the day, Simon’s sandwiches were basically the only great sandwiches in Seoul, sold from an Itaewon food cart on late weekend evenings (“Those Moroccan sandwiches from the food truck were the best sandwiches I’ve ever had in my life!” – Julie P.). They are still stellar. I predict arancini, the Sicilian stuffed and fried rice balls, will be the new churros this summer. I think the best are at Ciuri Ciuri, which is reviewed in this issue. Yet they’re popping up in various places – signs of a trend in progress. Manimal Smokehouse has been getting the most buzz lately. It’s a new American BBQ place in Itaewon. Most of the major BBQ proteins are represented, pulled pork, brisket, chicken and sausage. I need to send a reviewer out there fast. And by reviewer, I mean me.

May 2015 www.groovekorea.com 39

MORE INFO: JR Pub 128-4 Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu 02-793-3567 MORE INFO: Manimal Smokehouse 455-33 Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, 2F 02-790-6788

Edited by Joe McPherson (food@groovekorea.com)

An Ode to Houston Rapper Pimp C. RIP

FOOD & DRINK

Pimp’s C u p


ENTERTAINMENT Edited by Stewart McFeat (stewart@groovekorea.com)

Celebrating A Decade of Hae Bang Chon

The Hae Bang Chon Festival reaches itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tenth Year Anniversary Story by Lance Reegan-Diehl and Naheen Madarbakus-Ring / Photos by Lance Reegan-Diehl

Lance Reegan-Dieh

Brennan

Megan Kim

40 www.groovekorea.com May 2015

Brian Aylward

T

Hill Billy Geoff G

his yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hae Bang Chon (HBC) May Fest marks the 10th year anniversary of the much loved and established music festival. Taking place on Friday May 22nd and Saturday May 23rd (and conveniently on a three-day weekend this year), this definitive expat and international music festival invites a plethora of independent artists and performers from all over the country - and even other continents - to celebrate their love of music.

JLHBC


MAY

TBA

Film

While We’re Young, Mad Max General Release From KRW 6000 early bird price – KRW 30 000 (CGV Gold Class) Check local cinema listings www.cineinkorea.com/movie/index.php

Music

DJ Sliink 10:30pm / KRW 20 000 Cakeshop, Itaewon B1 34-16 Itaewon, Yongsan-Gu, Seoul, Korea UNTIL

MAY

~10

9,10

16

15

Music

FRIDAY

MAY

17,18

Young Guru 10:30 pm / KRW 20 000 Cakeshop, Itaewon B1 34-16 Itaewon, Yongsan-Gu, Seoul, Korea

May 2015 www.groovekorea.com 41

21

MAY

Dronetonics With-BaekMa, Silica Gel, Mineri, Matt Losing Face 9.00pm / KRW 10 000 Strange Fruit, Hongdae 330-15 Seogyo-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul

Glengarry Glen Ross Sat: 2:00pm & 7:00pm / Sun: 3.00pm KRW 20,000 / KRW 15 000 for students The Arts Tree Theatre, Guro 501 Guro-gu Guro 5-dong, Basement Level www.arts-tree.co.kr

MAY

FRIDAY

Music

Theatre

THURSDAY

09

Glengarry Glen Ross Sat: 2:00pm, 7:00pm / Sun: 3.00pm KRW 20 000, KRW 15 000 for students The Arts Tree Theatre, Guro 501 Guro-gu Guro 5-dong, Basement Level www.arts-tree.co.kr

Dronetonics With-Vidulgi OoyoO, Table People, YesYes 9.00pm / KRW 10 000 Freebird 2, Hongdae Basement 1st floor, 408-17 Seokyodong, Mapogu, Seoul.

MAY

MAY

Theatre

Music

SATURDAY

SATURDAY

Edited by Stewart McFeat (stewart@groovekorea.com)

MAY

07

SHOOTING THE ELEPHANT THINKING THE ELEPHANT Tuesday to Sunday, 10:30 am to 6:00 pm KRW 7000 Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art 60-16 Itaewon-ro 55-gil, Yongsan-gu, Seoul, Korea 140-893

FraiseVinyl Fetish Boudoir: Perversion 11.00pm / KRW 20 000 KRW 30 000 VIP Section Reservationsfraisevinyl.performance@gmail.com Freebird 2, Hongdae Basement 1st floor, 408-17 Seogyodong, Mapogu, Seoul. WEEKEND

MAY

Art

Performance

The HBC May Fest is ‘the’ independent music festival to kick-start the summer season. Now featuring over 115 live acts in eighteen independent venues, the acts are spread over two days, in the largest independent artist showcase of its kind in Korea. The festival first began in 2006 as an opportunity for expat musicians in the city to perform to larger and often unobtainable crowds. The Fest was originally created by Lance Reegan-Diehl and James Gaynor alongside the start-up label DEELEEBOB Music Company (which Reegan-Diehl currently owns). Reegan-Diehl also continues to be the central organizer for the festival, and realizes its increasing popularity every year as it gets bigger and better. Now in its 10th year celebration, the main street is where all the action happens. Synonymous with being a local expat hangout, the Hae Bang Chon festival has made the entire area bloom into a bubbly, busy place for all kinds of businesses to open, as it has slowly established itself over the last decade as an attractive neighborhood and the place to be. Today, the street has been even more popularized by MBC and by SBS for showcasing certain restaurants and the unique culture of the area. Here, many small independent business owners sell their goods and ply their trade, until that infamous weekend in May when the tables are cleared away as space is made for incoming musical equipment and posters of the many artists coming to perform are pinned to the doors. Performers, musicians and friends of the festival are returning to their original stomping ground, bringing an amalgamation of music which has spanned the festival over the last ten years. Co-founder of the festival James Gaynor returns to the HBC district to perform, visiting from his native Australia to be part of the 10th year celebrations. Gaynor was in the original line-up of the first HBC fest and will be onstage at Puerto on May 23rd at about 6pm. He will be surrounded by many old friends and colleagues as he used to live in Seoul for many years in what promises to be a great reunion. The 100+ acts consisting of bands, solo artists, duos and acoustic bands offering a range of music genres, styles and tempos are on hand to entertain all festival goers. Recent headliners of their own shows across the city this year, Diamond Randy Reno, Kimchi Cowboys, Tampas Dusk, DTSQ, Whatever That Means, and Dougie’s Truck will also perform sets at the two-day festival.

THURSDAY

ENTERTAINMENT

Now featuring over 115 live acts in eighteen independent venues, the acts are spread over two days, in the largest independent artist showcase of its kind in Korea.


A Walk down the Boulevard of Broken Guitar Strings. We speak to people who played, partied and provided the best of Twhe Fest.

01

01

02

42 www.groovekorea.com May 2015

Edited by Stewart McFeat (stewart@groovekorea.com)

ENTERTAINMENT

02 03

03 04

05

04

05

The Fest has always adapted to the demands of both musicians and venues, and with that, the size and scope of the festival has fluctuated over the years. The tenth year anniversary sees the return of regular HBC venues: VFW, Phillies, Bonny’s Pizza Pub, Rock Frites, Puerto, Al Matto, Despresso, Hidden Cellar, Camarata Music, Genie Pub, Fat Cat, Rabbit Hole, and also KyungLi Dan venues; Craftworks, Southside Parlor, Pet Sounds, Kimchi Sounds, Maloney’s Pub, and Thunderhorse Tavern. A singer songwriter afternoon will take place at Craftworks between 2pm-6pm on Saturday May 23rd and Sunday May 24th before the Blues Jam from ‘Hangouver’ at Phillies Pub (hosted by the L.RD band) starts at 9pm. The HBC fest weekend being no exception, the Hidden Cellar will also continue with their ongoing Sunday acoustic performances between 7pm and 10pm While many of the venues suit smaller acoustic acts, Phillies Pub, Camarata Music, Rabbit Hole, Thunderhorse Tavern, Kimchi Sounds, Southside parlor and VFW Canteen, are larger live band locations where the music is loud and rocking; probably due to the majority of the sound proofing in their basement locations. Street level acoustic performers will entertain the busy bars while below ground, a plethora of rock, alt-rock, funk, blues, R&B bands will keep the air vibrant until 1am. Although the festival brings a party atmosphere to HBC, meetings with the local author-

Maggie Devlin of BaekMa

“Our first ever show was at HBC Fest, back when we were still a two-piece. I think we had 3 original songs and did 2 covers. There was a drunk guy right at the front who kept shouting, ‘Play some Led Zeppelin!’ And we were like, ‘We don’t do covers!’ before realizing that we had nothing but covers left to play in our set. It was fun. It gave us a chance to cut our puppy teeth, and I’m pretty sure we’ve played every Fest since then. Looking forward to this year!”

Patrick Walsh of Used Cassettes

“Best memory was when Used Cassettes ran the info. tent for Lance which consisted of selling beers and giving info. to tourists. I think the four of us probably made the fest financially successful off of personal beer purchases. Not sure why we weren’t playing but it was one of the best times being involved, but in a different capacity”

Andro Paris of Tampas Dusk

“My favorite memory was when we played in the basement of Camarata. We saw so many familiar faces and the crowed was really energetic and supportive. I think it must have been just that right time of night when everybody had had just enough to drink to make it lively. I’m sure on more than one occasion I stomped out Tizzy’s guitar chord, a sweet trick of mine, while Simon was like a statue on bass, and Bardon was motoring on the drums”

Randy Koonse aka “Diamond Randy Reno” Seoul’s finest Neil Diamond tribute band

“My unforgettable moment came when an audience member came up and practically mugged me while I was singing Holly Holy. She was not that drunk, I swear. I managed to get through the song, and after the set was over, her husband came up to me and said “Now you see what I’ve got to put up with. But the sex makes it worth it!”

Michael Fisher of Phillies Pub

“Favorite memory of the festival? After two days of everyone partying, just when we think everything is dying down and we can finally get some sleep and the last call is done, a bagpiper walks in the bar at around 5:00am to get everyone going again and the partying continued. An American with a set of bagpipes playing Flower of Scotland was very random and somehow very appropriate as it symbolized the eclectic mix of artists and nationalities at this festival”

ities by Reegan-Diehl have brought about caution in the streets: this is still not a street party. Police presence helps to keep people and the traffic moving while the music and the party stays inside the bars. Local sports team players from the Phillies hockey (and cricket) teams and Bonnie’s Pizza cricket league also volunteer as security members to assist in keeping the streets clear of parties and people, alongside the Police. Visitors are asked to enjoy the festival by going inside to hear the music and be supportive of the local Peace officers who are there. Just check the signs posted about traffic caution to do your part. Finally, the HBC Festival is the success it is thanks to the support of the local places in Hae Bang Chon. Jacoby’s Burgers, Casablanca Sandwiches, Le Cafe, Al Matto, Despresso, Fat Cat, and Dracula’s Lounge are the local businesses that help in festival advertising and T-shirt support. While not every business in the area is a venue for live music, there are many who openly encourage the festival. These businesses can be clearly recognized by the HBC Fest posters which deck their windows, and the support they give to HBC Fest. Music sponsors including Sound Drive Amplifiers, Graphtech, Swing Guitars, Olympia Strings and Straps, along with all participating business owners are integral to the running of the shows. Reegan-Diehl explains their importance saying “the festival would not be a success without the open mind and support of

many of the local businesses the area. We do encourage all owners to take part in some way. And we hope to make that a reality after this year’s May Fest 2015”. Hae Bang Chon has seen a decade of music and festivities bringing together a multi-cultural community and local businesses to celebrate an area thriving in culture. Reegan-Diehl adds “I hope that more owners see a benefit to supporting the Festival and the efforts of my company DEELEEBOB Music.” when talking about the community’s efforts. HBC Fest’s ten year anniversary promises to be a mile-stone celebration. This is one birthday party that everyone’s invited to.


WEEKEND~

MAY

23~25

Music

Seoul Jazz Festival 3days -KRW287 000 2 days -KRW190 000, 1 day- KRW137 000 Olympic Park, 88 Bangi-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul www.seouljazz.co.kr/english

Theatre

Titus Andronicus Sat: 7:00 PM / Sunday: 2:00 PM & 7:00 PM 20 000 online reservation www.seoulshakespearecompany.org 25 000 at the door Theater Egg and Nucleus, Directions: Hyehwa Station(Line 4, Exit 2). 1-140 Dongsung-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul WEEKEND

JUNE

MAY

30,31

Theatre

6,7 13,14

Titus Andronicus 2.00pm & 7.00 pm KRW 20 000 online reservation KRW 25,000 (on the door) www.seoulshakespearecompany.org Theater Egg and Nucleus, Directions: Hyehwa Station(Line 4, Exit 2). 1-140 Dongsung-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul

HBC Venues at a glance Rock Frites

Live music solo artists.

Phillies (upstairs)

Live music solo artists.

Rabbit Hole

Live bands rock, punk, funk, and blues.

Genie Pub

Puerto

Live solo artists.

Live music venue, feature solo artists, and a few acoustic bands.

Craftworks

Phillies Rock Pit

Singer songwriter afternoon stage sessions

Southside Parlor

Live band stage full on rock shows, and acoutic rockers.

Live band venue, Rock Pit.

Thunderhorse

Live band venue everything from folk rock to heavy metal.

The Cave

Bonny’s Pizza

Live solo artist performances.

VFW

Live rock bands, and indie music

Despresso

Coffee lounge, chill zone for artists and DJ event.

Live Music venue, duo act performances.

Edited by Stewart McFeat (stewart@groovekorea.com)

MORE INFO The HBC Festival is a DEELEEBOB Music Production, with Lance Reegan-Diehl being the central point between artists, venues and business owners. Friday 22nd May (9pm-1am), Saturday 23rd May (2pm - 1am) HBC - Various venues. SEE MAP OUR PAGE 71 Noksapyeong Station (Line 6, Exit 2) Cost: *FREE* Purchase a T-shirt at KRW15,000 to support the festival. www.hbcfest.com (for updated schedule and performers list) sales@deeleebob.com

WEEKEND

ENTERTAINMENT

Performers, musicians and friends of the festival are returning to their original stomping ground, bringing an amalgamation of music which has spanned the festival over the last ten years.

Camarata Studio

Live bands mix of, rock, pop, and improv.

Hidden Cellar

live music, acoustic bands

Kyung Li Dan Venues at a glance Kimchi Sounds

Indie Rock Venue.

Pet Sounds

Solo artist stage, and house DJ performing many styles of Music.

Maloney’s Pub

Solo artist stage and evening spinning by 45RPM DJ Free.

WHERE TO GO IN Hae Bang Chon during the festival Great food, great hosts, always supportive of the fest. And the best sandwiches in HBC.

Jacoby’s Burgers

Classy, handmade burgers. Jacoby’s has supported the fest since it’s opening in 2008.

Fat Cat

Relax lounge for hungry thirsty fest patrons and artists. The owner has supported HBC Fest since 2006.

Al Matto

Food cooked in a real Dutch oven. Thin crust pizza and salads are their specialty. The owner has supported the fest since 2012 and owns live stage ‘Puerto’.

May 2015 www.groovekorea.com 43

Casablanca sandwiches


Story by Stewart McFeat / Photos by Jorge Toros

44 www.groovekorea.com May 2015

Edited by Stewart McFeat (stewart@groovekorea.com)

ENTERTAINMENT

Theatre of Blood

S

eoul Shakespeare Company stages the bloodbath that is “Titus Andronicus,” the Bard’s earliest and most visceral tragedy. Groove speaks to actor Brian Petersen, who plays the character Bassianus, about savagery on and off stage.

Groove Korea ‘GK’: When was the last time you experienced violence at close range? BP: Actually, on Sunday while leaving a “Titus” rehearsal I witnessed a group fight outside of a Lotteria. I have no idea what incited the incident. But the people involved were clearly furious. It was complete with screaming, hair grabbing, some separation and then more hair grabbing. If they’d had swords it would have been just like “Titus”! There were about six people involved, all going full out. I wanted to know the back story. Who are these people and how did they end up in this situation? What was the straw that broke … that caused this brawl to occur? That is the great part about working on a show like “Titus.” You get to discover why the characters commit these seemingly crazy acts. There is always a reason. It is the actor’s job to figure it out. GK: Whether it’s your random encounter on Sunday or the seemingly organized brutality against protesters across town around the same time, we are confronted with the question of violence and the question of its necessity. How is it used in “Titus”? What is the message? BP: In the play, some of the violence is revenge. To me, that seems like the easiest (motive) to understand. You killed a member of my family and now I am going to kill a member of your family. I can see how that might help a person grieve. The difficult action for me to understand is committing a violent act because of a loss of honor. Protecting the honor of one’s family is a massive driving force in this play. It is the cause of so much of the brutality. I believe the job of theatre is to ask questions, or better yet to inspire the audience to ask questions about the world they just explored.

GK: How do you feel about the use of violence in entertainment or as entertainment? If it is entertaining, “Titus” faces an ethical problem. If it isn’t, it faces an entertainment problem. BP: Four-hundred-year-old spoiler: A lot of people die in this play. None of them die from old age. The violence in “Titus” is always being planned or executed. If the violence moves the story forward, then I believe it and accept it as necessary. If it is used just for shock value, then what is the point? In theatre, it is often said that the reason a musical is so full of songs is because the characters in the world created feel things so intensely that the only way they can accurately express their emotions is through song. I think the same is true in “Titus Andronicus.” Except instead of songs, the characters use violence. It isn’t only physical, but also psychological and verbal. My character, Bassianus, a character generally concerned about the well-being of the people and his love, Lavinia, slings some racially hateful speech in order to wound another character. It takes on many forms. GK: A rainbow of viciousness! Is there any hope or amusement to be gained from this play? Is there any humanity in it? I think what fascinates people about “Titus Andronicus” is the search for humanity. I think it is tough to find, but if we have done our job correctly, it will be there. As I continue to explore this play I am constantly finding new reasons for why the characters behave the way they do. For an actor it is definitely a challenge. I hope that it is also a challenge for the audience! You may engage with it as a nod to a world in the process of collapse, or you may delight in the gruesome fantasy of rolling heads, mutilated bodies and wild narrative implausibilities. “Titus Andronicus” offers

a theatre of the obscene. It’s entertainment mixed with self-doubt. This is an event. Directed by Ray Salcedo, “Titus Andronicus” is the fifth main stage production for the company, which is made up of members from both the expat and local communities and produces one main production per year. The show will be performed in English with Korean subtitles and opens on Saturday, May 30, at 7 p.m., at Theater Egg and Nucleus, Directions: Hyehwa Station(Line 4, Exit 2). Address: 1-140 Dongsung-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul Other show times are Sunday, May 31 (2 p.m. and 7 p.m.); Saturdays, June 6 and 13 (2 p.m. and 7 p.m.), and Sundays, June 7 and 14 (2 p.m. and 7 p.m.). For tickets and more information, please visit www.seoulshakespearecompany.org.

As I continue to explore this play I am constantly finding new reasons for why the characters behave the way they do.


Now in its ninth year, the Seoul Jazz Festival promises to deliver an eclectic collection of soulful sounds

R

eturning to its now familiar home of the Olympic Park grounds, the ninth annual Seoul Jazz Festival presents a celebration of music between May 23rd and May 25th. Over 50 artists have been invited to perform at the much established jazz fest. Despite its name, performers have always branched out beyond the traditional jazz sounds, bringing an eclectic mix of acoustic, jazz funk, rock and pop to the four stages of the event.

The Seoul Jazz Festival will not disappoint with an amazing line-up performing at this year’s event

will perform with. The Sparkling Dome and Pink Avenue stages are indoor arenas which will undoubtedly benefit the more acoustic sounds. The Seoul Jazz Festival will not disappoint with an amazing line-up performing at this year’s event. Whether the ears prefer ballads, funk or rock, the array of artists performing promises a weekend of festivities for all. Get into the holiday weekend spirit, and head down to the Olympic grounds for some sweet summer sounds of jazz. MORE INFO The Seoul Jazz Festival takes places at Seoul’s Olympic Park grounds between Saturday 23rd and Monday 25th May. Tickets are priced between 123,000287,000 won. 424 , Olympic-ro , Songpa-gu , Seoul Subway: Olympic Park station (Line 5, Exit 3) 02-563-0595 (Private Curve will also be selling tickets) Tickets are available from Interpark (www.ticket.interpark.com/global). 1-day: KRW137,000, 2-day: KRW190,000, 3-day: KRW287,000

May 2015 www.groovekorea.com 45

Festivities kick off on Saturday May 23rd with Dutch pop and jazz singer Caro Emerald alongside dance favourites Basement Jazz, who have a seven album backlog, including latest LP “Junto”, to present. The Robert Glasper Experiment bring their more traditional jazz and blues to the stage, with a sound that has been heavily inspired by church and gospel harmonies. Headliners Chick Corea and Her-

bie Hancock come together in an astonishing collaboration that will finish the opening day with a combination of their explosive pianist sounds. Sunday will welcome a more soulful feel to the day with Brazilian musician Sergio Mendes bringing his Bossa Nova crossed with Jazz and Funk South American flavors to the stage. Wouter Hamel also returns to the Seoul Jazz event, performing from his third Dutch jazz offering, “Pompadour”. Lebanese-British singer-songwriter Mika brings his latest album, “The Origin Of Love”, and some exclusive tracks from the upcoming live album “No Place In Heaven” also expected. The final day (which is also a public holiday Monday) brings a more eclectic offering of music with Swedish rock outfit The Cardigans appearing in the afternoon. Grammy Award winning jazz singer-songwriter Gregory Porter also performs before Cuban Arturo Sandoval closes the show with his unique trumpeting, pianist style. Taking place on May’s three-day weekend later this month, the festival has been divided between four themed stages. The main stage at May Forest and Spring Garden are outdoor venues which should enhance some of the experimental sounds this year’s artists

Edited by Stewart McFeat (stewart@groovekorea.com)

Sounds of Jazz

ENTERTAINMENT

Story by Naheen Madarbakus-Ring / Photos Courtesy of Private Curve

The Sweet Summer


Taipei’s Doom-Pop Duo

Comes to Korea

46 www.groovekorea.com May 2015

Edited by Stewart McFeat (stewart@groovekorea.com)

ENTERTAINMENT

Story by Eric Davis / Photos by 22 Records

North Americanstyle quick-drawemotion doesn’t fly in Taiwan

D

ronetonics are Canadian expat Lars Berry and Taipei native Crystal Shien. They run counter to Taiwan’s laid-back, tropical vibe making dark electronic pop that recalls the early ’80s and bands like Bauhaus and Depeche Mode. Dronetonics found a niche in 21st century Taiwan, in festivals, in shampoo ads, in Taipei’s “22 Records”. Nice Legs, an art-pop trio from Seoul, invited them to play in Korea this May. Groove had the chance to talk with Berry about Taipei, vintage synthesizers, and time machines.


Groove Korea ‘GK’: How would you describe the Taipei and Taiwanese music scene? What do you like and dislike about playing there? LB: The music scene here is inclusive and open. Cliques exist, but are much less extreme than what I’d imagine things are like in comparably large cities back West. I feel like bands exist with quite fluid borders, swapping members back and forth according to skills and musical influence/direction. I think there is something quite special about a relatively large population being isolated to some degree — that is, 23 million people on a fairly small island. Dronetonics seems to fit somewhere between the experimental noise scene and kind-of, like, dark-techno DJ scene. … Crowds are open and very happy to stick around and chat after a show. There’s not a lot to dislike. For sure there aren’t enough venues; because Taipei is so dense, it’s hard to find a place that won’t disturb the locals with the volume necessary for a proper show. GK: If Dronetonics suddenly came into loads of money, how would you use it? Would you move somewhere else? Tour endlessly? Record endlessly? Quit your day jobs? LB: It would be nice to have a bit more money, but in as non-flaky a manner as I can say it, I am pretty happy right where I am. Maybe I could get a vintage Moog Opus — a keytar straight from 1980. A vineyard on a south-facing slope in the south of France. Don’t even know if there are vineyards in south of France. Endlessly recording sounds like purgatory. Endless touring where all the other bands are all-girl ’80s hair bands? That’d be fine. A time machine so that Dronetonics could take a field trip back to 1983. There were some bands in full swing at that time that kind of paved the way maybe for what we’re up to now. GK: Due to language barriers and cultural differences, it’s uncommon for locals and expats to play music together. How do your different upbringings contribute to Dronetonics? What are some problems you’ve encountered? We’ve both been immersed in other cultures for so long in the past that cultural differences aren’t really a big deal. Crystal spent some time in the U.S. and a lot more time in the U.K.; I have lived in Taiwan since time immemorial, so basically I get this place. There are plenty of times, though, when my moderately good Chinese is insufficient and Crystal has to translate something — especially in conversations related to recording or mixing or venues asking about things. This must get tedious. As for different upbringings, Crystal has taught me a fair amount about the benefits of not immediately reacting to something — and remaining cool. North American-style quick-draw-emotion doesn’t fly in Taiwan. People here keep their cool. Crystal has been a good teacher in this regard. GK: Can you talk about the pluses and minuses of being a duo? LB: The pluses are planning tours, like the one we’ll soon have around Korea, is quite a bit less complicated… but also, it’s easier to discuss songs and truly collaborate. I suppose there’s a kind of intimacy or something that wouldn’t exist in a project involving more people. Dinner reservations are easier, but disagreements also have no outlet — no third person to act as a mediator. This is hard sometimes. We have both learned a lot about communication. There have been long silences. Fortunately, though, there’s been a lot more hilarity, experimentation, and good solid work getting done. Show info Friday, May 15, at Freebird 2, 9 p.m. – 1 a.m. Lineup: Dronetonics, Vidulgi OoyoO, Table People, YesYes, Dronetonics 10,000 won Saturday, May 16, at Strange Fruit, 9 p.m. – 1 a.m. Lineup: BaekMa, Silica Gel, Mineri, Matt Losing Face, Dronetonics 10,000 won Other dates in Korea: Daegu at Urban, May 13, Ulsan Sticky Fingers, May 14 www.facebook.com/dronetonics dronetonics.bandcamp.com

Hair & Joy Served as Art Director at London’s Renowned RUSH SALON and nominated by the Guardian for “Best Hairdresser”

Trained at Toni & Guy and Vidal Sassoon Academy in UK Color, Perm, Magic Straight, Treatment and more English Spoken For more info, call Johnny Phone 02.363.4253 Mobile 010.5586.0243

Hair&Joy

Mapo-gu Dong gyo-dong 168-3_ 3F Seven Uniqlo Springs

HonhIk Univ. Stn. Line2 Exit8

www.hairandjoy.com Gangnam Apgujeong Branch

Qunohair

Phone 02.549.0335 www.qunohair.com 10-6, Dosan-daero 45-gil, Gangnam-gu, Seoul

range Cab

Travel In Comfort!

Best taxi service to Incheon and Gimpo airports We charge by meter (toll fees subject to surcharge)

TAXI orangecabwork@gmail.com

010-5960-0679


Edited by Stewart McFeat (stewart@groovekorea.com)

ENTERTAINMENT

Photo by Michael Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Dwyer

Story by Stewart McFeat

Burlesque, bondage and video art are part of FraiseVinylâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unique confection: A tie-loosening, skirt-lifting, jaw-dropping event in Seoul that will leave you breathless.

Something Wicked

This Way Comes

48 www.groovekorea.com May 2015

Photo by Hansol Choi

H

er nimble fingers have stitched together the glitziest of costumes with the skills of a twenty strong-cast including cabaret artists, bondage masters and musicians for May 9th. Groove speaks to FraiseVinyl about perversion, human chandeliers, and the real spirit of Halloween.


Photo by MinJoo

Photo by Hansol Choi

GK: What is your goal in these performances? FV: Putting the audience in front of something that is not conventional, which doesn’t follow the ‘correct’ way. They feel uncomfortable at first but then surprise themselves by liking it! Oolala! Imagine having an inner voice saying that you want to be spanked! Well the most common thing is that we are not normal. We are all deviant! So yes through my shows my goal is to make the audiences realize that they can break taboos and just be who they are and be proud. The most beautiful times are when I receive emails from people telling me that because of my shows they felt more confident and brave coming out to their friends. The power of art is to touch people and to move people.

GK: I find your performances are some kind of knot of the cute and the creepy. I know that a few aspects about the upcoming event will remain secret but can you tell us some things past audiences have experienced? FV: Yes, my shows often have creepy dolls and black vinyl ballet boots. Sometimes we’ve had a human chandelier - a woman suspended three meters from the ground with candles hanging from her and I then pour the hot wax on my body. Oh yes and the vampire drink at the Halloween show! I simulated cunnilingus on my stage partner Sacre Bleu in order to wake her from the dead; it ended with glittery water spurting from my mouth. And I was once a nun in red vinyl pushing rosary beads into my vagina though my panties.

Edited by Stewart McFeat (stewart@groovekorea.com)

‘The origin of performance art is really sadomasochism, it is about testing the limits of the body’

ENTERTAINMENT

Groove Korea ‘GK’: How did you get into this? FV: Performance and perversion? I discovered bondage and the fetish aesthetic from pictures by one of my favorite artists, Nabuyoshi Araki and also from Bellmer. I saw all these beautiful white-skinned women as dolls, suspended or attached to the floor ...all the ambiguity between such peaceful beauty and those painful ropes.I’m just obsessed by oppositions. This nightmarish beauty? ...Well, I was seduced; it’s better you don’t know what’s on my mind right now… It’s interesting how when you get the human body involved in art, everything starts to be so sexualized and twisted. The origin of performance art is really sadomasochism; it is about testing the limits of the body. Religious iconography has the same position: make the pain beautiful. But my first official burlesque show was in November 2011, with the cake act. I sat on a fresh cream-cake. It is just an amazing feeling...life is cream, cream is life. But for me the point of doing burlesque is not to be sexy on stage and exhibit my body because I’m shy and really not exhibitionist (it takes me thirty minutes to change into a bikini on the beach while I am under a towel) but it is to express something and as a political engagement. I approach burlesque as a way to be militant as a queer, LGBT, feminist act. It’s not so important for me to please the audience. I really want them to confront themselves.

GK: You have worked in other East Asian countries. Do people react differently to your shows? FV: Yes these past years I’m pretty happy to have had the chance to perform in Korea and in Japan. There are some differences. The crowd in Japan doesn’t really cheer during the show. It was really disturbing the first time because you usually get your energy to perform on stage from the audience’s energy. But, in fact, the Japanese crowd doesn’t want to disturb the performers so it is by respect for the show that they are quiet. The Korean crowd are really sweet and cheerful and so cute. There has been a fetish and burlesque scene in Japan for a long time. It’s great and there is a lot of interest and many venues. Korea only has three but nowadays I’m lucky that doors are opening for me and I’m getting more support. I don’t know any other performers who are into fetish. It’s frustrating! There are more walls to break down in Korea. Attending this event will mean being involved in more than one revolution: one grand magic lantern where those shadows on the wall of figures both tender and terrifying are animated in one swirling illumination.

May 2015 www.groovekorea.com 49

MORE INFO Freebird 2, Hongdae Basement 1st floor, 408-17 Seogyodong, Mapogu, Seoul. May 9th, 11pm-4am KRW 20 000 standard ticket KRW 30 000 for VIP Reservations to be made at fraisevinyl.performance@gmail.com FraiseVinyl Fetish Boudoir//////////perversion/////////// www.facebook.com/events/1603352529909986/ You are welcome to dress for the event. Be creative! It is a queer LGBT event and everybody is welcome.


Working up a Sweat Story by Nate Finch / Photos by Shane Pilon

Pinnacle TheHustler on his music, growing business and hustling.

50 www.groovekorea.com May 2015

H

is Twitter profile reads, “I went from being homeless in Korea to being on a magazine cover. My life is a movie.” For Pinnacle TheHustler, life is anything but normal. Working and traveling between the U.S. and South Korea, Pinnacle has not only established himself as a premier artist in Korea’s hip-hop scene, but is also highly sought after as a dj and promoter. “Under the PlanetHustle brand, we’re bringing international djs and artists into Korea and helping the club scene grow, especially in the hip-hop market,” says Pinnacle. The music video released in April, “Sweatin”, is part of the “Work to Do” EP released in September 2014, and was directed by William Sonny. While Pinnacle notes the video has “lots of attractive people kickin’ it in a club,” the video was conceived to be urban and accessible to everyone around the world. “However, we shot the video in such a way that, if you are in Korea or you’ve been here, you should be able to look at some of the scenes and say, ‘I know exactly where that is!’” Pinnacle says. Business for Pinnacle has continued to grow as he has brought over internationally recognized professionals like DJ Drama and Wiz Khalifa’s dj, DJ Bonics. As the hip-hop and club scene continues to grow in Korea, Pinnacle says PlanetHustle is poised to meet the growing demand. Reflecting on his business’ growth, he says he “created PlanetHustle, and now, instead of just paying myself, I get to pay other people too and help the club scene grow, especially in the hip-hop market.” We sat down with Pinnacle to speak more in-depth about “Sweatin’”, the EP, video, and business in South Korea.


Groove Korea ‘GK’: In your own words, what is the “Work to Do” EP about? PTH: “Work to Do” the EP is about working hard, being out there, hustling, doing what you gotta do. There’s a lot of facets of hustling, being better, being a better person, better in relationships. Even being betting with your political consciousness. Everything that I hit in that EP is relavant to our human existance. Relationships politics, money, going to the club and kickin’ it, all that stuff is in there.

GK: What’s the future look like for PlanetHustle? PTH: I’m starting to work with a few other people, more recently a photographer and a dancer. I’m working on something with them I can’t talk about right now. But, I’m really excited about the future and working with artists under the PlanetHustle umbrella. Whatever your art is, if it’s something I know I can grow and develop, I’m happy to joint venture. For me and the people I work with, everyday, every week, I’m learning something new about myself and my art. I want to work with people who are open to growing and developing their art.

For more information and to see the “Sweatin’” music video, visit www.planethustle.com

May 2015 www.groovekorea.com 51

GK: You wear several hats: rapper, dj, businessman. Why do all three? PTH: Just being a musician is not going to be profitable. You’re not going to be successful just being a musician, you’re always going to be at the whims of somebody else. I’ve been offered contracts multiple times, but at what personal cost? I decided that if I was going to be successful, I was going to have to give myself my own deal, which is exactly what I did when I created PlanetHustle. There’s actually a lot of growth going on in the hip-hop market here in Korea, and I fell blessed to be a part of helping it grow with this entity I developed.

GK: How is this multifaceted approach working for you? PTH: When I bring someone for a show, I’m helping to connect the American and Korean music industries. I’m also giving the artists that come over a positive experience of Korea and making Korea look good to the world. Also, I’m providing a source of entertainment to the club goers here in Korea they don’t usually get. Last but not least, I’m promoting myself as an artist.


AT THE BOX OFFICE THE BIG SCREEN

52 www.groovekorea.com May 2015

Edited by Stewart McFeat (stewart@groovekorea.com)

ENTERTAINMENT

Previews by Dean Crawford

Mad Max: Fury Road Dir. George Miller If you’d told me 12 months ago that one of the most anticipated films of the summer would be a “Mad Max” reboot, I would have laughed and suggested you’d knocked back one too many bottles of soju. Sure, the original “Mad Max” is considered a classic, but I find it hard to take “Beyond Thunderdome” seriously and couldn’t envisage what could better Tina Turner chasing Mel Gibson across a desert. So imagine my surprise when the first footage of “Fury Road” was released at 2014’s Comic-Com and looked really, REALLY good. It was colorful, it was frenetic, yet it looked downright menacing with some stunning cinematography. But as we all know, you can never read too much into a teaser as the world is full of terrible films that had amazing trailers. (Yeah, I’m looking at you, “Sucker Punch”!) Thus, I decided to keep my excitement at bay and reserve my judgment for the actual film. That lasted until the subsequent trailer was released which looked even better! “Mad Max: Fury Road” sees our titular hero team up with Furiosa (you know? like Fury … ) to cross the post-apocalyptic deserts in order to escape the evil Immortan Joe. Tom Hardy plays Max, Charlize Theron is Furiosa and Nicholas Hoult is Nux, Immortan Joe’s righthand man. Original “Mad Max” director George Miller returns to helm the sequel. I use the term “sequel” lightly, because despite the fact that “Fury Road” was written shortly after “Beyond Thunderdome,” it’s unclear whether the film is in fact a reboot or a soft sequel. Considering the amount of time the film has taken to reach the big screen (27 years to production, and two years from production to release) words like “relaunch,” “reboot” and “retake” have been thrown around. Yet the film is set after the events of the original “Mad Max” — which, I guess, would make it a sequel? The only certainty is that if the film is a success, we’ll be seeing more of “Mad Max” as Tom Hardy has signed on for three additional films, demonstrating the filmmakers’ confidence in “Fury Road.” Judging by the footage I’ve seen so far, I definitely share their optimism.

While We’re Young Dir. Noah Baumbach There comes a time in most comedic actors’ lives where they encounter something of a midcareer crisis and feel the need to be taken seriously. Jim Carrey grew up on “The Truman Show” and played it straight in “The Number 23.” Adam Sandler proved that he does in fact have some acting chops in P.T. Anderson’s oft-forgotten “PunchDrunk Love.” And Will Ferrell put in some star turns in “Stranger than Fiction” and the underappreciated “Everything Must Go.” I mean, he subsequently undid all that good work by making “Get Hard,” but that’s for another article. Another funnyman who seems to be taking on more and more “serious” roles is Ben Stiller, which is fitting considering his new movie, Noah Baumbach’s “While We’re Young,” is about a 40-something New Yorker going through a midlife crisis. Ben Stiller plays Josh, a filmmaker whose life gets turned upside down after he and his wife, Cornelia (Naomi Watts), start hanging out with a couple in their mid-20s, which causes them to question their lives and the choices they’ve made. The film also features Adam Driver and Amanda Seyfried as the trendy young couple who befriend Josh and Cornelia. It’s also worth noting that the film features Adam Horovitz, aka Ad-Rock from the Beastie Boys. Hopefully he’s a good actor and doesn’t sabotage the film. Geddit? Sabotage? Because Sabotage is the name of a Beastie … Boys … sooo … no? OK, just forget it. … Despite the talent involved in “While We’re Young,” I find myself leaning toward watching one of May’s trashier releases, horror ones at that — such as Eli Roth’s “Knock Knock,” cyber-horror “Unfriended” or “The Woman in Black 2.” As much as I enjoyed “The Squid and the Whale,” I was indifferent to Greenberg and certainly wasn’t a fan of Frances Ha. But with its central theme of looking back while also trying to move forward, I’ve no doubt that “While We’re Young” will be a poignant piece that will resonate with many filmgoers who find themselves in similar situations. Nostalgia/life lessons/New York hipsters arrive in May.


Previews by Dean Crawford

Korea DVD Corner The Small Screen ENTERTAINMENT

No Tears for the Dead Dir. Lee Jeong-beom

A Hard Day

Dir. Kim Seong-hoon Released around the same time as “No Tears for the Dead,” “A Hard Day” initially struggled at the box office, but benefited from strong word of mouth to outperform “No Tears” despite its lack of star power or a big-name director. This shouldn’t have come as much of a surprise, however, as Kim Seong-hoon’s sophomore feature was selected for competition in last year’s Cannes festival and generated critical acclaim from Korean and foreign critics alike. The film follows homicide detective Go Geon-soo (Lee Sun-gyun), who, along with several other officers, is being investigated by internal affairs for taking bribes. To make matters worse, during his mother’s funeral, he runs down and kills an unknown pedestrian and decides to hide the body inside his mother’s coffin. However, this is only the start of Geon-soo’s bad day, because as much as he wants to cover his tracks, somebody else wants the body back and will stop at nothing to get it. Within the first 15 minutes, you know you are watching something special. Despite Geon-soo being an awful piece of work, you find yourself siding with him, biting your nails hoping he gets through whatever problem he has to deal with next. I think that is a testament to the story-telling ability of Kim Seong-hoon and the acting of Lee Sun-gyun, one of the best Korean actors working today. Without giving away any serious spoilers, the only negative I can assign the film is one single moment during the final third, which requires the viewer to suspend disbelief so severely that it could potentially ruin the film. However, the pace is so intense that this moment is quickly forgotten; you don’t have a choice, as the film never lets up, leading to a typically Korean, i.e., violent, finale. Why throw one punch, when you can land 20? Why just shoot someone when you can break their arm first? “A Hard Day” is intense, graphic, and well worth your time.

May 2015 www.groovekorea.com 53

After the critical and commercial success of “The Man From Nowhere,” expectations were high for what director Lee Jeong-bom would produce next. That turned out to be “No Tears for the Dead,” which stars one of Korea’s biggest actors, Jang Dong-gun. Jang plays Gon, a Korean-born hit man who works for the triads in the United States. His latest mission doesn’t go according to plan, as he not only takes out his target, but also the target’s young daughter. Stricken by grief and remorse, Gon wants out of the game. But before he can leave, his boss wants him to take care of one last mission: taking out Mo-gyeong (Kim Min-hee), the mother of the girl he killed. If people were expecting another “Man from Nowhere,” they were sadly disappointed. While the action is thrilling and the combat scenes brutal (one particular knife fight genuinely made me wince), the film suffers from weaknesses in the script that make all the good work in the action sequences seem redundant. Gon is traumatized after killing a child; so much so that he sleeps in a pile of his own vomit and is clearly not himself. Yet the triad boss thinks it’s a good idea for him to kill her mother. This makes absolutely no sense and the film lost me at this point, which is very early on. Unfortunately, this isn’t the only convenient plot device. When Gon infiltrates Mo-gyeong’s house, it just so happens that she is watching a DVD of her dead daughter’s talent show. Can he go through with the hit? Or does he feel regret and go against his boss’s orders? I’ll let you watch the film and find out for yourself. If you’re not too bothered by outlandish plot devices and some iffy dialogue, and simply want a film that is action-packed and bloodsoaked, then this is the movie for you. Because, let me tell you, it’s lucky that there are no tears for the dead. If there were, the film might have to be renamed “Waterworld.”

끝까지 간다

Edited by Stewart McFeat (stewart@groovekorea.com)

우는 남자


Fighting for the Freedom

of Cuba


T R A V E L Edited by Eileen Cahill (eileen@groovekorea.com)

A Korean photographer looks back

on her trip to Cuba

May 2015 www.groovekorea.com 55

Story and photos by Yoki Suhyun Jeong Edited by Eileen Cahill and Celeste Maturen


“The world needs more men who complain less and do more; who promise less and work harder; who say, ‘Now, not tomorrow.’”

56 www.groovekorea.com May 2015

— Che Guevara, Cuba’s national hero


‘We want to listen to music from the world,’ he said. ‘We want to see other cultures and know what is happening in the world right now.’ Bullet holes in the wall; a trace of Cuba’s past

T R A V E L

The entrance to Callejón de Hamel, a colorful arts district featuring the work of Salvador Gonzáles Escalona

May 2015 www.groovekorea.com 57

A mural in Hamel by Salvador Gonzáles Escalona

Edited by Eileen Cahill (eileen@groovekorea.com)

C

uba is a dream destination for any photographer. The vintage cars and old-fashioned cash registers, straight out of the 1950s, are as striking as the landscape. Of the 22 countries I’d visited, Cuba was by far the most colorful. Everywhere I looked, there were vivid scenes for my lens to capture: the cobalt Caribbean, friendly Cubans passing the afternoons outside their homes and shops, historic buildings veiled in vines — not to mention the bullet-riddled walls and the omnipresent face of the country’s national hero, revolutionary fighter Che Guevara. Most fascinating of all, for me, was the artwork on display in Callejón de Hamel — a vibrant alley separated from the rest of the city by a high wall covered in murals. It’s a place where freedom of expression thrives, out of the censors’ reach. I met Alain outside a pizza parlor, singing and dancing with a group of his friends. He was 25 and wore a U.S. flag on his head, the words “Hip Hop” tattooed on his neck. They all sported the familiar logos of U.S. brands like Nike and Adidas. “I’m fighting for the freedom of Cuba!” Alain sang as he danced along with his friends. When I told him that Cuba seemed like a great place, he complained that there was no freedom.


T R A V E L

“We want to listen to music from the world,” he said. “We want to see other cultures and know what is happening in the world right now.” The government, he asserted, was blocking access to everything. I walked through the streets of Havana with Alain and his friends and videotaped their sidewalk performance. I could see that they were proud of their national identity — that came through in their creative blending of the hip-hop and salsa dance genres. It was Alain who urged me to check out Callejón de Hamel. When I bumped into him on the street the next day, he was still rapping those same lyrics: “Fighting for the freedom of Cuba.” Then the police turned up, and Alain disappeared down a side street. When I caught up with him, he was relieved to hear that the police were gone. Before we said goodbye two days later, I promised to share Alain’s hip-hop performance on YouTube. He wanted the world to see it, but Internet access in Cuba is severely restricted. Now that Cuba is in the news again — as Cuba and the United States take steps to normalize ties — I wonder if Alain and his friends will finally achieve their dream and get acquainted with the outside world. At the same time, though, I wonder selfishly if Cuba will lose its mystery and start to look just like every other tourist destination.

The author, Yoki Suhyun Jeong, with Alain November 2013

Edited by Eileen Cahill (eileen@groovekorea.com)

Now that Cuba is in the news again — as Cuba and the United States take steps to normalize ties — I wonder if Alain and his friends will finally achieve their dream and get acquainted with the outside world. Veronica, a hip-hop fan who sells magazines on the street

Photo by Suji Kim All other photos by Yoki Suhyun Jeong

May 2015 www.groovekorea.com 59


60 www.groovekorea.com May 2015

Edited by liam ring (liam@groovekorea.com)

SPORTS

Story by Liam Ring / Photos courtesy of Seoul Gaels

New Frontiers for the Seoul Gaels Building on strong roots for one of the fastest growing sports in the World

W

hen Irish rugby legend Brian O’Driscoll was asked if he was Ireland’s greatest sportsman, his answer was to point to hurling genius Henry Shefflin. He then patiently explained to journalists what exactly Shefflin played and why this sportsman was so out of O’Driscoll’s league. For many years only watched by the Irish at home and abroad, the Gaelic Athletic Association’s (GAA) dual team sports of Gaelic Football and Hurling has in recent years turned from niche interest outside the 32 counties to having an increasingly vibrant international reach with associations in North America, Australia and Asia. The sponsorship of Etihad Airways, coupled with coverage by the Murdoch owned SKY Sports, has meant many more are getting to know what are among the oldest team sports in the world. This world-wide interest was further reflected in the hosting of the first ever World GAA Games in Abu Dhabi, where male and female teams made up of players across continents competed against the best in the world. Pretty good for an organisation that still embraces its amateur status.

Yo u r L o c a l C l u b

T he S p o rts

Seoul Gaels have been representing the Korean capital since 2002, with both men’s and women’s teams successful in continental competition. Described as vibrant and dynamic by chairperson Declan Griffin, the club boasts men’s and ladies sides as well as under-age teams for ten to fifteen year olds. The presence of a Korean Community Officer is another attribute which Griffin says “helps the club bridge the gap with the local community.” Domestically, the club is involved alongside Daegu Fianna and Laochra Busan in the Korean GAA League which started up again in Busan in April. Gaels are coming off a highly successful 2014 season, with both men’s and ladies’ teams winning their domestic leagues, the men’s team reaching the football final of the Asian Games and the Ladies’ team triumphant in the Intermediate section. Both sides also won the North Asian games, making the Gael’s trophy cabinet almost as packed as premier league giants Manchester United’s. Gaels stalwart Gezina Annandale called last year fantastic and cites the Gaels as “one of the main reasons I am still in Korea, loving my life here.”

Gaels’s initial successes were in Gaelic Football, which has a number of similarities to Australian Rules, and is played competitively in the Korea GAA league throughout the year. However, a growing number of GAA enthusiasts throughout Asia have taken on the more challenging game of hurling, with skill sets from sports such as hockey and baseball being utilised in exhibition games at each round on the domestic GAA calendar this year. Hurling brings challenges from off the pitch for Gaels, with special equipment such as helmets and hurleys (a specifically shaped wooden stick) for which the club have to import equipment from Ireland. Hardly cheap to bring in such specialist equipment, Griffin emphasises that despite grants from home and the involvement of Etihad Airways in the under-age sides, the need for better financial aid is paramount, particularly with a dearth of Irish businesses on the peninsula. Despite this challenge, they still sent a hurling team to the Asian Games last year and are fully intent on repeating that feat. Add in several exhibition games throughout the year, and there’s plenty of opportunity to catch the fastest game on grass.


every SATURday

Seoul Baseball League

MAY

02

Dillingers / Beer O’Clock / Sam Ryan’s / Route 66 9am and 12pm Gwacheon Government Complex (Line 4)

Seoul Gaels GAA training

Seoul Gaels Men’s and Ladies’ Gaelic Football teams / Hurling and Camogie teams 12pm to 4pm Yongsan Army Base

Seoul Gaels is one of the main reasons I’m still in Korea and loving my life here. T he P l ayers

The season is a month old, with further rounds in Daegu (May 30th) and Seoul in Namyangju on July 11th. In between those, the club will challenge internationally at the China Games on June 20th and later host the North Asian Games in September. All of this leads towards the Asian Gaelic Games between October 23rd and 25th, where the men’s team will be seeking revenge for last year’s defeat to Singapore and the Ladies will be shooting for further success.

SUNday

MAY

10

AND MOST SUNDAY

MORE INFO seoulgaels@gmail.com https://www.facebook.com/seoul.gaels

And most wednesday

Ice Hockey Practice Matches

Seoul Chiefs 10am ‘til noon Check Seoul Chief’s Facebook Page for more details Mokdong Ice rink (Ice-time permitting)

Cycling the trails along the Han River. (Sun. 10 and the next two Sundays) th

KUPA Rise-up Korea

(Korean Language) Korea Ultimate sides from around the country hold training clinics with overseas trainers. 9.30am to 1pm / 2pm – 5.30pm Daejeon – the nearest subway station is Wolpyeong Station. FRIDAY~

MAY

22-25

30

16,17

(English Language with bilingual training on the Monday) Korea Ultimate sides from around the country hold training clinics with overseas trainers. One 2pm to 5.30pm session on Friday. 9.30am to 1pm / 2pm – 5.30pm the other days

Seoul Survivors Namwon City

MAY

MAY

KUPA Rise-up Korea

Castle Braii Rugby Training Camp

SATURDAY

WEEKEND

SATURDAY~

MAY

23-25

Korea GAA Second Round

Seoul Gaels / Daegu Fianna / Loachra Busan 11am to 6pm with an After Games Event Daegu Hwa Won Myeong Gok Sports Pitch - near Daegok subway station on the Red Line.

May 2015 www.groovekorea.com 61

Thanks to Seoul Gaels Chairperson Declan Griffin and Gezina Annandale for all their their help with the article.

06

Seoul Cycle Check Seoul Cycle’s Facebook page for details One of three routes along the Han River from this month’s article

G etting I n v o lv ed Training is usually on Saturday’s at the Yongsan Army base, with alternate venues announced via the club’s Facebook page. For a taste of GAA action without taking to the pitch, chief sponsor the Wolfhound Pub regularly shows live GAA matches from the All-Ireland Championship over the Summer months. Griffin is confident over the club’s future, particularly now that the club has a Korean Community Officer, and highlights “the more international mix to our club these days including more Koreans than ever ... a sure sign of integration into the local community.” With Seoul Gaels making strides with all genders, ages and nationalities both on and off the field, now is the time to try a sport with over three thousand years of history and an ever brighter future.

MAY

Edited by liam ring (liam@groovekorea.com)

C o ming U p

Seoul Chiefs 9.30pm to 11pm Check Seoul Chief’s Facebook Page for more details Mokdong Ice rink (Ice-time permitting)

wednesday

SPORTS

Players from countries as geographically diverse as Korea, South Africa, Australia and Canada have been getting involved since the club first started, and its international nature sees no sign of changing. A healthy membership has been highlighted by chairperson Declan Griffin as vital for the continued evolution of the club, and a part of this development is training clinics taking place to introduce the sport to young people. The starting of an under-age side last year, for children aged ten to fifteen, signifies the importance of developing interest in the sports as young as possible, something echoed back in Ireland where children regularly pick up a hurley or Gaelic football in the early days of elementary school and the name of the aforementioned O’Neill’s is stamped on many a child’s psyche. While ease factors mean that the under-age sides are concentrating on Gaelic Football for now, as the club progresses from its still-dominant football focus, children may well take on the more challenging sport in years to come. There are two ladies’ teams involved in the Korean League this year and recruitment is extremely healthy. Griffin points out that the ease of adapting to the sport means that many casual observers with friends in the team end up becoming involved as it’s a great way to exercise and “provides the right balance of fun and games.”

Ice Hockey Practice Matches


SPORTS Edited by liam ring (liam@groovekorea.com)

A Different Kind of Spin Story by Liam Ring / Photos courtesy of Korea Ultimate Players Association

E x- p a t s

62 www.groovekorea.com May 2015

I

s e e k

f sports like soccer trace their success partially to their paucity of equipment and simplicity, then the fast-paced sport of Ultimate has to be onto something. Played on a 100 by 40 meter-long field, this sevena-side sport guarantees a work-out. All you need, in the words of Nicholas Whale from Ulsan, “is a 175 gram disc, some friends, a clear space and you are ready to go.” Rules-wise this limited-contact game is incredibly simple, with a scoring system similar to touchdowns in American football and a fluidity in possession and movement likened to basketball or soccer. Perhaps the most unique aspect of the sport is its emphasis on the ‘spirit of the game.’ With no referee at any level, players are

t h e

U l t i m a t e

expected to make calls and reach a consensus on fouls, making it something to appeal to everyone’s sense of fair play. Such a focus on sportsmanship is bound to help create relationships that go beyond the sidelines, with Oliver Von Votteler from Pohang believing that “the people that play Ultimate are the kind of people that I like to surround myself with.” Last month was a typically busy one for the Korea Ultimate Players Association (KUPA), with the Jeju Fresh Fourteens attracting teams from China, Taiwan, Japan and Singapore. Twenty-two teams and over three hundred players from every continent barring Antarctica (fair enough, really) hit Seogwipo for one of Ultimate’s signature events in Asia. While a combined side from the United

t h r i l l

Ultimate creates bonds that go far beyond the sidelines.


All you need is a 175 gram disc, some friends, a clear space and you are ready to go.

Edited by liam ring (liam@groovekorea.com)

determines the Korean Champion of the Year with up to ten sides from different regions of the country competing for domestic honors. Bragging rights over the last two years have been shared over the peninsula, with Sajahoo of Busan winning the 2014 edition after #LGW of Seoul had taken it the year before. KUPA plan to send the 2017 champions to the next edition of the World Ultimate Club Championships, a sign of the association’s ambition. Benefits from the sport go well beyond the field of play, with players talking about their growth as individuals and the increase in their creativity. Socially, it’s an opportunity to meet new friends (and in ex-KUPA stalwart Rebekah Drews’ case even a husband) and have new experiences in a community where one instantly feels accepted. “Socially,” according to Sean Prichard, “Ultimate’s the best decision I’ve made in two and a half years in Korea,” and with so much on over the coming months, there are plenty of opportunities to get involved, learn a new sport and meet new people. Ultimate co-founder Jared Kass once spoke of the “perfect synchrony and joy of the moment” found in reaching a pass, and that enjoyment is echoed in South Korea, where players say they’ve “never loved a sport more” and that they “happily plan their life around it.” Get your discs at the ready. It’s going to be a jam-packed summer.

SPORTS

States and Japan took the title, Seoul’s own #LGW followed consistent domestic successes with the runners-up spot. The Seoul Spring League is taking place at the World Cup Peace Park most Sundays from April to early July, and all levels of ability are welcome. In addition, Seoul, Daejeon, and Busan will host cross-country tournaments into the fall, giving players the chance to compete against teams from other parts of the peninsula. Next month sees the second Rise Up Ultimate Clinic on May 16th-17th and 22nd-25th in Daejeon. An Ultimate education and training event, the two days involve a focus on everything from basics to more advanced skills with training clinics run by overseas trainers such as the sport’s guru Mario O’Brien. The first weekend is conducted in Korean, and is divided into morning and afternoon sessions focusing on offense on the Saturday and defense on the Sunday. The following weekend will cater to English speakers and follows the same format on Saturday and Sunday, but with an added workout on Friday evening and an allday bilingual training session working on core skills on the Monday public holiday. As with 2014, players will be able to register for courses in either language and can choose the number of days they want to attend. Rise Up takes place on the banks of the Gapcheon River with the nearest subway station being Wolpyeong Station on line one. Check KUPA’s website for more details. June brings Busan Bids on the Beach where people sign up individually and get placed in teams at random. A hark back to the early years of KUPA before fully organized teams and leagues, it’s an event that drew 200 people last year. Later events include the second Annual Summer Showdown where all men’s and women’s teams (the only event of its kind as Ultimate teams are usually mixed) face off and the KUPA Club Championships in the fall. Held since 2012, this event KUPA membership fees are 50,000 won and provide discounts on registration fees for all KUPA sponsored events and tournaments in 2015. Membership also allows entry to the Club Championship and a printed booklet on the sport with complete rules. In addition to competitive events, recreation leagues such as the Seoul League and ROK-U League run in the spring and fall and pick-up games are organized regularly by local facebook groups.

MORE INFO www.koreaultimate.net www.facebook.com/KoreaUltimate kupa.admin@gmail.com

May 2015 www.groovekorea.com 63

A huge thanks to Allison Walford for her help and all the KUPA members who sent in quotes and testimonials about their love of the sport.


SPORTS Edited by liam ring (liam@groovekorea.com)

Hitting the ice with ex-pat ice hockey

64 www.groovekorea.com May 2015

Ready, Steady, Puck!

W

hether it be a pint at your local watering hole or your mom’s cooking, we all miss home comforts from time to time. For some, lacing up their skates, getting out on the ice, and shooting some pucks is the cure for homesickness. Luckily, the Seoul Chiefs provide for those seeking a game. The Chiefs can trace their origins back to October of 2003, when Karl Dancause and Kyle Hawkins had the idea to start an ice hockey team. Since finding a home at the Mokdong arena in South-western Seoul, the Chiefs have been skating most Wednesday

nights and Sunday mornings. In the beginning, only a single goalie and four or five skaters came out, but through word of mouth, news quickly spread and the numbers grew. Nowadays, there are usually at least two full lines for each side and two goalies for each skate. Each session is one and half to two hours and, unless a game is scheduled, the team separates into ‘light’ and ‘dark’ teams and goes at it. The Chiefs welcome skaters of all levels and backgrounds to join; the only requirement is a love of hockey. Team captain Ryan Casavant, sums up the appeal of the Chiefs nicely, saying “the Chiefs have always been about having fun and playing a sport that we grew up with. Hockey is a great way to break up the monot-

Story and Photos by Terry Clark

The Chiefs have always been about having fun and playing a sport that we grew up with. Hockey is a great way to break up the monotony of everyday life and get some exercise as well.


Story and photos by Steve Price from www.kleaguefootball.com

Who will challenge for the K-League title?

T

he K-league top tier may only be in its third month of action, but the twelve clubs already have plenty to play for. With the prestigious title of Korean Champions along with three league spots for the Asian Champions League available, the competition is hotting up already. The three teams located in and around the capital see plenty of action over the next few months as they host the front-runners for domestic glory.

Ulsan Hyundai

When to watch Seongnam vs Ulsan (May 16th) FC Seoul vs Ulsan (May 31st) Suwon vs Ulsan (July 1st)

May 2015 www.groovekorea.com 65

MORE INFO: Incheon Iceholes www.hockeynightinkorea.com Incheon Iceholes Hockey Club

After challenging for the top honors in recent seasons, Ulsan disappointed pundits last season with a lowly sixth place finish. Chances this year depend a lot on whether it can keep hold of tall target-man Kim Shin-Wook who has been watched by several European clubs. His injury last season had a large effect on Ulsan’s final standing and his K-league counterparts expect him to be up with the league’s top scorers by the season’s end.

Other fixtures to look out for in May and June • The first knockout round of the Asian Champions League takes place on May 19th/20th and 26th/27th with fixtures to be announced early in the month. Suwon Bluewings and Seoungnam FC have already booked their places in the first knockout round. FC Seoul will join them with a win away to Kashima Antlers in the final round of matches on May 5th, although a draw will be enough if Western Sydney Wanderers fail to beat already qualified Guangzhou Evergrande. • Over at Jamsil Olympic Stadium, Seoul Eland FC has home matches against Gangwon on May 13th, Chungju Hummel on May 16th, Suwon FC on May 30th, Sangju Sangmu on June 20th, and Ansan Police on June 28th.

Edited by liam ring (liam@groovekorea.com)

2013’s K-League champions has a talented and close-knit squad and could be surprise title contenders. Young striker Kim Seung-Dae Jeonbuk Motors Last season’s championship winner has is touted as one of Korea’s future stars and made an impressive start to this season, is on the verge of breaking into the national strengthening their team, particularly up team. When to watch front. Bringing in former Suwon Bluewings Seongnam vs Pohang (June 7th) and Schalke 04 striker Edu (who has already scored four) while hanging onto Leonardo (who has matched Edu’s total thus far) will be FC Seoul Fans of the Sangam-based side might be a huge boost for its chances. Equally capable commiserating its terrible start to this seaof scoring goals is veteran striker Lee Dongson’s K-League, especially after the thrashing Gook, who is the K-League all-time top goal scorer and was predicted (along with Ulsan’s at rivals Suwon. However, it is worth rememKim Shin-Wook) to be the K-League’s top bering that the club was second from bottom goal-scorer this season by his fellow K-League after eleven games last season, and still had plenty of time to secure a top three place and players and team managers. Champions League football. The team still has When to watch quality in it, with Ko Myeong-Jin and Go YoSeongnam vs Jeonbuk (May 31st) Han as two of the K-League’s best midfielders Suwon vs Jeongbuk (June 21st) in the prime of their careers. Former Monaco and Arsenal striker Park Chu-Young has also Suwon Bluewings After finishing second last year, Suwon has re-joined the club and if he manages to find made a strong start this season; the team’s 5-1 the form that he had at the start of his career, demolition of FC Seoul on April 18th has been then he could provide the goals that pull FC a particular highlight. Captain Yeom Ki-Hun Seoul up the league. When to watch has stood out as this season’s key player with FC Seoul vs Jeonnam Dragons (May 16th) four goals and five assists to his name. North FC Seoul vs Ulsan (May 31st) Korean striker Jong Tae Se has also made a FC Seoul vs Incheon (June 3rd) bright start to the season with two goals and FC Seoul vs Busan (June 17th) four assists and is worth watching out for. FC Seoul vs Suwon (June 28th) When to watch Suwon vs Jeonbuk (June 21st) FC Seoul vs Suwon (June 28th) Suwon vs Ulsan (July 1st)

MORE INFO: Chiefs www.chiefshockeykorea.blogspot.kr Seoul Chiefs Ice Hockey Team

Pohang Steelers

SPORTS

ony of everyday life and get some exercise as well.” Never played hockey and want to give it a shot? The Chiefs are the team for you. “We are all like big kids playing with weapons in a sand box with only one toy ...a solid rubber puck!!!” describes Chiefs’ Assistant Captain, Jason Tamblyn. If equipment is an issue, as it can be difficult to bring equipment from overseas, the Seoul Chiefs have a stockpile of equipment from previous and current members of the team to offer new players everything they need to play. The team has in the past included players from Canada, the United States, Korea, China, Sweden and Russia among others. They regularly schedules games against other teams in South Korea, with teams in Daegu, Anyang, Ulsan, Cheongju-Daejeon and Busan meaning there is always a game on the horizon. In the coming months, the Chiefs are looking to put together an inter-squad tournament, pitting Chief vs. Chief. Over the years they have also traveled farther afield, with matches in Mongolia, Singapore, and Vladivostok, Russia. The month of April saw a string of games against the Incheon Iceholes, who are currently awaiting the opening of the new rink in Incheon. While there was an element of competitiveness, the games were more about having fun than the final score. The Chiefs also organized a road trip down to Daegu to take on the Lions for their annual spring matchup. The trip to Daegu is always a great source of legendary Chief tales. In the words of long-time Chief Darren McQuaid, “some of the best memories of playing chiefs hockey has been the road trips. Daegu is fun because they seem to have a close knit foreign community. When were down about 10 years ago the rink was wild with spectators. It was a lot of fun.” So, if you are itching to lace up some skates and play some shiny, get in touch with the Seoul Chiefs. See you on the ice!!


Gearing up

Story and Photos by Luc Tremblay at seoulcycle.com

for the Summer

Edited by liam ring (liam@groovekorea.com)

SPORTS

G e tt i n g s e t t o c y c l e t h e r o u t e s o f t h e H a n R i v e r

66 www.groovekorea.com May 2015

I

tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to say hello to fresher days without spluttering through the sand and smog. The weather is getting warmer and the nasty yellow dust season will hopefully soon be a distant memory. May brings the opportunity to get exploring and one of the best ways to do that is on your bicycle. With the wind in your hair, there are new places to see, and new things to do, all while a new perspective on the city and its environs awaits. There are literally hundreds of kilometers of paved trails to check out. Bicycle shops are everywhere in Seoul. Look around for the best deals

and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be afraid to ask for a discount. Koreans have a wonderful habit of throwing in free stuff with your purchase. Many of the shops have some English speakers who are eager to help out. If you are looking for a second hand bike, Craigslist online is also a good place to start your search as well as asking local cycle groups. Cycling is a great way to get around the capital and there are heaps of well-maintained paths running everywhere. A popular place to be in the summer is along the Han River which runs through the center of the capital with plenty of vendors offering a choice of paid or free rentals.


1 Gangseo

3 Mangwon

2 Nanji

Banghwa Stn.

Hapjeong Stn.

Mapo-gu Office Stn.

(Line 5 / Exits 1,2) Walk 1.9km

4 Ichon

(Line 6 / Exit 7) Walk 1.3km

Ichon Stn.

(Lines 2,6 / Exit 1) Walk 2km

6 Gwangnaru

5 Ttukseom

Cheonho Stn.

Ttukseom Resort Stn.

(Lines 4, Jungang / Exits 4) Walk 500m

(Lines 5,6 / Exit 1) Walk 500m

(Line 7, Exits 2,3) Walk 20m

2 1

3

B A

7 8 9

4

Tel. 02-2293-8111

8 Seonyudo

Seonyudo Stn. (Line 9 / Exit 1) Walk 350m

C Gangbyeon Stn. Tel. 02-475-4380

9 Yeouido

Yeouinaru Stn.

10 Banpo

D Jamsil Stn.

Tel. 02-3431-3480

Express Bus Terminal Stn.

(Line 9 / Exits 3,4)

(Lines 3,7,9 / Exit 8-1) Walk 700m

Saetgang Stn.

E Pugnap-dong

11 Jamwon

(Lines 5,9 / Exits 2,3)

E

Sinsa Stn. (Line 3, Exit 5) Walk 1km

Tel. 02-475-4380

12 Jamsil

Sports Complex Stn. (Line 2 / Exits 6,7) Walk 750m

Thanks to Matt Kelley at Discovering Korea Travel and Culture Blog for the map (www.discoveringkorea.com)

While free rentals may initially seem a good idea, keep in mind that these are quite basic, are limited in number, and can only be used for a short time. Depending on your ability, riding the entire Han River can take several hours and paid rentals may be a better option for those wanting to cycle the entire trail. A full-day rental is relatively inexpensive (around 3,000 won per half hour) and allows you more options when choosing your bike. Bike rentals are available daily, except on rainy days and are generally open from 9am to 6pm. Remember to bring an ID card (Student ID, Alien Registration Card, local or international driver’s license) to leave behind while renting a bicycle. Your ID will be returned to you when you return from your ride. You’ve got your bike, so get out there and explore the twelve inter-connected Han River Parks across Seoul.

Edited by liam ring (liam@groovekorea.com)

(Line 9 / Exit 1) Walk 350m

B Eungbong Stn.

6

SPORTS

Tel. 02-2293-8003

D

12

10

A Oksu Stn.

Seonyudo Stn.

C

11

Pay Free

7 Yanghwa

5

· Route 1: Nanji Park to Yeouido Park · Route 2: Gwangnaru Park to Banpo Park · Route 3: Ttukseom Han River Park to Amsa Ecological History Park MORE INFO Seoul Cycle is a group of mostly expats helping with ride meet-ups, finding the best places to check out and anything else that is related to cycling and exploring. We have different levels of riders from weekend explorers, from fashionable fixie bikes to hardcore long distance riders. Each has their own styles of bikes; however we all share the same enthusiasm and camaraderie of getting out there together. www.seoulcycle.com seoulcycle@gmx.com www.facebook.com/seoulcyclepage

May 2015 www.groovekorea.com 67

Stay safe at all times and remember that with so many people out there, there are bound to be some that will cut across your path. The law in South Korea treats bicycles the same as other transportation, so a cyclist is held accountable in accidents in the same manner that an automobile is. Ride smart, keep on the right hand side while riding and be careful when sharing the paths with pedestrians. Wear a helmet, have a bell on your bike and fix a front and rear light on your bicycle for nighttime cycling. Just like you never truly forget how to ride a bike, you’ll never forget the great times spent cycling on the well-planned, well-paved bicycle trails all over South Korea. Get out there, cycle safe and enjoy the pleasant cycling routes that Seoul has to offer.


LISTINGS

Edited by Sean Choi (sean@groovekorea.com)

EMBASSIES American Embassy (02) 397-4114 • 188 Sejong-daero, Jongno-gu, Seoul Canadian Embassy (02) 3783-6000 • (613) 996-8885 (Emergency Operations Center) Jeongdonggil (Jeong-dong) 21, Jung-gu, Seoul British Embassy (02) 3210-5500 • Sejong-daero 19-gil 24, Jung-gu, Seoul Australian Embassy (02) 2003-0100 • 19th fl, Kyobo bldg., 1 Jongno 1-ga, Jongno-gu, Seoul Philippine Embassy (02) 796-7387~9 • 5-1 Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul

Novotel Ambassador Gangnam (02) 567-1101 • 603 Yeoksam 1-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul

Seoul Samsung Hospital 1599-3114 • 50 Irwon-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul

Grand Hilton Seoul (02) 3216-5656 • 353 Yeonhui-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul

Asan Medical Center 1688-7575 • 88 Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul

Somerset Palace Seoul (02) 6730-8888 • 85 Susong-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul

Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center (053) 250-7167 (7177 / 7187) • 56 Dalseong-ro, Jung-gu, Daegu

Park Hyatt Seoul (02) 2016-1234 • 606 Teheran-ro, Gangnam-gu, Seoul Lotte Hotel Busan (051) 810-1000 • 772 Gaya-daero, Busanjin-gu, Busan Park Hyatt Busan (051) 990-1234 • 51, Marine City 1-ro, Haeundae-gu, Busan 612-824, Korea

Airlines Korean Air 1588-2001 Asiana Airlines 1588-8000 Lufthansa (02) 2019-0180 Garuda Indonesia (02) 773-2092 • garuda-indonesia.co.kr

Spanish Embassy (02) 794-3581 • 726-52 Hannam-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul

EMERGENCY MEDICAL CENTERS Jeju Air 1599-1500

French Embassy (02) 3149-4300 • 30 Hap-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul

Gangnam St-Mary’s Hospital 1588-1511 • 222 Banpo-daero, Seocho-gu, Seoul

T’way Air 1688-8686

Yonsei Severance Hospital (Sinchon) (02) 2227-7777 • 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul

British Airways (02) 774-5511

Seoul National University Hospital 1339 • 28-2 Yeongeon-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul

Delta Airlines (02) 754-1921

HOTELS & RESORTS Banyan Tree Club & Spa Seoul (02) 2250-8080 • San 5-5, Jangchung-dong 2-ga Jung-gu, Seoul

Jin Air 1600-6200

Cathay Pacific Airways (02) 311-2700

Emirates Airlines (02) 2022-8400

FAMILY & KIDS INTERNATIONAL SCHOOLS Yongsan Intl. School (02) 797-5104 • San 10-213 Hannam-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul Seoul Intl. School (031) 750-1200 • 388-14 Bokjeong-dong, Sujeong-gu, Seongnam, Gyeonggi-do Branksome Hall Asia (02) 6456-8405 • Daejung-eup, Seogipo-si, Jeju Island Daegu Intl. School (053) 980-2100 • 1555 Bongmu-dong, Dong-gu, Daegu

Dulwich College Seoul (02) 3015-8500 • 6 Sinbanpo-ro 15-gil, Seocho-gu, Seoul admissions@dulwich-seoul.kr www.dulwich-seoul.kr The curriculum from Toddler to IGCSE (ages 2 years to 16 years) follows the best practice of the Early Years Foundation Stage Framework and English National Curriculum enhanced for an international setting.

D ETUR

PO NS MU

NDO


Eton House Prep (02) 749-8011 • 68-3 Hannam-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul A unique British-style Prep School for children of all nationalities from 2-13 years of age. A broad, challenging and innovative curriculum preparing pupils for senior school and life beyond. / www.etonhouseprep.com AMUSEMENT PARKS Everland Resort (031) 320-5000 • 310 Jeondae-ri, Pogok-eup, Cheoin-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do Lotte World (02) 411-2000 0 • 240 Olympic-ro, Songpa-gu, Seoul Pororo Park (D-Cube city) 1661-6340 • 360-51 Sindorim-dong, Guro-gu, Seoul Children’s Grand Park (zoo) (02) 450-9311 • 216 Neungdong-ro, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul Seoul Zoo (02) 500-7338 • 159-1 Makgye-dong, Gwacheon-si, Gyeonggi-do BOOKSTORES What the Book? (02) 797-2342 • 176-2, Itaewon 1-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul • whatthebook.com Located in Itaewon, this English bookstore has new books, used books and children’s books. Kim & Johnson 1566-0549 • B2 fl-1317-20 Seocho-dong, Seocho-gu, Seoul

HEALTH ORIENTAL MEDICINE Lee Moon Won Korean Medicine Clinic (02) 511-1079 • 3rd fl., Lee&You bldg. 69-5 Chungdam-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul Specializes in hair loss and scalp problems and offers comprehensive treatments and services including aesthetic and hair care products. Soseng Clinic (02) 2253-8051 • 368-90 Sindang 3-dong, Jung-gu, Seoul Yaksan Obesity Clinic (02) 582-4246 • 1364-7, Seocho 2-dong, Seocho-gu, Seoul • www.dryaksan.com FITNESS Exxl Fitness Gangnam Finance Center, 737 Yeoksam-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul • www.exxl.co.kr Daily Morning Ashtanga Yoga Mysore Classes (English) Jivamukti, Forrest, Universal Yoga (Korean) Apgujeong Rodeo Stn, Exit 4 (02) 515-6011• www.taoyoga.kr UROLOGY & OB Tower Urology (02) 2277-6699 • 5th fl. 119 Jongno 3-ga, Jongno-gu, Seoul

Animal hospitals Chunghwa Animal Hospital / Korea Animal Transport (02) 792-7602 • 21-1 Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul / www.cwhospital.com Woori Pet Hospital (02) 393-6675 • 299-1 Youngcheon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul

MUSEUM & GALLERIES National Museum of Korea (02) 2077-9000 • 168-6 Yongsandong 6-ga, Yongsan-gu, Seoul The NMK offers educational programs on Korean history and culture in English and Korean. National Palace Museum of Korea (02) 3701-7500 • 12 Hyoja-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul This museum has a program called Experiencing Royal Culture designed for English teachers to help learn about Joseon royal culture. Seodaemun Museum of Natural History (02) 330-8899 • 141-52 Yeonhui-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul Don’t know where to take your kids on weekends? This museum exhibits a snapshot of the world and animals. National Museum of Contemporary Art, Korea (02) 2188-6000 • 313 Gwangmyeong-ro, Gwacheon-si, Gyeonggi-do Leeum Samsung Museum of Art (02) 2014-6901• 747-18 Hannam-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul 10:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Closed on Mondays, New Year’s Day, Lunar New Year and Chuseok holidays. Kumho Museum (02) 720-5114 • 78 Sagan-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Closed on Mondays. Gallery Hyundai (02) 734-6111~3 • 22 Sagan-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul The first specialized art gallery in Korea and accommodates contemporary art. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Closed on Mondays, New Year’s Day, Lunar New Year and Chuseok holidays. Plateau (02) 1577-7595 • 50 Taepyung-ro 2-ga, Jung-gu, Seoul 10 a.m.-6 p. m. Closed on Mondays. National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Seoul (MMCA SEOUL) (02) 3701-9500 • 30 Samcheong-ro, Sogyeok-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul Daegu Art Museum (053) 790-3000 • 374 Samdeok-dong, Suseong-gu, Daegu Art space for local culture presenting Daegu’s contemporary fine arts and internationally renowned artists.


Maps MAY 2015

Itaewon (including Haebangchon and Gyeongnidan) Garosugil l Gangnam Station l Samcheong-dong Seochon l Hongdae l Myeong-dong l Yeonnam-dong

Pick up GROOVE at your local

Lee Moon Won Korean Medicine Clinic 3rd Fl., Lee & You Bldg., 69-5 Cheongdam-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul / (02) 511-1079 Treatment for hair loss and scalp problems. One-stop services including aesthetic and hair care products.

Starbucks

Over 570 locations throughout Korea

National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Grand Hilton Seoul Seoul branch H Samcheongdong / Gyeongbokgung Bukchon Gwanghwamun (Palace) Square Daehakro (Hyehwa-dong) Somerset Palace Seoul Insadong Sinchon (Yonsei Univ. & H Myeong Ewha Womans Univ.) H dong Dongdaemun Deoksugung Lotte Hotel Seoul Market Dr.Kim’s Skin Laser Sheraton Grande Hongdae (Hongik Univ.) (Palace) & Esthetic Clinic H Walkerhill H Banyan Tree Seoul (은피부과) Esarang N Seoul Tower H Grand Hyatt Seoul Today Dental Clinic Itaewon Dental Lee Moon Won Korean Medicine Conrad Seoul H Olympic Park Oracle Clinic Clinic 63 City Building Garosugil National Museum H Lotte World COEX H H of Korea Sheraton Seoul D Cube Park Hyatt Seoul Novotel Ambassador H City Hotel JW Marriott Seoul Gangnam Gangnam Seoul Bright Eye Clinic Gangnam Station Seoul Arts Center

Gyeongbokgung (Palace) Gyeongbokgung was the first royal palace built by the Joseon Dynasty in 1395, three years after the dynasty was founded. Gyeongbokgung served as the main palace of the Joseon Dynasty and represented its sovereignty. It is the largest of the Five Grand Palaces, the others being Gyeonghuigung, Deoksugung, Changgyeonggung and Changdeokgung. Deoksugung (Palace) The changing of the Royal Guard and the patrol ritual take place here. The palace is unique for its modern seal engraving and a Western-style garden and fountain. N Seoul Tower Formerly known as Namsan Tower. Its main attractions include multicolored digital art projected onto the tower at night, a digital observatory and a roof terrace. Cheonggyecheon (stream) An 11-kilometer-long modern stream that runs through downtown Seoul, created as part of an urban renewal project. Cheonggyecheon is a restoration of the stream that existed during the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910). Myeongdong Cathedral Myeongdong Cathedral is the very first Roman Catholic parish church in Korea. It is also the first Gothic building ever built in Korea and was designated as Historic site No. 285 in Korea.

www.groovekorea.com Contact Info 010-5348-0212 / (02) 6925-5057 For Advertising ads@groovekorea.com

TODAY DENTAL 3 Fl., 630-19 Sinsa-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 1899-2854 Dental clinic specialized in cosmetic and general dentistry including dental implant and laminate. Oracle Clinic (Chungdam branch) 333 Bongeunsa-ro, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 1800-7588 Dermatologic and plastic surgery clinic with the largest number of branches in Korea 70+ overseas and domestic. Esarang Dental Clinic 26-16 Singongdeok-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul (02) 701-2199 Its internationally trained staff welcomes patients with heartfelt smiles. Dr.Kim’s Skin Laser & Esthetic Clinic (은피부과) 3 Fl., 85-2 Cheongdam-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul (02) 546-3322 Offering a comprehensive dermatological services for all ages and skins Gangnam Seoul Bright Eye Clinic 18 & 19 Fl., Mijin Plaza, 390 Gangnam-daero, Gangnam-gu, Seoul / 1588-3882 Experienced staffs with 10.000+ operations of LASIK & LASEK.

Grand Hyatt Seoul National Museum of Korea The six-story building of the National Museum of Korea 322 Sowol-ro, Yongsan-gu, Seoul / (02) 797-1234 is ranked as the sixth-largest museum in the world. Grand Hilton Seoul 353 Yeonhee-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 63 City Building (02) 3216-5656 The 63 City skyscraper is a Yeouido landmark commanding spectacular views of the city. Standing Conrad Seoul 249 meters high and comprising 60 floors and three 23-1 Yeouido-dong, Youngdeungpo-gu, Seoul basement levels, 63 City is one of Korea’s tallest and (02) 6137-7000 most recognized buildings. Dongdaemun Market It is Korea’s largest wholesale and retail shopping district featuring 26 shopping malls, 30,000 speciality shops and 50,000 manufacturers. All kinds of goods can be found here including silk and fabric, clothes, shoes and accessories, electronics, leather goods, sporting goods, office supplies, pet products and toys.

Park Hyatt Seoul 606 Teheran-ro, Gangnam-gu, Seoul (02) 2016-1234

Gwanghwamun Square Gwanghwamun Square is divided into six sections. At its center stands a statue of King Sejong the Great, the fourth and most respected king of the Joseon Dynasty and creator of Hangeul, the Korean alphabet; and a statue of Admiral Yi Sunshin, a naval commander noted for his victories against the Japanese navy during the Japanese invasions of Korea (1592-1598) and a national hero.

JW Marriott Seoul 176 Shinbanpo-ro, Seocho-gu, Seoul (02) 6282-6262

Lotte World Opened in 1989, Lotte World is a major recreation complex in downtown Seoul. It consists of Indoor Adventure (the world’s largest indoor theme park), an National Museum of Modern and outdoor theme park called Magic Island, a luxury hotel, Contemporary Art, Seoul branch Opened in 2013, the MMCA consists of a small number the Korean Folk Museum, shopping malls, department of separate national art museums focusing on different stores, sports facilities and a movie theater, all in one place. aspects of post-19th-century art. The Seoul museum spotlights “cutting-edge and international art.”

Sheraton Grande Walkerhill 177 Walkerhill-ro, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul (02) 2022-0000

Lotte Hotel Seoul 30 Eulji-ro, Jung-gu, Seoul / (02) 771-1000 Somerset Palace Seoul 7 Yulgokro 2-gil, Jongro-gu, Seoul (02) 6730-8888 Novotel Ambassador Gangnam 130 Bongeunsa-ro, Gangnam-gu, Seoul (02) 567-1101 Banyan Tree Club & Spa Seoul San 5-5, Jangchung-dong 2-ga Jung-gu, Seoul (02) 2250-8080


A

C

L1 Magpie Brewing Microbrewery A3 (02) 742-2849 • 691 Itaewon 2-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul

HBC FEST Puerto

1

HBC FEST Al Matto

Hanjin Villa

R10

HBC FEST Camarata Music Studio HBC FEST Genie Pub The Rabbit Hole

R17

HBC FEST R5 VFW L5

R4

L6

2

B

HBC FEST Rock Fvites

Namsan Daerim Apts.

HBC FEST The Cave

R8

R18

HBC FEST Hansin The Hidden Cellar Apts.

L10 The Springs tap house craft beer A4 (02) 795-7732 • 238 Noksapyeong-daero, Yongsan-gu, Seoul L11 Pier 39 bar A4 (02) 749-0339 • 658 Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul

C2 The Baker’s Table Bakery Cafe A3 070-7717-3501 • 691 Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul R4 Burger Mine Burgers A2 070-8263-2034 • 45-9 Yongsan-dong 2-ga, Yongsan-gu, Seoul

R22 Don Charly MEXICAN A4 (070) 8154-4475 • 250-12 Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul Authentic Mexican by Mexican chef

R5 Casablanca Moroccan A2 (02) 797-8367 • 44-8 Yongsan-dong 2-ga, Yongsan-gu, Seoul

C2 L1 R9

R3 Buddha’s Belly Thai A4 (02) 793-2173 • 673 Itaewon 2-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul

L12 Filament craft beer A4 (02) 749-0339 • 658 Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul

Hanjin Villa

3

L2 Noxa Lounge LOUNGE A4 (02) 790-0776 • 671 Itaewon 2-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul This cozy neighborhood hangout in Itaewon specializes in cocktails and tapas. Check out DOJO, a downstairs bar with huge variety of alcohol on offer.

R19

L7

Buy the Way cvs

MG Community Credit Cooperatives

R6 Pizzarium Pizza A5 (02) 312-7580 • 529 Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul L5 Phillies Pub Pub A2 (02) 793 2548 • 44-17 Yongsan-dong 2-ga, Yongsan-gu, Seoul R8 HBC Gogitjib Korean bbq A2 (02) 796-5528 • 46-5 Yongsandong 2-ga, Yongsan-gu, Seoul

Wellbeing Mart Seoul Digitech High School

IBK R22 S1 L12 L9 L11 L10 L2 R1

R19 Kkaolli pochana Thai B3 (070) 8872-1995 • 706 Itaewon 2-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul A hole-in-the-wall Thai restaurant serving real Thai with generous portions at cheap price.

R3

4

R15

HBC FEST Southside Parlor

R13

HBC FEST Thunderhorse

L6 Bonny’s Pizza & Pub Pub A2 (02) 792 0303 • 44-17 Yongsan-dong 2-ga, Yongsan-gu, Seoul

R12 R6

5

Itaewon Post Office

Pacific Mansion Gold

L7 Maloney’s Pub & Grill Pub b3 (02) 3785-1675 • 225-67 Itaewon 2-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul

CU cvs Rose Hill Villa

Itaewon Cheil Church

Itaewon Elementary School

R10 Jacoby’s Burgers Burgers A1 (02) 3785-0433 • 45-6 Yongsan-dong 2-ga, Yongsan-gu, Seoul R12 Taco Chili Chili Mexican A5 (02) 797-7219 • 527 Itaewon 2-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul R13 Trevia Italian A4 (02) 794-6003• 557 Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul Their pizzas are Roman-style; the thin, crispy dough comes out of the oven literally smoking hot.

Hyundai Villa

2 Itaewon Villa

1

6

Green Mart

No

ksa

pye

ong

Stn

.

L9 Craftworks Taphouse Microbrewery A3 (02) 794-2537 • 238 Noksapyeong-daero, Yongsan-gu, Seoul The first expat-owned microbrewery in Korea still offers some of the best brews around. Try out their seasonal tastes in a warm and inviting ambience. S1 The Nail Bar NAIL SHOP B4 (02) 794-8549 • Manicure, pedicure, tanning and waxing

Rib-eye night every 1st & 3rd Monday. Unlimited rib-eye steak at only 15,000won.

(02) 796-5528 46-5 Yongsandong 2-ga, Yongsan-gu, Seoul

Craftworks Taphouse Try out their seasonal tastes in a warm and inviting ambience.

R9 The Booth Pizza b3 (02) 1544-4723 • 705 Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul

R15 Mi Madre Spanish A4 (02) 790-7875 • 568 Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul R17 Kusina Filipino A2 (02) 790-1826 • 44-7 Yongsan-dong 2-ga, Yongsan-gu, Seoul R18 Pizzaria Retro Italian B3 (02) 749-8947 • 712 Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul

(02) 794-2537 238 Noksapyeong-daero, Yongsan-gu, Seoul

Phillies Pub

(02) 793-2548

44-17 Yongsan-dong 2-ga, Come check out one of Seoul, Korea 140-842 oldest and most popular foreign pubs you’ll find in Seoul.

ITAEWON (GYEOngnidan & HAEbangchon)

R1 Bao Asian A4 (02) 797-4769 • 658 Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul


Yongsandong Apts.

L1

D

E

Embassy of The Republic of the Philippines

2 1

3

Hangangjin Stn.

R1

1

C

ITAEWON (GYEOngnidan & HAEbangchon)

Itaewon (OVERVIEW)

B

A

H

Grand Hyatt Seoul Hotel

R14

Leeum Museum

C2

2

R15 F4

Itaewon Elementary School

2

L9

ITAEWON (main)

S2

H

1

4

3

No

R23

ksa

pye 3 ong S

R4

L3 Hamilton Hotel 2 1 Itaewon Stn. 3 4

F1

tn.

L4

R20

Cheil L12

L7

L5

R9

R2 R7

R16

F3

IP Boutique Hotel

R11

H

L8

Hannam Foreigner’s Apts.

L10

L1 Craftworks Taphouse Microbrewery A1 (02) 794-2537 • 238 Noksapyeong-daero, Yongsan-gu, Seoul The first expat-owned microbrewery in Korea still offers some of the best brews around. Try out their seasonal tastes in a warm and inviting ambience. R1 HBC Gogitjib (Haebangchon branch) A1 Korean bbq (02) 796-5528 • 46-5 Yongsandong 2-ga, Yongsan-gu, Seoul R2 Linus BBQ SANDWICH B3 (02) 790-2920 • 56-20 Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul Pulled pork sandwich, Brisket sandwich, coleslaw, mac and cheese R4 Vatos Urban Tacos Mexican B3 (02) 797-8226 • 181-8 Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul A unique ambience makes this upscale restaurant an ideal place to fill your stomach with authentic favorites. F1 What The Book English bookstore B3 (02) 797-4342 • 2F. 176-2 Itaewon 1-dong, Yongsan-gu,Seoul Located in Itaewon, this English bookstore has new books, used books and childrens’ books. www.whatthebook.com

L3 Reilly’s Taphouse bar C3 (02) 792-6590 • 3F. 123-32 Itaewon 1-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul Reilly’s Taphouse boasts some 20 draft beers and is committed to carrying the best craft brews from Korea and around the world. R7 Joongsim Korean B3 (02) 2235-0707 • 34-39 Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul

R19

Bokwang R9 Le Saigon Vietnamese B3 Elementary School (02) 792-0336 • 74-33 Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul

L5 Wolfhound Irish pub C3 (02) 749-7971 • 128-6 Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul L7 Rocky Mountain Tavern bar D3 010-6654-7202 • 736-12 Hannam-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul R11 On The Border Mexican D3 (02) 792-0682 www.ontheborder.co.kr Authentic Mexican restaurant with homemade dishes and freshest ingredients with 25 margaritas to choose from. F3 High Street Market Grocery shop for imported items D3 (02) 2201-0652 • 727-24 Hannam-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul One-stop shop for imported groceries and coveted deli products. F4 Beaker Shopping D2 (070) 4118-5216 • 738-36 Hannam-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul Discover a wide array of fashion items by the best international designers including James Perse, Aspesi, Rag&Bone, Vince, Jack Spade and more. R20 Sushi Way SUSHI RESTAURANT B3 (02) 794-3774 • 6 fl., 64-15 Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul Authentic Japanese Sushi restaurant with Fresh ingredients & Best price R14 Pizzeria D’Buzza Italian E1 (02) 794-9474 • 743-33 Hannam-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul This trendy joint has a full range of Italian fare. Make sure to make a reservation.

Place to relax and unwind Oriental massage and Spa packages for couples available

R15 Nari Jib Korean bbq D2 (02) 793-4860 • 738-24 Hannam-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul Samgyupsal and Cheonggukjang (pork BBQ and soybean paste pot stew) C2 Richesse Velours Cafe D2 (02) 797-8878 • 741-17 Hannam-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul Try its signature dessert menu item, bottled cupcakes. S2 One Spa Therapy SPA & massage D2 (02) 749-0409 • 3rd fl., 124-7 Itaewon 1-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul, Spa and massage packages starts at 20,000w. R16 Gida Sushi Japanese D2 (02) 749-3558 • 683-125 Hannam-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul Sushi bar with reasonable prices. L8 Yuda Japanese bar D2 (02) 388-5081 • 683-126 Hannam-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul L9 Muntaro Japanese bar D2 (02) 796-7232 • 683-124 Hannam-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul L10 Bull & Barrel Sports bar B3 (010) 9982-2423 • 44-82, Itaewon 1-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul A new hybrid bar and restaurant with a huge terrace and roof top and a state-of-the-art Dart Bar to throw at. R19 Left Coast Artisan burgers BURGER C3 (02) 6248-2998 • 131-20 Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu. Seoul L12 Craftworks Taphouse Microbrewery D3 070-4131-5002 • 736-9 Hannam-dong 2nd floor, Yongsan-gu, Seoul R23 Miya Got The Balls Italian A3 (070) 4231-4346 • 549, Itaewon 2-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul Korean-American chef from Master Chef Korea serving homemade meatballs, pasta and porchetta.

ONE SPA THERAPY

Foot massage 20,000w Full body massage starts at 30,000w

02-749-0409 (02) 793-2344

This tropical resort-themed lounge is a getaway from bustling city.

Seoul, Yongsan-gu, Itaewon-dong 112-3 Sun-Thu: 4:30 pm – 3 am Fri-Sat: 4:30 pm – 5 am

3rd fl. 124-7 Itaewon 1-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul

(3 mins from Itaewon subway stn.)

10am – 5am


ITAEWON (MAIN)

A

B

C

D

E

Cafe / Bakery / DESSERT Hair salon / spa

1

RESTAURANT PUB / LOUNGE Shopping

R10 L9 L8

R5 L6

R2

R9

R7

2

L10 L19

H

L1 L16

Shinhan Bank ABC Mart

H

R16

D’oro Hotel

R13

Hamilton Hotel

L17

L11

R14

R11 L5

R6

2

1

Concierge

3

Itaewon Stn.

3

4

R20

Starbucks

GS gas station

Itaewon Fire Station

KB

R17

L13

L18 R21

7-Eleven cvs

IBK

H

ITW Hotel

CU cvs CU cvs

R19

4

R1

R1 Bulldogs HOTDOG D4 (02) 6248-2998 • 131-20 Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu. Seoul R2 HBC Gogitjib (Itaewonbranch) Korean bbq A2 (02) 796-5528 • 118-9 Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul

L9 Prost pub C2 (02) 796-6854 • 116-1 Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul

R19 Marrakech Night Moroccan D4 (02) 795-9441 • 131-3 Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul

R10 Maple Tree House Korean bbq C2 (02) 790-7977 • 116-1 Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul

L16 Reilly’s Taphouse bar D2 (02) 792-6590 • 3F. 123-32 Itaewon 1-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul

R11 Ho Lee Chow Chinese C2 (02) 793-0802 • 119-25 Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul L1

L10 All that Jazz Jazz club D2 (02) 795-5701 • 112-4 Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul R13 My Thai Asian D2 (02) 794-8090 • 123-20 Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul

R21 Un Deux Trois French D2 (02) 796-1244 • 123-33 Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul An authentic French brasserie where traditions and trends mix, symbolizing a Parisian way of life L17

R14

L1 Rose & Crown pub A2 (02) 794-2555 • 118-23 Itaewon 1-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul Classic British pub specializes in ales and carries 40+ draft and bottled beers R5 Zelen Bulgarian B2 (02) 749-0600 • 116-14 Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul R6 Le saint EX French B2 (02) 795-2465 • 119-28 Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul L5 Baby Guinness pub B2 (02) 792-2777 • 119-17 Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul R7 Pattaya Thai B2 (02) 793-4888 • 116-14 Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul L6 Gecko’s Avenue Lounge C2 (02) 790-0540 • 116-6 Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul

R14 Jonny Dumpling 2 Chinese D2 (02) 790-8839 • 123-5 Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul

L17 The Glamping Bar&Grill A2 (02) 792-3189 • 171-23 Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul L11 Jeon Mandang Korean bar D2 Recreate the feel of outdoor camping and BBQ cuisine in (070) 8749-5004 • 118-18 Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul the warm indoors. L13 Dillinger’s pub B3 (02) 793-7232 • 72-32 Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul

R18 Don Valley Korean bbq C3 (02) 796-2384 • 127-12 Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul L15 Between bar E2 (02) 795-6164 • 124-7 Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul

L8 Glam Lounge C2 (010) 2657-6853 • 116-1 Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul R17 Gecko’s Terrace American C3 (02) 749-9425128-5 • Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul L8

R17

L18 Hollywood Grill Bar&Grill D2 (02) 749-1659 • 123-33 Itaewon 1-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul One of Itaewon’s favorite expat haunts. A real sports bar famed for its burgers and its broad range of pub fare. L19 The Bungalow Bar D2 (02) 793-2344 • 112-3 Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul This tropical resort-themed lounge is a getaway from bustling city. L19


GArosugil (sinsa-dong)

B

A

C

Cafe / Bakery / DESSERT Hair salon / spa

L4

RESTAURANT

R1 Elbon the table Italian A1 (02) 547-4100 • 530-5 Sinsa-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul

PUB / LOUNGE 1

Shopping

CU cvs

R1

Elementary School

7-Eleven cvs

R2 Vatos Urban Tacos Mexican A1 (02) 548-8226 • 532-11 Sinsa-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul

Shingu

R2

Starbucks

C1 La Eskimo Bakery B2 (02) 512-9244 • 546-3 Sinsa-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul

Imagestar

C11

R4 Spain club Spanish A2 (02) 515-1118 • 524-30 Sinsa-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul

2

C12

R5 Deli Heinz Burg Burger A3 (02) 541-8780 • 534-1 Sinsa-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul

C1

R4

R5

C2

3

R6

C4

R19

Hindol Villa

R7

GS25 cvs

R14

R10 R9 f3

Hanyoung House

C8

4

C9

R11

f2

L5

CU cvs

L2 7-Eleven cvs

KB

Starbucks IBK

GS25 cvs

R16

sa

Sin

. Stn

C2 Ikovox coffee Cafe A3 (02) 545-2010 • 534-10 Sinsa-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul

f1 Massimo Dutti Shopping B4 (02) 545-6172 • 541-7 Sinsa-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul

R7 buccella sandwich B3 (02) 517-7339 • 534-22 Sinsa-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul

f2 8 seconds Shopping B4 (070) 7090-1144 • 535-12 Sinsa-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul

C4 Godiva chocolate B3 (02) 517-3979 • 545-6 Sinsa-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul

C9 Ben’s Cookies Cookies A4 (02) 514-0051 • 518-10 Sinsa-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul

R9 Sarubia Italian B4 (02) 540-7344 • 542-3 Sinsa-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul

f3 Marimekko Shopping B4 (02) 515-4757 • 535-18 Sinsa-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul

R10 Hansung Mungo B4

R14 March Rabbit Veggie C3 (02) 3444-4514 • 560 Sinsa-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul

R19 Ozit Gastro pub B3 • 544-5 Sinsa-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul New addition to Garosugil serving sandwich, burgers and salads with the finest craft beer.

R12

5

H

R15

S-oil gas Station

R15 Yum Thai Thai C5 (02) 594-7988 •5-4 Nonhyun-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul R16 Songok Korean b5 (02) 545-3297 • 2 fl.537-7 Sinsa-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul Since 1961, it’s been serving one of Korea’s best UDON, SOBA and DONKATSU. Strongly recommended for casual dining.

Youngdong Hotel

C12 Mercy Juice JUICE B2 (02) 547-3595 • 551-11 Sinsa-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul Cleanses using 100% supernatural cold-pressed juice

C11 Remicone ICECREAM B2 (02) 6207-1029 • 547-12 Sinsa-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul Ice cream haven.

L4 Hanchu PUB B1 (02) 541-0969 • 549-9 Sinsa-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul Awarded ‘The best crispy fried chicken in Seoul’ by Chowzter. Get a side of pork stuffed and fried chili peppers.

L2 Wanso Izakaya C4 (02) 3444-2021 • 539-4 Sinsa-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul C8 Tokyo Panya Bakery C4 (02) 547-7790 • 543-8 Sinsa-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul

R11 Taco Chili Chili Mexican A4 (02) 545-1705 • 535-9 Sinsa-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul

C6

C6 Coffee Smith Cafe B5 (02) 3445-3372 • 536-12 Sinsa-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul

R6 The Original Pancake House Pancake A3 (02) 511-7481 • 523-20 Sinsa-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul

Japanese Ramyeon (02) 543-7901 • 2F. 542-3 Sinsa-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul

f1

R12 Bibigo Korean B5 (02) 544-7423 • 2F. 537-5 Sinsa-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul

L5 De Chou Lounge C4 (02) 514-2014 • B1 fl. 540-19 Sinsa-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul Carries unique Korean traditional soju not found in anywhere else. Pricey but absolutely worth exploring masterpieces by local brewers.


R2 Mano di Chef Italian C2

(02) 561-7111 • B1 825-18 Yeoksam-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul

R3 O’yull Healthy Fusion B3

(02) 554-0511 • 820-9 Yeoksam-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul

R4 Seoga & Cook Italian C2

(02) 558-5263 • 618-18 Yeoksam-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul All menu items are priced at 18,000won

R5 BOBIRED Korean Fusion C2

(02) 3452-1515 • 618-18 Yeoksam-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul

R6 Norita Garden Italian B3

(02) 596-5258 • 7F 1317-13 Seocho-dong, Seocho-gu, Seoul Cream pasta is recommended.

R7 Steakholic Steakhouse C3

(02) 568-8768 • 817-8 Yeoksam-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul All-you-can-eat steak for 28,000won

R8 Doni Burger Burger B3

(02) 534-6282 • 1317-31 Seocho-dong, Seocho-gu, Seoul Operated by famous comedian Chung Hyung-don

R9 Primo BacioBaci Italian B3

(02) 501-0885 • 816-3 Yeoksam-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul (02) 3453-7697 • B3. 821 Yeoksam-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul Italian restaurant with a stage for live music and private parties

R11 Bonguhwaro Korean BBQ C2

(02) 558-8452 • 619-14 Yeoksam 1-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul

R12 Gatten Sushi sushi C3

(02) 2051-1477 • 822-4 Yeoksam-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul A Japanese sushi franchise

R13 Dochi Pizzeria Pizza C2

(02) 556-8001 • 620-17 Yeoksam-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul Neapolitan pizza made in a forno oven

R14 General Banjum Chinese C2

(02) 553-1920 • 619-5 Yeoksam-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul Try various kinds of dimsum

(02) 539-6650 • 818-8 Yeoksam 1-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul Serving 9 different kinds of Big Rock premium beers from Alberta, Canada

R17 Lawry’s The Prime Rib Steak A4

(02) 590-2800 • 3F. 1317-23 Seocho-dong, Seocho-gu, Seoul

B

C Hair salon / spa

L2

Kyobo Tower

R19

1

Hollys

R1

R18 Sushino Baek Chef Sushi C2

(02) 565-0802 • 619-5 Yeoksam-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul

RESTAURANT PUB / LOUNGE

R20

R19 Genroku Udon

Japanese noodles A1 (02) 3481-8555 • 1302-50 Seocho-dong,Seocho-gu, Seoul All-you-can-eat Japanese noodles

Yeoksam Post Office

R26

CGV

R4

R15

R16

R18

R5

R14 R11

2

R20 Elkin the Black Italian B2

(02) 568-6987 • 813 Yeoksam 1-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul Try the lunch special of cream sauce with Boston steak pasta at 25,300won, served for two people.

R27 R13

Giordano R24

Lotte Cinema

R21 Rabat Moroccan B3

(02) 561-3665 • B2. 821-1 Yeoksam-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul Beef tajine with couscous at 26,500won

R25

3

L3

R8 R3

(02) 599-1140 • 1317-14 Seocho-dong, Seocho-gu, Seoul Popular Japanese burger franchise comes to Korea

R22 MegaBox R17

R10 R21

Starbucks

9

(02) 563-7977 • 822-1 Yeoksam-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul

R24 Chez Jin Italian C2

(02) 566-9079 • 817-35 Yeoksam 1-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul Enjoy Italian cuisine with club music

L3 SOS Seafood Pub C3

(02) 508-0458 • 818-11 Yeoksam-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul Cajun seafood at its finest

R25 Johnny Rockets Burger B3

(02) 2051-1226 • 816-4 Yeoksam-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul

S1

R12

12 Gangnam Stn.

1

8

4

7

R23

Samsung Digital

6

L2 Kodachaya Bar B2

(02) 3453-6666 • 808-5 Yeoksam-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 7 different tent bars with a unique concept for each. Its motto is ‘be crazy enough to win and too tired to lose’

11

10

S1 Nova Skin Clinic Skin clinic C3

(02) 2055-3610 • B1. 1320-10 Seocho-dong, Seocho-gu, Seoul

L1

R6

R22 Mos Burger Burger B3

R23 Ganga Indian A4

R7

R9

Gangnam Stn.

R10 I Have a Dream Italian B3

A

L1 Big Rock Brewery Pub C3

hyeon Stn. Line9. Sinnon

(02) 593-5904 • 1303-35 Seocho-dong, Seocho-gu, Seoul Two thumbs up. Fresh ingredients and a reasonable price.

2

3

R15 Big Plato Italian C2

(02) 557-3442 • 619-2 Yeoksam-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul A vintage interior and decent prices.

R16 Mies Container Italian C2

(02) 536-5786 • 1316-29 Seocho-dong, Seocho-gu, Seoul Salad spaghetti and bulgogi cream cheese pasta are recommended.

R26 Julio Mexican C2

(02) 568-5324 • 619-1 Yeoksam-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul

R27 Uncle 29 Mexican A2

•1308-16 Seocho-dong, Seocho-gu, Seoul

(02) 590-2800

j

3rd floor, GT Tower, 1317-23, Seocho-dong, Seocho-gu, Seoul www.lawrys.kr lunch 11:30am-2:30pm Dinner 5:30 pm-9:30pm

GANGNAM STATION

R1 Dos Tacos Mexican B2


HongDae (HongIK Univ.)

A

B

C

5 Ho ng

4

Cafe / Bakery / DESSERT

ik

Hair salon / spa .

2

Stn

.

Lotte Cinema S1

n St ik ng 8

RESTAURANT

7

Ho

ng

Ho

PUB / LOUNGE

1

D

3

ik

Stn

.

6

1

DANCE CLUB

9

KFC

Coffee Bean R4 R1

Seokyo Elementary School

V-HALL R17

Seokyo Prugio Apts. C1

2

H

Bobo Hotel

Smoothie King

VELOSO D7

Halla Mansion

D12

R16

Lotte Cinema

9 8

n.

St

3

KT&G SangsangMadang

D9 L1

4

R11 R8

7-Eleven cvs

C2 C3

5 Ha

pj

3

p

Ha

10

ng

o je

R12

D2

R13

D5

2 1

Wau Park

D6

PRISM HALL

D11

Hongik University

D3

CLUB GOGOS CLUB TA 打 D10 CLUB EVANS CLUB FF R2

Jungang heights Apts.

D1

eo

ng

St 6 n. 7

Freebird2 EVANS LOUNGE

R3

R5

C4

Wau Park

R10 R18 C5

1 Sangsu Stn. 4

2 3

C1 Paul & Paulina Bakery C2 (02) 333-0185 • 344-6 Seogyo-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul

C3 Museum café aA Cafe b3 (02) 3143-7312 • 408-11 Seogyo-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul

R1 Primo Baciobaci Italian C1 (02) 323-0098 • 346-47 Seogyo-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul

C4 Okrumong Cafe b3 (02) 325-4040 • 402-18 Seogyo-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul

D1 Club Freebird 2 (Big Bird) Club b3 (02) 335-4576 408-17 Seogyo-dong, mapo-gu, Seoul Club playing live music by local artists and bands facebook.com/clubfreebird2

C2 Peony Cafe b3 (02) 333-5325 • 403-15 Seogyo-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul

R10 Pakumori Curry Japanese curry b3 (02) 322-5001 • 411-15 Seogyo-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul

D2 Club NB Club / hip-hop C2 • 362-4 Seogyo-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoull

R2 Yoonsi Milbang Korean C3 (02) 3143-4116 • 411-6 Seogyo-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul

C5 Kyo bakery Bakery b3 (02) 794-5090 • 317-7 Sangsoo-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul

D5 Club M2 Club / electronic b2 • 367-11 Seogyo-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul

R3 Sunny the Grill Italian b3 (02) 337-8951 • 401-19 Seogyo-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul

R11 Hongdae Jopok Dukpoki Korean b3 (02) 337-9933 • 407-21 Seogyo-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul

D6 Club Mansion Club / electronic b2 • 368-22 Seogyo-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul

R4 La Paella Spanish C1 (02) 322-8870 • 2F. 345-3 Seogyo-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul

R12 Aloha Table Hawaiian b2 (02) 324-7718 • 364-14 Seogyo-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul

D7 Club Freebird Club / live music b2 • 364-22 Seogyo-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul

R5 Hakadabunko Japanese RAMEN c3 (02) 338-5536 • 93-28 Sangsoo-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul

R13 Agio Italian C2 (02) 322-8133 • 364-6 Seogyo-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul

D9 Club DGBD Club / live music b3 • 395-17 Seogyo-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul

S1 Hair & Joy Hair Salon C1 (02) 363-4253 • 3F. 168-3 Donggyo-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul

R16 Yeonga Korean BBQ b2 (02) 336-9992 • 366-13 Seogyo-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul

D10 Club Gogos Club / rock c3 • 407-8 Seogyo-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul

L1 Castle Praha Pub b3 (02) 337-6644 • 395-19 Seogyo-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul

R17 Gusto Taco Mexican C2 (02) 3142-8226 • 342-16 Seogyo-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul Mexican traditionalism done right: an efficient balance of flavor and texture.

D11 Club NB2 Club / hip-hop C2 • 361-10 Seogyo-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul

R8 No Stress Kitchen Italian b3 (02) 6083-1252 • 404-8 Seogyo-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul

R18 Gusto Taco Mexican C3 (02) 338-8226 • 146-6 Sangsu-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul

D12 Club Cocoon Club / hip-hop C2 • 364-26 Seogyo-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul

#liveishere Every last Friday on the month!

Get your pass at 20,000 won, Access 10 hottest and funkiest clubs in Hongdae!


SAMCHEONG-DONG

A

B

C

D

Silkroad Museum

R12 C1

1

R3 R4

R1

Eros Museum

R2

LeeC Gallery

Bansuk Villa

2

Café bene National Folklore Museum Samcheong Police Box Jinsun Book Café

R6

C2

3

Jeongdok Public Library

CU cvs

R5

Bukchon Art&culture Museum

C4

Hakgojae Gallery

R11

KIEHL’S

C3

Seoul Education Museum

4

R9

Art Sonjae Center R7

R10

National Museum of Contemporary Art, Seoul Branch

R8

Dam Gallery R13

R1

C1 Milk Bakery B1 (02) 735-7111 • 16-2 Palpan-dong, Jongro-gu, Seoul

R7

R1 A table French B1 (02) 736-1048 • 104-8 Palpan-dong, Jongro-gu, Seoul R2 A table bis French B1 (02) 736-1049 • 100-2 Palpan-dong, Jongro-gu, Seoul R3

R3 Cheongsoojeong 청수정 Korean / Seafood C1 (02) 738-8288 • 88-23 Samcheong-dong, Jongro-gu, Seoul

R12

R5 The Restaurant French B3 (02) 735-8441 • 59-1 Sogyeok-dong, Jongro-gu, Seoul R6 Agio Italian C3 (02) 720-1211 • 23-11 Hwa-dong, Jongro-gu, Seoul C3 Hit The Spot Cafe b3 (02) 739-5100 • 87 Sogyeok-dong, Jongro-gu, Seoul

R8 Ramyeon Dangineunnal 라면땡기는날 Korean noodle C4 (02) 733-3330 • 138-21 Hwa-dong, Jongro-gu, Seoul R9 Dal Indian curry C4 (02) 736-4627 • 144-2 Sogyeok-dong, Jongro-gu, Seoul R10 Satbyuldang Chicken C4 (070) 7773-4773 • 144-6 Sogyeok-dong, Jongro-gu, Seoul Skewered chicken with soy sauce / spicy sauce at 2,000won. Just look for a long waiting line.

R4 Chez simon French C1 (02) 730-1045 • 63-10 Samcheongdong, Jongro-gu, Seoul C2 Café aA Cafe b3 (02) 722-1211 • 55 Sogyeok-dong, Jongro-gu, Seoul C2

C4 Coffee Bangakgan 커피방앗간 Cafe b3 (02) 732-7656 • 102-1 Hwa-dong, Jongro-gu, Seoul R7 Cheonjin Poja 천진포자 Asian C4 (02) 739-6086 • 148-2 Sogyeok-dong, Jongro-gu, Seoul

R5

R11 Samcheonghwa Korean C4 (02) 733-8273 • 112 Sogyeok-dong, Jongro-gu, Seoul R12 Flora Pizza C1 (02) 732-7009 • 147-20 Samcheong-dong, Jongro-gu, Seoul Forno-ovened pizza R13 Kongji Potji Italian D4 (02) 745-2203 • 34-1 Jae-dong, Jongro-gu, Seoul


7-eleven cvs

L3

C

D

E

Seochon (서촌), located west of the Gyeongbokgung Palace, literally “West village” / “Western village”, is one of the oldest neighborhoods of Seoul, traditionally associated with Joseon era and Korean literature. Long neglected compared to the wealthier Bukchon (on the other side of the palace), Seochon has reclaimed part of its popularity, particularly following the protection of one of Seoul’s largest clusters of hanok (over 600), and the renovation of landmarks to host cultural venues. Experience the warm memories of the hidden old alleys of Seochon

1

2

B

L4

Seochon

A

Starbucks

L8 L7 Church

R1

R4 R3 Hyundai Motors

3

L6

L9

Dunkin Donuts

Paris Baguette

L2

R2

L1

Geumcheongyo Market

Kia Motors

L5

2 CU cvs

1

3 Gyeongbokg

ung Stn. (Line3)

L2 Bob Dylan & The Band Pub C3 (02) 739-6565 • 90 Chebu-dong, Jongro-gu, Seoul 8pm - 2am

R1 Chebudong Janchijib (체부동잔치집) Korean D3 (02) 730-5420 • 190 Chebu-dong, Jongro-gu, Seoula Perilla seed noodle, seafood and green onion jeon (pancake) and spicy noodle recommended. 9:30 am – 1 am L1 Seochon Kyedanjib (서촌계단집) Pub C3 (02) 737-8412 • 11-1 Naeja-dong, Jongro-gu, Seoul Two thumbs up! The best seafood tent-bar in Seoul. Serves the freshest seafood of the season daily delivered directly from the local fishermen.

R4 JeoNDaegamdaek (전대감댁) Korean C3 (070) 4202-5170 • 184 Chebu-dong, Jongro-gu, Seoul Serves unique and various kinds of Makeoli. Its menu items are perfect for meals as well. L3 Cheolpannam (철판남) Pub A2 (070) 8776-6001 • 155-2 Philun-dong, Jongro-gu, Seoul Teppan Yaki bar with Wagyu (Kobe) beef steak Reasonable steak menu price starting at 15,000 won. L4 Philun Sanghye (필운상회) Pub A2 Opened by the same owner of Cheolpannam (iron-pan man), serves anju to go with soju. Customers can order from Cheolpannam menu as well.

L7 Hyoja Barbe (효자바베) Pub B2 (070) 8749-0019 • 210-3 Chebu-dong, Jongro-gu, Seoul Pork bbq, chicken and grilled prawns starting at 25,000 won.

L5 Anju Maeul (안주마을)

R2 Tongyoung Sangsungui (통영생선구이) Korean C3 (02) 739-3322 • 20 Naeja-dong, Jongro-gu, Seoul Grilled fish and seafood restaurant

R3 Simsanae (심산애) Korean B3 (02) 734-1112 • 205-1 Philun-dong, Jongro-gu, Seoul Strongly recommended its Deodeok Makeoli made of mountain herb harvested be the owner a real ginseng digger.

Pub D3 (02) 723-3529 • 1-2 Naej a-dong, Jongro-gu, Seoul Cooked octopus and boiled cockles

L6 Passion Patato (열정감자) Pub C3 (070) 7778-4676 • 24 Naeja-dong, Jongro-gu, Seoul Fried potatoes with various seasonings and coffee draught beer and citrus draught beer.

L8 Seochon 181 (서촌181) JAPANESE PUB C2 (02) 733-0181 • 181 Chebu-dong, Jongro-gu, Seoul Japanese casual pub with many sake menu.

L9 Killi BanBan (킬리뱅뱅) PUB C3 (010) 5737-0852 • 23 Naeja-dong, Jongro-gu, Seoul Spanish Hipster pub carrying the finest Platinum beer.


Myeong-dong

A

B

C

D

E

Euljiro 1(il)-ga Stn. 8

7-Eleven cvs

5 7

6

1 Lotte Hotel

KEB

Seoul

TGI

i

Mr. Pizza

Myeong-dong Tourist Information Center

Metro Hotel

Skypark Hotel [II]

7-Eleven cvs

Skypark Hotel [Central]

Lotte Duty Free

2

Lotte Avenuel

Seoul YMCA

ABC Mart

Ibis Ambassador Hotel

Lotte Cinema

R4

Hadongkwan

Osulloc Tee house

Seoul Royal Hotel

Starbucks

R2

Myeong-dong Donkatsu

Olive young

Myeong-dong Shinhan Bank Burger King Theater

Lotte Young Plaza

Nanta Theater CGV

Jhill Hotel

Police Eight Stn. SEconds

R3

Andong Jjimdak Myeong-dong Catholic church

Olive young

Frisbee

Levis

Chinese Embassy

3

Lacoste Dunkin Donuts

Vips

Hamheung Myeonok

R1

Myeong-dong Kyoja Seoul lobal Cultural Center

Kyesung Girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;High School

Nike Town Forever 21 American A-land apparel

New Balance

CROCS GS25 cvs

Savoy Hotel

Starbucks

4

NineTree Hotel Shinhan Bank

Quicksilver & Roxi

CGV

UNICLO

UNICLO Migliore

R1 Myeongdong Kyoja Korean D3 With more than 40 years of history, Myeongdong Kyoja has been loved by the locals for many years. The restaurant is popular for its Kalguksu, a Korean noodle dish that serves handmade noodles and other ingredients in a bowl of thick chicken broth. The mini dumpling toppings add a zesty touch while the crazy chili kimchi gives you garlic breath that may be hellish for your companion, but well worth it. The pork dumplings are also highly recommended. R2 Myeongdong Donkatsu Korean B2 Opened in 1983, this restaurant serves delicious donkatsu (Japanese pork cutlet). The secret is in aging thick slices of seasoned pork fillet (150kg total) for three to four days making the meat tenderer.

5

6

The Grand Hotel

Skypark Hotel [III] TOUSlesJOURS

8 7 ng Stn. Myeong-do

R3 Andong Jjimdak Korean D2 Dak means chicken in Korean, and jjim means steamed, stewed or braised in a sauce. Andong Jjimdak, which originated from the city of Andong, is a spicy version that has become enormously popular since late 1990â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Braised in a sweet and savory braising liquid, the dish gets its spiciness from dried whole red chili peppers and fresh fiery hot green peppers called Cheongyang gochu. R4 Hadongkwan Korean D2 Opened in 1939, it is the most representative gomtang (traditional Korean soup boiled with beef bone) restaurant in Seoul. With its long history, Hadongkwan provides an authentic taste of gomtang and it only opens its door until 4:30pm.


This is the place where you can experience Korean culture and get information about travelling in Seoul.

HANDICRAFT-MAKING

K-FOOD COOKING

K-DRUM samullori

K-POP DANCE

HANBOK(Korean Traditional Costume)

K-BEAUTY MAKE-UP

Email seoulcenter3789@gmail.com

EXIT

5

Euljiro 1-ga Station

Website www.seoulculturalcenter.com (English support) Facebook www.facebook.com/Seoulcenter3789

Myeong-dong Tourist Information Center

10 min. walk

Opening Hours 10:30am - 7:30pm open everyday except New Yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day & Chuseok

Myeong-dong Theater

Tel 02.3789.7961

EXIT

6

5F

5 min. walk

5 min. walk

Address 5th FL, M-Plaza, 27 Myeong-dong 8-gil, Junggu, Seoul

EXIT

8

Myeong-dong Station


Yeonnam-dong

R1 Yeonnam Blues Restaurant/bar B4 (02) 325-1478 • 150-6 Donggyo-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul Wines, cocktails, beer or even soju well go with its menu items. Groove recommends Halla tonic (Hallasan soju mixed with tonic) and spicy seafood stew.

A

1

B

C

D

R8 Soiyeonnam 소이연남 THAI C2 (02) 323-5130 • 229-67 Yeonnam-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul

Yeonnam-dong Community Service Center

R9 Lie Lie Lie Vietnamese C3 (010) 2880-7973 • 227-5 Yeonnam-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul BANH MI (Vietnamese sandwich)

R8 L1

Green House

2

L2 R6

R3

홍어랑탁이랑 R4

L3 R5 C3 R7 R9 R2

po

Air roa

ail

rt R d

C1 Nakrangparang Cafe C4 (02) 6204-7888 • 148-3 Donggyo-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul Named after the first café in Korea opened in 1931. Rest your feet at this retrointerior café with a bowl of mango shaved ice. 12 pm – 10 pm. Closed on Mondays

C2

3

Demyung Vivaldi Park Apts. Gyeongam little theater Sambuja Squid Bulgogi

Jin House

R1

Yeonnam Police Box

4

C1 C4

C5

R10

R2 Tuk Tuk Noodle Thai Thai D3 070-4407-5130 • 227-37 Yeonnam-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul Thai chef and Thai beer served in Thai interiors and music.

5

L1 Dan Dan Japanese bar C2 (02) 6092-2298 • 228-9 Yeonnam-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul Izakaya serving various menu items at reasonable price starting at 4,000won. 5pm – 3 am. Closed on Tuesdays L2 228-9 Café / bar C2 070-4244-2289 • 228-9 Yeonnam-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul A cozy place to enjoy cocktails and live music. 2pm – 2am R3 Casa di Noa Italian B3 (02) 3142-1108 • 257-8 Yeonnam-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul Homemade Italian cuisine served by an Italian chef owner. R4 달빛부엌 Moonlight kitchen Asian cuisine C2 (02) 322-3559 • 227-13 Yeonnam-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul Thai, Chinese and Japanese dishes cooked with the freshest from market daily. 5:30 pm – 1:30 am. Closed on Sundays

C5 Travel Maker cafe B4 (02) 338-1545 • 152-7 Donggyo-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul American breakfast

3 4

홍대최대포

R10 SOUPMAN Restaurant C4 Serving chicken, brocoll, pumpkin, potato, gorgonzola and cacao soups starting from 5,600 won. R7 Assisi Italian D3 070-4114-0736 • 227-6 Yeonnam-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul Almost as if you’re dining at your friends’. This small but welcoming ambiance is recommended for dining with your friends. / 11:50 am – 11 pm. Closed on Mondays. C2 Viva Brasil Brazilian dessert cafe C2 070-8951-8282 • 255-25 Yeonnam-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul A dessert café serving Brazilian fruit bowl, smoothies and cheese breads. C3 Isim Coffee shop D3 070-4238-5050 • 227-5 Yeonnam-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul Just when you think you know about coffee, the barista owner will extend your knowledge. Just ask. You won’t regret C4 Tomi’s bakery Bakery C4 (02) 333-0608 • 148-4 Donggyo-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul A local bakery opened by a Japanese patissier Tomigawa. Vietnamese coffee is recommended to go with its breads. / 10 am – 9 pm

Donggyo-dong Samgeori

Ho

ng

ik

St

n.

5

L3 Sisili Soju bar D2 (02) 334-8117 • 227-15 Yeonnam-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul Groove editors’ favorite spot. Seafood grilled or raw, beef grilled or raw and Hallasan soju. Soju lovers’ haven for sleepless nights. 6 pm – 5 am R6 Taiwanese Night Market 대만야시장 Taiwanese restaurant C2 (02) 322-3058 • 227-20 Yeonnam-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul Various Taiwanese dumplings, Paux mama, fried chicken/prawn/port/squid starting at 5,000won. The best spot for late night snacks in the area. 9 am – 2 am R5 Himeji Japanese curry D3 010-4743-1055 • 227-15 Yeonnam-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul Homemade curry at less than 5,500won. Its menu curry noodle is strongly recommended to first time visitors.


Copyright (C) 2015 SEOULMETRO. All rights Reserved.

Subway map


May 2015  

HBC Fest 10 years young!

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you