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PERMIT NO. 32 St. JOSEPH, MO

The Griffon News encourages students to rethink their position on the Proposition B vote.

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TOBACCO BAN

November 1, 2012

Excessive surplus over budget calls student fees into question Matthew Hunt | Opinions Editor mhunt8@missouriwestern.edu With university budget surpluses exceeding $7 million in the past three years without the Student Success Act fees, questions are raised about the need for new fees, the act itself and the missing Advisory Committee. The Student Success Act, which was voted on by the Student Senate, assigned a fee of $75 per full-time student, $50 for part-time student and $25 for summer classes. It also mandated an Advisory Committee, but after six months it has yet to be appointed. The Advisory Board is supposed to be made up of six voting members with the SGA president voting in case of a tie. Three members are to be appointed by the uni-

$$$ ABOUT THE $$$ STUDENT SUCCESS ACT

• Three-year budget surplus tops $7 million without new student fee. • Student Success Act fees are still being collected. • There is no Advisory Committee as mandated by the Student Success Act six months ago. • Student Senate has the power to end the fee. versity president and three appointed by the Student Government Association president. The Student Success Act has provided over $300,000 in new student fees this semester without supervision of the Advisory Committee.

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WAS HB UR

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Vol 95 | Issue 32

Ellis Cross | News Editor elliscross@yahoo.com

No. 11 Griffons return home to face No. 25 Washburn on senior night.

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Western gets a shout out on Comedy Central.

Missouri Western students never voted on the new student fee. At the time of the Student Success Act vote in April, SGA officials said that there wasn’t enough time to do a student vote before the administration would have to

cut student services to balance the budget. To avoid the cuts, the Student Success Act was hurried through to fund student services and save them from the chopping block. In initial forums with students and Student Senate before the Student Success Act passed, it was clear that the Advisory Committee would have a great deal of power and flexibility. “The Advisory Committee does have the power to reduce the fee or terminate it,” SGA President (at that time) Alison Norris said in a public hearing in the hall on the ground floor of Blum Union just weeks before the act was passed. No one argued with Norris even though the room was filled with SGA Senate, Western administration and faculty.

SEE FEES PAGE 2

State works on new formula for higher education Katelyn Canon | Staff Writer kcanon@missouriwestern.edu Missouri Western received $1,560 in state appropriations per student in 2012, which is 26.8 percent lower than the average in state appropriation. That may soon change. The Missouri Joint Committee on Education is working to create a new formula for funding higher education with House Bill 1731. President Robert Vartabedian traveled to Warrensburg, Mo., to address the committee on the goals of higher education. “I think now they are just at a stage where their wanting some generic input about higher education and I assume that the Committee on Joint Education will zoom in on some details later,” Vartabedian said. “Right now I think they are just dealing with some broader issues.” By law, the committee is

required to establish the appropriation formula by December of 2013 and it will go into effect July 1, 2014. Prior to the Joint Committee forming, higher education lacked a consistent funding formula. “What has happened is we kind of got locked into a formula when we were a much smaller school and then we had some tough financial times, and so we have kind of been punished for growing in many ways,” Vartabedian said. The ‘tough years’ that Vartabedian referred to started in 2007, when Western had to draw $2.6 million from reserves to balance the university budget. Then from 2007 to 2008, the university withdrew an additional $700,000, which resulted in a 10-year low of $4.5 million in reserve funds.

SEE BILL PAGE 2

Drake, Wiz Khalifa opener The Voice of Western: to perform at Blacklight Party Three contestants left Nathaniel Conant | Staff Writer nconant@missouriwestern.edu

Eboni Lacey | Editor-In-Chief elacey@missouriwestern.edu This year’s annual Blacklight Party will glow just a little more. Though the room will be filled with the usual black lights and neon glow sticks, stars will also be shining throughout the place. These stars are not any hum-drum astronomical spheres, but are actual stars -- as in celebrities -- that have opened for some big artists including Drake, Trey Songz, Wale and Wiz Khalifa. These celebs are none other then the hip-hop, pop group L.A.M.E. On Friday, Nov. 2, L.A.M.E., which stands for Living Above Maximum Elevation, will be on campus in Blum Union promoting their album at 11 a.m. They will play their music for a few hours and host a mini pre-party before the real boogie down starts later in the evening. The members of the duo,

Mr. Moe and M. Taylor, are very excited to take the Western stage. “We believe in having a lot of fun,” Mr. Moe said. “That’s why we make good party music. It’s all about the dance floor and telling a true story, never degrading and never profanity words or anything like that.” Vice President of Western Activities Council Lauren Dillon said getting L.A.M.E. to come to Western was actually not her idea as she was first approached by L.A.M.E.’s public relations liaison, friend and Western student Bryan Miller, who noticed that L.A.M.E.’s tour made a stop to St. Louis, so a pit stop to Western was a definite possibility. “We definitely lucked out in getting them,” Dillon said. “They put on great performances. In the Midwest, they haven’t really reached here yet, but I think with them being here

it won’t be long until we are listening to their stuff on a regular basis.” Miller said that the group’s message of living life at an elevated level is something every student can relate to. “Their message and who they are as a group is very positive,” Miller said. “That’s what living above maximum elevation is. It’s living at your best potential, bettering yourself because once you’re a better person you can be a better fit in society.” In addition to L.A.M.E. promoting in Blum during the day, the group will also be talking to a music class in the afternoon and will hold a formal Q-and-A about what it takes to be in the industry. Dillon really appreciated the group’s effort in getting more personal with Western rather then just performing at a

SEE LAME PAGE 2

Although the venue for the second elimination round of Missouri Western’s “The Voice of Western” was changed, the mood wasn’t. The judges were faced with cutting their team from three down to one competitor to represent them in the finals. The thing that really shook up this elimination round was each singer picked a ballad they were assigned to learn and sing, but then had to throw the names of their songs into a hat to draw from. The first team to compete on the night was that of judge Derek Thompson. The first performer on the night was Jacob Mills who sang “I Can’t Make You Love Me.” After Mills was Steve Talbot, who sang the hit song “Break Even” by The Script. The last singer for Thompson’s team was Joe Dahman, who sang

THE VOICE OF WESTERN

NOVember 1st @

Kemper 101 6:00 P.M. - 9:00 P.M.

Mystery Guest $1,000 Grand Prize

“Go Light Your World.” After short thought, Thompson chose Dahman to move on into the final round. “I’ve always been kind of a shy guy, so standing up there waiting for Derek to make his decision is really nerveracking for me,” Dahman said. Next up was judge Sarah Waters’ team, with only two competitors to perform. Breauna Watkins, who had drawn “No One” by Alicia Keys, was the first to sing as she walked through the crowd serenading a few gentlemen on the way. The next ballad drawn was Bob Dylan’s “To Make You Feel My Love,” sang by Lauryn Roberts. Her performance won her a ticket into the finale. The final team to compete on the night was judge Morgan Breckenridge’s. First up for her was Ryan Lombard, who sang “Listen” by Beyonce. The only duet performers left in the competition are Reagan Barnett and Kirsten Clemens, and they sang Adele’s “Someone Like You.” Gavin Morris was the last performer for the night as he drew “Stop and Stare” by One Republic. Out of Breckenridge’s choices, she chose Morris to move on. “My favorite part has been being able to come out and try different styles of music,” Morris said. “People that know my singing know I’m more of a rocker, and to come out and challenge myself with different genres has

Finalist Gavin Morris sings “Fine by Me” by Andy Grammer at the first round of “The Voice of Western.” Evan Roberts | Photo Editor

been a great experience for me.” The finale will take place at 6 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 1, in Kemper Recital Hall. This time, however, the show will start out a little differently. The three contestants along with their judges/coaches will all perform together, followed by a duet between each judge/coach and contestant. After that, each finalist will get there solo, which will be their last chance to impress the surprise guest judge, who is still unknown at this time. “I think singing a duet with our coach will really help me loosen up for my solo performance later in the night,” Roberts said. “One of the things Sara has helped me with is come out of my shell and to start off with her singing next to me will be great.”


NEWS NEWS NOTES

The Griffon News

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November 1, 2012

State Appropriation Per Student L.A.M.E. to show Western new genre

$9,000

University of Missouri

$8,500

Four choral ensembles from Missouri Western will be featured at the First Thursday Downtown Noon Concert Series at 12:10 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 1 in the First Presbyterian Church, 7th and Jules in St. Joseph. The concert will feature the Missouri Western Concert Chorale, the Men’s Chorus, the Renaissance Singers and the Women’s Chorus.

“Rappelle-toi Prévert” Coming to Missouri Western Nov. 2 Poems from one of the most popular French poets and screenwriters of the 20th century will be the focus of a two-actor dramatized reading at Missouri Western. “Rappelle-toi Prévert,” the performance in French conceived and produced by André Nerman, pays homage to the life and works of Jacques Prévert. The reading performed by Nerman and Nelly-Anne Rabas will be held at 7 p.m. Friday, Nov. 2 in the Kemper Recital Hall inside Leah Spratt Hall on the Missouri Western campus. The reading is free and open to the public.

Last Day to Withdraw From Classes Nov. 2 Nov. 2, from 8 a.m.-4:30 pm., is the last day students can withdraw from classes or change their courses from credit to audit. Students will not be assessed a $50 processing fee doing so. In order to withdraw from classes or to audit a current class, go to the Registrar’s Office in Eder 102. Students need to know their G number and their CRN number for the particular course.

$7,500

Central

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Northwest

$6,500

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$6000 $5,500 $5,000 $4,500 $4,000 FY2006

FY2007

BILL:

CONTINUED FROM FRONT According to the Western publication “Seeking a Solution to Unintentional Financial Disparity,” the university has had to cut expenditures by permanently decreasing operating budgets across campus 30 percent and increasing class sizes in most cases to room capacity just to name a few. Vartabedian also said “that by going to Missouri

FY2008

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CONTINUED FROM FRONT Chad Hammontree | Graphics Editor

First Thursday Concert Series Features MWSU Choral Groups Nov. 1

Truman

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Western, you are not getting the same cut of the pie as other people are at other universities, and we don’t think that’s fair.” Student enrollment numbers and credit hours taken are both being taken into consideration when devising the new funding formula. If total enrollment numbers were considered, Western would receive more state appropriations, placing the university in the same range at other Missouri universities.

“I tried to slip in the fact that I know you’re not completely inclined to go on headcount, but I certainly think it should be part of the mix as it is with most states,” Vartabedian said. “That you’re rewarded for growing and you’re not rewarded for not growing, and we have had some pretty significant growth over the past several years such that we are falling more and more behind in terms of per student appropriation.”

Act to not allow the Advisory Committee the power to raise the amount of the fee. Afterward, Clifford Petersen asked for clarification from the SGA sponsor of the bill, Johnson. Petersen asks if the committee would be able to reduce the fee and Johnson replied ‘yes.’ Student Gov. (at the time) Peter Gregory mentioned the last line, which states that all changes must go through the SGA. Then Gregory suggested removing the second to the last sentence of the act, which removed the possibility for the committee to raise the amount of the fee but would allow the committee to lower it. The vote was unanimous to remove this sentence. With that vote the power of the committee to change the fee amount went away. More important than the committee’s powers is the fact that after six months of the act’s passage mandating

its formation, the committee doesn’t exist. “We are waiting until Mel Klinkner’s position is filled before creating the committee,” Scott said. Many of those who pushed for the Student Success Act are no longer on campus. The SGA members that were involved and are on campus are Student Gov. Brian Shewell and Scott. “I think if I had to do it all over again I would,” Scott said. Scott does not stand alone in his support of the Student Success Act. Shewell also believes it is still a good idea. “I co-authored the act, and it is still something that is needed,” Shewell said. “With the act, the university can start rebuilding our reserves with money they were going to give to these programs that the act is now helping to support.” The present reserves are at $8.3 million. That is a 10-year

party, which was something the group decided all on their own. “We’ve never done it before,” Dillon said. “It’s a great opportunity for people to hear the music before they come to the party.” Mr. Moe and M. Taylor will also bring solo artist Billy Ray to Western to introduce him to the Midwest as well. The Louisiana native is featured in a few of L.A.M.E.’s tracks and is currently touring with them. The men hope that by promoting themselves before the party they will show Western a little about what they are about. “All of us are recent graduates and we know how it is to try to connect with a lot of college students,” M. Taylor said. “Most of our fan base is young adults. That’s why we know it’s important to show

people that we are more then artists, we have personalities too just like them.” The Blacklight Party starts at 10 p.m. and will be held in Blum 218. The party will kick off with DJ Sound Ninja spinning until 11 p.m. followed by performances by L.A.M.E. and Ray until midnight. Then DJ Sound Ninja will be back on from midnight-2 a.m. Free white shirts, glow sticks and body paint will also be given away. “Everybody should be at the Blacklight Party so we can show you guys how to party. Or you can show us how to party,” Mr. Moe said jokingly. To find out more information about L.A.M.E., visit their website at weneedmorelame.com or follow the men on Twitter: Mr. Moe @ mrmoemusic and M. Taylor @MTaylorRAPS. Billy Ray can also be followed @ItsBillyRay.

Student Success Act collects $300K FEES:

CONTINUED FROM FRONT “We have it (legislation) in there to remain flexible for the Advisory Committee,” SGA Chair of the Budget Committee (at that time) Amanda Johnson said during that meeting. The common belief that was propagated during these hearings was that an Advisory Committee would be formed with authority to affect the fee amount. Griffon News has received a copy of the act from Student Affairs Administrative Coordinator Kathy Kelly, which states “[t]he committee also does not retain the authority to change the fee amount.” As the April 2012 SGA Senate meeting progressed, the gavel fell and SGA President Jacob Scott clearly announced the last vote was to amend the Student Success

high. That high has been obtained without a single dollar provided by the Student Success Act’s new student fees to support student services. “The Student Success Act was created for the sole purpose to ensure student approved fees for programs and services for students,” Scott said. “SGA was aware of the lack of funding from the state as well our budgetary problems. “We took it upon ourselves to try to do what we could with what we had to correct the problem.” The “problem” at the time was a looming cut of 12.5 percent proposed by Gov. Jay Nixon. That cut would have meant $2.5 million less in state appropriations. Vice President of Financial Planning at the time was Klinkner. He was looking for a way to support student services and supported the Student Success Act.

The SGA considered Recreation Services, Center for Academic Support, Student Success Center, Student Life and Career Services as the five main areas to support. The Student Success Act does spell out support for these programs on 2011-12 budget levels. The Memorandum of Understanding of the Student Success Act mentions the powers of the Advisory Committee and limits them to massaging the fee allocations among the five areas and they have the ability to report abuse of power to an Administrative Review. There is no mention of a way for the Advisory Committee to terminate this fee, even if the committee existed. All powers of changing the fee or eliminating the fee are up to the Student Senate and has to be amended by a 75 percent vote.

CAMPUS INFORMATION CAMPUS CRIME REPORTS

CALENDAR OF EVENTS • • • •

• •

1. Stealing 2. Vandalism

1 p.m., Sunday, Oct. 21, Vaselakos Hall 7:32 p.m., Friday, Oct. 26, Lot Q

3. Drug Offense

2 a.m., Saturday, Oct. 27, Vaselakos Hall

4. Assault

6:44 p.m., Sunday, Oct. 28, Scanlon Hall

Friday, Nov. 2 Last day to withdraw at 8 a.m. • Children’s Opera Production, “Hansel and Gretel” at 7:30 p.m. WAC’s “Blacklight Party at 10 p.m. • Griffon Softball Alumni Game at 8 p.m.

Sunday, Nov. 4 Children’s Opera Production, “Hansel and Gretel” at 3 p.m.

Saturday, Nov. 3 Griffon Football vs Washburn at 1:30 p.m. Children’s Opera Production, “Hansel and Gretel” at 3 p.m.

Tuesday, Nov. 6 “Extreme Planets” Planetarium Show at 7 p.m. Griffon Volleyball vs Quincy at 7:30 p.m.

• •

Monday, Nov. 5 Registration begins for spring 2013 classes

If your organization would like to announce an event, e-mail the information to stories@thegriffonnews.com


The Griffon News

Proposition B to increase funding for higher education Brian Ramsey | Staff Writer bramsay@missouriwestern.edu It is well known that colleges across Missouri are in financial slumps. On Nov. 6, Missourians will be given a chance to vote on Proposition B that could generate an estimated $85 million annually towards the state of Missouri’s higher education, according to the Missouri Western Board of Governors. Proposition B is an increase in taxes on tobacco purchases in Missouri. As with anything or anyone that needs voting on, there are going to be pros and cons. To add to that, no matter what a person’s position, that person is always going to anger someone else. “The American Cancer Society started the initiative on the ballot,” Ann Pearce, special assistant to President Dr. Robert Vartabedian, said about Proposition B. “Missouri has the lowest tobacco tax in the nation. This would bring us up to 33rd. So it’s not like its moving us up to the top of the pack, no pun intended.” The current tax rate on cigarettes in Missouri is 17 cents per pack. If Proposition B passes, tobacco tax would be raised to 90 cents per pack. This tax would apply to all tobacco and their products. Cigarettes, roll your own tobacco, cigars, smokeless tobacco such as snuff, and even papers would be included in this tax. The money is split into percentages; 50 percent of the generated money from this tax would go to elementary and secondary education, 30 percent would go to higher education and 20 percent would go to offer health initiatives to help people stop smoking. “The money that is given to the institutions of higher education is based on their core funding from the state from the previous fiscal year,” Pearce said. “Twentyfive percent of that money has to go to help prepare the health professionals.” According to Rick Gilmore, interim vice president for Financial Planning and Administration, the overall money expected for the state of Missouri is between $280$300 million statewide. However, the 2012 Initiative Petitions Approved for Circulation in Missouri clearly states that “[t]he additional actual costs incurred by the state in collecting and enforcing the taxes imposed may be paid from moneys appropriated from the Health and Education Trust Fund for that purpose, not to exceed one and one half of one percent of the total moneys collected in that fiscal year,” meaning that 1.5 percent of the money made from this tax is going into cost of collection. Gilmore says that $80-$90 million will be split between Missouri’s four-year institutions and the community colleges. “Missouri Western’s share of that, I’ve estimated depending on where it falls, should be about $2 million to $2.1 million,” Gilmore said. Twenty-five percent of that $2 million will be put towards the health industries in what is called “Caring for Missourians” and the remaining 75 percent can be used for other things like salaries, equipment, renovations of facilities, and things

NEWS CSE, CME receive majority of allocated funds Page 3

November 1, 2012

of that nature. Some people have hopes of Proposition B passing. Kathleen O’Conner, chairman and associate professor of the department of nursing, believes that the number one reason Proposition B is important is to try and decrease the number of smoking related illnesses. “One way to discourage smoking is to increase the cost,” O’Conner says. “It’s a bit at odds if we say we stand to get money from that tax if it passes. The ultimate goal would be to decrease the amount of smokers, which would decrease the amount of money that tax generates.” Decreasing the amount of smokers among adults and teens is the goal of the American Cancer Society and the Show-Me a Brighter Future program. “Ethically I couldn’t say anything different,” O’Conner said. “I would

Tobacco Tax Illinois $1.98 Iowa $1.36 Kansas $0.79 Missouri $0.17 Nebraska $0.64 * If Proposition B is passed, then the Missouri tobacco tax will increase from $0.17 to $0.90, taking us from the lowest rank to the 32nd highest taxed state.

hope that the eventuality is that there are fewer smokers.” A few may not vote at all just because of problems with the government in the past. “Whenever you have a bill to increase revenues, that bill doesn’t ever dictate where that money is going to go,” biology major Travis Birkhead said. “The budget that gets passed by the legislature dictates where the money goes. Unless that money is written into the legislature, that it will go into a special fund that is not part of the general fund.” The Initiative Petition says any money collected from this tax will be placed in something called the “Health and Education Trust Fund.” “Even then, we see when the national government implemented Social Security,” Birkhead said. “Then they turned around, the legislature not the people, voted to roll that fund into the general fund. So at this point the Social Security fund is just a budget item and a general fund, so your Social Security tax is just an additional tax.” Of course there are people who are in opposition of Proposition B but not just because of the increase in cost of cigarettes. “It’s going to have that trickle-down effect,” sociology major Kirk Gries said. “You’re hurting the retailers, because they are not going to be able to sell. Therefore they aren’t going to order. They are also going to go out of business because they can’t afford to pay their bills, like rent and utilities, and that’s going to hurt the city.”

Katelyn Canon | Staff Writer kcanon@missouriwestern.edu With around $95,000 in rollover in Student Affairs, the Student Government Association is looking to again take control of the funds. Interim Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students Judy Grimes explained the surplus in Student Affair funds. “The reason that it is so high is because the budgets a year ago, it was a mess,” Grimes said. “The state wasn’t funding us, they were cutting money, and we were just concerned we would be taking some really big hits, so Dr. Peralez specifically protected some of those funding just in case and in

the end some of that we have been able to rollover.” While $95,030 rolled over from the previous fiscal year, Grimes also emphasized how that ability to rollover benefits students. “The beauty of rollover is that you don’t get down to the last day and try to spend it foolishly,” Grimes said. Each year, Student Affairs allocates the majority of funds to the Center Multicultural Education, and the Center for Student Engagement. Intramurals and the Non-Traditional and Commuter Student Center also receive a smaller portion of some of the allocated money as outlined from the SGA constitution. For 2012-2013, the Center

for Multicultural Education received $17,701.64, and the Center for Student Engagement was given $31,055.95. The CME uses its funds to provide activities such as the International Lecture Series. The CSE holds several student activities, like Western Warm Up. “It’s certainly a lot of the late night events that we do,” Grimes said. “... and I think the Non-Trads are doing some interesting things this year.” SGA would like to gain more control over the allocated funds. Grimes said she collaborates with the SGA president. “I work really closely with [SGA President] Jacob Scott,” Grimes said. “We meet every

other week and part of the meeting includes looking at the proposals … and then we go through an approval process and Jacob and I make sure that we are all on that same page that SGA would want to be a part of these things.” Scott wants to ensure that SGA has the ability to control the allocated funds. “The money could be spent a little bit better as far as there should be more of an advisory role among SGA because we don’t have necessarily as much say as I think we should with the money, but that’s something I am working on,” Scott said. SGA has tabled the issue and will discuss it at the next meeting.

Employment Center to hold panel Matthew Hunt | Opinions Editor mhunt8@missouriwestern.edu Diverse employers will educate students and alumni for an Employer Panel during an economic crisis. The Career Development Center will be hosting an event for students and alumni to become educated on what employers are looking for in potential candidates for hiring. Donnell Turner, director for the CDC said the event will provide knowledge for future job seekers. “The Employer Panel is designed to provide students information on ‘what does an employer look for in a potential employee,’” Turner said. Nursing major Kaylee Ayers said she will be attending the event by the CDC and advises others to do the same. She said it’s important to attend because one of these individuals can be possible future employers. “I have attended one of these before,” Ayers said. “I have learned what employers might be looking for in possible candidates for job positions.” The panel will feature different speakers from numerous industries for non-profit and profit. The CDC website shows that Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, Super Target, State Farm, Federated Mutual Insurance, U.S.P. Leavenworth and UMB are

just a few industries that will be speaking. “I believe that, collectively, they will offer students at Missouri Western with a diverse set of expectations to consider as they transition into the real world of work,” Turner said. The downturn in the current economy and the competitiveness of the job market should influence students to attend this event Turner said. Those students who plan to attend could benefit from this event and see how to improve what they need to for future interviews. “Graduating students should flock to an event such as this,” Turner said, “to ascertain information that could potentially assist them in their job search.” Students who plan to attend have the opportunity for a Q-and-A session after the employers speak on behalf of their companies. Turner said that each employer is allowed an allotted time to speak, and there will be a break-out session for students to interact with the employers. Darian Cunningham, civil engineering major said he will be attending the event and is excited to hear from the numerous speakers about the job market. “I am going because it’s important to me to get a job in the future,” Cunningham said. “I think it will be great to get some knowledge about

RA of the Month Leaverton Hall

Name: Taylor Braby

Major: Pre-Med.

Chad Hammontree | Graphics Editor

what employees are looking for.” The main purpose of this event is to get students out and aware about potential job possibilities and interaction with these employers. Turner said it’s an employers’ market right now, and he wants students well prepared, equipped, and ready to contend with the enormous task. “My primary purpose and

interest for Missouri Western students is that they are able to contend with the competition in the job market,” Turner said. “Both from former graduates and experienced, downsized professionals.” The event is from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Nov. 6. It will be held in the Enright Rooms 214 and 216 in Blum Union, and lunch will be provided for the first 75 students who register.

RA of the Month Scanlon Hall

Name: Jessica Cato

Major: Nursing

Home: St. Joseph, Year In School: Junior Mo.

Home: Liberty, Mo. Year In School: Sophomore

Favorite MWSU memory: Attending the Homecoming football games.

Favorite MWSU memory: Driving the golf cart around campus!

If you could give one bit of advice to new students, what would that be? Get involved and go to class.

If you could give one bit of advice to new students, what would that be? To enjoy college but to work hard and keep the bigger picture in mind!


FEATURES

The Griffon News November 1, 2012

Page 4

New international student director shares her own experiences Albert Shelby | Features Editor ashelby1@missouriwestern.edu Coming to a new school or community always has its ups and downs. When you are an international student, fitting in and getting use to another country can be even more difficult. Amy Kotwani, Missouri Western’s new international student director understands that and it is her job to make sure all international students are cared for. “It is my job to get more international students to come here to Western,” Kotwani said. “When the international students come, I do programming for them, new student orientation and if they have any emergencies, they call me.” The Kotwani family is from India, but she was born in Kingsport, Tenn. She grew up in Virginia, then eventually moved to St. Joseph, Mo., and has been a resident for 20 years. When headed into college, Kotwani took up journalism, advertising and political science so she could be educated about all three areas. “For college, I went to

Mizzou,” Kotwani said. “In their journalism program, you could pick a sequence so I picked the advertising sequence in the journalism program and I did the same with political science. So I did a double major.” Prior to working at Western, Kotwani did a lot of volunteering work with the organizations here on campus. Before she was offered the job, Kotwani was already familiar with how things worked. One of Kotwani passions is culture. She noted that she is heavily evolved in the Indian culture in St. Joseph. Dancing is a huge part in the culture and in her spare time she enjoys dancing at different events. Kotwani admitted that when she was younger she did not have many friends that were Indian. She did not know much about the culture because the only people she knew of the Indian culture were her parents. “I always wanted to be apart of my culture,” Kotwani said. “My parents were the only members from my family to come here from India. All my relatives are in

Amy Kotwani, Missouri Western’s new international student director, poses with her husband. *Submitted photo

India so I have always felt a little starved for the culture.” She started to get involved with her heritage more when she went to the University of Missouri. Kotwani started to

participate in dance recitals in the school and eventually she was surrounded by all people of different ethnicity and it helped her fill that missing element in her life.

She ended up being the president for the Indian organization at Missouri. Kotwani feels that she can relate to the international students on campus because she was once in the same situation. She understands how it feels to try to fit in a place where you are literally the only member of your culture. “We have a good international student population,” Kotwani said. “But some of them might be the only one’s here from their culture. They are coming to a place new to them. At home, they are around people that are similar to them and their comfortable.” She is very passionate about the international students because having to go through the same thing, she knows what to expect. “I know what it feels like to feel like you are different from everyone else,” Kotwani said. “I also know how rough it is to fit in. That’s why I am really passionate about making sure that the international students here have a real positive experience and feel like they have a good support system.” Some of the international

students here at Western really do not have any experience here in the United States. They live with there parents in their respective countries and then are sent to the states for school. Gilbert Imbiri is an international student from Indonesia. Imbiri was sent to the states for school as well. He started out in high school here in St. Joseph and eventually enrolled at Western. “I like it here,” Imbiri said. “Everybody here is very laid back. I’m really good with adapting to things. With Amy being hired, I feel like we have somebody that knows what we go through. She can help the students here that do have problems with adapting.” Imbiri feels that Kotwani catches on to things fast. She fits in to what it means to be an international student director. “I like somebody to take charge,” Imbiri said. “It’s upsetting to the international students when they found out the director is not involved. We do not have to worry about that with Amy.”

Anime Club: Yep, we have one Andy Garrison | Staff Writer jgarrison@missouriwestern.edu It’s a dark, brisk, fall evening on a Thursday as the clock tower chimes seven times. The wind slowly shuffles the leaves outside of Murphy, twisting them into small dancing tornadoes of oranges, yellows and browns. Just visible in the peripheral, a figure is dressed in a long brown trench coat with a belt holding a line of bullets thrown over one shoulder and a hat pulled low; like a shadow, he quietly slips into room 110. At his heels, a man with a black kimono follows him closely with a long black sword slung loosely over a shoulder. Both are gone within the span of a breath and a heartbeat leaving behind only the icy wind and the echos of the tower’s chime fading into the night. Should fear be the emotion of the moment? Nah, it’s just the weekly meeting of Mis-

souri Western’s Anime Club. Yep -- we have one. For those few who may not know what anime is, they are movies or a series of episodes that are skillfully drawn or animated, through computer generated imagery, that frequently contain ancient Japanese cultural tales and legends that were traditionally passed on through the , somewhat lost, art of storytelling. They help children, young adults and even adults to obtain these, otherwise, lost pieces of folklore. Student Matthew Kurtz gives his personal account and a warning. “I first got into it when I was a kid,” the four-year member said. “I just thought they were neat cartoons. As I got older and found out more about it, I naturally got more into Japanese culture in general. I use anime as a way to pick up on cultural ideas, although you have to be careful with that, there

can be some things that can be misinterpreted.” Club President Robert Bradley goes on to support this idea of cultural distribution in anime. “From a personal perspective, it also gives a little bit of insight into a counter culture going on here in America,” Bradley said. “The people who (here in America) are watching anime (and are creating a subculture of their own).” Five-year club veteran Cassandra Mohling, explains what the club tries to introduce about the culture beyond just showing anime. “We are trying to get more into the culture,” Mohling said. “Last year we had origami and a drawing night which was pretty fun.” They also attend an anime convention each year called “Nakakan,” that takes place in Liberty, Mo. There is a charge at the door; however, it costs $30 if there are seven or more to a group. The door

fee is due prior to Nov. 30. The club meets every Thursday at 7 p.m. in Murphy Hall, and anyone and everyone is invited to join free of charge, although there is a small fee per semester that is optional. “[There are] $5 dues per semester if you want to pay them,” Mohling said. “They are mainly for if you want pizza or stuff like that.” For more information or contact information for the Anime Club, visit them via mwsu.orgsync.com under the “social interest” category. Other than motivating people to learn more about Japanese culture, the club’s goal is a pretty simple one. “Our biggest goal is probably just to get more people interested in this,” Bradley said. “Because we like it a lot and we think other people would like it if they gave it a chance.”

Robert Bradley counsels Amanda Shellnut after being mummified for a friendly competition during the Anime Club’s Hallween party. The club wore their costumes to celebrate Halloween early. Evan Roberts | Photo Editor

‘Cloud Atlas’ astonishes Brian Duskey | Multimedia Editor bduskey@missouriwestern.edu With a near 3-hour running-time, “Cloud Atlas” may seem like quite the commitment. There are a lot of characters and several plots that are not told in linear fashion, but this epic is one of the most ambitious pictures in film history. Based on the 2004 novel by David Mitchell, “Cloud Atlas” interweaves six different stories-- which take place during six different times-into one giant narrative. With each of the stories being told at the same time, it can be a lot to take on and

rather confusing, but it eventually pays off. Each individual story hits their plot points at the exact same time -- and when all of the stories hit their climaxes at the same time, it is completely thrilling. Tom Hanks and Halle Barry are the headliners of this well put-together cast, who all put on spectacular performances. With all of the actors playing several parts, the audience is shown the diverse range of the cast. With the assistance of make-up and some great vocal adjustments, they are able to convince us that these are completely separate worlds.

We give this movie 4 out of 5 stars

MOVIE TRIVIA: “Cloud Atlas” was based on  David Mitchellʼs novel, which was considered “unfilmable.”

Hanks will most likely receive a majority of the publicity for the film, and rightfully so, but the two unspoken heroes of the film are Ben Whinsaw and Jim Broadbent. Both are incredibly convincing and tremendously entertaining in their respected roles. They bring great sympathy to their characters while also pushing a realism that makes the audience realize the complications of the human condition. The cinematography in “Cloud Atlas” is also topnotch. There are several shots within the film that will have you whispering “wow” under your breath. It took a trio of directors to make this epic come to life. The two Wachowski siblings (Lana and Andy) and Tom Tykwer. It is clear to see the style of the Wachowski’s within this film because of its stunning visuals, but they did go overboard occasionally. In some of the more futuristic scenes, there were these outlandish laser gun fights and while they made sense, they didn’t necessarily match with the rest of the story. A majority of the film is

*Photo courtesy of imdb.com

about the emotions of the characters with some violence to portray the world that they were living in, but the pacing of the laser fights just came off as their way of showing off some special effects. While the make-up was convincing and stellar in most of the film, there were some scenes in which it was just distracting. The most glaring example was, once again, in the futuristic setting and Jim Sturgess was put into make-up to appear Asian. It is completely understood why this was done, but the end result was

just too distracting. I didn’t see another Asian character, I just saw Sturgess with a strangely molded face. Despite the incredible performances, wonderful pacing and jaw-dropping cinematography, this film is still not guaranteed to please. Through process of it’s non-linear story, a lot of audiences may not completely understand the point to this film. They may not get it.

If they do get it, it will be incredibly rewarding and overwhelmingly memorable. Nonetheless, give this film a shot and an opportunity. It is easily worth the $10. Even if you become one of the audience members who doesn’t completely grasp the film, you will still be rewarded with the experience of seeing “Cloud Atlas” in a theater; an experience to not be missed.

View our video movie review at 

www.GriffonNews.com


The Griffon News

FEATURES

Page 5

November 1, 2012

Ancient history professor revives medieval times

Michelle Cordonnier | Staff Writer mcordonnier1@missouriwestern.edu Missouri Western recently enhanced the history department by adding a new professor to the staff to teach Ancient and Medieval History and Early Modern History. Eventually, Dr. Jay Lemanski will help to expand the upper level history courses by introducing and teaching classes on ancient Rome and ancient Greece. Lemanski is originally from Detroit. He came to Western from his most recent appointment as a Senior Lecturer for the history department at the University of Akron in Akron, Ohio. From 2003-2012, Lemanski was also a teaching assistant and an instructor at Akron. “I am from a big city, and I grew kind of tired of living in a larger community,” Lemanski said. “I enjoy the smaller community; the countryside around St. Joseph is nice. I like the idea of having big city amenities and the smalltown feeling that St. Joseph offers.” Lemanski is enjoying the transition from big

Dr. Jay Lemanski History Professor city living to the smaller community of St. Joseph, and he is happy with the colleagues he has met since being at Western. Lemanski said the smaller campus gives the college and community a more intimate quality than the larger colleges offer. “I am very pleased with the instructors and students that I have met since coming to Western,” Lemanski said. “They are the nicest people, and have made me feel very welcome.” Junior Kristen Brantley is taking Lemanski’s Ancient and Medieval History course, which she is enjoying this semester. She said she has had trouble in history

classes before, but so far this semester she has learned a lot from Lemanski’s teaching style. “He has a passion for the subject,” Brantley said. “He’s not just passing out information, but actually making the material more relatable. College is tough, and he makes it easier by providing us with study guides, easily readable maps and interesting readings.” Lemanski is educated in a variety of subjects, such as history and modern languages. He earned his bachelor’s degree at Concordia College in Ann Arbor, Mich., in 1983. Lemanski was a dual major in Greek and Hebrew with a minor in Latin. In 1985, he received his first master’s degree at the University of Michigan in near eastern studies. Lemanski continued to study at the University of Michigan and received his doctorate in 1989. The year 2005 brought Lemanski his second master’s degree in the history department. Lemanski passed his Ph.D. comprehensive exams

How To: Make Porky’s Cojones

in 2007 with distinctions in Medieval, Early Modern Europe, the Middle East and the United States pre-1877. In 2007, Lemanski also won a one-year Robert W. Little Graduate Research Fellowship, and in 2008, he was awarded a Graduate Student Government Research Grant from the University of Akron. The year 2009 finally brought Lemanski his Ph.D. in history from the University of Akron. In addition to his extensive knowledge of history, Lemanski is skilled in many language cultures, such as: German, Greek, Latin, Arabic, Anglo-Saxon, Hebrew, Sumerian, Akkadian, Ugaritic and French. “Lemanski’s use of other languages helps to illustrate certain points in ancient Greece and ancient Rome,” Brantley said. Lemanski also has the ability to decipher and translate ancient Greek and Roman clay tablets from the beginnings of written language. Throughout Lemanski’s years of schooling, he has worked in the education

field as an assistant librarian of rare books and as reference librarian. He has also worked for the New York Times as an Indexer for the University Microfilms International and has taught courses in Absolution to Revolution, Ancient Middle Eastern Studies, Renaissance and Religious Studies, Early and Late Medieval European Studies, the Latin Language, Middle Eastern Studies and Humanities in the Western Tradition. “This is my last history course required for my degree, but if I had to take another one, I would definitely consider taking a different course taught by Dr. Lemanski,” Brantley said. Lemanski said he’s enjoying teaching at Western more than anything else. He feels that the students are very diverse for a smaller community and is enjoying getting to know them through the classes he teaches. “The best part of Missouri Western is the students,” Lemanski said. “I like the students; I enjoy talking to them, and getting to know

them. They are very interesting and engaging. I like teaching them. I have great students here at Missouri Western, I couldn’t ask for more.”

Lemanski’s Decipherable Languages Akkadian Anglo-Saxon Arabic French German Greek Hebrew Latin Sumerian Ugaritic

Comedians give Western shout out on Comedy Central

*Submitted photo Professional comedians and Comedy Central TV stars Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele gave Missouri Western a special shout out on their TV show, “Key and Peele.” The video segment was a sports listing re-enactment that made fun of funny (made up) names of players from numerous sports teams. The Missouri Western’s player’s name was “X-Wing @Aliciousness.” To view the full video, search “Key & Peele: East/West College Bowl” on YouTube. The clip currently has over 2 million hits.

Love the “How To”?

How about we make one exclusively for you! Andy Garrison | Staff Writer

Andy Garrison | Staff Writer jgarrison@missouriwestern.edu This week’s How To is an easy way to entertain a handful of friends and family with an appetizer using only four ingredients. It makes an awesome finger food for football games, movie night or sleepovers for the kids. This recipe makes approximately five dozen sausage balls. What you will need: • Two large baking sheets • Two large bowls • One liquid measuring cup • One dry ingredient measuring cup • Two hands, attached to a body with a pulse • A spatula • An oven mitt The ingredient list: • Three cups of standard issue Bisquick mix • One third cup of water. • One pound of either breakfast or Italian sausage. • One, two cup, bag of shredded sharp cheddar

cheese Step 1: Preheat the oven to a temperature of 350 degrees. Step 2: Put the three cups of Bisquick into one of the large bowls. Step 3: Add in the two cups of shredded cheddar. Step 4: Add in the one third cup of water. Step 5: Add in the sausage. Step 6: Mix all the ingredients thoroughly with your hands. Continue to mix for a couple of minutes after it seems that it is mixed to evenly distribute the grease from the sausage into the dry mix. *Note: As the mix absorbs the water it can become very sticky and cling to your hands. It is a good idea to keep some hot water running in the sink. The hot water easily removes any of the stubborn sticky mixture. Step 7: Place the two baking sheets onto the counter top near the bowl containing the mixture.

Step 8: Form the mixture into small balls about the size of a walnut. Note: There should be approximately enough balls to cover a full sheet and a half. Step 9: Carefully place the two sheets into the oven, side by side, on the middle rack. Set the timer for fifteen minutes. Step 10: After 15 minutes, check on the balls. When they are done they should be a light brown in color with a darker crust on the bottom. If they don’t look done, reset the timer in increments of five minutes until they are finished cooking. Step 11: Using the spatula, remove the balls from the sheets and carefully transfer them into the clean bowl. Step 12: Allow them to cool for approximately five minutes.

Tweet us @GriffonNewsCom #GNhowto

EMPLOYER PANEL: WHAT DO EMPLOYERS LOOK FOR IN PROSPECTIVE EMPLOYEES? Do you know what it takes to become a successful applicant in a highly-competitive job market? Join a diverse group of employers for a discussion on this valuable topic, Q&A, and networking.

Tuesday, November 6th 11:30am to 2:00pm Enright 214 & 216 (Spratt Hall)

Registration is required. Call 816.271.4205 to register.

Lunch will be provided.

Career Development Center

Enjoy! missouriwestern.edu/careerdevelopment


OPINIONS

The Griffon News

Page 6

November 1, 2012

Editorial: Students should take a stand on this election season

CAMPUS

Flip-flopping seems to be the game that the Missouri Western Board of Governors likes to play. In a crucial election year, the Board of Governors has decided to support Proposition B which would favor a bill that could raise taxes on cigarettes for revenue toward Higher Education. The proposition would generate an estimated $84 million boost from the tobacco tax for universities throughout the state of Missouri. Western would be given a nice handout if the tax is passed by the voters in Missouri on Nov. 6. If passed Western would receive $2 million. However, at the same time the Board has voted to make smoking of any tobacco illegal on campus. It just seems quite questionable for a Board to support a bill that would favor a cigarette tax, but not allow students to smoke on their own campus. The support for Proposition

B by the Board is just another example of where a select few individuals make a decision and hope the majority of students will follow. It just doesn’t seem fair to raise the tax on a pack of cigarettes by 73 cents from a nationwide low 17 cents per pack. Proposition B has good intentions for other universities throughout the state who have not banned tobacco on their campuses. However, if Western is tobacco-free, why support this bill? They decided to go around the students by making the campus smoke free without a student vote, and then ask the students to support a bill that would raise the taxes on cigarettes. If students would pay attention to the issues in this election and vote responsibly they could make a huge impact, and that goes for all voters throughout the state. Students who are able to vote in the November election need to go into the voting booth and think clearly about the way they vote on

B

TOBACCO BAN

1 of next year. “They” have won and without so much as a whimper from anyone. “They” did it by going where “They” knew “They” could win. “They” used the faculty senate where “They” knew “They” had the numbers. Let me tell you who “They” are before I go further. “They” are the people who do not believe you have personal freedom. “They” believe that “They” know what is best for you, and it is best for you to live your life the way “They” want you to. “They” are actually few in number but are somehow powerful. It is by definition a

Andrew Setter and Chad Hammontree | Staff Illustrator and Graphics Editor

this issue. It’s time to stand up and fight for your rights, and show the Board that they could take away our rights on campus, but we can take away extra revenue from

them in the voting booth. It’s time for these flip-flop decisions by the Board come to an end. So on Tuesday Nov. 6, go vote and determine whether or not we need to stand together as

a student body, or follow a small group of individuals who determine the outcome for over 6,000 students. Make the right decision next Tuesday.

NANNY STATE. Welcome to Western where it is OK to serve alcohol, paid for by Western Foundation, for President Vartabedian’s house parties and house parties of the Board of Governors, but not OK to smoke on campus. (By the way, smoking is not one of the president’s habits.) We seem to have plenty money to buy the additional insurance to cover the off campus alcohol policy, but we are seeking to save insurance money by banning smoking on campus. The president is working hard to free up drinking rules for his parties and those of the Board of Governors while he signs away the per-

sonal freedom of many of Western’s students, faculty and staff. He probably didn’t even change pens. What the president and “They” need to realize is, we once were a dry campus. I’ll make another wild prediction, since I’m batting a thousand. This smoking ban thing won’t last as long as the alcohol ban of days gone by. Just wait till the first $50,000-a-year donor or a Gold Coat member walks outside and lights up at half time. I predict you will soon see a smoking area close to Looney. Eventually those in charge will begin to make exception for those annoying contributing alum who go

to events at Spratt Stadium, Spratt Hall and, oh yes, those public events at Fulkerson. What about those Chiefs fans? Don’t forget them! Surely “They” will give them a smoking area. After all, the Chiefs fans were one of the first to break the alcohol ban. Darn that general public. It is so difficult to get them to understand that they have no personal freedom here at Western. They don’t understand the power of the “They.” The problem is “They” don’t understand basic human desire. Humans desire to be free, my friends. Freedom will win. Smokers need only be patiently defiant.

Degrees of success: All classes count

Andy Garrison | Staff Writer jgarrison3@missouriwestern.edu Most students today appear to think that college is just a place to come after high school, get a degree and move on. Most students today are wrong. As I walk the halls of Missouri Western, with my bag full of so many books it feels like I have a body thrown over my shoulder,

inevitably some whisper winds its way into my consciousness to damage my calm. “Why do I have to study English?” “It’s got nothing to do with my degree!” Such words generally slipping from the mouths of people who have spent so much on credit cards and unnecessary loans that they should run for Congress. If one truly wants to remain single-minded, and never open one’s self up to becoming a more complete individual with multiple tools and critical skills, and instead have one thing that pertains to their degree constantly burned into their minds, perhaps go to a seminary and study theology, I

hear they are pretty good at that. The history of college, especially one of the liberal arts, has always been more about expanding your base; not necessarily to just come and study a single field and then be vomited out into the workforce. If one doesn’t want to take my word for it, I would be happy to supply some credible validation. An article entitled “College of Letters & Science from Berkeley University” states, “To be liberally educated is to be transformed. A liberal arts education frees your mind and helps you connect dots you never noticed before, so you can put your own field of study into a broader context. It enables you to form opinions and

The Griffon News Staff Eboni Lacey Editor-in-Chief

Blair Stalder Chad Hammontree Andrew Setter Ellis Cross Evan Roberts Tevin Harris Kyle Inman Christian Mengel Albert Shelby Matthew Hunt Brian Duskey Lauren Dillon Hanna Greenwell Andy Inman Kyler Penland Shelley Russell Bob Bergland

Should Missouri Western have a fall break? Ali Howat Freshman

I’m tired of being right

WITH ELLIS CROSS

I warned smokers long before the smoking ban was brought to the students for a courtesy vote that it would be shoved down, or up, any available orifice of smokers just as soon as “They” found a way. Well, last week President Dr. Robert Vartabedian signed the smoking ban into law. It will take effect July

PROPOSITION

VOICE

Managing Editor Graphics Editor Staff Illustrator News Editor Photo Editor Assistant Photo Editor Sports Editor Assistant Sports Editor Features Editor Opinions & Online Editor Multimedia Editor Design Artist Design Artist Design Artist Ad Manager Copy Editor Faculty Advisor

judgments, rather than defer to an outside authority.” To go back a bit further, a statement from Albert Einstein goes on to back up this claim. “The value of an education in a liberal arts college is not the learning of many facts but the training of the mind to think something that cannot be learned from textbooks,” Einstein said. To defer back to the English specific proclamation that initially pushed my buttons, I have never learned more about critical thinking and analysis in my entire life than I learned in a single semester of Dana Andrews’ writing and rhetoric class. Even though, at the time, it was not something that I felt was specific to my degree,

I firmly believe if I had not taken his class it would be kind of like operating on one lung. I could still survive in my field just fine, but I wouldn’t be running any marathons. We have choices when it comes to our education. One is not lashed to a liberal arts college to get a degree. If one simply wants to study degree specific courses for four years, mucking through their studies, turning in halfassed work because they were told to, more pissed off then turned on about their education, and wearing all that disdain on their face as they whisper about how horrible it all is; perhaps a liberal arts college just isn’t for you.

“Yes, to have time to study for midterms last week.”

Summer Dunn Sophomore

“Yes, so we have a break and don’t stress out.”

Parker Joslin Freshman

“Yes, because most universities do.”

Marisa Grayson Freshman

“Yes, it’s easier to focus after a small stressrelieving break.” Check out the full responses at GriffonNews.com

The Griffon News is written and published by students of Missouri Western State University during the fall and spring semesters. The first copy of each issue is free; additional copies are 50 cents. Content of this paper is developed independently of the faculty and administration, or other campus organizations or offices. Readers are encouraged to submit story ideas, information and advertising to The Griffon News office, Eder 221, 4525 Downs Drive, St. Joseph, Mo. 64507, or by phoning (816) 271-4412 (advertising and news room). You may also e-mail thegriffonnews@gmail.com. Copy and advertising must be received by noon Friday, the week prior to publication. Guidelines for letters to the editor: • All letters to the editor must be typed and double spaced. Letters must be no longer than 350-400 words and guest columns no longer than 500 words. Letters and columns will be edited for style. • All letters must include signature and identity verification information, such as phone number. The Griffon News reserves the right to edit all letters for length and Associated Press style. • The Griffon News will not withhold names under any circumstances. Anonymously submitted letters will not be published. • Views expressed on the opinion pages are not necessarily those of The Griffon News staff or Missouri Western State University.


SPORTS November 1, 2012

Volleyball falls to No.15 Truman Christian Mengel | Asst. Sports Editor

cmengel@missouriwestern.edu

If Truman State is ranked No. 15 in the nation, then the Griffons should be in the top 25 based on how the teams looked on Oct. 30. Both teams played similarly, and the first three sets were anybody’s game. However in the end, the Griffons lost three sets to one (25-22, 1925, 25-22, 25-15). The Griffons came out looking strong and confident from the very beginning. The first set was all but easy for the Bulldogs, as they didn’t even gain the lead until the score was 20-19. It was defense that held it together, forcing the Bulldogs to get their points from kills; 20 of the 25 points were from kills. The second set looked about as good as it could get for the Griffons. For the first time in a long time, there were smiles on the court. They looked more comfortable and relaxed than they have all year. Stephanie Hattey could easily notice the good vibes. “We need to just play relaxed; we get too uptight and then we don’t play very well,” Hattey said. “We played relaxed tonight and our passing was awesome. I have to give them props for that. Our passing was amazing.” Hattey finished the night with eight kills, 26 assists and 15 digs. She wasn’t the only one who felt the passing helped. Freshman Jessie Tho-

rup felt that the good passing led to other good things for the Griffons. “We were playing really well together as a team,” Thorup said, “and passing really well helped us with our offense, and that took them out of system, which helped out our blocking.” Thorup led the Griffons with 10 kills on the night. Early on, the Griffons seemed to have passed some of their season-long issues onto the Bulldogs side. There were communication issues for the Bulldogs -- communication issues that led to holes in the defense. The Griffons had no problem finding those holes. The Griffons were able to take the second set, showing the No. 15 team in the nation that they weren’t going to walk out with an easy win. The Griffons looked much more like the team to beat tonight. If someone knew nothing about these two teams, except one was a .500 win team and the other was ranked No. 15 in the nation, they wouldn’t have been able to tell which team was which. One thing the Bulldogs clearly had on the Griffons was taking advantage of mistakes at the net. There were multiple times that bumps from the Griffons would be just a little long and float over the net. Those felt like give away points to the Bulldogs, as they made a kill out of most of them. The third set was a similar story for the most part, com-

The Griffon News

Page 7

Libero Sarah Faubel digs a ball in the recent contest against the Truman State Bulldogs. Jason Brown | Photo Contributor

ing right down to the end. All three of the first sets could have easily been swung either way, as it all depended on who was on a hot streak at the end. Both teams had an equal share of mistakes, and both teams would capitalize well anytime the other team made one. The forth set was unfortunately a remembrance of old problems for the Griffons. It was the little things that ate away at the scoreboard. Communication problems, inaccurate hits, positioning problems and errors were adding up and frustrating the team. Coach Cory Frederick didn’t know what was happening in the last set. “For whatever reason,

I think we looked uptight mentally,” Frederick said. “Truman didn’t do anything different to us when we were getting digs in the fourth game, we were having trouble putting up a good hittable ball if it wasn’t our setter. That’s where we really seemed to struggle.” Even though the fourth set wasn’t what the Griffons wanted to end on, there were plenty positive things to take away from this game. “I think the team, for whatever reason, came out and played relaxed,” Frederick said. “Practices have been helping this week so hopefully it will continue on this weekend.”

Division II playoff system is a joke Not only is Missouri Western in the toughest Division II conference in the country, it also in the toughest region when it comes to post season play. Football fans remember the national title game between Alabama and LSU. Some hated it and some loved it. The ones that loved it believed they were the best two college teams in the country. The ones that hated it felt like the BCS was biased towards the South Eastern Conference. The SEC was widely known, and still known, as the best football conference in the nation. Division II is similar, but not the same. It is similar in that, the MIAA is just like the SEC. There are multiple teams in the MIAA that will not make it a game further than the regular season, but could be a conference contender if they were in almost any other conference. Division I has bowl games that determine how a team finishes the season. Division II has a playoff system, and only a certain number of teams can make it in. The playoffs are separated by regions. There are four regions with 10 teams in each one. Depending on what conference the school is in, determines what region the team is in. The MIAA is the toughest region by far, Super Region 3. Nine of the 10 teams in Super Region 3 are ranked in the top 25. The worst team in the region is Pittsburg State at 6-2 (last year’s champion). There are only 12 schools ranked in the top 25 in all three other regions combined. Super Region 3 is a league above the others, while Super Region 2 is a league below. Super Region 2 has a combined total of 23 losses, which is more than twice the total of Super Region 3. Super Region 2 has just one ranked team. The worst team in Super Region 3 would be competing for the top spot if they were in Super Region 2. That’s fair, right? As of now, Western, Northwest Missouri State, Emporia and Pittsburg State are the teams who will be representing the MIAA. Washburn is sitting right behind them, waiting for the opportunity to take someone’s spot. West-

Christian Mengel Asst. Sports Editor cmengel@missouriwestern.edu

ern and Washburn will play this weekend. With a win, the Griffons would probably secure a sport in the playoffs, no matter the outcome of their last game of the season against Northwest; but things could get ugly quick in the MIAA. Say Western loses to Washburn this weekend and beats Northwest next weekend. Also say that Washburn goes on to beat Emporia next weekend. Pittsburg has two fairly easy games left and will likely win them both. The MIAA would have five teams tied for first if this happened, all tied with two losses. What would that playoff bracket look like? It’s embarrassing to know that after so many years, this is the best system that Division II has come up with. It should be less like the NFL playoffs, and more like the NCAA March Madness bracket. I mean there are already 40 teams in it, so it statistically would seem to hold up better anyway. In the NCAA basketball tournament, teams aren’t confined to the same region just because they are in the same conference. They are broken up so the chance of two teams from the same conference playing for the championship is always possible. In reality, the best teams are brawling it out in the same region, while other regions are practically full of warm-up games for whoever the top team is. There is no doubt that whoever comes out of Super Region 3 will have had the toughest road. Depending on how you look at it, the last team standing in Super Region 3 will be either exhausted and beaten up or confident and fired up for having beaten some of the best teams in the country.

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It’s time to register for spring classes

Priority Registration: November 5-January 21 Early Registration: November 28-January 9 Walk-in Registration: January 8, 1-6:30pm, Eder Hall Instructions: missouriwestern.edu/registrar/registration

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Accounting Information Systems...... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Lewis.........................ACC 418-40....21528

Technical Report Writing................... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Jordan........................EGT 350-40.....21302

accounting business

Business Statistics II.......................... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Staff...........................GBA 310-40....21338

marketing

Principles Of Marketing..................... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Hickman....................MKT 301-40...22350 International Mkt. and Trade............. 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Ertekin.......................MKT 451-40... 20511

management

Management Information Systems.... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Lewis.........................MGT 418-40...21530

COMMUNICATION STUDIES & THEATER communication studies

Oral Communication.......................... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Bond..........................COM 104-40...21335 Small Group Communication............ 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Harris.........................COM 324-40...21384

theatre

Introduction To Theatre...................... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Lillie..........................THR 113-40....22302

COMPUTER SCIENCE, MATH & PHYSICS computer science

Applied Database Systems................ 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Hecker.......................ACT 301-40....22179 Web Development Tools.................... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Becker.......................ACT 311-40.....20523 Computer Systems and Archtres....... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Staff...........................CSC 200-40.....20672 Microcomputer Applications............. 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Staff...........................CSC 201-40.....20540

math

Foundations/Univ. Math I.................. 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Moore........................MAT 081-40....20596 Foundations/Univ. Math I.................. 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Moore........................MAT 081-41....22044 Foundations/Univ. Math II................. 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Moore........................MAT 082-40....21475 Foundations/Univ. Math II................. 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Moore........................MAT 082-41....22045 Foundations/Univ. Math III............... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Moore........................MAT 083-40....21821 Foundations/Univ. Math III............... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Moore........................MAT 083-41....22046 College Algebra.................................. 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Hegeman...................MAT 116-40....20849

physics

Introduction to Astronomy................. 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....4...... Godfrey.....................PHY 104-40....20559 College Physics I................................ 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....4...... Bucklein....................PHY 110-40.....20568

CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LEGAL STUDIES criminal justice

Intro to Criminal Justice..................... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Briscoe......................LAW 100-40....21962 Juvenile Delinquency......................... 1/14-5/7......... WILSON...3...... Dierenfeldt................LAW 110-40....21359 Juvenile Delinquency......................... 1/14-5/7......... WILSON...3...... Dierenfeldt................LAW 110-41....21963 Juvenile Delinquency......................... 1/14-5/7......... WILSON...3...... Huffman....................LAW 110-42....21357 Juvenile Delinquency......................... 1/14-5/7......... WILSON...3...... Huffman....................LAW 110-43....21969 Juvenile Delinquency......................... 1/14-5/7......... ARRG .....3...... Lindsteadt..................LAW 110-44....21970 Modern Police Procedures................. 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Jang...........................LAW 130-40....21360 Intro to Theories of Crime................. 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Godboldt...................LAW 210-40....21953 Understanding Research in CJ........... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Lindsteadt..................LAW 255-40....21364 Criminal Law...................................... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Courtney....................LAW 260-40....21366 Probation and Parole.......................... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Godboldt...................LAW 270-40....22129 Practicum I......................................... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Tushaus.....................LAW 290-40....21379 Research Methods.............................. 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Lindsteadt..................LAW 405-40....21395 Internship............................................ 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Katz...........................LAW 465-40....21401 Research Methods in CJ.................... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Lindsteadt..................LAW 505-40....21524 Graduate Internship............................ 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Tushaus.....................LAW 670-40....22147 Research and Publication................... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Tushaus.....................LAW 680-40....21958

legal assistant

Introduction to Law............................ 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Staff...........................LAT 101-40.....21314 Introduction to Mediation.................. 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Katz...........................LAT 335-40.....21339

ECONOMICS economics

engineering technology

ENGLISH, FOREIGN LANGUAGES & JOURNALISM english

College Writing And Rhetoric........... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Crain..........................ENG 104-40....21547 College Writing And Rhetoric........... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Bartels.......................ENG 104-42....22005 College Writing And Research.......... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Bartels.......................ENG 108-40....20145 College Writing And Research.......... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Katchen.....................ENG 108-41....21551 College Writing And Research.......... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Donaher.....................ENG 108-42....22098 Approaches To Literature.................. 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Crain..........................ENG 210-40....20155 Topics in Teaching Writing................ 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....2...... Lock-McMillen.........ENG 501-40....22006

HEALTH, PHYSICAL ED & RECREATION physical education

Fitness And Wellness......................... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Kriewitz....................PED 101-40.....21462 Fitness And Wellness......................... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....0...... Kriewitz....................PED 101-41.....21464 Drug Education.................................. 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Dodd..........................PED 294-40.....21944 Socio Aspects Sport Phys Act............ 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Russell.......................PED 375-40.....21940 Personal & Environmental Hlth........ 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Dodd..........................PED 391-40.....21594

recreation and sports management

Philos & Leadership In Rec. Adm..... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Hardy.........................RSM 300-40....21286 Recreation Law For The Practit......... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....2...... Blessing.....................RSM 325-40....21289 Resorts, Parks, Recr. Area Facil......... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Hardy.........................RSM 342-40....21292 Promotion Sprt & Rec Agencies ...... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Choi...........................RSM 343-40....21294 Org. & Adm. / Leisure Agencies....... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Hardy.........................RSM 424-40....21297 Leadership Effectiveness................... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Staff...........................RSM 699-40....22370

HISTORY & GEOGRAPHY history

American History Since 1865............ 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Frieling......................HIS 150-40......22232

MUSIC music

Perspectives In Music........................ 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Edwards....................MUS 101-41....21441 Perspectives In Music........................ 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... May...........................MUS 101-42....21442

NURSING

allied health

Medical Terminology......................... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....2...... Yeh............................ALH 106-40....20707 Medical Terminology......................... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....2...... Yeh............................ALH 106-41....20708 Applied Nutrition............................... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....2...... Nuckolls....................ALH 352-40....20710

health information technology

Information Technology and Sys....... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Dolan.........................HIF 320-40...... 22111 Quality Management.......................... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Dolan.........................HIF 350-40...... 22112 Professional Management.................. 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....2...... Dolan.........................HIF 371-40...... 22113 Financial and Resource...................... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Dolan.........................HIF 440-40...... 22114 Applied Research............................... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Dolan.........................HIF 460-40...... 22115 Professional Management II.............. 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Dolan.........................HIF 465-40...... 22116 Health Informatics Senior Semi........ 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....2...... Dolan.........................HIF 470-40...... 22117 Pharmacology..................................... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....2...... Ellis...........................HIT 132-40......22109 Health Care Statistics......................... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....2...... Dolan.........................HIT 235-40......21526 Principles Of Management................ 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Staff...........................HIT 240-40......20687 Coding & Classification Sys I........... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Dolan.........................HIT 275-40......22217 Coding & Class Systems I Lab.......... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....1...... Dolan.........................HIT 276-40......22272 Coding & Class Systems II................ 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Staff...........................HIT 277-40......20690 Coding & Class Systems II Lab........ 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....1...... Staff...........................HIT 278-40......20698 Reimbursement Systems.................... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....2...... Dolan.........................HIT 279-40...... 22110

nursing

Quantitative Analysis......................... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Brooks.......................NUR 314-40....21498 Health Alterations: Community......... 1/14-5/7......... OFFCAM..3...... Harris.........................NUR 453-40....22287 HealthCare Policy, Org, & Fin.......... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Donaldson.................NUR 506-40....21512 Research for Evid-Bsd Nur................ 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Donaldson.................NUR 616-40....21898

Current Issues In The Economy........ 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Hamzaee...................ECO 101-40.... 21172 Principles Of Macroeconomics......... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Courington................ECO 260-40.... 21175 Principles Of Microeconomics.......... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Lawson......................ECO 261-40.... 21180 Business And Econ Forecasting........ 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Courington................ECO 460-40.... 21185

POLITICAL SCIENCE, SOCIAL WORK & SOCIOLOGY

EDUCATION

American National Government....... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Kovacs......................PSC 101-40.....21403

education

Educational Psychology..................... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....2...... Wall...........................EDU 225-40....20031 Introduction to Reading..................... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Blake.........................EDU 310-40....21997 Secondary Reading Techniques......... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....2...... Flowers......................EDU 311-40.... 20011 Psychology & Educ of Exc. Stu........ 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....2...... Eicher........................EDU 315-40....20010 Sci and SS for Young Children.......... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Flowers......................EDU 333-40....20700 Intro to Early Childhood Educ........... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....2...... Claflin........................EDU 358-40....20012 Behavior Management....................... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....2...... Staff...........................EDU 370-40....20013 Seminar in Elem. Ed.......................... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Irvine.........................EDU 403-40....20014 Sem. - Ed. & Human Relations......... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Eddins.......................EDU 404-40....20015 Language Development for Ed.......... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Svoboda-Chollet.......EDU 414-40....21344 Trends & Mgmt of Programs............. 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Hagan........................EDU 422-40....20952 Curric Methods & Mat E Ch Ed........ 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....4...... Claflin........................EDU 440-40....20756 Applied Education Practices.............. 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Tushaus.....................EDU 490-40....22001 Applied Education Practices.............. 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Tushaus.....................EDU 490-41....22407 Topics in Teaching Writing................ 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....2...... Lock-McMillen.........EDU 501-40....22007 Topics in Teaching Writing................ 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....2...... Tushaus.....................EDU 501-41....22408 Prof Learning Community................. 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....2...... Tushaus.....................EDU 502-40....22000 Literature Review and Case Stu........ 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Eicher........................EDU 611-40....20803 Ass. & Ping for St. with ASD............ 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Kalis..........................EDU 651-40....22337 Class Prog For Stud. with ASD......... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Staff...........................EDU 652-40....20808

tesol - teaching english to speakers of other languages

Methods Tch Sec Lang Stu................ 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Dickerson..................TSL 468-40.....21774 Materials and Assessmnt TESOL ..... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Dickerson..................TSL 469-40.....21775 Methods of Teach L2 Students.......... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Dickerson..................TSL 660-40.....21776 Materials and Assessments................ 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Dickerson..................TSL 662-40.....21777

political science

social work

Substance Abuse and Dep.................. 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Atkinson....................SWK 345-40... 21147

sociology

Introduction to Sociology.................. 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Kamali.......................SOC 110-40..... 21150 Introduction to Sociology.................. 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Kibirige.....................SOC 110-41.....21947 Introduction To Archaeology............. 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Albright.....................SOC 200-40..... 21157 World of Islam.................................... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Kamali.......................SOC 325-40.....22329

PSYCHOLOGY psychology

General Psychology........................... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Henry.........................PSY 101-40.....22125 Industrial/Organizational Psy............ 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Henry.........................PSY 310-40.....20307

WESTERN INSTITUTE continuing education

Nutrition & Weight Control............... 1/14-5/7......... ONLINE....3...... Harrison....................CED 278-40....20462

missouriwestern.edu/schedule Western is an equal opportunity institution.

Degree Completion:

Do you have credit toward a degree that you never finished? Missouri Western can help you finish that degree through our three degree completion programs. missouriwestern.edu/completion

B.S. General Studies

Complete the degree you started but never finished. For students with 75+ credit hours.

B.S. Technology

Turn your associate’s degree into a career customized bachelor’s degree.

Interdisciplinary Studies

Requires completion of a course from each of 7 areas, a 24 and a 12 hour concentration.


wi.missouriwestern.edu What can you find at Western Institute’s website? Testing Center

Noncredit Online Courses

Kansas City Classes

Law Enforcement Academy

Pass the Power Adult Literacy

Study Abroad

Professional Development

Intensive English Program

Study Abroad & Exchange Programs:

Cave Ecology - Missouri

Paris, France

London, England

New York City

Spain

Belize

Germany & Austria

Saint-Étienne, France

BIO 355 - January 2-17, 2013 Instructor: Dr. David Ashley

SPA250 | 350 - May 8-27, 2013 Instructor: Dr. F. Eduardo Castilla Ortiz

HON 395 - March 8-15 2013 Instructor: Dr. Susie Hennessy

March 8-17, 2013, pending approval Instructor: Don Lillie

NUR 492 - May 12-20, 2013 Instructor: Julie Baldwin

MUS 450 - May 13-23, 2013 Instructor: Dr. Matt Edwards

ART 381 - April 4-7, 2013 Instructor: Geo Sipp

FRE 207 | 307 - June 15-July 13, 2013 Instructor: Dr. Susie Hennessy

Degrees: Did you know Missouri Western has a campus in Kansas City?

6364 N Cosby Avenue, Kansas City, MO 64151

M.A.S. Autism

B.S. Elementary Education

B.S.N.-for-the-R.N.

M.A.S. TESOL

B.S. Early Childhood Ed

POST Certificate

a Masters of Applied Science in Assessment a Graduate Certificate

a Masters of Applied Science in Assessment a TESOL Certification

2+2 degree: take your first two years at MCC and complete your degree at MWSU’s Kansas City Northland campus.

Turn your AAT or AAS degree into a bachelor’s degree. Courses are offered in Kansas City, St. Joseph and online.

Western Institute Classes title............................... dates.......days.........times.................location..... hrs.. instructor......... #/section....... crn

St. Joseph Classes act prep

A.C.T. Prep.................... 3/2-30...S..............9am-1pm..........Spratt 103...0... Marmaud.... MIS 100-01...22004

computer

Microsoft Access....... 3/26-4/23...T..............6-9pm...............Spratt 212...1... Readenour.... CED 256-01...22160 Microsoft Access....... 3/26-4/23...T..............6-9pm...............Spratt 212...0... Readenour..... CPT 120-01...22001 Microsoft Word......... 3/28-4/25...R..............6-9pm...............Spratt 212...1... Readenour.... CED 186-01...22162 Microsoft Word......... 3/28-4/25...R..............6-9pm...............Spratt 212...0... Readenour..... CPT 130-01...22003 Microsoft Excel.............. 4/1-29...M.............6-9pm...............Spratt 212...1... Readenour.... CED 147-01...22161 Microsoft Excel.............. 4/1-29...M.............6-9pm...............Spratt 212...0... Readenour..... CPT 117-01...22002

global positioning systems

Intro To Gps................... 1/9-11...WRF........8am-5pm..........Spratt 212...2... Chevalier.... CED 490-97...22219 Intro To Gps................... 1/9-11...WRF........8am-5pm..........Spratt 212...0... Chevalier..... MIS 440-97...22044 Intro To Gps................. 3/13-15...WRF........8am-5pm..........Spratt 212...2... Chevalier.... CED 490-01...22159 Intro To Gps................. 3/13-15...WRF........8am-5pm..........Spratt 212...0... Chevalier..... MIS 440-01...22005

intensive english program

Beg Listening & Speaking.. 1/14-5/7...MTWR....10:20-11:30am....Spratt 208...3... Mathies..... CED 086-01...21742 Beg Listening & Speaking.. 1/14-5/7...MTWR....10:20-11:30am....Spratt 208...0... Mathies....... IEP 086-01...22032 Beg Grammar & Comp...... 1/14-5/7...MTWR....9-10:15am........Spratt 208...3... Mathies..... CED 087-01...21739 Beg Grammar & Comp...... 1/14-5/7...MTWR....9-10:15am........Spratt 208...0... Mathies....... IEP 087-01...22033 Beg Reading................ 1/14-5/7...MTWR....12:30-1:40pm.....Spratt 208...3... Voigt......... CED 088-01...21733 Beg Reading................ 1/14-5/7...MTWR....12:30-1:40pm.....Spratt 208...0... Voigt........... IEP 088-01...22034 Beg Academic Writing.... 1/14-5/7...MTWR....1:45-3pm..........Spratt 212...3... Voigt......... CED 089-01...21734 Beg Academic Writing.... 1/14-5/7...MTWR....1:45-3pm..........Spratt 212...0... Voigt........... IEP 089-01...22035 Inter Listening & Speaking .1/14-5/7...MTWR....10:20-11:30am....Spratt 208...3... Mathies..... CED 096-01...21743 Inter Listening & Speaking.. 1/14-5/7...MTWR....10:20-11:30am....Spratt 208...0... Mathies....... IEP 096-01...22036 Inter Grammar & Comp..... 1/14-5/7...MTWR....9-10:15am........Spratt 208...3... Mathies..... CED 097-01...21740 Inter Grammar & Comp....... 1/14-5/7...MTWR....9-10:15am........Spratt 208...0... Mathies....... IEP 097-01...22037 Inter Reading............... 1/14-5/7...MTWR....12:30-1:40pm.....Spratt 208...3... Voigt......... CED 098-01...21735 Inter Reading............... 1/14-5/7...MTWR....12:30-1:40pm.....Spratt 208...0... Voigt........... IEP 098-01...22038 Inter Academic Writing ..... 1/14-5/7...MTWR....1:45-3pm..........Spratt 212...3... Voigt......... CED 099-01...21736 Inter Academic Writing...... 1/14-5/7...MTWR....1:45-3pm..........Spratt 212...0... Voigt........... IEP 099-01...22039 Adv Listening & Speaking.. 1/14-5/7...MTWR....10:20-11:30am....Spratt 208...3... Mathies..... CED 166-01...21744 Adv Listening & Speaking.. 1/14-5/7...MTWR....10:20-11:30am....Spratt 208...0... Mathies....... IEP 166-01...22040 Adv Grammar & Comp...... 1/14-5/7...MTWR....9-10:15am........Spratt 208...3... Mathies..... CED 167-01...21741 Adv Grammar & Comp...... 1/14-5/7...MTWR....9-10:15am........Spratt 208...0... Mathies....... IEP 167-01...22041 Adv Reading............... 1/14-5/7...MTWR .12:30-1:40pm.....Spratt 208...3... Voigt......... CED 168-01...21737 Adv Reading............... 1/14-5/7...MTWR....12:30-1:40pm.....Spratt 208...0... Voigt........... IEP 168-01...22042 Adv Academic Writing....... 1/14-5/7...MTWR .1:45-3pm..........Spratt 212...3... Voigt......... CED 169-01...21738 Adv Academic Writing........ 1/14-5/7...MTWR....1:45-3PM.........Spratt 212...0... Voigt........... IEP 169-01...22043

leadership

Gateway Leadership.... 1/14-5/7...W.............10-10:50am......Eder 208.....1... Bryant....... CED 119-01...21669

law enforcement academy / criminal justice

Police Mthds & Op..... 1/14-5/7...MTWRF....8am-5pm..........Wilson 184...12.. Wilson........POL 150-02...21972 Police Mthds & Op..... 1/14-5/7...S...............8am-5pm..........Wilson 184....6... Wilson........POL 150-03...21617 Police Mthds & Op..... 1/14-5/7...S...............8am-5pm..........Wilson 184....6... Wilson........POL 150-04...21971 Police Mthds & Op..... 1/14-5/7...S...............8am-5pm..........Wilson 184....6... Wilson........POL 150-05...22297

Offered once-a-week in a blended class format at the MCC-Penn Valley Health Science Institute.

Become a police officer through our parttime, evening academy or full-time, day academy.

SPRING 2013 title............................... dates.......days.........times.................location..... hrs.. instructor......... #/section....... crn

nursing home administration

Making Stress Work for You.... 3/20...W.............8:45-11:30am...Arrg............0... Teliczan.....NHA 214-01...22010 Making Stress Work for Your Residents....3/20...W.............12:30-3:15pm...Arrg............0... Teliczan.....NHA 215-01...22011 Excercise for Aging Adults.......... 4/24...W.............8:45-11:30am...Arrg............0... Raffensperger...NHA 216-01...22012 Alzheimer’s Research Initiatives.... 4/24...W.............12:30-3:15pm...Arrg............0... Staff..........NHA 217-01...22013

photography and photoshop

Photo Level 1............ 2/14-3/21...R..............6-8:30pm..........Poppl 102...1... Callow...... CED 225-01...22154 Photo Level I............. 2/14-3/21...R..............6-8:30pm..........Poppl 102...0... Callow...... PHO 225-01...22015 Photo Level 2............ 3/28-4/25...R..............6-8:30pm..........Poppl 102...1... Callow...... CED 226-01...22155 Photo Level 2............ 3/28-4/25...R..............6-8:30pm..........Poppl 102...0... Callow...... PHO 226-01...22023 Photoshop Level 1..... 2/12-3/19...T..............6-8:30pm..........Rem 108.....1... Callow...... CED 325-01...22156 Photoshop Level I..... 2/12-3/19...T..............6-8:30pm..........Rem 108.....0... Callow...... PHO 325-01...22025 Photoshop Level 2..... 3/26-4/23...T..............6-8:30pm..........Rem 108.....1... Callow...... CED 326-01...22157 Photoshop Level 2..... 3/26-4/23...T..............6-8:30pm..........Rem 108.....0... Callow...... PHO 326-01...22030

sign language

Concepts Of Sign Lang I... 1/28-3/18...M.............6:30-9:30pm.....Murphy 206...1... Ballard...... CED 152-01...22163 Concepts Of Sign Lang I... 1/28-3/18...M.............6:30-9:30pm.....Murphy 206...0... Ballard....... MIS 105-01...22006 Concepts Of Sign Lang II.. 3/25-4/29...M.............6:30-9:30pm.....Murphy 206...1... Ballard...... CED 252-01...22164 Concepts Of Sign Lang II.. 3/25-4/29...M.............6:30-9:30pm.....Murphy 206...0... Ballard....... MIS 205-01...22007

spanish

Conversational Spanish I.... 1/24-4/4...R..............6:30-8:30pm.....Spratt 109...0... Cathey........ MIS 106-01...22008

stress management

Stress Management..... 1/14-5/7...W.............6:30-9:30pm.....Murphy 112.3. . Teliczan..... CED 178-01...20654

volunteer training

Vol Train: Dom & Sex Viol Advo..... 2/5-28...TR...........5-9pm...............YWCA.......2... Turner....... CED 159-01...22324

Kansas City Northland Campus education

Multicultural Ed.......... 1/14-5/7...W.............9:30-11:20am...KCN...........2... Foster........ EDU 308-20...21342 Sc Mthds in EC/Elem..... 1/14-5/7...R..............8-10:50am........KCN...........3... Kincheloe.. EDU 330-20...20006 Assessing & Individualizing...... 1/14-5/7...MW.........8-9:20am..........KCN...........3... Blake......... EDU 360-20...20007 Seminar Elem Ed........ 1/14-5/7...MTWRF...12:30-4pm........Arrg............3... Irvine........ EDU 403-20...20008 Student Teaching III....... 1/14-5/7...MTWRF...8am-5pm..........Arrg............9... Kelly......... EDU 408-20...20009 Physical Sci for Elem Teac........ 1/14-5/7...T..............8-10:50am........KCN...........3... Ellis............PHS 230-20...20910

criminal justice

Intro to Computer Forensics....... 1/14-5/7...T..............6:30-9:20..........KCN...........3... Owen....... LAW 535-20...22146

MCC - Penn Valley Campus education

Exp in Early Child Ed........1/14-5/7...MTWRF...10-11am...........Arrg............2... Kelly......... EDU 460-20...22334

nursing

Nursing Leadership & Mgt...... 1/14-5/7...R..............2-4:50pm..........Penn Valley....3... Brose.........NUR 474-20...21783 Sr. Capstone Clinical....... 1/14-5/7...Arrg.........Arrg..................Arrg............7... Staff..........NUR 475-20...21787


SPORTS

The Griffon News

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November 1, 2012

Soccer seniors finish game, season with win; puts night in record books Mika Cummins | Staff Writer mcummins1@missouriwestern.edu The Griffons said goodbye to their five seniors Friday night and made it a game the whole team will remember for a very long time. Missouri Western hosted Missouri Southern Friday, Oct. 26, to close out the regular season and to hold their senior night. Prior to the game, the senior midfielders Ashlyn Castillo and Ashley Grunder, goalkeeper Kelly Voigts, forward Abby Widrig and defender Erin Widrig were honored as they played their last game of their career. The teams would stay scoreless throughout regulation, sending it into overtime. Close to an hour and a half into the game, Abby knocked in the winning goal and ended the special night on a high note. With a final record of 6-91 overall, it became a night -- and season -- for the Missouri Western record books.

“There’s a couple things that have never happened,” coach Chad Edwards said. “We’ve never lost less than 10 games, and we’ve never won our last game of the season, or scored in it. Tonight was a gift to them, they earned it.” Just a couple weeks ago, Abby, the sports management major, broke the mostcareer goals record (previously 11 set by Audrey Henderson). Her main goal before hanging up her cleats was to extend the record a little bit, “so the next person has something to reach for.” Her game-winning goal on senior night set it at 13, certainly something not easily reached. Abby’s sister Erin, also a sports management major, started 59 of the 60 games she played in over her four years as a Griffon. She has over 5,000 minutes of play and collected two assists. “Hard work does pay off,” Erin said. “ We hope we’ve

given them the desire to keep working hard.” Voigts, a transfer physical education major from Johnson County Community College, became the goalkeeper with the most wins in the history of the program with 10 wins, including five shutouts. In just two seasons, she racked up 218 saves and over 2,500 minutes of play. “It’s unbelievable to go out like this,” Voigts said. “But at the same time, it’s really hard to be done with my career. Overall, it was an awesome night.” Castillo, a biology major, has played all four years at Western. She’s started 67 of the 68 games she’s played in. Castillo made her first goal as a Griffon this year against William Jewell. She’s tied for second for most-career assists with five. As a transfer from MIAA rival Washburn, Grunder had a lot to offer to the growing Griffon team. In her three seasons as a Griffon,

(Left) Abby Widrig, who had the game-winning goal in the game, pushes the ball down the field. (Right) Rochelle Gillilan hugs senior Ashlyn Castillo after the victory. Tevin Harris | Asst. Photo Editor

Grunder played in 36 games and scored one goal out of three shots. Grunder is a nursing major. “It feels awesome,” Grunder said. “Not many teams get to go out on a win and we did.” Despite not securing a spot

in the MIAA Tournament, the Griffons’ storybook-finish to the season ended the

five seniors careers with a night full of hugs, tears and happiness.

Anderson hit another field goal to make the score 20-0 at the start of the second quarter. Quarterback Travis Partridge connected with the elusive Tyron Crockom on a screen pass for a 19-yard touchdown and then ran the ball in from eight yards out to give the Griffons a commanding 26-0 lead at the halftime break. “Tyron is just a good football player,” Coach Jerry Partridge said. “He catches Coach Jerry Partridge gives a couple of Griffon football players the ball and has ran reverses. a pep talk during their game against the Emporia State Hornets. The wealth has been spread around pretty evenly on ofThe Griffons triumphed 57-28. fense for us.” *Courtesy of Western Media Relations The second half started with another highlight play Griffons on top 3-0; then run- what we had the week be- from the Griffons, this time it ning back Michael Hill went fore at Pitt,” Hill said. “We was on defense. Cornerback to work. Hill ran for two didn’t run too many differ- Michael Jordan intercepted touchdowns in the first quar- ent plays, a lot of inside zone a pass thrown by quarterter, both from three yards out and kept shoving it down back Tyler Eckenrode and reas the Griffons took at 17-0 their throat. I don’t know turned it for a 91-yard touchlead. how many times we passed, down that put the Griffons “We pretty much came out but we smashed them in the on top 33-0. and wanted to carry over trenches.” “Michael Jordan is going

to be one of the very best corners we have ever had here,” Partridge said. “He’s solid as it gets with good speed, good agility, good hands, and he’ll tackle you.” Hill had 185 yards and two touchdowns after the first half and was able to rest for the second half with the large lead. Reserve backs Dominic Thomas and Raphael Spencer took over rushing the ball and found success, showing the depth that the Griffons are working with at the position. “We’ve done that a lot this year, and the running backs behind me can come in and do the things that I did,” Hill said. “It feels good, but also I want to be out there at the same time. Whenever you are out of the game, you know that your team did their part to get you there.” The Griffons rushing attack was responsible for 382 net yards and five touch-

downs. Thomas gained 53 yards and scored on an 11yard touchdown run while Spencer gained 96 yards and scored on a seven yard touchdown run that put the Griffons on top 47-0. Emporia scored 14 points in both the third and fourth quarters as the Griffons reserves got into the game, but it was too late as the Griffons already had an insurmountable lead. The Griffons forced the Hornets to punt eight times on the day and held Eckenrode to 24-for-48 passing and forced two interceptions. “We’ve got a lot of kids playing time in two games where they shouldn’t have gotten the playing time,” Partridge said. “It was good to play a lot of kids and hopefully we are going to be healthy enough now for this pivotal stretch run.”

Griffons swat Hornets 57-28 Kyle Inman | Sports Editor kinman@missouriwestern.edu

Griffon Football looked ferocious on Thursday, Oct. 25, serving No. 20 Emporia State its first loss of the season with a 57-28 blowout at Welch Stadium in Emporia, Kan. The Griffons improved to 8-1 while the Hornets dropped to 8-1. The Hornets came into the game with the top ranked offense in the MIAA, but the physical Griffon defense allowed only one first down in the entire first half and no points. “We played Emporia well and obviously we are starting to reach our expectations,” defensive end David Bass said. “It’s ideal and I know it’s not going to happen every week, but we are going to go out and try to make it happen.” Kicker Taylor Anderson made a field goal to put the

ATHLETE of the WEEK MICHAEL JORDAN #23 - Defensive Back

Andy Inman and Chad Hammontree | Design Artist and Graphics Editorr

Kyle Inman | Sports Editor kinman@missouriwestern.edu

After two dominant road performances, the No. 11 Griffons return to Spratt Stadium at 1:30 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 3, to take on No. 25 Washburn in a pivotal MIAA contest on senior day. Washburn is 7-2, but Northwest Missouri State beat them 56-6 last week on their home field. “Washburn is a good football team,” coach Jerry Partridge said. “They have had a very good year. They had a tough week last week, but I don’t think they were themselves that week. They are always physical, wellcoached and do the fundamental things right. They play well in all phases. Offensively they can run the ball and make plays throwing the football, and defensively their linebackers are very athletic and they have size in the front.” The Griffons are on a roll lately, defeating two of the top-ranked teams in the

RR..I I..PP WAS H BU R

N

Michael Jordan recorded three solo tackles and scored a touchdown on a 91-yard interception return in the third quarter of the Griffons 57-28 win on Thursday in Emporia, Kan. Jordan was part of the Griffons secondary that held Emporia State quarterback Tyler Eckendrode to 24-for-48 passing.

Western looks to continue streak

Chad Hammontree | Graphics Editor

MIAA -- and the country -- on the road when they played Pittsburg State and Emporia State. This week the Griffons are back playing at Spratt Stadium, where they took a one-point loss to Southern the last time they played. “We’ve been playing pretty well at home, too,” Partridge said. “I think we’ve been playing well all year long, but to me the last two weeks we’ve played are best.” The Griffons have gained 982 yards on offense in the last two games with seven different players scoring touchdowns while the de-

fense has only allowed 42 points, most of which came with Western’s starters sitting on the bench. Washburn is led by quarterback Mitch Buhler, who has thrown for 1,692 yards on the season with 16 touchdowns and six interceptions. He has several main targets to throw to with Matt Kobbeman gaining 435 yards and four touchdowns, Tore’ Hurst has 324 yards and three touchdowns, Jordan Hart has 307 yards and four touchdowns and Ryan Mertz catches passes for 210 yards and three touchdowns. “I think they are a good ball club,” defensive end David Bass said. “Ever since I’ve been here, they have done what they had to do to win. They are a 7-2 program so I’m not sleeping on them.” Hayden Groves leads the Washburn rushing attack with 593 yards and six touchdowns on the season for an average of 4.3 yards per carry. The Griffons aren’t going to overlook Washburn de-

spite its big loss last week because they know how it feels to bounce back from a loss. “They are still a tough team,” running back Michael Hill said. “They got beat pretty bad against Northwest, but look at us, when we got beat and came back and were ready to go and did some damage on Pitt. We just have to prepare for this like any other tough MIAA game.” Both Hill and Bass have been four-year players at Western, and they want to come away with a victory on their senior night. “I have 22 other brothers out here with me, and I want to go out with a win, not for myself, just for them,” Bass said. “It’s our last time at Spratt in the regular season, so we want to make it perfect.” “It’s definitely going to mean a lot,” Hill said. “’For all these guys in the class and the coaches and everyone a part of Mo West, It makes you think back – and it goes fast – and just cherish it. “

The Griffon News Issue 9  

The Griffon News is the student newspaper of Missouri Western State University.

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