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While balancing a full course load, Western student Katie McKnight expresses herself though modeling.

Less than one percent of students voted in the election. More campaigning could have boosted voting.

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VOTE FOR YOUR 2013  SGA CANDIDATES!    ? ?

SGA PRESIDENT                       

SGA VICE PRESIDENT                   

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SGA SENATORS                           

Western football players demonstrated their skills for NFL recruiters on Pro Day held March 21. Page 10

March 28, 2013

griffonnews.com

Vol 95 | Issue 19

Weiberg named men’s head basketball coach

Gilbert Imbiri | Asst. Photo Editor

Kyle Inman | Sports Editor kinman@missouriwestern.edu Athletic Director Kurt McGuffin hired 38-year-old Brett Weiberg as head coach of Western men’s basketball from a pool of over 200 applicants. Weiberg will become only the fourth coach in the history of the program. Weiberg brings 15 years of coaching experience to Western, including his last job at Northern Oklahoma where he spent five years as an assistant and then took over the head coaching duties from his father. He is fresh off leading them to a 27-4 record and a regular season conference championship. While he hopes to turn the program back into a winner, academic success is a also a priority for Weiberg who graduated 80 percent of his players at Northern Oklahoma with associate degrees and is a two-time member of the Southland Conference All-Academic Team as a player at Sam Houston State. Weiberg has won 125 games in the seven seasons of his head coaching career.

To see the full story, visit Griffonnews.com

Senator frustrated with administration’s reaction to parking proposal Albert Shelby | Asst. News Editor ashelby1@missouriwestern.edu SGA has voiced the idea of extending and improving parking for students to administration. A proposal has not been made yet but members of SGA are hoping that administration will make a decision soon. SGA Senator Travis Hart believes that once they get a sure answer from the administration, the process of proposing extended parking will be official. “Currently the Student Government Association is waiting on the administration to get back with us to proceed fourth with imple-

Sisco, Williams win election, Inauguration set April 19

menting the solutions to improve parking and accessibility on campus,” Hart said. “The issue is that administration is a little reluctant to get started right away and it’s taking time for them to get back with us.” Hart noted that parking has been one of the more important issues on campus that students have voiced their opinions about. “Administration has other things on their agenda and it seems that they put parking, the number one complained issue on campus, basically on the back burner,” Hart said. “In particular, Lonnie Johnson.” There has not been any accurate estimates but they are

patiently waiting to move forward and get something started before April. “Cale Fessler is the vice president of financial planning,” Hart said. “And I have been working with him to figure out the numbers. I’m waiting to hear back from him about our possibilities.” SGA hopes to expand parking in different areas, as well as helping with the accessibility around buildings like Potter and Griffon Residential hall. “We want to put a drop-off zone in Potter because currently there is not one,” Hart said. “We also want to improve residential hall parking by changing the barriers, making it more accessible for

students living in the halls.” Hart and other members of SGA plan to implement a drop-off and pick-up zone for students with disabilities at Potter, Griffon and Scanlon hall, which they state is another top priority when dealing with parking. Students have been concerned about where they can park and there have also been complaints about the lack of parking spots. Lot G known as Blum Union parking lot is designated for staff, faculty and non-resident students from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m Monday thru Friday. Parking is prohibited from that parking lot from 2:00 a.m. to 4:30 a.m. Blum is a popular place

for students and sometimes the parking area is full, leaving students having to park somewhere else that they may not be permitted to park at. Parking Lots H, E, F, O and Q are restricted for students living on campus with the proper decals on the back of their cars, open also from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. After 4:30 p.m. and on weekends, reserved parking lots B,E,F,H,I,J,K and N are open for general parking to all faculty, staff student and visitor parking.

SEE PARKING PAGE 2

A school divided:

Fine art to split from college of libel arts & science Joyce Stevenson | Staff Writer jstevensno1@missouriwestern.edu

Katy Sisco and Dillon Williams ran on a platform of change, as shown in this campaign poster. *Submitted Photo

Matt Hunt | News Editor mhunt8@missouriwestern.edu It’s not even the end of the school year, and the newly elected President of Student Government Association is already working on issues for next school year. President-elect Katy Sisco and Vice President-elect Dillon Williams were elected to SGA. Sisco and Williams received 268 votes, compared to presidential candidate Mary Beth Rosenauer

and Derek Thompson, who had174 votes. A total of 443 students voted in this year’s SGA election, which showed a decrease compared to last year’s numbers, where 1,065 students voted. “I feel very honored and excited for this opportunity to be elected the President of SGA,” Sisco said.

SEE ELECTION PAGE 2

Walking through the halls of Potter, it is obvious that students have outgrown the building. They sit on the floor using laptops or playing instruments. They are overflowing classrooms and studios. They rehearse outside to escape the cramped building when able. Finally, change is on its way. The Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs Jeanne Daffon has submitted a plan to achieve two things: splitting the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and renovating Potter Hall. “Its an area on our campus that is growing. The number of students has probably closed to tripled in the last few years so there’s a lot of energy there, a lot of new things going on, a lot of new students,” Daffron said. While the original plan included dividing LAS into

a College of Fine Arts and Humanities, and a College of Social and Natural Sciences; however, that plan has been reworked to propose a School of Fine Arts instead. “This is still really in the discussion state so right now it’s looking more like we will end up doing a School of Fine Arts but still could change,” Daffron said. Daffron went on to explain that although the proposal could change, the proposal would most likely be finalized within a week. Aside from forming a new school and the renovation of Potter Hall, the administration would also hire a new dean to facilitate the proposed changes. Daffron said the university would like to have the dean position filled by July 1, but realizes this is “an aggressive timeline.” The new dean would help with fundraising events,

writing grants, contacting benefactors, earmarking gifts, and assisting the administration to make the plan happen. The money appropriated will not only compensate for the new

position but also fund the Potter renovation. Potter Hall has needed renovation work for many years.

SEE LAS PAGE 2

School

! ! n n o o o o S S g n n i i m m CCoo g s t r A e n i of F

Joe Snapp | Graphics Editor


NEWS

The Griffon News March 28, 2013

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Sisco ready to get the ball rolling SGA hopes for administration’s approval for improvements ELECTION

NEWS NOTES

CONTINUED FROM FRONT

WHM Film Series: ‘Monsoon Wedding’ March 28th, 6:00p.m. Women’s History Month will be featuring the last Film Series. The series will end with ‘Monsoon Wedding’. The event will be placed in the Kermper Hall, Spratt 101.

Last Day to Withdraw from classes and Registration for Summer/ Fall classes Students at Missouri Western can withdraw from classes with no refunded and a “W” on their transcript this Friday, March 29, 2013 from 8:00am to 4:30pm. Students at Missouri Western can start registering for classes on Monday, April 1, 2013. Contact your advisor to receive your pin number to register for classes. If you don’t know who your advisor is, go to Goldlink and search under Academics.

First Thursday Noon Concert Series The Missouri Western Symphonic Winds Ensemble will perform. The audience is invited to bring lunch to eat during the performance. Beverages will be provided. A freewill offering of $3 is suggested to defray expenses and insure the continuation of the series. The location for the concert is First Presbyterian Church, 7th and Jules. They suggest a donation of $3 per attende. The event will take place on Thursday, April 4, 2013 at 12:10 p.m.

“I’m excited for next year and ready to get things going.” Mary Beth Rosenauer, who ran against Sisco for SGA presidency, congratulated Sisco as the next President of SGA and plans to work with her in the future. She said in the debate that Sisco and herself are friends and plan to remain in contact. “I stay in contact with Katie every day,” Rosenauer said. “We are really good motivators for each other, and I’m very proud and excited for her.” Since she was elected, Sisco plans on keeping her campaign promise by visiting with organizations on campus throughout the rest of the school year. She wants the students to rest assured that she plans to keep them informed with everything SGA is doing. “Dillon and I have already started plans for our administration next year,” Sisco said. This new administration wants students to know they are welcome to come forth with issues on their minds. Sisco said she would try her best to fix any issues that are

Katy Sisco

brought forth to SGA. Sisco believes her connection with residential life as a Residential Assistant will help the process become smoother when she brings up the issue of bringing back Residence Council to SGA as one of the branches for SGA. She was part of the effort to help RA’s bring back Residence Hall Association. If RHA is able to be reinstated, then Sisco believes RC might be an afterthought. “It would be beneficial to us to get more students involved on campus,” Sisco said. “We can put in place our representation and students can come and voice their opinions that live on campus.” Student leaders found the numbers low and the process of voting confusing this time around. Last year, students were able to go to Missouri Western’s homepage and click the “Vote Here” button. This year, students had

to click the “Students” tab to vote. SGA Senator MonTerio Seewood said he is happy for Katy Sisco and Dillon Williams. Seewood said Sisco and Williams had no SGA experience, but he believes they are both great leaders and are eager to learn. “We found that voting this year was quite low, compared to past elections,” Seewood said. “I hope that next year we can find a way to get the students more engaged and interested in SGA and their elected student leaders.” Jacob Scott, president of SGA, said that he is excited to see the new president and vice president take the oath and start their term. He believes Sisco and Williams will do a great job leading the Senate and are willing to work in the transition with Scott. However, he believes the election wasn’t as competitive as last year. “The election wasn’t as competitive as the one last year,” Scott said. “I think it was low because of spring break and there wasn’t as competitive like it was between my opponent and I on certain issues.” The inauguration is set for April 19 at 5:30 p.m. in the Fulkerson Center.

PARKING CONTINUED FROM FRONT On weekends, parking in Blum parking lot will be open from Friday at 4:30 pm to Monday at 8am. Overnight parking is prohibited at Blum from 2-4:30 am. These restrictions have caused complaints from commuter students in general because most would like to park close to whatever building their class is taking place. The idea of extending parking is not far fetched for current SGA President Jacob Scott. He believes in the idea and hopes that it will be addressed by the end of the semester. “We have a parking improvements proposal,” Scott said. “We are trying to figure out the details, far as enroll-

ment and also concerning specific laws regarding what parking improvements can be made.” Where the money will come from to pay for the improvements is uncertain at this point, but Scott is almost sure that students will not be issued any additional fees to help pay for the project. “As far as a fee is concerned, there really is not any in discussion,” Scott said. “It is a possibility, but we are hoping to do it internally through the money we have with SGA.” “Travis Hart offering the proposal and I am just supporting him,” Scott said. “Any time we have surveys around campus, parking is one of the more complained about issues. It is clearly an overwhelming concern.”

Western to hire dean for school of fine arts LAS CONTINUED FROM FRONT The percussion annex was purchased approximately a decade ago, and was intended to be a temporary fix until funds for renovations were available, but with budget cuts from the state, Potter Hall renovations went unfunded. Daffron explained that Missouri Western is “lean in administration.” The formation of the School of Fine Arts and reorganization of the LAS school would help even the dean to faculty ratio within the respective schools. Of the approximately 200 faculty members at Western, LAS has 128 full and half-time faculty members. In comparison, the College of Professional Studies has 64 faculty members and the

Dr. Jeanna Daffron Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs Craig School of Business currently has 18. “Having a dean that is more focused on a narrower number of disciplines would lead to more interaction with students and faculty,” Daffron said.

Dr. Murray Nabors, dean of LAS agreed with Daffron that a dean focused on just fine arts would be an asset to the University. Within LAS the Communication Studies, Theatre and Cinema department would tentatively be reorganized and the Theatre and Cinema majors would be moved to the School of Fine Arts. “I think they recognized all along that LAS was pretty large and so for a workload standpoint as well as a balance standpoint that LAS was just too big,” said Bob Bergland, faculty senate president. The dividing of LAS would result in approximately 104 faculty members and nine departments.

CAMPUS INFORMATION CAMPUS CRIME REPORTS

CALENDAR OF EVENTS • •

Friday, March. 29 Last Day to withdraw from classes starting at 8:00 a.m.

Monday, April. 1 Registration begins for Summer/ Fall classes.

1. 1. Property Damage

11:26 p.m., Monday, March. 18, Downs Drive

Thursday, March. 28 “Private Lives” 7:30 p.m.

Thursday, April. 4 Private Lives” 3:00 p.m. Tuesday, April. 5 First Thursday Concert at 12:10 p.m.

If your organization would like to announce an event, email the information to stories@thegriffonnews.com


The Griffon News

NEWS

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March 28, 2013

Transportation planner speaks to Western about bus routes

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Monday- Friday: Buses depart downtown (inbound) at: 5:15, 6:15, 7:15, 8:15, 9:15, 10:15, 11:15 a.m. 12:15, 1:15, 2:15, 3:15, 4:15, 5:15, 6:15, 7:15, 8:15 Monday- Friday: Buses depart downtown (outbound) at: 5:15, 6:15, 7:15, 8:15, 9:15, 10:15, 11:15 a.m. 12:15, 1:15, 2:15, 3:15, 4:15, 5:15, 6:15, 7:15

Joe Snapp | Graphics Editor

Albert Shelby | Asst. News Editor ashelby1@missouriwestern.edu On March 25th, St. Joseph transportation planner Ty Nagle and general manager of the Saint Joseph Transit Mary Gaston discussed public access for students on campus in Eder. The meeting was held to speak about what was researched from the data derived from the 2012 transportation study. The study showed that most of the students at Western do not take advantage of the St. Joseph transit because of their lack of knowledge of

how the system works. Nagle noted that students felt that the transportation system was not efficient enough. “I think that the bus system is most significant to students because the population that comes from out of the city are not used to the transit system here in St. Joe,” Nagle said. “Because different cities kind of have different densities that will support the transit system better or worst.” The study also showed that students would prefer to take a cab because they did not know where the bus was coming from, as well as the

price. Nagle noted that students would only have to pay 50 cents for bus fare, which is cheaper than most cabs that charge seven to eight dollars a ride. “The transit operational review that was completed last year looks at how we can facilitate the students better through where they want to go, where they are coming from, and how the system works,” Nagle said. “A big thing we found was an informational site of our route deviation and how students are actually able to use that more towards taxi services that can come to your

Annual event helps students get industry, business savvy Daniel Cobb| Staff Writer dcobb3@missouriwestern.edu The third annual Engineering Technology Awards Banquet took place in Spratt on March 25 in celebration of local businesses and Missouri Western students involved in the field. Twelve tables of students and employees representing various businesses around Saint Joseph filled Spratt on Monday. Sponsors for the program at Missouri Western as well as some of their contributions to the Engineering Department were projected onto a board at the beginning of the event, along with the pictures of students receiving scholarships in the field for their involvement in the department. “The Engineering Awards Banquet is a fundraising event that celebrates engineering technology,” Dr. George Yang, professor and chair of the engineering department, said. “It’s also a great opportunity for students to get to know the various businesses and industries around Saint Joseph.” The banquet is also a way for professors at Missouri Western to improve their department. We invite professionals from the industry and incorporate any con-

door,” Nagle said. “We know through weather conditions and athletic injuries, walking across campus is not that viable.” Nagle and Gaston brought up the possibilities of starting a student fee for students that would guarantee them a bus pass. Gaston wants to make sure that students and staff at Western are on the same page when it comes to transportation. She noted that this was the reason the recent transportation study is important. “We want to implement as much as the study recommendations that were made

from the study that they did last year,” Gaston said. “We want to work with the plans the university has. Its important that we get a lot student feedback as well.” Gaston said that she has not received a lot of complaints from students but people in general would like to have frequent service. Mike Ritter is the Disability Services Coordinator and the transportations for kids with disabilities were a strong concern for him. “We have several key parking lots on campus that are highly competitive which means that there is only a few spots there that people

compete to get,” Ritter said. “We can’t change everything. But in the areas where we can, I think it is imperative to change what you can and when you can.” Ritter acknowledges that he felt it was important to have a meeting like the transportation meeting because it shows that the university is focused on all students, including ones with disabilities. “We just need to put all of our intelligence and enthusiasm behind these projects, and hopefully we can please everyone.”

every one of them uses. It’s very important that we support the university in this regard, Landes said. Ronald Auxier, another co-chair of the MWSU Engineering Technology Advancement Committee, presented the Student Excellence Award to Korbin Von Stentzsch, a junior at Missouri Western who came highly recommended by his professors and peers. Dr. George Yang “I’d like to thank Missouri Engineering Department Chair Western for this award,” cerns they have concerning Stentzsch said, “as well as our classes and programs, the engineering department Dr. Raheem, assistant pro- and the rest of the staff for fessor at Missouri Western, reassuring me that I’m doing said. a good job.” Alan Landes, co-chair of Auxier also presented MWSU Engineering Tech- the Community Excellence nology Advancement Com- Award for a member in the mittee, opened the banquet engineering technology inwith many compliments to dustry who had shown comthe quality of Missouri West- mitment to advancing the ern students. field while supporting Mis“The work ethic of stu- souri Western in the process. dents coming from this Dr. Raheem believes that school is fantastic, making these awards are incredible them great candidates for honors for both students and many of the jobs available to community members. them in the future,” Landes “Not only are they great said. “They have much more for resumes; these awards experience than schools that come with the support of the only focus on research.” entire staff in the engineering Landes also commented department, and will help that though the different students and community companies and businesses members distinguish themmay work in different dis- selves from the crowd,” Raciplines, the engineering heem said. technology program is what

Korbin Von Stentzsch speaks after being presented with the Student Excellence Award during the Engineering Banquet. Tevin Harris | Photo Editor

event,” Kowich said. “The opportunity for seniors at Western to attend can be beneficial in many ways.” Missouri Western alumni and students will have the chance to network during breakfast and hear guest speaker, Carol Roever, Interim Dean of the Craig School of Business and Leslie Oberg ‘10 present on the Craig School of Business’ Entrepreneurship Program. Roever said that the purpose for her speaking is to get individuals updated on the programs the Craig School of Business offers to students. She wants to give the alumni and other guests the basic facts about what the school offers now for students and

often talk about our younger alumni, those who are looking for jobs or looking to advance in their careers.” Dan Danford, former Board of Governor, said there are more business school graduates working in the Kansas City area than in the St. Joseph area. He said there is a large block on students who have built their careers down in Kansas City and it would be beneficial to meet with others outside of the St. Joseph area. “I don’t compare Missouri Western to any Ivy League school, and it’s all about the people you meet,” Danford said. “The networking you create

Spend the morning eating breakfast with Griffon alumni Matt Hunt| News Editor mhunt8@missouriwestern.edu Western Alumni will get the opportunity to interact with one another at this year’s Eggs and Issues: Kansas City. Colleen Kowich, director of Alumni Relations, said what the alumni association is trying to do, is if a business has a service we want to get that out there for others to know about. She said the organization has rebranded their Eggs and Issues from campus and has placed an Eggs and Issues event in Kansas City. “Any alumni or graduate in the St. Joseph or Kansas City area is able to attend the

graduates about their Entrepreneurship Program. “We want to let them know that they are eligible for the program,” Roever said. “Students will have the chance to meet with our alumni from other regions and have the opportunity to hear about the program we offer at the Craig School of Business.” Kowich said students need to have that network with older professionals who have been in these positions for a while. It gives alumni a better chance to discuss and share their stories about other successful alumni who have made something out of their education at Western. “It’s a great opportunity to network,” Kowich said. “We

through these relationships makes a big difference in your career.” The event is set for Wednesday April 3, 2013 from 7:15 AM to 8:30 AM. The location will be in the Kansas City area at the Cafe at Briarcliff Village, 4125 N Mulberry Drive, Kansas City, MO 64116. Joe Snapp | Graphics Editor


NEWS

March 28, 2013

Backpack buddies to host walk-a-thon Albert Shelby | Asst. News Editor ashelby1@missouriwestern.edu

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The Griffon News

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On April 6th the Backpack Buddies program will be hosting a walk-a-thon in the Griffon Indoor Sports Complex. Registration will take place on the same day at 9:30 a.m. and the actual one-mile walk will take place from 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. The purpose of the event is to donate money for kids in the St. Joseph School District. Mallorie Nighthart is a student at Western and she volunteered to help out with the event. “It is a fundraising event for the Backpack Buddies program,” Nighthart said. “It’s a program for chil-

dren from K-12. You go individually or you can have teams. You just walk a mile and whatever donations are given is how the walk-a-thon makes the money.” Every walker that donates at least $5 will then receive an armband. The team to donate the most money will receive a free dinner for five from either Red Lobster, Olive Garden, Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory, or Dunkin’ Donuts. “This event will fund children in St. Joseph,” Nighthart said. “And it is for the St. Joseph School District only.” Nighthart is a Public Relations major and she said she got involved with the

program through a class. She noted that that she expects it to be a fairly decent turnout at the event and hopes that a lot of money will be raised to help benefit children in the St. Joseph school district. “I think that 300 attendees would be quite an accomplishment,” Nighthart said. “However, the objective and the amount of money that we want to make is only $5,000 and if we divided that with $150, it would allow us to sponsor 33 kids a school year.” It will cost $150 to sponsor a child in the program and Nighthart is hoping that they can raise more money so they will be able to sponsor a bigger amount

of students each school year. Kelsey Corzine is a teacher in the St. Joseph School District and also a former Griffon. She sees the program as a way for Western students to ensure that students in the Backpack Buddies program are given the daily nutrition needed for kids their age. “I think that it would be great for Missouri Western students to help with Backpack Buddies,” Corzine said. “I teach in the St. Joe School District, and many of our students depend on the food they get from Backpack Buddies as their main source of nutrition outside of school. The more people that take an interest

in this cause and can lend a helping hand, the better it will be for the kids. I think it is more elementary kids that are impacted by Backpack Buddies though.” Western student Kathie Marquart’s opinion was similar to Corzine’s. Marquart understands and remembers how students are made fun of when they are not able to pay for something at school. “I support it,” Marquart said. “I think it’s a great way to make sure a child gets to eat lunch and can prevent the future teasing because of not being able to pay for a lunch.”

Western alumni debuts first short film Eboni Lacey | Editor-in-Chief elacey@missouriwestern.edu

Imagine having to find two straight men that would be willing to kiss each other on camera and actually look like they like it? This was the task of Missouri Western graduate Joseph Franklin, who debuted his first short film in Kansas City this past week entitled “A Guy For Me.” Alex J. Michaels and Kevin Britton deliver a passionate kiss in Western alumni Joseph Franklin’s first film “A Guy For Me.” “They didn’t even rehearse the kiss,” Franklin said. “They just did it. It had to be [in one shot].” Franklin, a 2010 graduate, wrote the original play three years ago yet added some bits and pieces along the way to truly make some heads spin. The most head turning part in the film involves a passionate kiss by the two men, which was something that was not the easiest to portray. “I feel it put a big spin to it because it left the audience questioning,” Franklin said. “They wanted to know what happened between them two and where does it go from there. That wasn’t expected, where in other love films you

know what’s going to happen.” On top of the hard task of casting two men for such a steamy scene, Franklin also had a lot on his plate such as writing the script, shooting, directing, producing and editing, as well as promoting the film and finding a venue to host his release. Franklin took on a tremendous amount of tasks and duties as today’s directors usually have an entire crew to help do all of this work. “It’s time schedules, it’s rehearsals, its booking venues, it’s very hard,” Franklin said. “You got to have a passion for it and love doing it.” Franklin was very happy and a bit surprised at his big audience turnout. The movie was released at “The View,” a big community center in Grandview, Mo. At the film’s start, every seat was taken and some people were even standing in the back. “I’m glad this many people came,” Franklin said. “It was a full house and I believe I sold out.” The 50-minute film revolves around Sheri, a young black woman who’s a single girl, looking for a special someone to love her. In the first scene, Sheri, played by Kansas City native and aspiring actress

(Left to Right) Joseph Franklin poses with actors Alex J. Michaels, Kevin Britton and Nahmel Simmons at his movie release. Eboni Lacy | Editor-in-Chief

Alex J. Michaels and Kevin Britton deliver a passionate kiss in Western alumni Joseph Franklin’s first film “A Guy For Me.” *Still shot from film Nahmel Simmons, appears to be on a really cute date. She then runs to the bathroom and suddenly bumps into William - a tall, dark and handsome man whose broad shoulders and cute smile seem to make Sheri quickly forget about the lonely date who’s still waiting on her. However, Sheri keeps it classy and though she seems interested in William, who is played by Kevin Britton, she doesn’t give him her number. That is until they bump into each other again and again. As the movie continues, the audience discovers that Sheri was not really on a romantic date but was out with a close friend, Ricky, played by Alex J. Michaels, who later reveals that he wants her as more than a friend and has wanted her for years. Sheri soon finds herself in a crazy love triangle between her close friend and William, who quickly

becomes Sheri’s love interest. The movie soon heats up even more when Ricky questions his feelings and sexuality and kisses William very unexpectedly. From there, the movie becomes a nailbiting whirlwind of intense emotions, as all three characters put their true feelings out there but seem to quickly have their hearts broken. “I liked the plot of it and the storyline. I didn’t suspect that twist that [Ricky] was gay,” audience member Yolanda Jackson said. “My favorite part was when [Sheri] said ‘I’ve know him all my life. I never suspected that.’ I thought that was kind of funny. I knew the first scene,” Jackson said jokingly about knowing Ricky’s sexuality. Besides the emotion, there was also a lot of comedy that really kept the audience laughing and cheering.

“I liked the funny parts. It was surprising when he went in for that kiss,” audience member Torin Hamlett said. “[My favorite part] was when Ricky was making moves.” Chemistry had to be developed between all three characters so the audience would really believe that the emotions were real. Simmons, who was also Franklin’s assistant director in addition to having the leading role, explained that the chemistry between the cast was very natural which made her character come to life. “Somehow it all just kind of works out,” Simmons said. “[Franklin] is a great casting director as well because it just fit. Everything just flowed. It was like a family.” Simmons included that playing Sheri was pretty natural for her because she went through a personal situation

very similar to the one Sheri was in. “Some of the scenes Sheri kind of reminded me of myself at one point in my life,” Simmons said. “I was kind of myself at one point. [The hardest part] was kissing the guys. We’re like fiancés and girlfriends and that was kind of weird. It’s a lot of hard work but when you enjoy what you do, it’s not such a challenge. It’s more fun then anything.” As his first film jitters are now out of the way, Franklin is already holding auditions in late April for his next film, “King’s Daughter,” a story of a young girl who’s crying out for attention from her father. Franklin is hoping for more community support and another full house in the audience. He hopes the crowd will be as surprised as they were for this film.

Awarding those who make a difference Daniel Cobb | Staff Writer dcobb3@missouriwestern.edu The third annual Engineering Technology Awards Banquet took place in Spratt on March 25 in celebration of local businesses and Missouri Western students involved in the field. Twelve tables of students and employees representing various businesses around Saint Joseph filled Spratt on Monday. Sponsors for the program at Missouri Western as well as some of their contributions to the Engineering Department were projected onto a board at the beginning of the event, along with the

pictures of students receiving scholarships in the field for their involvement in the department. “The Engineering Awards Banquet is a fundraising event that celebrates engineering technology,” Dr. Yang, professor and chair of the engineering department, said. “It’s also a great opportunity for students to get to know the various businesses and industries around Saint Joseph.” The banquet is also a way for professors at Missouri Western to improve their department. We invite professionals from the industry and incorporate any concerns they have concerning

our classes and programs, Dr. Raheem, assistant professor at Missouri Western,

Dr. Maureen Raffensperger Director of Physical Therapist Program

said. Alan Landes, co-chair of MWSU Engineering Technology Advancement Committee, opened the banquet with many compliments to the quality of Missouri Western students. “The work ethic of students coming from this school is fantastic, making them great candidates for many of the jobs available to them in the future,” Landes said. “They have much more experience than schools that only focus on research.” Landes also commented that though the different companies and businesses may work in different disciplines, the engineering

technology program is what every one of them uses. It’s very important that we support the university in this regard, Landes said. Ronald Auxier, another co-chair of the MWSU Engineering Technology Advancement Committee, presented the Student Excellence Award to Korbin Von Stentzsch, a junior at Missouri Western who came highly recommended by his professors and peers. “I’d like to thank Missouri Western for this award,” Stentzsch said, “as well as the engineering department and the rest of the staff for reassuring me that I’m doing a good job.”

Auxier also presented the Community Excellence Award for a member in the engineering technology industry who had shown commitment to advancing the field while supporting Missouri Western in the process. Dr. Raheem believes that these awards are incredible honors for both students and community members. “Not only are they great for resumes; these awards come with the support of the entire staff in the engineering department, and will help students and community members distinguish themselves from the crowd,” Raheem said.


FEATURES

The Griffon News March 28, 2013

Page 5

Above Average

Western model bares all in pursuit of artistic expression JQ Dever | Staff Writer jdever@missouriwestern.edu The booth is set up. The make up has been dabbed ever so lightly on her face. She is nervous, but she is ready. This is a slice of the life of Katie McKnight, a Western

student who has been modeling since last July. Looking through her photos, you’d think modeling was her fulltime career. But it isn’t. Besides modeling, Katie also attends Western and she maintains good grades while balancing out school, modeling and being a member of Alpha Gamma Delta sorority. Katie is double majoring in economics and psychology and

minoring religion, so she doesn’t have a ton o f time to devote to the camera, but she makes it work. Katie says a big reason she loves modeling is because she is able to express her-

self in such a personal way. She takes the same personal approach with every artistic thing she does, whether it’s song writing, modeling, or creating any other form of art. She feels that expressing yourself through art allows you to be the most naked you could possibly be in front of others. It strips away all of your walls and shows people who you really are. “The hardest thing for me during a shoot, is to know what you look like, to know what your body position is. It’s difficult to know if what you’re doing is going to look good in a photo,” McKnight said. Katie chooses all of her outfits herself and does her own hair and makeup, which requires her to be very creative. Katie is really into alternative modeling. She loves the type of shots that are super interesting, that catch the eye right away. Katie has been photographed by very open, artistic photographers, and that is intentional. She prefers photographers who are artistic because they allow her to have more freedom and to do odd things. Although modeling is a big part of her life, she’s not sure it’s her main source of income in the future. She’s worked too hard at Western for that. “I’d like to continue modeling as long as I can, but in no way would I try to make

person to attend this year’s show. “It gets better every year,” Wiedmaier said. “The theme we’ve chosen is quite different from the years previous and should bring in a large crowd.” PRIDE chose a 1950’s theme for their drag show this year. Wiedmaier said the design and look for this theme is completely different from their burlesque theme from last year. The event will headline three drag queens which include Bianca Bliss, Catia Lee Love, Madison Elise and a few other surprise special guests. The organization plans to take donations from those who attend the event and

all tips that the drag queens collect will be donated to a group in need. Tyler Rhoad, former president of PRIDE and Wiedmaier said they would not release the organization they plan to donate the money they receive this year to. “All the tips that are donated to the drag queens will be donated to a charity,” Wiedmaier said. “You will have to attend the event to hear who our secret charity will be.” The event has been held for the last couple of years and has seen a significant number of large crowds. Keisha Davis, former president of PRIDE, plans to attend this year’s event. She believes the reason attendance has been so high is due to the event

in

*photos courtesy of Gene Starr

it my career,” McKnight said. Katie says that double majoring and working towards a minor is not easy, but she has learned how to balance everything out. The biggest help has been deciding to keep a strict schedule. She keeps not one but four different schedules, so if she forgets one for some reason, she’s got three back-ups. Katie is not able to do much modeling right now because she has so much to do for school and she puts that first. Katie has been photographed by four or five different photographers, some Saint Joseph based and others based in Kansas City, Missouri. A couple of them seem to think the same of her. Fred Byrd has been a photographer since 2009. He photographed one of Katie’s shoots and had a lot of good things to say about her. “Katie makes it easier to photograph her because she knows angles, what poses look good and she can go through them really quickly. We have similar personalities. We’re both kind of awkward so it makes the shoots really enjoyable,” Byrd said.

Byrd says Katie contributes to every look. She basically comes up with everything by herself. “Sometimes I like to give a couple ideas on how I want them to look but normally I just let them do what they do,” Byrd said. “I really liked that she’s gotten out there. It’s kind of hard to get into modeling in Missouri and I applaud her for doing so. She’s very different and she doesn’t make it boring.” Dansare Marks, another St. Joseph photographer, also photographed Katie. Marks was excited going into the shoot because she knew how beautiful and eager Katie was and how easy Katie would make it for Marks to photograph her. “It was an absolute joy. I’ve known Katie since we were young, so it was very comfortable spending time with her. She’s incredibly cooperative and is eager to make the shoot as creative as possible. It definitely shows in her poses and facial expressions,” Marks said. Katie’s creative, different and fun personality makes photographers and the cam-

era love her. Many people may think that a photo shoot is nothing more than just going in and moving around while someone takes pictures of you, but in Katie’s opinion, it’s not the easiest thing to do. “First, you go in and there’s that awkward moment when you first meet the photographer. While getting things situated, the photographer will usually put on music to make it more comfortable. You’ll get dressed, have your makeup on, and then you stand in a booth and that’s another awkward moment because you don’t know what to do for the first pose. Once you get going, within like five or ten minutes, it becomes almost like dancing. You start to get comfortable and it turns out to be really fun,” McKnight said. When it comes to modeling, Katie isn’t really doing it for any sort of personal gain. There is a message behind her modeling. She wants to show women that all sizes are beautiful, because beauty isn’t only found outwardly, but it lies within as well.

Drag out your PRIDE Matthew Hunt | News Editor mhunt8@missouriwestern.edu This year’s drag show will feature some “FLY” drag queens in this 1950’s theme event. The Pride Alliance will be hosting their annual Missouri Western Drag Show on April 2. The doors will open at 7:00 p.m. and the show starts at 8:00 p.m. PRIDE President Kayla Wiedmaier said the event will take place on April 2nd in the Fulkerson Center and believes this year’s event will bring in more students and members of the community. Western students will get into the drag show for free with their Western ID. The show will charge members of the community $3 a

being a unique cultural experience that students aren’t used to. Students should go because not only is it a lot of fun,” Davis said. “It’s educational and there’s something in it for everyone.” Sarah Matthews, member of PRIDE, said that students and those in the community should attend because it’s the one time of the year where everyone can come together for an exciting event. “Students should come to the drag show because it’s simply a fun and entertaining experience, that most people don’t get to see on a daily basis,” Matthews said.

(Above) Dirty Dorthy interacts with students at last year’s PRIDE Alliance Drag Show. *Courtesy of Will C Photography

How To: Eat healthy while living on campus Jourdan Ryan | Features Editor jhuffman10@missouriwestern.edu When you’re hanging out in your dorm room and you suddenly get hungry, where do you go? There’s the cafeteria, Einstein’s Brothers Bagels, or Quizno’s Subs. But how do you resist a mouthwatering everything bagel with extra cream cheese or an ice cream cone at the cafeteria when you’re trying to change your eating habits? Eating healthy on campus can be difficult, but when you take simple things into account, like the caloric intake of the foods you’re eating, keeping your waistline under control becomes much easier. Choosing to make healthy choices starts with break-

fast, and at Western, you have a lot of options to stifle your morning hunger while keeping track of the nutritional facts of the foods you’re eating. Western’s cafeteria, located in Blum Student Union, offers a handful of dishes for breakfast each day. There’s buttermilk biscuits, scrambled eggs, and fresh waffles. But don’t run up to the food counter with an empty plate in hand and pile all these tasty treats on just yet. Those buttermilk biscuits contain more than 162 calories per serving, not to mention over 21 grams of carbohydrates. The scrambled eggs are packed with more than 331 milligrams of cholesterol and 163 calories per serving. And those waffles, the ones that you’re

gonna drizzle with syrup and lather with butter, already contain over 568 calories per serving. The healthiest breakfast item on campus is the turkey sausage patty, weighing in with only 67 calories per serving. When lunchtime rolls around, don’t immediately rush to Einstein’s and grab yourself a pepperoni pizza bagel, which contains 440 calories. At Einstein’s, you can get a fresh garden salad, at only 220 calories, or chicken noodle soup, at 120 calories. The bagel thins at Einstein’s only contain 140 calories, so those are a good snack option. The only problem is that if you get a bagel, you might want to get cream cheese, and one plain container of cream cheese con-

tains 120 calories. The light option contains 80. For dinner, Western offers a lot of options, like healthy subs at Quizno’s. Here, you can find a whole slew of sandwiches, each under 500 calories. There’s the baja chicken sandwich, the veggie guacamole, the basil pesto chicken panini, the prime rib philly, the ultimate turkey club, and the honey bourbon chicken sandwich. If you’re not in the mood for a sub, Quizno’s also offers salads, wraps, grilled flatbreads, and soups. The peppercorn caesar chicken salad, broccoli cheese soup, honey mustard chicken salad, Mediterranean chicken salad, and the cobb salad are all also under 500 calories. Eating healthy can be

tricky, especially on campus. With all the junk food taunting you in the C-store, it’s hard to keep your taste buds in check and opt for healthier options instead of calorie-filled ones. Set a regular snack time for yourself and stick to it every day. That way, you aren’t just eating when you get bored or when there’s a lull in your homework schedule. If you cook anything in your dorm, keep in mind that the healthiest way to prepare foods is to steam them. Try to avoid add-ons like butter or oil if you can. Ultimately, finding healthy foods on campus can be done. You just have to know where to look.

How to:

Healthy Eating

Joe Snapp | Graphics Editor


The Griffon News March 28, 2013

Page 6

FEATURES

Lara Croft raids tombs

rated from the rest of the crew and realizes that she is definitely not alone on the Lara Croft, the enigmat- island, as mercenaries conic hero of the Tomb Raider stantly pursue her. video game franchise, is The game’s biggest flaw finally reborn through devel- doesn’t lie within its story, oper Crystal Dynamics, who however. Rather, it’s the hope to provide the series’ characters that lack any sort protagonist with a solid ori- of depth.  Lara’s voice actor gin story that challenges does a fine job, and her transLara’s will to survive on an formation from “defenseless island full of insane merce- archaeologist” to “full-on naries. survivor” is definitely cool Fresh out of college, (if not a bit sudden).  It’s the Lara sets out on her first rest of the crew that fail to expedition aboard the ship deliver.  I had a lot of trouble Endurance in an effort to connecting with them and find the kingdom of Yamatai, feeling for their cause, mainan ancient kingdom ruled ly because every other senby a queen who held mys- tence that they utter is some tical powers.  With a crew form of, “We need to get off of engineers and archaeolo- of this island.”  Their diagists, Lara attempts to lead logue isn’t great, and when the ship into The Dragon’s some members of the crew Triangle, an area contain- end up getting left behind or ing brutal storms and harsh lost, I didn’t really care.  On waves that are responsible the bright side, this is probfor numerous shipwrecks.  ably the game’s only notable Sure enough, the ship suc- flaw. cumbs to the violent weather, leaving the crew ship- For the rest of the review wrecked on a mysterious check us out online at island.  Lara is quickly sepagriffonnews.com

Daniel Cobb | Staff Writer dcobb3@missouriwestern.edu

Hello midterms, Hello stress Jason Ruckman | Staff Writer jruckman@missouriwestern.edu While midterm grades do let students know where they stand academically, we must all muddle through the stress and worry of our midsemester tests. With the stress of midterms weighing down on Western students this time of year, many still appreciate them for what they are and feel that they’re necessary for letting us know where we are in each class. “It really helps me to see where I’m going,” student Shaun Butterworth said. “If I see a low grade, it motivates

me to work harder and if I see a high grade, it motivates me to keep working hard.” This seems to be a reoccurring opinion at Western as Sharon Rodriguez agrees, saying that they show her what she still needs to do in each class. Most agree that if we did not have these midterm tests, we would be left hopelessly unknowing how we were doing in our classes, therefore floating towards a sea of failure, only to find out we had failed when it is too late. Although most of us can agree we need midterm grades, that does not make the midterms week any less stressful. While every week

*Photo courtesy of digitaltrends.com

of the year is a grind for most, adding the stressful layer of midterms is just something else to worry about, but there are ways to deal with it. Natascha Kracheel, an exchange student from Germa-

ny, says her procrastination doesn’t help with anything, but she has ways of getting through it. “I need a lot of energy drinks and do a whole lot of running and yoga to cope

Lindsey Stubbs screams out her stress. Brian Duskey | Multimedia Editor

Writing the future

with it,” Kracheel said. “Still, I end up having too little time so I pull all-nighters.” While she finds midterms helpful, she says that she is glad that they don’t have midterms at her German university and enjoys not having to deal with the stress of it when she’s there. Other ways of coping with the doldrums of an impending midterm are utilizing the free tutors in the Hearnes Center, or just spending a few more hours a week studying and preparing. Beyond that, having a normal sleep pattern, though often difficult to achieve, can be beneficial for college students. Eating healthy, and

not forgetting to have breakfast, even for just that week, is another good way to be as prepared as possible. As we near the end of the semester and see the light at the end of the tunnel, some jump with glee at the sight of straight A’s and others sigh with the frustration of falling below their expectations. No matter where you are or what your grades are though, students at Western and across the U.S. are all glad when midterm week is over.

Griffon graduate returns to Western as teacher

Jourdan Ryan | Features Editor jhuffman10@missouriwestern.edu For most of us, the second we graduate, we tell ourselves we will never meander the halls of our alma mater ever again. We throw our caps, have our graduation parties, and try as hard as we can to move on with our lives. Sometimes, the past just creeps back up on us though. That’s exactly what happened to alumni student Mary Dockery. Dockery graduated in 2009 with a degree in English Literature, and now, more than three years later, she finds herself back at Western, but not as a student. “Right now, I’m part-time faculty here at Missouri Western, teaching English,” Dockery said. “After graduating from the University of Kansas in May of 2012, I knew that my husband and I wanted to move home for a while, and so teaching at Missouri Western just made sense – it’s home to me.” Though she walked away from Western for a time, she gives credit to her college home for shaping her into the person she has become. “Missouri Western is wonderful for so many rea-

sons – the classrooms are small, the instructors are interested in the individual students, and as a student, you can get a lot of one-on-one attention if you go after it, if you want that attention,” Dockery said. “I also like how the students at Missouri Western come from so many different backgrounds and education levels, and I do think that meeting so many different people helped me open my mind and see the world in a different way.” Besides teaching, Dockery also busies herself with her own writing. She is a published writer, predominantly with poetry. She loves to attend local poetry readings to hear what others are doing and to get to read her own work to the world as well. She loves living what she refers to as the “writer’s life,” which means she is constantly writing, day in and day out, and submitting some of that writing to local contests and national journals in an attempt to get it published, as well as spending time in community with fellow writers. But even a seasoned professional writer, who some-

times gets paid for what she produces, can get a wrench thrown at her by the writing process sometimes. “The act of creating is probably one of my favorite parts of writing, those moments where you feel like you are in a dreamlike trance, and

“The act of creating is probably one of my favorite parts of writing, those moments where you feel like you are in a dreamlike trance, and when you wake up, there’s something new on the page that you invented.” -Mary Dockery

when you wake up, there’s something new on the page that you invented,” Dockery said. “The most stressful part is when it’s more difficult to get into that zone, and to be honest, that zone is harder and harder to come by the more you write.” There are a few Western writers and teachers that Dockery now includes in that community that were once her professors and are now her colleagues. She credits each of them for different reasons, but she feels honored to get to teach alongside them today. “Dawn Terrick and Kay Siebler were instructors who, though pretty different teaching styles, showed me how much fun you can have being a teacher and a writer. They challenged me,” Dockery said. “Dr. Russ Phillips from the Psych department took me under his wing and let me take part in his studies and research. He was one of the first instructors I felt comfortable sharing in class for because he truly wanted to hear many perspectives. Dr. William Church was my creative writing instructor, and he

Mary Stone Dockery reads some of her work to a crowd at a poetry reading in Kansas. *Submitted Photo

was my mentor and the one who helped me learn how to allow my confidence to grow. He also didn’t mind being perfectly honest and telling me when something I wrote was awful, and I think this helped develop the thick skin a writer needs to survive out there.” Dockery still values the relationship she formed with Dr. Bill Church while she attended Western and she is grateful to continue learning from him as she begins her teaching journey on campus. “[Bill] helped me see that you have to keep growing as a writer, that you can’t just write the same way over and over, so because of him, experimenting and trying new things is not as scary,” Dockery said. “He’s still my mentor and it’s because of him I even went to KU for my MFA.” The future is wide open

for Dockery. She is unsure of what it holds, or how long she’ll be lending her Western-gained knowledge to the students she now teaches. One thing is for sure though. She will continue to write and she will continue to be unafraid of where that process takes her, and that fearlessness will carry her through. “My dreams are always changing,” Dockery said. “It used to be that my ultimate goal was a PhD in creative writing, but now I’m not so sure that’s what I want. I’m publishing and writing, and this is ultimately the most important dream. But it’s also true that my writing has a long ways to go and I think that’s what keeps me pushing forward. I’m excited to see where the writing goes, how it changes, how I change.”


The Griffon News March 28, 2013

Editorial: If students at Western have a problem with the Student Government Association next semester, they can blame poor campaigning procedures and unreasonably short campaign time. Through a lack of taking full advantage of campaigning through social media sites as well as web-based voting problems, the election for SGA president and vice president came to an end with only .072 percent of Western’s student body turning in a vote. Aside from the low voter turnout, the candidates were only allotted a two-week time frame to campaign and could only disperse posters and banners for the final week leading up to the election. With an election that is as important to students' interests and future representation as this was, candidates need to be given a more reasonable amount of time to campaign and let students know what they are about before the voting process. However, the blame for the low turn-out is not entirely on the campaigning structure. There was a very limited utilization of social media by the candidates during the process to reach out to Western and that contributed to the low number of student voters as well. In the future, candidates need to use their available resources to the fullest po-

tential because that is what the rest of the student body deserves. According to the bylaws for campaigning, although the distribution of posters and materials and campaigning is allocated to a ridiculously small amount of time, candidates can get endorsements from organizations as far as four weeks prior to the election. Working to get endorsements from organizations that reflect the candidate’s agenda is one way that they could efficiently utilize their resources as well as show the students what they are about further out from the election and boost voter numbers. On top of these two issues, there was also a failure on the website used to vote that caused some issues. For several minutes, last year's president and vicepresidential candidates were posted in place of the two current candidates and following that, there were several moments with no candidates on the voting webpage at all. Neither Northwest State University or Missouri Southern State University's department of Student Affairs could be reached for a comment on SGA election procedures; however, Northwest has a similar time frame for campaigning. They give candidates two and a half weeks, but one of those weeks falls on spring break. Campaigning time isn't the

Candidates need more time to campaign, boost voter turnout

VOTE FOR YOUR 2013  SGA CANDIDATES!    ? SGA VICE PRESIDENT                   ? SGA PRESIDENT                       

of other useful information about the program and are as follows: • mental illness • hearing impairment • impaired functioning of arms or legs • back injury • alcoholism or drug addiction • mental retardation • learning disability • traumatic brain injury and • other physical or mental disabilities that prevent the person from finding and keeping a job. At first, one may think that a student would need some-

I’m walking down a treelined avenue listening to local street musicians while munching on a soft pretzel and sipping pink lemonade. I’m comfortable in my new spring capris, tee and Chuck’s. It’s a beautiful sunny day and I am on my way back to class at Missouri Western. The musicians are fellow Missouri Western students, getting some practice playing to the public. The pret-

zel and pink lemonade came from a bistro operated by Western students. All of the clothes I am wearing, including the Chucks, were purchased in a neighboring thrift store operated by Western students.  This could be our future. Missouri Western has a total of over 700 acres of land. I think we should be addressing ways to join the St. Joseph community to the University.  Every day, over 3500 people enter and exit the campus. These people are students, faculty, campus employees, family, friends,

Katelyn Canon Joe Snapp Matthew Hunt Albert Shelby Tevin Harris Gilbert Imbiri Kyle Inman Christian Mengel Jourdan Ryan Andy Garrison Brian Duskey Lauren Dillon Hanna Greenwell Mika Cummins Dave Hon Bob Bergland

What should the SGA president-elect focus on first? Kayla Harris Sophomore

“Internet, our internet connection sucks.”

Justin Kirkland Senior Eboni Lacey | Editor-in-Chief only area in which we lag behind other state universities. In their last SGA election, Missouri State had a voting turnout of nearly 14 percent compared to our less than one percent turnout. In the future, the whole

campaigning and voting process needs to be buttoned up and made much more accessible for the students. It should run smoothly and students should be given a more reasonable amount of time to learn what the candi-

dates that are going to represent them are all about; and we as students need to make more of an effort to vote because 443 out of 6099 students deciding our leadership just isn’t going to cut it.

Vocational Rehabilitation helps disabled students pay for college thing severe to be wrong with them to qualify but in actuality, the qualifications are much broader than they seem. I qualify simply because I have ADHD. Others who qualify would be those with depression, bi-polar disorder, and many other relatively common disorders. This program is made readily available on campus by appointment via VR counselor Tom Wilson. He can be reached at (816) 3872280 and appointments take place on Tuesdays. With the program being this accessible and easy to get into, students who have

vendors and laborers. They eat and shop in the community. Why not develop the land around the school to cater to these people while offering employment opportunities to students? Since Missouri Western developed the current campus, it has been a separation of city and school. I often hear that St. Joseph doesn’t feel like a college town should. Let’s change that.  There are many opportunities that could be researched for business possibilities. Small shops featuring students artwork, clothing, mu-

The Griffon News Staff Eboni Lacey Editor-in-Chief

VOICE

?

disabilities, no matter how trivial they think they may be, need to set up an appointment as soon as possible. The only drawback comes if you have not been diagnosed professionally in over three years but it’s not really a big deal, just time consuming. In the case of a student fitting that criteria or having never been diagnosed but suspecting the existence of a disability, VR will actually get you diagnosed for free. There is absolutely no excuse why students with disabilities should ever graduate college with student loan debt. VR will even pay a

student’s rent or on-campus living expenses if they fit the right criteria and they even pay for their books. Students who believe that they just may fit the qualifications should check it out. The worst they can say is no, and the best they can do is give students an absolutely free education. Students can’t let laziness be their disability when it comes to funding their schooling; that is one disability that will never qualify them for VR and a debt-free start at life.

Staff writer feels community should support Western Joyce Stevenson | Staff Writer jstevenson@missouriwestern.edu

CAMPUS

SGA SENATORS                           

w/ Andy Garrison The government puts me through school for free and even pays my gas to get there and plenty of other Missouri Western students qualify to do the same but fail to take advantage and slide into debt instead. The program that is in place is called Vocational Rehabilitation [VR] and it helps students with a variety of disabilities fund college, or many other training programs, to make them more attractive in the job market without breaking the bank. The list for qualifying for VR can be found at http:// www.dars.state.tx.us/drs/ vr.shtml” along with a ton

OPINIONS

Page 77 Page

Managing Editor Graphics Editor News & Online Editor Assistant News Editor Photo Editor Assistant Photo Editor Sports Editor Assistant Sports Editor Features Editor Opinions Editor Multimedia Editor Design Artist Design Artist Ad Manager Senior Editor Faculty Advisor

sic, pottery, and crafts could be scattered among bistros, coffee shops, musical venues, thrift/vintage stores and cozy diners. The possibilities are endless. Many other schools our size offer this adjacent to campus. It would tie the students in with the community, making us more supportive of one another. What better way to create jobs in the community than to create them next to or on campus? Most of the Heartland Health, American Family Insurance, and Mitchell Woods employees pass by our gates

daily. Altec employees travel by our campus as well. These are St. Joseph’s largest employers, besides the St. Joseph School District.  Let’s address how Missouri Western can help students make money, share their talents and engage the community. I have suggested this idea over the years to many people, hoping that someday the school will take notice and at least look into the possibilities of creating a more pleasant campus experience for everyone.

“Parking, I’m sure that is a pretty high one on there.”

Katie McKnight Junior

“Do we know where the 75 dollar fee is going? That, figure outwhere that is going. I think it’s also important to work on parking; I know they are working on that.”

Brandon Herring Senior

“Parking garage is definitely a good idea because, number one, when it’s snowy outside our cars won’t be covered in ice.”

The Griffon News is written and published by students of Missouri Western State University during the fall and spring semesters. The first copy of each issue is free; additional copies are 50 cents. Content of this paper is developed independently of the faculty and administration, or other campus organizations or offices. Readers are encouraged to submit story ideas, information and advertising to The Griffon News office, Eder 221, 4525 Downs Drive, St. Joseph, Mo. 64507, or by phoning (816) 271-4412 (advertising and news room). You may also e-mail thegriffonnews@gmail.com. Copy and advertising must be received by noon Friday, the week prior to publication. Guidelines for letters to the editor: • All letters to the editor must be typed and double spaced. Letters must be no longer than 350-400 words and guest columns no longer than 500 words. Letters and columns will be edited for style. • All letters must include signature and identity verification information, such as phone number. The Griffon News reserves the right to edit all letters for length and Associated Press style. • The Griffon News will not withhold names under any circumstances. Anonymously submitted letters will not be published. • Views expressed on the opinion pages are not necessarily those of The Griffon News staff or Missouri Western State University.


OPINIONS

The Griffon News March 28, 2013

Page 8

Campus police owe students an explanation I think the campus police should submit some kind of statement to the students and the community about the situation with Lavonte Douglas. Real police make statements. If they want to act like real police, they need to explain the situation to the students. They claim to be here to “protect us” and not a single student has a reason to feel any kind of protection is being provided by campus police. I have been pepper sprayed. I was dared my freshman year of college to get sprayed in a conversation someone was having on whether or not it even works, since they never sprayed it. I can tell you first hand that it was the worst pain I ever

Christian Mengel | Asst. Sports Editor

cmengel@missouriwestern.edu

felt in my life, and it’s why I think it was wrong that they (unsuccessfully) tried to use it on Douglas. From the stories I’ve heard and what I’ve read so far, it seemed like the use of pepper spray was overboard, on

top of the entire situation already being overboard. I haven’t heard anyone who was the food court that day say, “wow, Lavonte was so out of line.” In fact, everything I have heard has been just the opposite, saying the campus police was out of line. There is no reason that Douglas should get in any type of trouble with the law over this. If he does get in trouble, then I think the students have a right to see the video. The school should show us why pepper spray was necessary. We all know the school isn’t going to allow that footage to leak out to students based on two main reasons, depending on the outcome. Reason one: if Douglas is

found innocent, this whole situation will look terrible on the school. It will make whoever was in charge of hiring campus police look like an idiot for hiring shitty cops. On top of making the administration look bad, it will lower the student’s already dangerously low faith in the campus police’s ability to successfully maintain a safe campus. Reason two: if Douglas is found guilty, this will still look equally terrible on the school because that means our campus police are not effective at all. Look at the whole situation, it was said that one of the officers may have tripped, and they both pulled out their pepper spray, one of them shot the spray and missed, and

Douglas was able to run off. Are you kidding me? If that was a real assault, what in the hell kind of security is that? Are we as students supposed to feel safe, knowing that two officers couldn’t successfully spray someone? Then they let him run away. It makes me think how these officers would react if there really was a serious threat on campus, say someone assaulting someone with a knife or if somebody brought a gun to campus. I’m glad to know if there was a serious threat on campus, our officers would react the same way a typical girl would, pull out pepper spray, hope it works and call the police.

Senior editor disenchanted with University Discover gold. It’s the slogan of our wonderful university. The place where Griffons stomp the yard and non-trads roll around with their backpacks. The place that every other university laughs at. “Haha, open enrollment!” Don’t get me wrong, I love this school. But it’s not what I was promised. And that’s what this column is about. My junior year of high school I was determined to attend Mizzou. I was told by counselors that it was the premier journalism school in the Midwest. “And it’s a great college experience.” College experience is just a fool’s gold universities use to attract, well, fools. Mizzou

Dave Hon | Senior Editor dhon1@missouriwestern.edu has a rock climbing wall and they used to have tanning beds in their rec-center. I’ve been told of (and seen first hand) the underground party scene of Truman State University. It’s all glitter

on the biggest turd ever crapped out. But more often, I see fools on this campus buying fool’s gold. This university no longer values education, but instead the “college experience.” We have an online remedial math program but we have six different greek organizations (and a rock to honor them). We have increasing class sizes but we also have exquisite overpriced coffee in half our academic buildings. We have three counselors to help students transverse growing up but we have nine armed officers hired by Western. This column is about priorities. It’s time someone answer for all the things

OUT FRONT WITH HUNT

The PRIDE Alliance has been known by many names in the past. However, students can all agree that they put on one hell of a drag show each spring. This organization deserves a lot of credit for the amount of work, dedication and community support they bring to the campus. The drag show last year brought hundreds of students and members of the community together for a good cause. The PRIDE Alliance

Dear School Newspaper Editor, I represent a group of Junior High students from Mid-Buchanan R-V, and we want folks to be aware of a major tragedy occurring in our nation: modern slavery. We call ourselves Caring About Rescuing Slaves (C.A.R.S.). In our research, we found that not very many people are aware of this problem. We ask that you would please consider including the following information in your upcoming newspaper. Did you know that 800,000 people are estimated to be trafficked across the border of the US every year? That’s not even half of it! There are around 27 million people trafficked around the world! This is a horribly high number, and it’s not getting lower any time soon. In fact,

doesn’t charge the students to attend the event, but they do charge those from the community who attend. It’s a small fee, but the money they receive all goes to charity. It’s a great opportunity for anyone who has ever wanted to get out of their comfort zone and see men dressed in long gowns, wigs and lipstick. Though some people don’t agree with the way the event is set up and the sexuality of those who partici-

human trafficking is the second largest criminal industry in the world. Modern slavery consists of many things and is more diverse that what you may think. They include forced labor in domestic servitude, agricultural, settings sweatshops, food services industries and sex trafficking. Sex trafficking has by far the largest number of slaves, and people, often kids, are literally sold in ads for mail order brides, pornographic magazines, exotic dance joints, brothels and fake massage parlors. The traffickers go by the simple rule: Supply Drives Demand. As long as there are those who will buy, they will continue to abduct and force people to provide services. Sex traffickers specifically target children ages10-17,

pate, it’s a great way to show the diversity amongst our campus and how far we’ve come. If you attend the drag show, you will see so much diversity in one room that it’s incredible. No matter who you are or where you come from, the event brings people from all walks of life together. It’s not just a “gay thing”, it’s an event for everyone. Missouri Western has shown an increase in student

with the average age being 14 years old! Even children as young as young as four are used as sex slaves! Think of this was you! You would be told that if you don’t do as you’re told, your family would be seriously injured or even killed. If you complain in any way, you will be beaten of forced to go without food or water. You would be kept in a room with no light, and maybe with no covering. You may be hand-cuffed, gagged and left naked most of the time. Although you might want to kill yourself, that’s not even an option because you are constantly monitored. This is the reality for 1 in 3 girls and 1 in 7 boys. Human trafficking in our nation will only be stopped when enough people raise their voice in protest. Since

wrong with this place. All the things I was told why Western is gold and all the other universities are just expensive hogwash. I want my gold and if I can’t get it I’m going to make sure that the freshmen this year get their’s in four years. This isn’t journalism, at least not like you’ve seen it before. I’m biased; I have an agenda. There will be no apologies for my disillusionment of your fantasies. If it takes me removing the mascot’s mask to make people realize the truth, then that’s what I’ll do. Some of you will see this as an affront to something you hold precious. I don’t blame you. Western is a mag-

ical place. It has some great qualities that other universities don’t have. I’ll leave that pandering up to our Public Relations department. More importantly, I want to be clear, this isn’t a soap box. I don’t plan on standing on top of a high moral podium lecturing to students who have already been lectured enough. This is a funnel. Who knows the illusions of Western better than me; you. As students, you should be willing to join with me in this metaphorical “pitchfork and torch” march of truth. Cause we’re not after Frankenstein’s monster, we’re after Frankenstein.

PRIDE deserves credit for their work at Western support for events, however many organizations aren’t able to keep up with the type of events that PRIDE puts on for the students at Western. PRIDE has been a developing organization for the past five years and has received much attention recently, considering the latest endorsements, from President Barack Obama supporting marriage equality to Missouri considering a vote for Marriage Equality. The group continues to strive to increase their

numbers through fundraising and events. Even though St. Joseph is still a small urban city, it shows increasing support throughout the community. The drag show is coming up, and it’s for a good cause. The leaders of the group work hard each year and plan all year round for this one night event. It’s a great way to have fun and to show that you stand for all people, no matter who they are.

this is happening to young people, let’s take a stand together! Caring About Rescuing Slaves is hosting a car show on April 14 from 12:30-2:30 at East Ridge Village Shopping Center to bring awareness and to help raise funds for LOVE146, a national organi-

zation with a local presence dedicated to advocacy of victims. Please get involved & spread the word! Sincerely, Reagan Webster C.A.R.S. Student Media Representative

CAMPUS

VOICE

What should the SGA president-elect focus on first? Rhett Eisenberg Freshman

“Smoking on the campus, they should ban it.”

Swan Holt Junior

“This is my first semester here so I really don’t know.”

Merriam Hayden Senior

“Money being more evenly spread across campus. Like the music and art departments are getting the least amount of money.”

Robert Bradley Junior

“I can tell you what their priority shouldn’t be; they shouldn’t be using as much of the budget to refurbish Blum Union.”


The Griffon News

Page 9

March 28, 2013

SPORTS

DII offers competitive recruiting Adam Euchner | Contributor Writer colleges to identify potential players based on their abiliaeuchner@missouriwestern.edu Coaches win with players and no matter the division, there is a process for identifying talent, and more importantly, finding it before your rivals do. When people think about recruiting for collegiate sports, they more than likely assume that recruiting is just a matter of seeing who is putting up the best numbers and offering them a full-ride scholarship. In reality, the legwork involved in recruiting players for college sports teams is an intensive process. While Division II recruiting may not be something that’s going to grace the cover of the sports section, it’s definitely competitive. Some schools, particularly Division II schools like Missouri Western, rely on local recruiting services such as Mullensports.net, run by Jerry Mullens and Ballstars.net, run by Rick Ball. They are recruiters who identify high school and junior college talent and post stats to their respective websites. This is an easy way for

ties in a specific aspect of their sport. Tiffany Goldwire, Western’s women’s basketball graduate assistant, is almost entirely in charge of identifying prospective players for the team. She said she looks for spots on the team that need attention due to graduation and attrition. “If we have a really strong outside player who is going to be graduating, I will look at multiple recruiting sites and try and find someone who is really strong in that position, and cross-reference them with other sites,” Goldwire said. While playing for a successful program is ideal, Goldwire noted that it isn’t everything. “I try to find people who have played consistently throughout their career, but them being on a winning team doesn’t necessarily mean anything,” she said. “You can be a really good player on a bad team and still be an asset. That’s why individual statistics is some-

thing I focus on. We also want to be sure that people we recruit are going to graduate, so academics are very important too.” Anthony Medina, the men’s basketball graduate assistant, is also in charge of recruiting. He said the men’s program does things a bit differently. While he does use recruiting services, he prefers a more hands-on approach of actually going to games of prospective student-athletes. Medina said he covers a lot of miles to scout players. He has been to Dallas and to Oklahoma, but some places are too remote. “I’ve been in touch with a kid from Alaska and if it wasn’t for the fact that it’s so expensive to travel there, I’d go watch him play too,” Medina said. Western’s head basketball coach Tom Smith has been known for recruiting almost specifically from junior colleges so a website such as NJCAA.org, which is the National Junior College Athletic Association, is something that is particularly helpful.

Kayla Dysart and Evangel’s Ali Sivinski was a close one that made the one match difference between Western and Evangel as Dysart was defeated 6-4, 0-6 and 10-8. Dysart played great thoughout the entire match but just couldn’t get over the hump in the final set. Boldridge won her match against Kelly Bush 6-2, 6-2 while Lindsay Beger defeated in a close matchup at the end. Phine Mulumba 6-2, 7-5 and Alyssa Dougan defeated Kailey Roland 6-1, 6-2. The Griffons’ confidence has been growing throughout the entire season. “This is one of my most talented teams I have had and you can sense that their confidence is growing,” Coach Ron Selkirk said. “They are playing matches now where they are saying ‘I can win this match.’” Sophmore Ceara Boldridge

came out of the day’s matchups undefeated. “I came in today thinking we had a good chance coming in today and I knew it was going to be close,” Boldridge said. “I feel like we are still growing and my play has really improved from last season and today I was playing a lot more consistent, getting into a rhythm.” Lindsay Beger left the match day 1-0. “My stroke swing was starting to slow down as I got tired but at the end I was happy I ended up closing the match out at the end,” Beger said. Western’s No. 1 Meara Smith fell in her singles match 6-0, 6-2 and No. 2 Denise Chiao was defeated 6-1, 6-0 in her match. “I was confident out there today but I just couldn’t get into a rhythm,” Smith said. In doubles competition,

Smith’s wife Patsy, who accompanies him on many recruiting ventures, shed some light on his philosophy about recruiting from junior colleges. “Coach Smith takes the stars of junior college teams and molds them together into one team,” Patsy Smith said. Medina said that while Coach Smith has really made a niche out of junior college recruiting, he has also recruited true freshman players straight out of high school, like last year where he recruited three true freshmen. Reed Mells, a college sophomore basketball player out of Des Moines, Iowa was recruited by Coach Smith in his senior year at Grandview Park Baptist High School. Grandview is a private school in the smallest division in Iowa; 1A. Mell’s graduating class had 28 students in it. His team made it to the state tournament, and he was averaging 25-30 points a game and in some games, upwards of 10 assists. “I had no idea I was even

Westerns goal is to recruit players with potential to play at the highest level. Here football coach Jerry Patridge chats with a NFL scout from the Redskins on Pro Day for Western’s NFL prospects. Tevin Harris | Photo Editor

being looked at for recruitment until Coach Smith showed up on my doorstep one day saying he wanted to talk to me about playing basketball for Missouri Western,” Mells said. “He told me that his assistant coach Mike Nicholson had been coming to my games and watching me. Coach Smith also recruited Tevin Harris out of Chicago and Freddie Manyawu from near Kansas City, both as freshmen too.” People assume that serious collegiate recruiting is something that only big name Di-

vision I schools regularly do but it is obviously not. People may also assume that smaller Division II schools such as Western are comprised of mostly local homegrown talent, and again they’d be wrong. The rosters of all the athletic teams on campus show an eclectic mix of players from all over the United States, and proves that Division II recruiting is a serious, time intensive process that’s comparable to recruiting at all levels of college sports.

Griffon Tennis faces tough “Love” Gary Smith | Staff Writer gsmith16@missouriwestern.edu

Missouri Western tennis showed promising signs in their hard fought battle against Evangel University, but fell 5-4 in their non-conference matchup on their home court at the St. Joseph Tennis and Swim Club. With this loss, the Griffons fall to 3-11 (0-6 MIAA) on the year and made it consecutive loss No. 10. Starting the day off slow, the Griffons pulled out one win from the doubles action by the pair Ceara Boldridge and Kelly Cochran, who defeated their opponents 8-4, but even after the win, the Griffons were still down 4-1 in match play. In singles action, the Griffons hit a spark and won No. 4, No. 5 and No. 6 but it was too late. The No. 3 matchup between Western’s

Denise Chiao goes for a back hand in the Griffon’s tennis match. Jason Brown | Photo Contributor

Denis Chiao and Meara Smith fell 8-1 in their matchup while Dysart and Alyssa Dougan fell in their match 8-4. The Griffons have one of

the youngest rosters in the MIAA with seven of its 10 on the roster being freshmen. The Griffons next matchup is on Wednesday, March 27 at 3 p.m. against Emporia

State University. Western still has nine matches before MIAA Tournament play begins April 19-20.

Softball extends winning streak Kyle Inman | Sports Editor kinman@missourwestern.edu Griffon softball stayed hot in cold weather over the weekend extending its winning-streak to eight games and overall record to 20-8 with a 4-0 showing at the Spring Sports Complex. “We are starting to put the pieces all together and feel really good about where we are,” Coach Jen Bagley said. “But I don’t feel really good about the fact that we have snow on our field again.” Western was scheduled to play several more games, but snow forced the cancellation of the Missouri Western Softball Classic and the Griffons were only able to reschedule four. Griffons defeat Lincoln University 8-3 After entering the third inning down by a run, the Griffon offense exploded for five runs in the bottom half. Tiffany Gillaspy scored after she hit a triple that drove in two runs and Michelle Stevenson hit a home run. Western tacked on two more runs as the game went on when Bree Fleschner stole home and Kendall Sorensen hit a triple and then made her way home after an error from the second basemen.

Pitcher Janie Smith got the win after pitching all seven innings and allowing just two earned runs and seven hits. Smith is off to a 9-3 start to her freshman season. Western edges Emporia State University 4-2 The Griffons pulled away in the fourth inning after three scoreless innings in this non-conference game between two of the top teams in the MIAA. In the bottom of the fourth, Sorensen hit a double that scored Gillaspy. Taylor Anding and Maegan Roemmich both singled to drive in runs and push the Griffons lead to 3-0. Emporia fired back with a two-run sixth inning, but it wasn’t enough as Western added another run off of a Roemmich double in the bottom half of the inning. Jackie Bishop pitched all seven innings and gave up six hits and two earned runs while striking out seven batters. “I felt really good about the way we approached the plate offensively,” Bagley said. “Their pitching is always among top in the league and we really made it seems easy. It was good it see.

SEE SOFTBALL PAGE 10

(Left) Kat Steponovich focuses on the ball as she tries to get a hit in the Griffons win against Emporia State University. (Top Right) Brooke Schaben highfives her teammate as they make their victory. (Bottom right) Griffons cheer on their teammates from the dugout in cold weather at the Spring Sports Complex. Gilbert Imbiri | Asst. Photo Editor


SPORTS

The Griffon News

Page 10

Two Griffons prepare for NFL draft

March 28, 2013

Baseball streak ends, stays on top of MIAA

Kyle Simpson gets a hit against the opposing team. Tevin Harris | Photo Editor

Christian Mengel | Asst. Sports Editor

cmengel@missouriwestern.edu

Michael Hill receives a pass during the NFL Pro-day on Friday, March 22.

Kyle Inman | Sports Editor kinman@missouriwestern.edu Pro scouts from most NFL teams showed up to the Griffon Indoor Sports Complex on Friday, March 21 to take a look at players from across the area with pro aspirations. For the second consecutive year, Western will most likely have a player chosen in the NFL draft, which starts on Thursday, April 25. Last year it was kicker Greg Zuerlein who was selected in the sixth round of the draft by the Saint Louis Rams. This year, it’s defensive end David Bass and runningback Michael Hill who are on the radar of the big leagues. Possibly getting Hill and Bass to the next level is more of an achievement than Zuerlein getting drafted last season for coach Jerry Partridge and his staff. While Zuerlein only spent one season kicking at Western, Bass and Hill were program players who each spent five years as Griffons. Both players were largely unrecruited by other universities coming out of high school, redshirted their freshman season and made huge strides in performance

at Western. ss, a 6-4 262 pound defensive end, came to Western weighing in at only 200 pounds and added 60 to his frame in the weight room. He started for four straight years and broke the all-time Western sack record with 39.5 for his career. “He looks the part,” Partridge said of scouts looking at Bass after he broke the record. “His measurements are good, he just needs to put some numbers up and he’s already done that throughout his career.” Scouts got a look at Bass already at the NFL combine and in the East West Shrine Bowl where he competed alongside FBS Division I prospects and showed promise. “Bass has room to refine his pass rush moves to be more effective, but he flashed in practice why he was able to be so productive in college,” said Dane Brugler of NFLDraftScout.com. Bass projects as a defensive end or an outside linebacker in the NFL and is projected to be drafted sometime in between rounds four and

seven. Hill’s future in the NFL is a little less secure, but the 5-10 204 pound runningback has been steadily climbing up the boards, which should be no surprise to those who have seen him play. Hailing from Central High School in St. Joseph, local product Hill broke the alltime and single season rushing record at Western, running for 4,601 yards in his career. He led the entire nation in rushing yards as a senior and was a finalist for the Harlon Hill trophy, awarded to the nation’s best Division II player. He was a power runner at Western who would hit defenses just as hard as they hit him. He would routinely send corners and safeties from opposing defenses out with injury from running into them. Scouts got a look at Hill at the Raycom College All-Star Classic, which featured 22 players from the SEC – widely considered the best football conference in the nation at any level. Hill took full advantage of his opportunity and busted off two long runs

Tevin Harris | Photo Editor

for 45 and 54 yards with two touchdowns. Even if he doesn’t hear his name called in the draft, Hill is likely to be invited to a pro camp and have an opportunity to make a team. The only thing scouts have doubts about with him is his speed. He doesn’t run the 40-yard-dash at blazing speed, but showed his speed on the field during the season when he broke off a 93yard run for a touchdown. Similar concerns were shown by scouts to Texans runningback Arian Foster, who went undrafted in 2009, but eventually made the NFL as a free agent and was the league’s leading rusher in 201 and a three-time pro bowler. Hill hopes to be a diamond in the rough for the team that takes a chance on him. Getting players to the NFL annually is just another sign that Western football is taking steps toward becoming a powerhouse in DII football. If the Griffons continue to win a lot of games every season, the pipeline to the highest level could be an every year thing.

Bishop breaks all-time win record SOFTBALL

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 10 All of those things came together and showed us what type of things we are capable of.” Western outscores Northern University 11-6, Bishop breaks record Western’s bats warmed up in game one of a doubleheader as the Griffons put two runs on the board in the first inning when Michelle Stevenson hit a double that scored Gillaspy and Fleschner. Northern responded and tied the game after a throwing error from the Griffons. Western took control of the game in the third inning with

four runs off of four hits to make the score 7-2. Kat Steponovich and Fleschner added home runs to extend the lead. Jackie Bishop went all seven innings for the win, which put her in the history books ahead of Cheri Kemp as Western’s all-time win leader. Bishop is only in her junior season and is 10-3 on the year. “Ever since I’ve been here people ask me if I know who Cheri Kemp is,” Bagley said. “To be able to take a record form her is something that Jackie should be very, very proud of because those records and her name have stuck with this program for many years.” Bishop is now just one win

away from the becoming the all-time wins leader. Griffons blowout Nothern University 15-1 in game two of doubleheader Fleschner continued her hot hitting by blasting a homer to right field to open up a 2-0 lead in the first inning. The Griffons scored six more runs in the first inning to make it 8-2 and the route was on. Smith pitched her way to her second win of the weekend by going all seven innings. Fleschner had four of the 12 hits for the game for Western and finished the two games against Northern hitting a perfect 8-for-8 with six runs batted in. “What we need is confi-

dence and consistency and I think we are starting to achieve that,” Bagley said. Weather hasn’t been kind to the Griffons so far this spring and they are forced to try and keep their momentum from the eight game winning-steak while practicing in the GISC. “You go into the indoor and we are grateful to have it, but it isn’t the surface we play on,” Bagley said. “Everything looks different when you have the roof on you. Taking the momentum of us being able to practice on the field is something I’m concerned about.” Western returns to action on Friday, March 29 at Missouri Southern.

Missouri Western’s 17game win streak may have ended, but the Griffons still pulled out a series win against one of the top teams in the MIAA, University of Central Oklahoma. Western’s one loss to Central Oklahoma came Friday evening and is the only conference loss it has had in their 15 MIAA games so far this season. The Griffons have been playing outstanding all season both offensively and defensively, and have shown every team they’ve faced thus far why they are sitting at the top of the MIAA. Westerns coach, Buzz Verduzco, has moved on from the win streak talk and is now looking on the bright side of entering into the middle of the regular season. “The streak is over, so I can say that now,” Verduzco said. “We’ve kind of gotten past that now but it was a great run. Now as far as how we talk to the team and what that means is, we try to get them to be a little bit more consistent minded during the middle part of the season.” Top pitcher Brandon Simmons saw that loss as a reminder for how bad losing feels, and motivated the team to not want to feel like that again. “This weekend was a good test for us,” Simmons said. “[Central Oklahoma] was a very competitive team and they gave us kind of a reality check. Their pitching was outstanding and really shutdown our hitters, who have been on fire. I think this past weekend really put the nasty taste of losing back into our mouth and no one enjoyed it.” Hitting for the Griffons has been off the charts so far in the first half of their season. Westerns hitting numbers are greater than their opponents in every statistical batting category. Runs have been the biggest standout

number, having a total of 221 runs scored, averaging out to the team scoring 9.6 runs per game, which is almost twice as many as their opponents 114 runs, at 4.9 runs per game. Western has scored 10 or more runs in 12 games. Simmons believes that teams that have such dominant hitting are capable of taking the pressure off of their pitchers. “Having a lineup such as this one it really makes the game so much easier,” Simmons said. “It makes you not afraid to go out and throw strikes and if you give up a run or two, then our team will come up a get them back. It really makes pitching a whole lot easier in general.” The key to their hitting seems to be coming from their power. The Griffon big bats have already hit 30 homeruns. With seven players hitting over .400, and five players slugging over .600, it’s hard not to get rack up the runs. Westerns own Michael Schulze, Kyle Simpson and Bubba Dotson are three of the top four hit leaders in the MIAA. Schulze and Dotson have been the MIAA hitters of the week these last two weeks. Schulze feels that the good hitting between players motivates everyone to elevate their game. “We are all just very confident and focused,” Schulze said. “Friendly competition is definitely there between all of us. Once one guy hits everyone wants to hit, so it’s actually a good thing. Offense in baseball is contageous so we all definitely feed off each other at the plate. In the end, we all have the same goal and that is to win.” Although the 17 game win streak ended, another streak still continues. Schulze is currently on a 16 game hit streak. Ever since the first game cancellation, he has recorded at least one hit in every game.

ATHLETE of the WEEK Bree Fleschner #14 - Outfielder

14

Bree Fleschner went 9-for-15 in four games over the weekend including a perfect 8-for8 with six runs batted in on Sunday in a two-game sweep over Northern University. She is batting .348 so far this season with five homeruns and 14 runs batted in on the season with a .573 slugging percentage.

Bree Fleschner Andy Inman and Chad Hammontree | Design Artist and Graphics Editor Andy Inman and Chad Hammontree | Design Artist and Graphics Editorr


It’s time to register for summer and fall classes! missouriwestern.edu/schedule SUMMER REGISTRATION DATES

FALL REGISTRATION DATES

Priority Registration: April 1- May 28 Early Registration: May 1- May 28 Walk-in Registration: May 23, 1-4:30 pm, Eder Hall Instructions: missouriwestern.edu/registrar/registration

Priority Registration: April 1- Aug 26 Early Registration: Aug 1- Aug 26 Walk-in Registration: Aug 20, 11-6:30 pm, Eder Hall Instructions: missouriwestern.edu/registrar/registration

SUMMER 2013 Online Classes

title...................................................... dates.............. location.............. hrs.. instructor............number/section...crn#

BIOLOGY biology

*Principles of Cell Biology.............. 5/28-7/18.....T R,9-12 PM, REM 205.....4...... Daggett...........BIO-106-40.....30468 *Principles of Cell Biology.............. 5/28-7/18..... T R,9-12 PM, REM 205.....0...... Daggett...........BIO-106-41.....30469 Pathophysiology................................5/28-7/18.....ONLINE..................4.......Casey.............BIO-375-40.....30357

BUSINESS accounting

Introductory Financial Acctg............. 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3...... Adkins............ ACC-201-40...30604

management

Management of Organizations........... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3.......West...............MGT-305-40...30605 Org. Beh., Leadership & Change...... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3.......Luthans..........MGT-401-40...30606

marketing

Principles Of Marketing..................... 6/24-7/18....... ONLINE...............3.......Scarfino.........MKT-301-46...30618

COMMUNICATION STUDIES, THEATRE & CINEMA communication

Oral Communication.......................... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3.......Bond..............COM-104-40...30466

COMPUTER SCIENCE, MATH & PHYSICS astronomy

Introduction to Astronomy................. 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............4....... Godfrey.........PHY-104-40....30068 Must sign up for a face-to-face lab.

computer science

Microcomputer Applications............. 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3....... Noynaert.......CSC-201-40....30031

mathematics

Foundations/Univ. Math I.................. 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3....... Moore............MAT-81-40......30463 Foundations/Univ. Math II................. 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3....... Moore............MAT-82-40......30464 Foundations/Univ. Math III............... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3....... Moore............MAT-83-40......30465

CRIMINAL JUSTICE, LEGAL STUDIES & SOCIAL WORK criminal justice

Intro to Criminal Justice................5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...................3.......Courtney........LAW-100-40...30157 Intro to Theories of Crime............5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...................3.......Godboldt........LAW-210-40...30479 Understanding Research in CJ......5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...................3.......Lindsteadt......LAW-255-40...30161 Criminal Law.................................5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...................3.......Courtney........LAW-260-40...30162 Practicum I....................................5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...................3.......Tushaus..........LAW-290-41...30608 Intermediate Criminal Law...........5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...................3.......Kopek............LAW-410-40...30165 Internship.......................................5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...................3.......Tushaus..........LAW-465-40...30171 Senior Seminar..............................5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...................3.......Katz...............LAW-470-40...30372 *Forensic Photography.................5/28-7/18....... W, 6:30-9:20 PM, NKC......3.......Rezzelle.........LAW-615-40...30620 Graduate Internship.......................5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...................3.......Tushaus..........LAW-670-40...30536

legal studies

title...................................................... dates.............. location.............. hrs.. instructor............number/section...crn#

EDUCATION education

Educational Psychology..................... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............2........Young...........EDU-225-40....30344 Psychology & Educ of Exc. Stu........ 5/28-6/20....... ONLINE...............2........Eicher...........EDU-315-45....30346 Assessing and Individualizing........... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3........Blake............EDU-360-40....30455 Behavior Management....................... 5/28-6/20....... ONLINE...............2........Claflin...........EDU-370-45....30149 Scrn Diag for Early Childhood.......... 5/28-6/20....... ONLINE...............3........Claflin...........EDU-418-45....30599 Policy Decisions................................. 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3........Eddins...........EDU-510-40....30133 Seminar Professional Writing............ 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3........Staff..............EDU-612-40....30331 Data Informed Analysis & Dec......... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3........Wall..............EDU-615-40....30131 Improving Outcomes: Document...... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3........Wall..............EDU-630-40....30314 Improving Outcomes: Document...... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............6........Wall..............EDU-630-41....30366 Improving Outcomes: Document...... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3........Frick.............EDU-630-42....30452 Improving Outcomes: Document...... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............1........Wall..............EDU-630-43....30532 Fundamentals of ASD........................ 5/28-6/20....... ONLINE...............3........Eicher...........EDU-650-45....30425 Beh. Int. for Stud. with ASD.............. 5/28-6/20....... ONLINE...............3........Bashinski......EDU-653-45....30273

tesol - teachers of english to speakers of other languages

Methods Tch Sec Lang Stu................ 5/28-6/20....... ONLINE...............3.......Dickerson......TSL-468-45.....30353 Methods of Teach L2 Students.......... 5/28-6/20....... ONLINE..............3.......Dickerson......TSL-660-45.....30354 Research in ELL................................. 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3.......Dickerson......TSL-663-40.....30355

ENGLISH, FOREIGN LANGUAGE & JOURNALISM english

College Writing And Rhetoric........... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3........Bartels..........ENG-104-40....30501 College Writing And Research.......... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3........Crain.............ENG-108-40....30493 Approaches To Literature.................. 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3........Bensyl...........ENG-210-40....30069 Approaches To Literature.................. 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3........Donaher........ENG-210-41....30406 Seminar Professional Writing............ 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3........Staff..............ENG-612-40....30330

HEALTH, PHYSICAL ED & RECREATION physical education

Fitness And Wellness......................... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3....... Kriewitz........PED-101-40....30227 Fitness And Wellness......................... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............0....... Kriewitz........PED-101-41....30229 Kinesiology........................................ 5/28-6/20....... ONLINE...............3....... Kraft..............PED-303-45....30236 Psychology Of Sport.......................... 5/28-6/20....... ONLINE...............2....... Russell...........PED-374-45....30577 Socio Aspects Sport Phys Act............ 5/28-6/20....... ONLINE...............3....... Russell...........PED-375-45....30461 Personal & Environmental Hlth........ 5/28-6/20....... ONLINE...............3....... Dodd.............PED-391-45....30370

MUSIC music

Perspectives in Music........................ 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3.......Gilmour.........MUS-101-40...30158 Perspectives In Music........................ 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3.......Edwards.........MUS-101-41...30160

NURSING & ALLIED HEALTH allied health

Introduction to Mediation.................. 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3....... Katz...............LAT-335-40.....30478

Medical Terminology......................... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............2.......O’Connor......ALH-106-40....30166 Applied Nutrition............................... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............2.......Nuckolls........ALH-352-40....30168

ECONOMICS, POLITICAL SCIENCE & SOCIOLOGY

Intro To Physical Therapy.................. 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............1....Raffensperger...PTA-100-40.....30226

economics

Principles Of Microeconomics.......... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3.......Courington....ECO-261-40....30565 Money And Banking.......................... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3.......Hamzaee........ECO-363-40....30566

political science

American National Government....... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3....... Euchner.........PSC-101-40.....30571

sociology

Introduction to Sociology.................. 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3.......Kibirige.........SOC-110-40....30567 Social Problems.................................. 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3.......Kamali...........SOC-230-40....30568 Criminology....................................... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3.......Kibirige.........SOC-430-40....30569 *blended course

Western Institute Classes

physical therapy

PSYCHOLOGY pyschology

General Psychology........................... 5/28-6/20....... ONLINE...............3...... Gerhart...........PSY-101-44.....30562 Life-Span Developmental.................. 5/28-6/20....... ONLINE...............3...... Deka...............PSY-240-44.....30581 Introduction To Forensic Psych......... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3...... Bargar.............PSY-290-41.....30179 Introductory Psy Statistics................. 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3...... Cronk.............PSY-300-40.....30580 Abnormal Psychology........................ 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3...... Bargar.............PSY-309-41.....30485

WESTERN INSTITUTE nutrition

Nutrition & Weight Control............... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3......Harrison..........CED-278-40....30009

Kansas City Classes

title............................... dates.......days.........times.................location..... hrs.. instructor......... #/section....... crn

title............................... dates.......days.........times.................location..... hrs.. instructor......... #/section....... crn

St. Joseph Classes

Kansas City Northland Campus

global positioning systems Gps Map & Nav........ 5/15-5/17...WRF........8-5:00pm........Spratt 212.....2... Chevalier.. CED 490-99...30551 *

healthcare

education

Mathematics Methods... 5/28-7/18.. MTWTh.... 9-11:50am......... KCN.....3....Foster....... EDU 351-25...30598 Math/Elem/Middle....... 5/28-7/18... MTWTh....11am-12:20pm...KCN....3...Anderson...MAT 352-20...30064

Skills/Success in Healthca..... 1/9-6/9...ARRG.....ARRG.................................3.....Ellis......... CED 139-25....30629

law enforcement academy

Cr Asp of Policing I.... 7/1-8/23...MTWRF..8-5pm...............Wilson 184...3..... Wilson......POL 100-01...30559 Cr Asp of Policing I.... 5/8-6/20...MTWRF..8-5pm...............Wilson 184...3..... Wilson......POL 100-02...30552 Cr Asp of Policing I.... 5/8-8/10...S..............8-5pm...............Wilson 184...3..... Wilson......POL 100-03...30558 Cr Asp of Policing I.... 5/8-8/10...S..............8-5pm...............Wilson 184...3..... Wilson......POL 100-05...30556 Cr Asp of Policing 2.... 7/1-8/23...MTWRF..8-5pm...............Wilson 184...3..... Wilson......POL 130-01...30560 Cr Asp of Policing 2.... 5/8-6/20...MTWRF..8-5pm...............Wilson 184...3..... Wilson......POL 130-02...30553 Cr Asp of Policing 2.... 5/8-8/10...S..............8-5pm...............Wilson 184...3..... Wilson......POL 130-03...30555 Cr Asp of Policing 2.... 5/8-8/10...MTR........8-5pm...............Wilson 184...3..... Wilson......POL 130-05...30557

* noncredit option available

Spratt Hall 105 Phone: 816-271-4100 Fax: 816-271-5922 wi@missouriwestern.edu

wi.missouriwestern.edu


FALL 2013 Online Classes

title...................................................... dates.............. location.............. hrs.. instructor............number/section...crn#

BUSINESS

title...................................................... dates.............. location.............. hrs..... instructor.........number/section...crn#

sociology

accounting

Introduction to Sociology.................. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3......Kamali............SOC 110-40.....12782 Introduction to Sociology.................. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3......Kibirige...........SOC 110-41.....12783 Introduction To Archaeology............. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3......Albright..........SOC 200-40.....12785 Social Problems.................................. 8/2-12/13....... ONLINE...............3......Kamali............SOC 230-40.....12786

business

EDUCATION

Introductory Financial Acctg............. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Staff...............ACC 201-41....12816 Introductory Managerial Acctg.......... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Fowler...........ACC 202-41....12817 Accounting Information Systems...... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Staff...............ACC 418-41.... 11828 Business Communications................. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3........Payne............GBA 220-40....12814 Business Statistics II.......................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3........Staff..............GBA 310-40....10550

finance

Personal Finance................................ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Scarfino.........FIN 210-40......12827

management

Management of Organizations........... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......West...............MGT 305-40...12815 Organizational Behavior.................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Luthans..........MGT 350-40...12809 Management Information Systems.... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Staff...............MGT 418-41... 11827

marketing

Principles Of Marketing..................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Hickman........MKT 301-40...10591 International Mkt. and Trade............. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Ertekin...........MKT 451-40...10596

COMMUNICATION STUDIES, THEATRE & CINEMA communication

Oral Communication.......................... 10/15-12/5..... ONLINE...............3...... Bond...............COM 104-40...12859

theatre

Introduction To Theatre...................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Lillie..............THR 113-40....12697

COMPUTER SCIENCE, MATH & PHYSICS astronomy

Introduction to Astronomy................. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............4.......Godfrey.........PHY 104-40.... 11210 Must sign up for a face-to-face lab.

computer science

Introduction to Web Graphics............ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Becker...........ACT 202-40....12590 Applied Database Systems................ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Hecker...........ACT 301-40.... 12113 Computer Systems and Archtres....... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Staff...............CSC 200-40..... 11575 Microcomputer Applications............. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Staff...............CSC 201-40.....10263 Microcomputer Applications............. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Staff...............CSC 201-42.....10261 Networking and Telecommunicati.... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Noynaert........CSC 294-40.....12317

mathematics

Foundations/Univ. Math I.................. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Moore............MAT 81-40......10614 Foundations/Univ. Math I.................. 9/9-12/13....... ONLINE...............3.......Moore............MAT 81-41......12723 Foundations/Univ. Math II................. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Moore............MAT 82-40...... 11678 Foundations/Univ. Math II................. 9/9-12/13....... ONLINE...............3.......Moore............MAT 82-41......12734 Foundations/Univ. Math III............... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Moore............MAT 83-40...... 11984 Foundations/Univ. Math III............... 9/9-12/13....... ONLINE...............3.......Moore............MAT 83-41......12762 College Algebra.................................. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Hegeman.......MAT 116-40....10301

CRIMINAL JUSTICE, LEGAL STUDIES & SOCIAL WORK criminal justice

Intro to Criminal Justice..................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Staff...............LAW 100-40.... 11504 *Juvenile Delinquency....................... 8/26-12/13..... W, 10-10:5, Wilson 170....3.......Staff...............LAW 110-40.... 11507 *Juvenile Delinquency....................... 8/26-12/13..... W, 11-11:50, Wilson 170...3.......Staff...............LAW 110-41....12166 *Juvenile Delinquency....................... 8/26-12/13..... T, 5:30-6:20, Wilson 170...3.......Huffman........LAW 110-42....12412 *Juvenile Delinquency....................... 8/26-12/13..... T, 6:30-7:20, Wilson 170...3.......Huffman........LAW 110-43....12413 Juvenile Delinquency......................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Lindsteadt......LAW 110-44....12414 Modern Police Procedures................. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Jang................LAW 130-40.... 11508 Criminal Investigation....................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Staff...............LAW 190-40....12848 Penology and Corrections.................. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Godboldt........LAW 200-40.... 11510 Intro to Theories of Crime................. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Godboldt........LAW 210-40....12399 Understanding Research in CJ........... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Staff...............LAW 255-40.... 11512 Practicum I......................................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Tushaus..........LAW 290-40.... 11527 CJ Communications........................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Charrette........LAW 300-40....12849 Senior Research.................................. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Lindsteadt......LAW 420-40.... 11535 Juvenile Law and Procedures............ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Kissock..........LAW 440-40.... 11537 Internship............................................ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Katz...............LAW 465-40.... 11540 Quantitative Analysis......................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Lindsteadt......LAW 520-40....12075 Criminal Law and Evidence.............. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Staff...............LAW 600-40....12078 Graduate Internship............................ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Tushaus..........LAW 670-40....12454 Research and Publication................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Tushaus..........LAW 680-40....12853 *blended course

legal studies

education

Educational Psychology..................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............2....... Young............EDU 225-40....10177 Applied Methods & Mgt.................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Eddins...........EDU 304-40.... 11482 Multicultural Education..................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............2....... Foster............EDU 308-40.... 11700 Secondary Reading Techniques......... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............2....... Flowers.........EDU 311-40....10127 Psychology & Educ of Exc. Stu........ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............2....... Eicher............EDU 315-40.... 11591 Sci and SS for Young Children.......... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Flowers.........EDU 333-40.... 11483 Mathematics Methods........................ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Foster............EDU 351-40....12303 Intro to Early Childhood Educ........... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............2....... Claflin...........EDU 358-40.... 11592 Behavior Management....................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............2....... Claflin...........EDU 370-40.... 11628 Teach Read in Elem Sch.................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............2....... Blake.............EDU 375-40....12337 Seminar in Elem. Ed.......................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Irvine.............EDU 403-40....10129 Sem. - Ed. & Human Relations......... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Staff...............EDU 404-40....10132 Language Development for Ed.......... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Bashinski......EDU 414-40.... 11593 Fam, Comm & Sch: Partnering......... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Claflin...........EDU 421-40.... 11629 Trends & Mgmt of Programs............. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Hagan............EDU 422-40.... 11959 Research Approaches in Assemen..... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Ellis...............EDU 530-40.... 11039 Improving Outcomes: Document...... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Wall...............EDU 630-40.... 11055 Improving Outcomes: Document...... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............6....... Wall...............EDU 630-41.... 11056 Improving Outcomes: Document...... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Frick..............EDU 630-42.... 11673 Improving Outcomes: Document...... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............1....... Wall...............EDU 630-43....12451 Tchg. Com. & Soc. Skills.................. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Bashinski......EDU 654-40.... 11625 Int. Erly Int. St. w/ ASD..................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Kalis..............EDU 655-40.... 11626

tesol - teachers of english to speakers of other languages

Second Language Acquisition........... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Staff...............TSL 467-40..... 11616 Methods Tch Sec Lang Stu................ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Staff...............TSL 468-40..... 11614 Methods of Teach L2 Students.......... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Staff...............TSL 660-40..... 11613 Second Language Acquisition........... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Staff...............TSL 661-40..... 11615 Language and Culture........................ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Staff...............TSL 664-40..... 11970

ENGLISH, FOREIGN LANGUAGE & JOURNALISM english

College Writing And Rhetoric........... 8/27-10/10..... ONLINE...............3....... Crain.............ENG 104-40....12715 College Writing And Rhetoric........... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Katchen.........ENG 104-41....12733 College Writing And Research.......... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Donaher........ENG 108-40....12739 College Writing And Research.......... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Bartels...........ENG 108-41....12740 College Writing And Research.......... 10/15-12/5..... ONLINE...............3....... Crain.............ENG 108-42....12860 Approaches To Literature.................. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Crain.............ENG 210-40....10472 Language Awareness.......................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Donaher........ENG 232-40....10696 Language Awareness.......................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Donaher........ENG 232-41....12741 Studies in Popular Literature............. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Donaher........ENG 334-40....12743

HEALTH, PHYSICAL ED & RECREATION physical education

Fitness And Wellness......................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Kriewitz........PED 101-40..... 11479 Fitness And Wellness......................... 8/26-11/1....... ONLINE...............0....... Kriewitz........PED 101-41..... 11480 Community Health............................. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............2....... Dodd.............PED 388-40..... 11104 Personal & Environmental Hlth........ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Dodd.............PED 391-40..... 11107

recreation sports management

Philos & Ldership In Rec. Adm........ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Hardy............RSM 300-40....10912 Recreation Law For The Practit......... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............2....... Blessing........RSM 325-40....10920 Promotion Sprt & Rec Agencies........ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Choi...............RSM 343-40....10927 Adv.Travel & Tourism Develop........ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Choi...............RSM 344-40....10928

MUSIC music

Perspectives In Music........................ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Edwards........MUS 101-40....10950 Perspectives In Music........................ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... May...............MUS 101-41.... 11584 Perspectives In Music........................ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... May...............MUS 101-42.... 11585

NURSING & ALLIED HEALTH allied health

Medical Terminology......................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............2.......Yeh.................ALH 106-40....10684 Applied Nutrition............................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............2.......Nuckolls........ALH 352-40....10686

health informatics and information management

*Introduction to Law.......................... 8/26-12/13..... F, 9-9:50, Wilson 205....3.......Kissock..........LAT 101-40..... 11487 *Introduction to Law.......................... 8/26-12/13..... R, 5:30-6:20, Wilson 130...3.......Kissock..........LAT 101-42.....12840 *Introduction to Law.......................... 8/26-12/13..... R, 6:30-7:20, Wilson 130...3.......Kissock..........LAT 101-43.....12841 Introduction to Law............................ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Kissock..........LAT 101-44.....12842 Paralegal Studies................................ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Tant-Shafer....LAT 115-40..... 11489 Legal Computer Applications............ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Palmer...........LAT 250-40..... 11492 Introduction to Mediation.................. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Katz...............LAT 335-40..... 11850 Domestic Relations............................ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Soper..............LAT 370-40..... 11497 Civil Rights Law................................ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Tushaus..........LAT 420-40..... 11499

Health Data Management.................. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Dolan.............HIF 300-40...... 11945 Clinical Class Sys............................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Dolan.............HIF 310-40...... 11948 Legal and Ethical................................ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............2.......Dolan.............HIF 330-40...... 11950 Human Resources.............................. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Dolan.............HIF 410-40......12299 Clinical Data Management................ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Dolan.............HIF 420-40......12300 Applied Health Informatics............... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Dolan.............HIF 430-40......12301 American History Since 1865............ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Frieling..........HIS 150-40......12598 Health Care Delivery Systems........... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Dolan.............HIT 200-40......10673 Coding & Classification Sys I........... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Dolan.............HIT 275-40......10678 Coding & Class Systems I Lab.......... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............1.......Dolan.............HIT 276-40......10680

*Selected Topics In Social Work....... 8/26-12/13..... S, 9-4pm, Wilson 205....3...... Clary...............SWK 270-40...12847 Substance Abuse and Dep.................. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3...... Atkinson.........SWK 345-40...12419

Foundations Nsng Leadership........... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Donaldson.....NUR 501-40.... 11705

social work

DIGITAL MEDIA digital media

Project Management.......................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............2....... Bergland........ADM 525-40...12824

ECONOMICS, POLITICAL SCIENCE & SOCIOLOGY economics

Current Issues In The Economy........ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Lawson..........ECO 101-40....12653 Principles Of Macroeconomics ........ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Courington....ECO 260-40....12657 Principles Of Microeconomics.......... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Courington....ECO 261-40....12660 Economics Of Health Care................ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Lawson..........ECO 375-40....12664

nursing

PSYCHOLOGY pyschology

General Psychology (Online)............ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Henry.............PSY 101-40.....12539 General Psychology........................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Gerhart...........PSY 101-41.....12582 Social Psychology.............................. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Henry.............PSY 365-40.....12567

WESTERN INSTITUTE nutrition

Nutrition & Weight Control............... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Harrison.........CED 278-40....10100 *blended course

Western Institute & Kansas City Classes

title............................... dates.......days.........times.................location..... hrs...... instructor..... #/section....... crn

title............................... dates.......days.........times.................location..... hrs......instructor..... #/section....... crn

computer Microsoft Excel....... 10/28-12/2...M.............6-9 pm..............Spratt 212...1.. Readenour.. CED 147-01...12536 *

Concepts Of Sign Lang I... 9/9-10/14...M.............6:30-9:30pm.....Murphy 206...1.....Ballard..... CED 152-01...12537 * Concepts Of Sign Lang II.... 10/21-12/2...M.............6:30-9pm..........Murphy 206...1.....Ballard..... CED 152-01...12538 *

St. Joseph Classes

intensive english program

Beg Listening & Speaking... 8/26-12/13...MTWR....10:20-11:30......Spratt 208...3.....Mathies...... CED 86-01...10128 * Beg Grammar & Comp.. 8/26-12/13...MTWR....9-10:15am........Spratt 208...3.....Mathies...... CED 87-01...10133 * Beg Reading............ 8/26-12/13...MTWR....12:30-1:40........Spratt 208...3.....Voigt.......... CED 88-01...10115 * Beg Academic Writing... 8/26-12/13...MTWR....1:45-3:00 pm....Spratt 212...3.....Voigt.......... CED 89-01...10123 * Int Listening & Speaking.... 8/26-12/13...MTWR....10:20-11:30......Spratt 208...3.....Mathies...... CED 96-01...10130 * Int Grammar & Comp.... 8/26-12/13...MTWR....9-10:15 am.......Spratt 208...3.....Mathies...... CED 97-01...10136 * Int Reading.............. 8/26-12/13...MTWR....12:30-1:40pm...Spratt 208...3.....Voigt.......... CED 98-01...10117 * Int Academic Writing..... 8/26-12/13...MTWR....1:45-3 pm.........Spratt 212...3.....Voigt.......... CED 99-01...10125 * Adv Listening & Speaking.. 8/26-12/13...MTWR....10:20-11:30......Spratt 208...3.....Mathies.... CED 166-01...10131 * Adv Grammar & Comp...... 8/26-12/13...MTWR....9-10:15 am.......Spratt 208...3.....Mathies.... CED 167-01...10137 * Adv Reading........... 8/26-12/13...MTWR....12:30-1:40........Spratt 208...3.....Voigt........ CED 168-01...10121 * Adv Academic Writing....... 8/26-12/13...MTWR....1:45-3 pm.........Spratt 212...3.....Voigt........ CED 169-01...10126 * griffon edge Griffon Edge Orient...... 8/22-8/24...RFS.........9-5:00 pm.........ARRG........1.....Neeley..... CED 131-01...12869 leadership Gateway Leadership... 8/26-12/13...M.............12-12:50 pm.....Murphy 103....1.....Hodkins... CED 119-01...11664 Gateway Leadership... 8/26-12/13...W.............12-12:50 pm.....Murphy 103....1.....Tiner........ CED 119-02...11665 Gateway Leadership... 8/26-12/13...M.............2-2:5 pm...........Murphy 104....1.....Hodkins... CED 119-03...11666 Gateway Leadership... 8/26-12/13...T..............2-2:50 pm.........Murphy 113....1.....Clark........ CED 119-04...12119 Gateway Leadership... 8/26-12/13...R..............2-2:50 pm.........Murphy 113....1.....Clark........ CED 119-05...12120 Gateway Leadership... 8/26-12/13...W.............2-2:50 pm.........Murphy 108....1.....Bryant...... CED 119-06...12128 Gateway Leadership... 8/26-12/13...F..............12-12:50 pm.....Murphy 103....1.....Tiner........ CED 119-07...12468 law enforcement academy / criminal justice Police Mthds & Op... 8/26-12/13...MTWRF..8am-5pm..........Wilson 184...12....Wilson......POL 150-01...11589 Police Mthds & Op... 8/26-12/13...S..............8am-5pm..........Wilson 184....6.....Wilson......POL 150-03...12186 Police Mthds & Op... 8/26-12/13...S..............8am-5pm..........Wilson 184....6.....Wilson......POL 150-05...12437 photography and photoshop Photography............ 9/26-10/24...R..............6-8:30 PM........Poppl 102...1.....Callow..... CED 225-01...12527 * Photoshop for Photogs.... 10/31-12/5...R..............6-8:30 PM........Rem 108.....1.....Callow..... CED 325-01...12529 *

* noncredit option available

sign language

stress management

Stress Management.10/16-12/11...W.............6:30-9:30pm.....TBA............2..... Teliczan... CED 178-01...12589

volunteer training

Vol Train: Dom & Sex Viol Advo... 10/1-31...TR...........5-9pm...............YWCA.......2.....Turner...... CED 159-01...12532

Kansas City Northland Campus education

Exp in Teaching II.... 8/26-12/13...MTWTF..1-2:00pm..........NKC...........2....Kelly......... EDU 303-20...10111 Applied Methods & Mgt.....8/26-12/13...TTh..........10-11:00am......NKC...........3....Irvine........ EDU 304-20...11207 Intro to Reading...... 8/26-12/13...MW.........8-9:20am..........NKC...........3....Smith........ EDU 310-20...10113 Psych & Ed of Exc. Stu.... 8/26-12/13...W.............9:30-11:20am...NKC...........2....Eicher....... EDU 315-20...12105 Lang Arts Methods... 8/26-12/13...F..............8-9:50am..........NKC...........2....Smith........ EDU 320-20...10114 Soc Studies Methods Ele.. 8/26-12/13...M.............9:30am-2:20pm...NKC...........3....Irvine........ EDU 340-20...10118 Evaluation of Abilities..... 8/26-12/13...m.............9:30-11:20am...NKC...........2....Porter........ EDU 342-20...10119 Teach Read in Elem Sch... 8/26-12/13...Th............8-9:50am..........NKC...........2....Blake........ EDU 375-20...10122 Math/Elem/Mid Teach II....8/26-12/13...MW.........8-9:20pm..........NKC...........3....Anderson..MAT 353-20...10490

criminal justice

Biological Evidence....8/26-12/13...Th............6:30-9:20pm.....GKC...........3... Staff......... LAW 620-20...12851 Physical Evidence... 8/26-12/13...T..............6:30-9:20pm.....GKC...........3... Rezzelle... LAW 630-20...12405

MCC - Penn Valley Campus military science

Foun. Of Officership.... 8/26-12/13...T..............12:30-1:20pm...PVC............1... Bailey......... MIL 116-20...12464

nursing

Bridge to Bacc. Nursing.... 8/26-12/13...ARRG.....ARRG..............PVC............2... Harris........NUR 384-20...12648 Health Promo/Assess.....8/26-12/13...Th............1:30-5:30pm.....PVC............3... Quenstedt-Moe...NUR 385-20...12649 Nursing Research in Practice.... 8/26-12/13...ARRG.....ARRG..............PVC............2... Corder.......NUR 395-20...11957 Research Application.... 8/26-12/13...ARRG.....ARRG..............PVC............1... Quenstedt-Moe...NUR 459-20...11958 Nur Leadership/Mgt..... 8/26-12/13...Th............1:30-5:30pm.....PVC............3... Brose.........NUR 474-20...11956 Senior Capstone Clinical.... 8/26-12/13...ARRG.....ARRG..............PVC............7... Staff..........NUR 475-20...12407 Sel Topics In Nursing.... 8/26-12/13...ARRG.....ARRG..............PVC.........1-3...Staff..........NUR 492-20...12721


NON-PROFIT ORG. U.S. POSTAGE

PAID

PERMIT NO. 32 St. JOSEPH, MO

While balancing a full course load, Western student Katie McKnight expresses herself though modeling.

Less than one percent of students voted in the election. More campaigning could have boosted voting.

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VOTE FOR YOUR 2013  SGA CANDIDATES!    ? ?

SGA PRESIDENT                       

SGA VICE PRESIDENT                   

?

SGA SENATORS                           

Western football players demonstrated their skills for NFL recruiters on Pro Day held March 21. Page 10

March 28, 2013

griffonnews.com

Vol 95 | Issue 19

Weiberg named men’s head basketball coach

Gilbert Imbiri | Asst. Photo Editor

Kyle Inman | Sports Editor kinman@missouriwestern.edu Athletic Director Kurt McGuffin hired 38-year-old Brett Weiberg as head coach of Western men’s basketball from a pool of over 200 applicants. Weiberg will become only the fourth coach in the history of the program. Weiberg brings 15 years of coaching experience to Western, including his last job at Northern Oklahoma where he spent five years as an assistant and then took over the head coaching duties from his father. He is fresh off leading them to a 27-4 record and a regular season conference championship. While he hopes to turn the program back into a winner, academic success is a also a priority for Weiberg who graduated 80 percent of his players at Northern Oklahoma with associate degrees and is a two-time member of the Southland Conference All-Academic Team as a player at Sam Houston State. Weiberg has won 125 games in the seven seasons of his head coaching career.

To see the full story, visit Griffonnews.com

Senator frustrated with administration’s reaction to parking proposal Albert Shelby | Asst. News Editor ashelby1@missouriwestern.edu SGA has voiced the idea of extending and improving parking for students to administration. A proposal has not been made yet but members of SGA are hoping that administration will make a decision soon. SGA Senator Travis Hart believes that once they get a sure answer from the administration, the process of proposing extended parking will be official. “Currently the Student Government Association is waiting on the administration to get back with us to proceed fourth with imple-

Sisco, Williams win election, Inauguration set April 19

menting the solutions to improve parking and accessibility on campus,” Hart said. “The issue is that administration is a little reluctant to get started right away and it’s taking time for them to get back with us.” Hart noted that parking has been one of the more important issues on campus that students have voiced their opinions about. “Administration has other things on their agenda and it seems that they put parking, the number one complained issue on campus, basically on the back burner,” Hart said. “In particular, Lonnie Johnson.” There has not been any accurate estimates but they are

patiently waiting to move forward and get something started before April. “Cale Fessler is the vice president of financial planning,” Hart said. “And I have been working with him to figure out the numbers. I’m waiting to hear back from him about our possibilities.” SGA hopes to expand parking in different areas, as well as helping with the accessibility around buildings like Potter and Griffon Residential hall. “We want to put a drop-off zone in Potter because currently there is not one,” Hart said. “We also want to improve residential hall parking by changing the barriers, making it more accessible for

students living in the halls.” Hart and other members of SGA plan to implement a drop-off and pick-up zone for students with disabilities at Potter, Griffon and Scanlon hall, which they state is another top priority when dealing with parking. Students have been concerned about where they can park and there have also been complaints about the lack of parking spots. Lot G known as Blum Union parking lot is designated for staff, faculty and non-resident students from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m Monday thru Friday. Parking is prohibited from that parking lot from 2:00 a.m. to 4:30 a.m. Blum is a popular place

for students and sometimes the parking area is full, leaving students having to park somewhere else that they may not be permitted to park at. Parking Lots H, E, F, O and Q are restricted for students living on campus with the proper decals on the back of their cars, open also from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. After 4:30 p.m. and on weekends, reserved parking lots B,E,F,H,I,J,K and N are open for general parking to all faculty, staff student and visitor parking.

SEE PARKING PAGE 2

A school divided:

Fine art to split from college of libel arts & science Joyce Stevenson | Staff Writer jstevensno1@missouriwestern.edu

Katy Sisco and Dillon Williams ran on a platform of change, as shown in this campaign poster. *Submitted Photo

Matt Hunt | News Editor mhunt8@missouriwestern.edu It’s not even the end of the school year, and the newly elected President of Student Government Association is already working on issues for next school year. President-elect Katy Sisco and Vice President-elect Dillon Williams were elected to SGA. Sisco and Williams received 268 votes, compared to presidential candidate Mary Beth Rosenauer

and Derek Thompson, who had174 votes. A total of 443 students voted in this year’s SGA election, which showed a decrease compared to last year’s numbers, where 1,065 students voted. “I feel very honored and excited for this opportunity to be elected the President of SGA,” Sisco said.

SEE ELECTION PAGE 2

Walking through the halls of Potter, it is obvious that students have outgrown the building. They sit on the floor using laptops or playing instruments. They are overflowing classrooms and studios. They rehearse outside to escape the cramped building when able. Finally, change is on its way. The Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs Jeanne Daffon has submitted a plan to achieve two things: splitting the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and renovating Potter Hall. “Its an area on our campus that is growing. The number of students has probably closed to tripled in the last few years so there’s a lot of energy there, a lot of new things going on, a lot of new students,” Daffron said. While the original plan included dividing LAS into

a College of Fine Arts and Humanities, and a College of Social and Natural Sciences; however, that plan has been reworked to propose a School of Fine Arts instead. “This is still really in the discussion state so right now it’s looking more like we will end up doing a School of Fine Arts but still could change,” Daffron said. Daffron went on to explain that although the proposal could change, the proposal would most likely be finalized within a week. Aside from forming a new school and the renovation of Potter Hall, the administration would also hire a new dean to facilitate the proposed changes. Daffron said the university would like to have the dean position filled by July 1, but realizes this is “an aggressive timeline.” The new dean would help with fundraising events,

writing grants, contacting benefactors, earmarking gifts, and assisting the administration to make the plan happen. The money appropriated will not only compensate for the new

position but also fund the Potter renovation. Potter Hall has needed renovation work for many years.

SEE LAS PAGE 2

School

! ! n n o o o o S S g n n i i m m CCoo g s t r A e n i of F

Joe Snapp | Graphics Editor


NEWS

The Griffon News March 28, 2013

Page 2

Sisco ready to get the ball rolling SGA hopes for administration’s approval for improvements ELECTION

NEWS NOTES

CONTINUED FROM FRONT

WHM Film Series: ‘Monsoon Wedding’ March 28th, 6:00p.m. Women’s History Month will be featuring the last Film Series. The series will end with ‘Monsoon Wedding’. The event will be placed in the Kermper Hall, Spratt 101.

Last Day to Withdraw from classes and Registration for Summer/ Fall classes Students at Missouri Western can withdraw from classes with no refunded and a “W” on their transcript this Friday, March 29, 2013 from 8:00am to 4:30pm. Students at Missouri Western can start registering for classes on Monday, April 1, 2013. Contact your advisor to receive your pin number to register for classes. If you don’t know who your advisor is, go to Goldlink and search under Academics.

First Thursday Noon Concert Series The Missouri Western Symphonic Winds Ensemble will perform. The audience is invited to bring lunch to eat during the performance. Beverages will be provided. A freewill offering of $3 is suggested to defray expenses and insure the continuation of the series. The location for the concert is First Presbyterian Church, 7th and Jules. They suggest a donation of $3 per attende. The event will take place on Thursday, April 4, 2013 at 12:10 p.m.

“I’m excited for next year and ready to get things going.” Mary Beth Rosenauer, who ran against Sisco for SGA presidency, congratulated Sisco as the next President of SGA and plans to work with her in the future. She said in the debate that Sisco and herself are friends and plan to remain in contact. “I stay in contact with Katie every day,” Rosenauer said. “We are really good motivators for each other, and I’m very proud and excited for her.” Since she was elected, Sisco plans on keeping her campaign promise by visiting with organizations on campus throughout the rest of the school year. She wants the students to rest assured that she plans to keep them informed with everything SGA is doing. “Dillon and I have already started plans for our administration next year,” Sisco said. This new administration wants students to know they are welcome to come forth with issues on their minds. Sisco said she would try her best to fix any issues that are

Katy Sisco

brought forth to SGA. Sisco believes her connection with residential life as a Residential Assistant will help the process become smoother when she brings up the issue of bringing back Residence Council to SGA as one of the branches for SGA. She was part of the effort to help RA’s bring back Residence Hall Association. If RHA is able to be reinstated, then Sisco believes RC might be an afterthought. “It would be beneficial to us to get more students involved on campus,” Sisco said. “We can put in place our representation and students can come and voice their opinions that live on campus.” Student leaders found the numbers low and the process of voting confusing this time around. Last year, students were able to go to Missouri Western’s homepage and click the “Vote Here” button. This year, students had

to click the “Students” tab to vote. SGA Senator MonTerio Seewood said he is happy for Katy Sisco and Dillon Williams. Seewood said Sisco and Williams had no SGA experience, but he believes they are both great leaders and are eager to learn. “We found that voting this year was quite low, compared to past elections,” Seewood said. “I hope that next year we can find a way to get the students more engaged and interested in SGA and their elected student leaders.” Jacob Scott, president of SGA, said that he is excited to see the new president and vice president take the oath and start their term. He believes Sisco and Williams will do a great job leading the Senate and are willing to work in the transition with Scott. However, he believes the election wasn’t as competitive as last year. “The election wasn’t as competitive as the one last year,” Scott said. “I think it was low because of spring break and there wasn’t as competitive like it was between my opponent and I on certain issues.” The inauguration is set for April 19 at 5:30 p.m. in the Fulkerson Center.

PARKING CONTINUED FROM FRONT On weekends, parking in Blum parking lot will be open from Friday at 4:30 pm to Monday at 8am. Overnight parking is prohibited at Blum from 2-4:30 am. These restrictions have caused complaints from commuter students in general because most would like to park close to whatever building their class is taking place. The idea of extending parking is not far fetched for current SGA President Jacob Scott. He believes in the idea and hopes that it will be addressed by the end of the semester. “We have a parking improvements proposal,” Scott said. “We are trying to figure out the details, far as enroll-

ment and also concerning specific laws regarding what parking improvements can be made.” Where the money will come from to pay for the improvements is uncertain at this point, but Scott is almost sure that students will not be issued any additional fees to help pay for the project. “As far as a fee is concerned, there really is not any in discussion,” Scott said. “It is a possibility, but we are hoping to do it internally through the money we have with SGA.” “Travis Hart offering the proposal and I am just supporting him,” Scott said. “Any time we have surveys around campus, parking is one of the more complained about issues. It is clearly an overwhelming concern.”

Western to hire dean for school of fine arts LAS CONTINUED FROM FRONT The percussion annex was purchased approximately a decade ago, and was intended to be a temporary fix until funds for renovations were available, but with budget cuts from the state, Potter Hall renovations went unfunded. Daffron explained that Missouri Western is “lean in administration.” The formation of the School of Fine Arts and reorganization of the LAS school would help even the dean to faculty ratio within the respective schools. Of the approximately 200 faculty members at Western, LAS has 128 full and half-time faculty members. In comparison, the College of Professional Studies has 64 faculty members and the

Dr. Jeanna Daffron Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs Craig School of Business currently has 18. “Having a dean that is more focused on a narrower number of disciplines would lead to more interaction with students and faculty,” Daffron said.

Dr. Murray Nabors, dean of LAS agreed with Daffron that a dean focused on just fine arts would be an asset to the University. Within LAS the Communication Studies, Theatre and Cinema department would tentatively be reorganized and the Theatre and Cinema majors would be moved to the School of Fine Arts. “I think they recognized all along that LAS was pretty large and so for a workload standpoint as well as a balance standpoint that LAS was just too big,” said Bob Bergland, faculty senate president. The dividing of LAS would result in approximately 104 faculty members and nine departments.

CAMPUS INFORMATION CAMPUS CRIME REPORTS

CALENDAR OF EVENTS • •

Friday, March. 29 Last Day to withdraw from classes starting at 8:00 a.m.

Monday, April. 1 Registration begins for Summer/ Fall classes.

1. 1. Property Damage

11:26 p.m., Monday, March. 18, Downs Drive

Thursday, March. 28 “Private Lives” 7:30 p.m.

Thursday, April. 4 Private Lives” 3:00 p.m. Tuesday, April. 5 First Thursday Concert at 12:10 p.m.

If your organization would like to announce an event, email the information to stories@thegriffonnews.com


The Griffon News

NEWS

Page 3

March 28, 2013

Transportation planner speaks to Western about bus routes

MESSANIE

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Monday- Friday: Buses depart downtown (inbound) at: 5:15, 6:15, 7:15, 8:15, 9:15, 10:15, 11:15 a.m. 12:15, 1:15, 2:15, 3:15, 4:15, 5:15, 6:15, 7:15, 8:15 Monday- Friday: Buses depart downtown (outbound) at: 5:15, 6:15, 7:15, 8:15, 9:15, 10:15, 11:15 a.m. 12:15, 1:15, 2:15, 3:15, 4:15, 5:15, 6:15, 7:15

Joe Snapp | Graphics Editor

Albert Shelby | Asst. News Editor ashelby1@missouriwestern.edu On March 25th, St. Joseph transportation planner Ty Nagle and general manager of the Saint Joseph Transit Mary Gaston discussed public access for students on campus in Eder. The meeting was held to speak about what was researched from the data derived from the 2012 transportation study. The study showed that most of the students at Western do not take advantage of the St. Joseph transit because of their lack of knowledge of

how the system works. Nagle noted that students felt that the transportation system was not efficient enough. “I think that the bus system is most significant to students because the population that comes from out of the city are not used to the transit system here in St. Joe,” Nagle said. “Because different cities kind of have different densities that will support the transit system better or worst.” The study also showed that students would prefer to take a cab because they did not know where the bus was coming from, as well as the

price. Nagle noted that students would only have to pay 50 cents for bus fare, which is cheaper than most cabs that charge seven to eight dollars a ride. “The transit operational review that was completed last year looks at how we can facilitate the students better through where they want to go, where they are coming from, and how the system works,” Nagle said. “A big thing we found was an informational site of our route deviation and how students are actually able to use that more towards taxi services that can come to your

Annual event helps students get industry, business savvy Daniel Cobb| Staff Writer dcobb3@missouriwestern.edu The third annual Engineering Technology Awards Banquet took place in Spratt on March 25 in celebration of local businesses and Missouri Western students involved in the field. Twelve tables of students and employees representing various businesses around Saint Joseph filled Spratt on Monday. Sponsors for the program at Missouri Western as well as some of their contributions to the Engineering Department were projected onto a board at the beginning of the event, along with the pictures of students receiving scholarships in the field for their involvement in the department. “The Engineering Awards Banquet is a fundraising event that celebrates engineering technology,” Dr. George Yang, professor and chair of the engineering department, said. “It’s also a great opportunity for students to get to know the various businesses and industries around Saint Joseph.” The banquet is also a way for professors at Missouri Western to improve their department. We invite professionals from the industry and incorporate any con-

door,” Nagle said. “We know through weather conditions and athletic injuries, walking across campus is not that viable.” Nagle and Gaston brought up the possibilities of starting a student fee for students that would guarantee them a bus pass. Gaston wants to make sure that students and staff at Western are on the same page when it comes to transportation. She noted that this was the reason the recent transportation study is important. “We want to implement as much as the study recommendations that were made

from the study that they did last year,” Gaston said. “We want to work with the plans the university has. Its important that we get a lot student feedback as well.” Gaston said that she has not received a lot of complaints from students but people in general would like to have frequent service. Mike Ritter is the Disability Services Coordinator and the transportations for kids with disabilities were a strong concern for him. “We have several key parking lots on campus that are highly competitive which means that there is only a few spots there that people

compete to get,” Ritter said. “We can’t change everything. But in the areas where we can, I think it is imperative to change what you can and when you can.” Ritter acknowledges that he felt it was important to have a meeting like the transportation meeting because it shows that the university is focused on all students, including ones with disabilities. “We just need to put all of our intelligence and enthusiasm behind these projects, and hopefully we can please everyone.”

every one of them uses. It’s very important that we support the university in this regard, Landes said. Ronald Auxier, another co-chair of the MWSU Engineering Technology Advancement Committee, presented the Student Excellence Award to Korbin Von Stentzsch, a junior at Missouri Western who came highly recommended by his professors and peers. Dr. George Yang “I’d like to thank Missouri Engineering Department Chair Western for this award,” cerns they have concerning Stentzsch said, “as well as our classes and programs, the engineering department Dr. Raheem, assistant pro- and the rest of the staff for fessor at Missouri Western, reassuring me that I’m doing said. a good job.” Alan Landes, co-chair of Auxier also presented MWSU Engineering Tech- the Community Excellence nology Advancement Com- Award for a member in the mittee, opened the banquet engineering technology inwith many compliments to dustry who had shown comthe quality of Missouri West- mitment to advancing the ern students. field while supporting Mis“The work ethic of stu- souri Western in the process. dents coming from this Dr. Raheem believes that school is fantastic, making these awards are incredible them great candidates for honors for both students and many of the jobs available to community members. them in the future,” Landes “Not only are they great said. “They have much more for resumes; these awards experience than schools that come with the support of the only focus on research.” entire staff in the engineering Landes also commented department, and will help that though the different students and community companies and businesses members distinguish themmay work in different dis- selves from the crowd,” Raciplines, the engineering heem said. technology program is what

Korbin Von Stentzsch speaks after being presented with the Student Excellence Award during the Engineering Banquet. Tevin Harris | Photo Editor

event,” Kowich said. “The opportunity for seniors at Western to attend can be beneficial in many ways.” Missouri Western alumni and students will have the chance to network during breakfast and hear guest speaker, Carol Roever, Interim Dean of the Craig School of Business and Leslie Oberg ‘10 present on the Craig School of Business’ Entrepreneurship Program. Roever said that the purpose for her speaking is to get individuals updated on the programs the Craig School of Business offers to students. She wants to give the alumni and other guests the basic facts about what the school offers now for students and

often talk about our younger alumni, those who are looking for jobs or looking to advance in their careers.” Dan Danford, former Board of Governor, said there are more business school graduates working in the Kansas City area than in the St. Joseph area. He said there is a large block on students who have built their careers down in Kansas City and it would be beneficial to meet with others outside of the St. Joseph area. “I don’t compare Missouri Western to any Ivy League school, and it’s all about the people you meet,” Danford said. “The networking you create

Spend the morning eating breakfast with Griffon alumni Matt Hunt| News Editor mhunt8@missouriwestern.edu Western Alumni will get the opportunity to interact with one another at this year’s Eggs and Issues: Kansas City. Colleen Kowich, director of Alumni Relations, said what the alumni association is trying to do, is if a business has a service we want to get that out there for others to know about. She said the organization has rebranded their Eggs and Issues from campus and has placed an Eggs and Issues event in Kansas City. “Any alumni or graduate in the St. Joseph or Kansas City area is able to attend the

graduates about their Entrepreneurship Program. “We want to let them know that they are eligible for the program,” Roever said. “Students will have the chance to meet with our alumni from other regions and have the opportunity to hear about the program we offer at the Craig School of Business.” Kowich said students need to have that network with older professionals who have been in these positions for a while. It gives alumni a better chance to discuss and share their stories about other successful alumni who have made something out of their education at Western. “It’s a great opportunity to network,” Kowich said. “We

through these relationships makes a big difference in your career.” The event is set for Wednesday April 3, 2013 from 7:15 AM to 8:30 AM. The location will be in the Kansas City area at the Cafe at Briarcliff Village, 4125 N Mulberry Drive, Kansas City, MO 64116. Joe Snapp | Graphics Editor


NEWS

March 28, 2013

Backpack buddies to host walk-a-thon Albert Shelby | Asst. News Editor ashelby1@missouriwestern.edu

Backpack Buddies

2013

April 6th -Mil One alk eW 0 10:0 -10: 45 a

Regis tratio n 9:3 0 am

The Griffon News

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On April 6th the Backpack Buddies program will be hosting a walk-a-thon in the Griffon Indoor Sports Complex. Registration will take place on the same day at 9:30 a.m. and the actual one-mile walk will take place from 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. The purpose of the event is to donate money for kids in the St. Joseph School District. Mallorie Nighthart is a student at Western and she volunteered to help out with the event. “It is a fundraising event for the Backpack Buddies program,” Nighthart said. “It’s a program for chil-

dren from K-12. You go individually or you can have teams. You just walk a mile and whatever donations are given is how the walk-a-thon makes the money.” Every walker that donates at least $5 will then receive an armband. The team to donate the most money will receive a free dinner for five from either Red Lobster, Olive Garden, Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory, or Dunkin’ Donuts. “This event will fund children in St. Joseph,” Nighthart said. “And it is for the St. Joseph School District only.” Nighthart is a Public Relations major and she said she got involved with the

program through a class. She noted that that she expects it to be a fairly decent turnout at the event and hopes that a lot of money will be raised to help benefit children in the St. Joseph school district. “I think that 300 attendees would be quite an accomplishment,” Nighthart said. “However, the objective and the amount of money that we want to make is only $5,000 and if we divided that with $150, it would allow us to sponsor 33 kids a school year.” It will cost $150 to sponsor a child in the program and Nighthart is hoping that they can raise more money so they will be able to sponsor a bigger amount

of students each school year. Kelsey Corzine is a teacher in the St. Joseph School District and also a former Griffon. She sees the program as a way for Western students to ensure that students in the Backpack Buddies program are given the daily nutrition needed for kids their age. “I think that it would be great for Missouri Western students to help with Backpack Buddies,” Corzine said. “I teach in the St. Joe School District, and many of our students depend on the food they get from Backpack Buddies as their main source of nutrition outside of school. The more people that take an interest

in this cause and can lend a helping hand, the better it will be for the kids. I think it is more elementary kids that are impacted by Backpack Buddies though.” Western student Kathie Marquart’s opinion was similar to Corzine’s. Marquart understands and remembers how students are made fun of when they are not able to pay for something at school. “I support it,” Marquart said. “I think it’s a great way to make sure a child gets to eat lunch and can prevent the future teasing because of not being able to pay for a lunch.”

Western alumni debuts first short film Eboni Lacey | Editor-in-Chief elacey@missouriwestern.edu

Imagine having to find two straight men that would be willing to kiss each other on camera and actually look like they like it? This was the task of Missouri Western graduate Joseph Franklin, who debuted his first short film in Kansas City this past week entitled “A Guy For Me.” Alex J. Michaels and Kevin Britton deliver a passionate kiss in Western alumni Joseph Franklin’s first film “A Guy For Me.” “They didn’t even rehearse the kiss,” Franklin said. “They just did it. It had to be [in one shot].” Franklin, a 2010 graduate, wrote the original play three years ago yet added some bits and pieces along the way to truly make some heads spin. The most head turning part in the film involves a passionate kiss by the two men, which was something that was not the easiest to portray. “I feel it put a big spin to it because it left the audience questioning,” Franklin said. “They wanted to know what happened between them two and where does it go from there. That wasn’t expected, where in other love films you

know what’s going to happen.” On top of the hard task of casting two men for such a steamy scene, Franklin also had a lot on his plate such as writing the script, shooting, directing, producing and editing, as well as promoting the film and finding a venue to host his release. Franklin took on a tremendous amount of tasks and duties as today’s directors usually have an entire crew to help do all of this work. “It’s time schedules, it’s rehearsals, its booking venues, it’s very hard,” Franklin said. “You got to have a passion for it and love doing it.” Franklin was very happy and a bit surprised at his big audience turnout. The movie was released at “The View,” a big community center in Grandview, Mo. At the film’s start, every seat was taken and some people were even standing in the back. “I’m glad this many people came,” Franklin said. “It was a full house and I believe I sold out.” The 50-minute film revolves around Sheri, a young black woman who’s a single girl, looking for a special someone to love her. In the first scene, Sheri, played by Kansas City native and aspiring actress

(Left to Right) Joseph Franklin poses with actors Alex J. Michaels, Kevin Britton and Nahmel Simmons at his movie release. Eboni Lacy | Editor-in-Chief

Alex J. Michaels and Kevin Britton deliver a passionate kiss in Western alumni Joseph Franklin’s first film “A Guy For Me.” *Still shot from film Nahmel Simmons, appears to be on a really cute date. She then runs to the bathroom and suddenly bumps into William - a tall, dark and handsome man whose broad shoulders and cute smile seem to make Sheri quickly forget about the lonely date who’s still waiting on her. However, Sheri keeps it classy and though she seems interested in William, who is played by Kevin Britton, she doesn’t give him her number. That is until they bump into each other again and again. As the movie continues, the audience discovers that Sheri was not really on a romantic date but was out with a close friend, Ricky, played by Alex J. Michaels, who later reveals that he wants her as more than a friend and has wanted her for years. Sheri soon finds herself in a crazy love triangle between her close friend and William, who quickly

becomes Sheri’s love interest. The movie soon heats up even more when Ricky questions his feelings and sexuality and kisses William very unexpectedly. From there, the movie becomes a nailbiting whirlwind of intense emotions, as all three characters put their true feelings out there but seem to quickly have their hearts broken. “I liked the plot of it and the storyline. I didn’t suspect that twist that [Ricky] was gay,” audience member Yolanda Jackson said. “My favorite part was when [Sheri] said ‘I’ve know him all my life. I never suspected that.’ I thought that was kind of funny. I knew the first scene,” Jackson said jokingly about knowing Ricky’s sexuality. Besides the emotion, there was also a lot of comedy that really kept the audience laughing and cheering.

“I liked the funny parts. It was surprising when he went in for that kiss,” audience member Torin Hamlett said. “[My favorite part] was when Ricky was making moves.” Chemistry had to be developed between all three characters so the audience would really believe that the emotions were real. Simmons, who was also Franklin’s assistant director in addition to having the leading role, explained that the chemistry between the cast was very natural which made her character come to life. “Somehow it all just kind of works out,” Simmons said. “[Franklin] is a great casting director as well because it just fit. Everything just flowed. It was like a family.” Simmons included that playing Sheri was pretty natural for her because she went through a personal situation

very similar to the one Sheri was in. “Some of the scenes Sheri kind of reminded me of myself at one point in my life,” Simmons said. “I was kind of myself at one point. [The hardest part] was kissing the guys. We’re like fiancés and girlfriends and that was kind of weird. It’s a lot of hard work but when you enjoy what you do, it’s not such a challenge. It’s more fun then anything.” As his first film jitters are now out of the way, Franklin is already holding auditions in late April for his next film, “King’s Daughter,” a story of a young girl who’s crying out for attention from her father. Franklin is hoping for more community support and another full house in the audience. He hopes the crowd will be as surprised as they were for this film.

Awarding those who make a difference Daniel Cobb | Staff Writer dcobb3@missouriwestern.edu The third annual Engineering Technology Awards Banquet took place in Spratt on March 25 in celebration of local businesses and Missouri Western students involved in the field. Twelve tables of students and employees representing various businesses around Saint Joseph filled Spratt on Monday. Sponsors for the program at Missouri Western as well as some of their contributions to the Engineering Department were projected onto a board at the beginning of the event, along with the

pictures of students receiving scholarships in the field for their involvement in the department. “The Engineering Awards Banquet is a fundraising event that celebrates engineering technology,” Dr. Yang, professor and chair of the engineering department, said. “It’s also a great opportunity for students to get to know the various businesses and industries around Saint Joseph.” The banquet is also a way for professors at Missouri Western to improve their department. We invite professionals from the industry and incorporate any concerns they have concerning

our classes and programs, Dr. Raheem, assistant professor at Missouri Western,

Dr. Maureen Raffensperger Director of Physical Therapist Program

said. Alan Landes, co-chair of MWSU Engineering Technology Advancement Committee, opened the banquet with many compliments to the quality of Missouri Western students. “The work ethic of students coming from this school is fantastic, making them great candidates for many of the jobs available to them in the future,” Landes said. “They have much more experience than schools that only focus on research.” Landes also commented that though the different companies and businesses may work in different disciplines, the engineering

technology program is what every one of them uses. It’s very important that we support the university in this regard, Landes said. Ronald Auxier, another co-chair of the MWSU Engineering Technology Advancement Committee, presented the Student Excellence Award to Korbin Von Stentzsch, a junior at Missouri Western who came highly recommended by his professors and peers. “I’d like to thank Missouri Western for this award,” Stentzsch said, “as well as the engineering department and the rest of the staff for reassuring me that I’m doing a good job.”

Auxier also presented the Community Excellence Award for a member in the engineering technology industry who had shown commitment to advancing the field while supporting Missouri Western in the process. Dr. Raheem believes that these awards are incredible honors for both students and community members. “Not only are they great for resumes; these awards come with the support of the entire staff in the engineering department, and will help students and community members distinguish themselves from the crowd,” Raheem said.


The Griffon News March 28, 2013

Page 6

FEATURES

Lara Croft raids tombs

rated from the rest of the crew and realizes that she is definitely not alone on the Lara Croft, the enigmat- island, as mercenaries conic hero of the Tomb Raider stantly pursue her. video game franchise, is The game’s biggest flaw finally reborn through devel- doesn’t lie within its story, oper Crystal Dynamics, who however. Rather, it’s the hope to provide the series’ characters that lack any sort protagonist with a solid ori- of depth.  Lara’s voice actor gin story that challenges does a fine job, and her transLara’s will to survive on an formation from “defenseless island full of insane merce- archaeologist” to “full-on naries. survivor” is definitely cool Fresh out of college, (if not a bit sudden).  It’s the Lara sets out on her first rest of the crew that fail to expedition aboard the ship deliver.  I had a lot of trouble Endurance in an effort to connecting with them and find the kingdom of Yamatai, feeling for their cause, mainan ancient kingdom ruled ly because every other senby a queen who held mys- tence that they utter is some tical powers.  With a crew form of, “We need to get off of engineers and archaeolo- of this island.”  Their diagists, Lara attempts to lead logue isn’t great, and when the ship into The Dragon’s some members of the crew Triangle, an area contain- end up getting left behind or ing brutal storms and harsh lost, I didn’t really care.  On waves that are responsible the bright side, this is probfor numerous shipwrecks.  ably the game’s only notable Sure enough, the ship suc- flaw. cumbs to the violent weather, leaving the crew ship- For the rest of the review wrecked on a mysterious check us out online at island.  Lara is quickly sepagriffonnews.com

Daniel Cobb | Staff Writer dcobb3@missouriwestern.edu

Hello midterms, Hello stress Jason Ruckman | Staff Writer jruckman@missouriwestern.edu While midterm grades do let students know where they stand academically, we must all muddle through the stress and worry of our midsemester tests. With the stress of midterms weighing down on Western students this time of year, many still appreciate them for what they are and feel that they’re necessary for letting us know where we are in each class. “It really helps me to see where I’m going,” student Shaun Butterworth said. “If I see a low grade, it motivates

me to work harder and if I see a high grade, it motivates me to keep working hard.” This seems to be a reoccurring opinion at Western as Sharon Rodriguez agrees, saying that they show her what she still needs to do in each class. Most agree that if we did not have these midterm tests, we would be left hopelessly unknowing how we were doing in our classes, therefore floating towards a sea of failure, only to find out we had failed when it is too late. Although most of us can agree we need midterm grades, that does not make the midterms week any less stressful. While every week

*Photo courtesy of digitaltrends.com

of the year is a grind for most, adding the stressful layer of midterms is just something else to worry about, but there are ways to deal with it. Natascha Kracheel, an exchange student from Germa-

ny, says her procrastination doesn’t help with anything, but she has ways of getting through it. “I need a lot of energy drinks and do a whole lot of running and yoga to cope

Lindsey Stubbs screams out her stress. Brian Duskey | Multimedia Editor

Writing the future

with it,” Kracheel said. “Still, I end up having too little time so I pull all-nighters.” While she finds midterms helpful, she says that she is glad that they don’t have midterms at her German university and enjoys not having to deal with the stress of it when she’s there. Other ways of coping with the doldrums of an impending midterm are utilizing the free tutors in the Hearnes Center, or just spending a few more hours a week studying and preparing. Beyond that, having a normal sleep pattern, though often difficult to achieve, can be beneficial for college students. Eating healthy, and

not forgetting to have breakfast, even for just that week, is another good way to be as prepared as possible. As we near the end of the semester and see the light at the end of the tunnel, some jump with glee at the sight of straight A’s and others sigh with the frustration of falling below their expectations. No matter where you are or what your grades are though, students at Western and across the U.S. are all glad when midterm week is over.

Griffon graduate returns to Western as teacher

Jourdan Ryan | Features Editor jhuffman10@missouriwestern.edu For most of us, the second we graduate, we tell ourselves we will never meander the halls of our alma mater ever again. We throw our caps, have our graduation parties, and try as hard as we can to move on with our lives. Sometimes, the past just creeps back up on us though. That’s exactly what happened to alumni student Mary Dockery. Dockery graduated in 2009 with a degree in English Literature, and now, more than three years later, she finds herself back at Western, but not as a student. “Right now, I’m part-time faculty here at Missouri Western, teaching English,” Dockery said. “After graduating from the University of Kansas in May of 2012, I knew that my husband and I wanted to move home for a while, and so teaching at Missouri Western just made sense – it’s home to me.” Though she walked away from Western for a time, she gives credit to her college home for shaping her into the person she has become. “Missouri Western is wonderful for so many rea-

sons – the classrooms are small, the instructors are interested in the individual students, and as a student, you can get a lot of one-on-one attention if you go after it, if you want that attention,” Dockery said. “I also like how the students at Missouri Western come from so many different backgrounds and education levels, and I do think that meeting so many different people helped me open my mind and see the world in a different way.” Besides teaching, Dockery also busies herself with her own writing. She is a published writer, predominantly with poetry. She loves to attend local poetry readings to hear what others are doing and to get to read her own work to the world as well. She loves living what she refers to as the “writer’s life,” which means she is constantly writing, day in and day out, and submitting some of that writing to local contests and national journals in an attempt to get it published, as well as spending time in community with fellow writers. But even a seasoned professional writer, who some-

times gets paid for what she produces, can get a wrench thrown at her by the writing process sometimes. “The act of creating is probably one of my favorite parts of writing, those moments where you feel like you are in a dreamlike trance, and

“The act of creating is probably one of my favorite parts of writing, those moments where you feel like you are in a dreamlike trance, and when you wake up, there’s something new on the page that you invented.” -Mary Dockery

when you wake up, there’s something new on the page that you invented,” Dockery said. “The most stressful part is when it’s more difficult to get into that zone, and to be honest, that zone is harder and harder to come by the more you write.” There are a few Western writers and teachers that Dockery now includes in that community that were once her professors and are now her colleagues. She credits each of them for different reasons, but she feels honored to get to teach alongside them today. “Dawn Terrick and Kay Siebler were instructors who, though pretty different teaching styles, showed me how much fun you can have being a teacher and a writer. They challenged me,” Dockery said. “Dr. Russ Phillips from the Psych department took me under his wing and let me take part in his studies and research. He was one of the first instructors I felt comfortable sharing in class for because he truly wanted to hear many perspectives. Dr. William Church was my creative writing instructor, and he

Mary Stone Dockery reads some of her work to a crowd at a poetry reading in Kansas. *Submitted Photo

was my mentor and the one who helped me learn how to allow my confidence to grow. He also didn’t mind being perfectly honest and telling me when something I wrote was awful, and I think this helped develop the thick skin a writer needs to survive out there.” Dockery still values the relationship she formed with Dr. Bill Church while she attended Western and she is grateful to continue learning from him as she begins her teaching journey on campus. “[Bill] helped me see that you have to keep growing as a writer, that you can’t just write the same way over and over, so because of him, experimenting and trying new things is not as scary,” Dockery said. “He’s still my mentor and it’s because of him I even went to KU for my MFA.” The future is wide open

for Dockery. She is unsure of what it holds, or how long she’ll be lending her Western-gained knowledge to the students she now teaches. One thing is for sure though. She will continue to write and she will continue to be unafraid of where that process takes her, and that fearlessness will carry her through. “My dreams are always changing,” Dockery said. “It used to be that my ultimate goal was a PhD in creative writing, but now I’m not so sure that’s what I want. I’m publishing and writing, and this is ultimately the most important dream. But it’s also true that my writing has a long ways to go and I think that’s what keeps me pushing forward. I’m excited to see where the writing goes, how it changes, how I change.”


The Griffon News March 28, 2013

Editorial: If students at Western have a problem with the Student Government Association next semester, they can blame poor campaigning procedures and unreasonably short campaign time. Through a lack of taking full advantage of campaigning through social media sites as well as web-based voting problems, the election for SGA president and vice president came to an end with only .072 percent of Western’s student body turning in a vote. Aside from the low voter turnout, the candidates were only allotted a two-week time frame to campaign and could only disperse posters and banners for the final week leading up to the election. With an election that is as important to students' interests and future representation as this was, candidates need to be given a more reasonable amount of time to campaign and let students know what they are about before the voting process. However, the blame for the low turn-out is not entirely on the campaigning structure. There was a very limited utilization of social media by the candidates during the process to reach out to Western and that contributed to the low number of student voters as well. In the future, candidates need to use their available resources to the fullest po-

tential because that is what the rest of the student body deserves. According to the bylaws for campaigning, although the distribution of posters and materials and campaigning is allocated to a ridiculously small amount of time, candidates can get endorsements from organizations as far as four weeks prior to the election. Working to get endorsements from organizations that reflect the candidate’s agenda is one way that they could efficiently utilize their resources as well as show the students what they are about further out from the election and boost voter numbers. On top of these two issues, there was also a failure on the website used to vote that caused some issues. For several minutes, last year's president and vicepresidential candidates were posted in place of the two current candidates and following that, there were several moments with no candidates on the voting webpage at all. Neither Northwest State University or Missouri Southern State University's department of Student Affairs could be reached for a comment on SGA election procedures; however, Northwest has a similar time frame for campaigning. They give candidates two and a half weeks, but one of those weeks falls on spring break. Campaigning time isn't the

Candidates need more time to campaign, boost voter turnout

VOTE FOR YOUR 2013  SGA CANDIDATES!    ? SGA VICE PRESIDENT                   ? SGA PRESIDENT                       

of other useful information about the program and are as follows: • mental illness • hearing impairment • impaired functioning of arms or legs • back injury • alcoholism or drug addiction • mental retardation • learning disability • traumatic brain injury and • other physical or mental disabilities that prevent the person from finding and keeping a job. At first, one may think that a student would need some-

I’m walking down a treelined avenue listening to local street musicians while munching on a soft pretzel and sipping pink lemonade. I’m comfortable in my new spring capris, tee and Chuck’s. It’s a beautiful sunny day and I am on my way back to class at Missouri Western. The musicians are fellow Missouri Western students, getting some practice playing to the public. The pret-

zel and pink lemonade came from a bistro operated by Western students. All of the clothes I am wearing, including the Chucks, were purchased in a neighboring thrift store operated by Western students.  This could be our future. Missouri Western has a total of over 700 acres of land. I think we should be addressing ways to join the St. Joseph community to the University.  Every day, over 3500 people enter and exit the campus. These people are students, faculty, campus employees, family, friends,

Katelyn Canon Joe Snapp Matthew Hunt Albert Shelby Tevin Harris Gilbert Imbiri Kyle Inman Christian Mengel Jourdan Ryan Andy Garrison Brian Duskey Lauren Dillon Hanna Greenwell Mika Cummins Dave Hon Bob Bergland

What should the SGA president-elect focus on first? Kayla Harris Sophomore

“Internet, our internet connection sucks.”

Justin Kirkland Senior Eboni Lacey | Editor-in-Chief only area in which we lag behind other state universities. In their last SGA election, Missouri State had a voting turnout of nearly 14 percent compared to our less than one percent turnout. In the future, the whole

campaigning and voting process needs to be buttoned up and made much more accessible for the students. It should run smoothly and students should be given a more reasonable amount of time to learn what the candi-

dates that are going to represent them are all about; and we as students need to make more of an effort to vote because 443 out of 6099 students deciding our leadership just isn’t going to cut it.

Vocational Rehabilitation helps disabled students pay for college thing severe to be wrong with them to qualify but in actuality, the qualifications are much broader than they seem. I qualify simply because I have ADHD. Others who qualify would be those with depression, bi-polar disorder, and many other relatively common disorders. This program is made readily available on campus by appointment via VR counselor Tom Wilson. He can be reached at (816) 3872280 and appointments take place on Tuesdays. With the program being this accessible and easy to get into, students who have

vendors and laborers. They eat and shop in the community. Why not develop the land around the school to cater to these people while offering employment opportunities to students? Since Missouri Western developed the current campus, it has been a separation of city and school. I often hear that St. Joseph doesn’t feel like a college town should. Let’s change that.  There are many opportunities that could be researched for business possibilities. Small shops featuring students artwork, clothing, mu-

The Griffon News Staff Eboni Lacey Editor-in-Chief

VOICE

?

disabilities, no matter how trivial they think they may be, need to set up an appointment as soon as possible. The only drawback comes if you have not been diagnosed professionally in over three years but it’s not really a big deal, just time consuming. In the case of a student fitting that criteria or having never been diagnosed but suspecting the existence of a disability, VR will actually get you diagnosed for free. There is absolutely no excuse why students with disabilities should ever graduate college with student loan debt. VR will even pay a

student’s rent or on-campus living expenses if they fit the right criteria and they even pay for their books. Students who believe that they just may fit the qualifications should check it out. The worst they can say is no, and the best they can do is give students an absolutely free education. Students can’t let laziness be their disability when it comes to funding their schooling; that is one disability that will never qualify them for VR and a debt-free start at life.

Staff writer feels community should support Western Joyce Stevenson | Staff Writer jstevenson@missouriwestern.edu

CAMPUS

SGA SENATORS                           

w/ Andy Garrison The government puts me through school for free and even pays my gas to get there and plenty of other Missouri Western students qualify to do the same but fail to take advantage and slide into debt instead. The program that is in place is called Vocational Rehabilitation [VR] and it helps students with a variety of disabilities fund college, or many other training programs, to make them more attractive in the job market without breaking the bank. The list for qualifying for VR can be found at http:// www.dars.state.tx.us/drs/ vr.shtml” along with a ton

OPINIONS

Page 77 Page

Managing Editor Graphics Editor News & Online Editor Assistant News Editor Photo Editor Assistant Photo Editor Sports Editor Assistant Sports Editor Features Editor Opinions Editor Multimedia Editor Design Artist Design Artist Ad Manager Senior Editor Faculty Advisor

sic, pottery, and crafts could be scattered among bistros, coffee shops, musical venues, thrift/vintage stores and cozy diners. The possibilities are endless. Many other schools our size offer this adjacent to campus. It would tie the students in with the community, making us more supportive of one another. What better way to create jobs in the community than to create them next to or on campus? Most of the Heartland Health, American Family Insurance, and Mitchell Woods employees pass by our gates

daily. Altec employees travel by our campus as well. These are St. Joseph’s largest employers, besides the St. Joseph School District.  Let’s address how Missouri Western can help students make money, share their talents and engage the community. I have suggested this idea over the years to many people, hoping that someday the school will take notice and at least look into the possibilities of creating a more pleasant campus experience for everyone.

“Parking, I’m sure that is a pretty high one on there.”

Katie McKnight Junior

“Do we know where the 75 dollar fee is going? That, figure outwhere that is going. I think it’s also important to work on parking; I know they are working on that.”

Brandon Herring Senior

“Parking garage is definitely a good idea because, number one, when it’s snowy outside our cars won’t be covered in ice.”

The Griffon News is written and published by students of Missouri Western State University during the fall and spring semesters. The first copy of each issue is free; additional copies are 50 cents. Content of this paper is developed independently of the faculty and administration, or other campus organizations or offices. Readers are encouraged to submit story ideas, information and advertising to The Griffon News office, Eder 221, 4525 Downs Drive, St. Joseph, Mo. 64507, or by phoning (816) 271-4412 (advertising and news room). You may also e-mail thegriffonnews@gmail.com. Copy and advertising must be received by noon Friday, the week prior to publication. Guidelines for letters to the editor: • All letters to the editor must be typed and double spaced. Letters must be no longer than 350-400 words and guest columns no longer than 500 words. Letters and columns will be edited for style. • All letters must include signature and identity verification information, such as phone number. The Griffon News reserves the right to edit all letters for length and Associated Press style. • The Griffon News will not withhold names under any circumstances. Anonymously submitted letters will not be published. • Views expressed on the opinion pages are not necessarily those of The Griffon News staff or Missouri Western State University.


OPINIONS

The Griffon News March 28, 2013

Page 8

Campus police owe students an explanation I think the campus police should submit some kind of statement to the students and the community about the situation with Lavonte Douglas. Real police make statements. If they want to act like real police, they need to explain the situation to the students. They claim to be here to “protect us” and not a single student has a reason to feel any kind of protection is being provided by campus police. I have been pepper sprayed. I was dared my freshman year of college to get sprayed in a conversation someone was having on whether or not it even works, since they never sprayed it. I can tell you first hand that it was the worst pain I ever

Christian Mengel | Asst. Sports Editor

cmengel@missouriwestern.edu

felt in my life, and it’s why I think it was wrong that they (unsuccessfully) tried to use it on Douglas. From the stories I’ve heard and what I’ve read so far, it seemed like the use of pepper spray was overboard, on

top of the entire situation already being overboard. I haven’t heard anyone who was the food court that day say, “wow, Lavonte was so out of line.” In fact, everything I have heard has been just the opposite, saying the campus police was out of line. There is no reason that Douglas should get in any type of trouble with the law over this. If he does get in trouble, then I think the students have a right to see the video. The school should show us why pepper spray was necessary. We all know the school isn’t going to allow that footage to leak out to students based on two main reasons, depending on the outcome. Reason one: if Douglas is

found innocent, this whole situation will look terrible on the school. It will make whoever was in charge of hiring campus police look like an idiot for hiring shitty cops. On top of making the administration look bad, it will lower the student’s already dangerously low faith in the campus police’s ability to successfully maintain a safe campus. Reason two: if Douglas is found guilty, this will still look equally terrible on the school because that means our campus police are not effective at all. Look at the whole situation, it was said that one of the officers may have tripped, and they both pulled out their pepper spray, one of them shot the spray and missed, and

Douglas was able to run off. Are you kidding me? If that was a real assault, what in the hell kind of security is that? Are we as students supposed to feel safe, knowing that two officers couldn’t successfully spray someone? Then they let him run away. It makes me think how these officers would react if there really was a serious threat on campus, say someone assaulting someone with a knife or if somebody brought a gun to campus. I’m glad to know if there was a serious threat on campus, our officers would react the same way a typical girl would, pull out pepper spray, hope it works and call the police.

Senior editor disenchanted with University Discover gold. It’s the slogan of our wonderful university. The place where Griffons stomp the yard and non-trads roll around with their backpacks. The place that every other university laughs at. “Haha, open enrollment!” Don’t get me wrong, I love this school. But it’s not what I was promised. And that’s what this column is about. My junior year of high school I was determined to attend Mizzou. I was told by counselors that it was the premier journalism school in the Midwest. “And it’s a great college experience.” College experience is just a fool’s gold universities use to attract, well, fools. Mizzou

Dave Hon | Senior Editor dhon1@missouriwestern.edu has a rock climbing wall and they used to have tanning beds in their rec-center. I’ve been told of (and seen first hand) the underground party scene of Truman State University. It’s all glitter

on the biggest turd ever crapped out. But more often, I see fools on this campus buying fool’s gold. This university no longer values education, but instead the “college experience.” We have an online remedial math program but we have six different greek organizations (and a rock to honor them). We have increasing class sizes but we also have exquisite overpriced coffee in half our academic buildings. We have three counselors to help students transverse growing up but we have nine armed officers hired by Western. This column is about priorities. It’s time someone answer for all the things

OUT FRONT WITH HUNT

The PRIDE Alliance has been known by many names in the past. However, students can all agree that they put on one hell of a drag show each spring. This organization deserves a lot of credit for the amount of work, dedication and community support they bring to the campus. The drag show last year brought hundreds of students and members of the community together for a good cause. The PRIDE Alliance

Dear School Newspaper Editor, I represent a group of Junior High students from Mid-Buchanan R-V, and we want folks to be aware of a major tragedy occurring in our nation: modern slavery. We call ourselves Caring About Rescuing Slaves (C.A.R.S.). In our research, we found that not very many people are aware of this problem. We ask that you would please consider including the following information in your upcoming newspaper. Did you know that 800,000 people are estimated to be trafficked across the border of the US every year? That’s not even half of it! There are around 27 million people trafficked around the world! This is a horribly high number, and it’s not getting lower any time soon. In fact,

doesn’t charge the students to attend the event, but they do charge those from the community who attend. It’s a small fee, but the money they receive all goes to charity. It’s a great opportunity for anyone who has ever wanted to get out of their comfort zone and see men dressed in long gowns, wigs and lipstick. Though some people don’t agree with the way the event is set up and the sexuality of those who partici-

human trafficking is the second largest criminal industry in the world. Modern slavery consists of many things and is more diverse that what you may think. They include forced labor in domestic servitude, agricultural, settings sweatshops, food services industries and sex trafficking. Sex trafficking has by far the largest number of slaves, and people, often kids, are literally sold in ads for mail order brides, pornographic magazines, exotic dance joints, brothels and fake massage parlors. The traffickers go by the simple rule: Supply Drives Demand. As long as there are those who will buy, they will continue to abduct and force people to provide services. Sex traffickers specifically target children ages10-17,

pate, it’s a great way to show the diversity amongst our campus and how far we’ve come. If you attend the drag show, you will see so much diversity in one room that it’s incredible. No matter who you are or where you come from, the event brings people from all walks of life together. It’s not just a “gay thing”, it’s an event for everyone. Missouri Western has shown an increase in student

with the average age being 14 years old! Even children as young as young as four are used as sex slaves! Think of this was you! You would be told that if you don’t do as you’re told, your family would be seriously injured or even killed. If you complain in any way, you will be beaten of forced to go without food or water. You would be kept in a room with no light, and maybe with no covering. You may be hand-cuffed, gagged and left naked most of the time. Although you might want to kill yourself, that’s not even an option because you are constantly monitored. This is the reality for 1 in 3 girls and 1 in 7 boys. Human trafficking in our nation will only be stopped when enough people raise their voice in protest. Since

wrong with this place. All the things I was told why Western is gold and all the other universities are just expensive hogwash. I want my gold and if I can’t get it I’m going to make sure that the freshmen this year get their’s in four years. This isn’t journalism, at least not like you’ve seen it before. I’m biased; I have an agenda. There will be no apologies for my disillusionment of your fantasies. If it takes me removing the mascot’s mask to make people realize the truth, then that’s what I’ll do. Some of you will see this as an affront to something you hold precious. I don’t blame you. Western is a mag-

ical place. It has some great qualities that other universities don’t have. I’ll leave that pandering up to our Public Relations department. More importantly, I want to be clear, this isn’t a soap box. I don’t plan on standing on top of a high moral podium lecturing to students who have already been lectured enough. This is a funnel. Who knows the illusions of Western better than me; you. As students, you should be willing to join with me in this metaphorical “pitchfork and torch” march of truth. Cause we’re not after Frankenstein’s monster, we’re after Frankenstein.

PRIDE deserves credit for their work at Western support for events, however many organizations aren’t able to keep up with the type of events that PRIDE puts on for the students at Western. PRIDE has been a developing organization for the past five years and has received much attention recently, considering the latest endorsements, from President Barack Obama supporting marriage equality to Missouri considering a vote for Marriage Equality. The group continues to strive to increase their

numbers through fundraising and events. Even though St. Joseph is still a small urban city, it shows increasing support throughout the community. The drag show is coming up, and it’s for a good cause. The leaders of the group work hard each year and plan all year round for this one night event. It’s a great way to have fun and to show that you stand for all people, no matter who they are.

this is happening to young people, let’s take a stand together! Caring About Rescuing Slaves is hosting a car show on April 14 from 12:30-2:30 at East Ridge Village Shopping Center to bring awareness and to help raise funds for LOVE146, a national organi-

zation with a local presence dedicated to advocacy of victims. Please get involved & spread the word! Sincerely, Reagan Webster C.A.R.S. Student Media Representative

CAMPUS

VOICE

What should the SGA president-elect focus on first? Rhett Eisenberg Freshman

“Smoking on the campus, they should ban it.”

Swan Holt Junior

“This is my first semester here so I really don’t know.”

Merriam Hayden Senior

“Money being more evenly spread across campus. Like the music and art departments are getting the least amount of money.”

Robert Bradley Junior

“I can tell you what their priority shouldn’t be; they shouldn’t be using as much of the budget to refurbish Blum Union.”


The Griffon News

Page 9

March 28, 2013

SPORTS

DII offers competitive recruiting Adam Euchner | Contributor Writer colleges to identify potential players based on their abiliaeuchner@missouriwestern.edu Coaches win with players and no matter the division, there is a process for identifying talent, and more importantly, finding it before your rivals do. When people think about recruiting for collegiate sports, they more than likely assume that recruiting is just a matter of seeing who is putting up the best numbers and offering them a full-ride scholarship. In reality, the legwork involved in recruiting players for college sports teams is an intensive process. While Division II recruiting may not be something that’s going to grace the cover of the sports section, it’s definitely competitive. Some schools, particularly Division II schools like Missouri Western, rely on local recruiting services such as Mullensports.net, run by Jerry Mullens and Ballstars.net, run by Rick Ball. They are recruiters who identify high school and junior college talent and post stats to their respective websites. This is an easy way for

ties in a specific aspect of their sport. Tiffany Goldwire, Western’s women’s basketball graduate assistant, is almost entirely in charge of identifying prospective players for the team. She said she looks for spots on the team that need attention due to graduation and attrition. “If we have a really strong outside player who is going to be graduating, I will look at multiple recruiting sites and try and find someone who is really strong in that position, and cross-reference them with other sites,” Goldwire said. While playing for a successful program is ideal, Goldwire noted that it isn’t everything. “I try to find people who have played consistently throughout their career, but them being on a winning team doesn’t necessarily mean anything,” she said. “You can be a really good player on a bad team and still be an asset. That’s why individual statistics is some-

thing I focus on. We also want to be sure that people we recruit are going to graduate, so academics are very important too.” Anthony Medina, the men’s basketball graduate assistant, is also in charge of recruiting. He said the men’s program does things a bit differently. While he does use recruiting services, he prefers a more hands-on approach of actually going to games of prospective student-athletes. Medina said he covers a lot of miles to scout players. He has been to Dallas and to Oklahoma, but some places are too remote. “I’ve been in touch with a kid from Alaska and if it wasn’t for the fact that it’s so expensive to travel there, I’d go watch him play too,” Medina said. Western’s head basketball coach Tom Smith has been known for recruiting almost specifically from junior colleges so a website such as NJCAA.org, which is the National Junior College Athletic Association, is something that is particularly helpful.

Kayla Dysart and Evangel’s Ali Sivinski was a close one that made the one match difference between Western and Evangel as Dysart was defeated 6-4, 0-6 and 10-8. Dysart played great thoughout the entire match but just couldn’t get over the hump in the final set. Boldridge won her match against Kelly Bush 6-2, 6-2 while Lindsay Beger defeated in a close matchup at the end. Phine Mulumba 6-2, 7-5 and Alyssa Dougan defeated Kailey Roland 6-1, 6-2. The Griffons’ confidence has been growing throughout the entire season. “This is one of my most talented teams I have had and you can sense that their confidence is growing,” Coach Ron Selkirk said. “They are playing matches now where they are saying ‘I can win this match.’” Sophmore Ceara Boldridge

came out of the day’s matchups undefeated. “I came in today thinking we had a good chance coming in today and I knew it was going to be close,” Boldridge said. “I feel like we are still growing and my play has really improved from last season and today I was playing a lot more consistent, getting into a rhythm.” Lindsay Beger left the match day 1-0. “My stroke swing was starting to slow down as I got tired but at the end I was happy I ended up closing the match out at the end,” Beger said. Western’s No. 1 Meara Smith fell in her singles match 6-0, 6-2 and No. 2 Denise Chiao was defeated 6-1, 6-0 in her match. “I was confident out there today but I just couldn’t get into a rhythm,” Smith said. In doubles competition,

Smith’s wife Patsy, who accompanies him on many recruiting ventures, shed some light on his philosophy about recruiting from junior colleges. “Coach Smith takes the stars of junior college teams and molds them together into one team,” Patsy Smith said. Medina said that while Coach Smith has really made a niche out of junior college recruiting, he has also recruited true freshman players straight out of high school, like last year where he recruited three true freshmen. Reed Mells, a college sophomore basketball player out of Des Moines, Iowa was recruited by Coach Smith in his senior year at Grandview Park Baptist High School. Grandview is a private school in the smallest division in Iowa; 1A. Mell’s graduating class had 28 students in it. His team made it to the state tournament, and he was averaging 25-30 points a game and in some games, upwards of 10 assists. “I had no idea I was even

Westerns goal is to recruit players with potential to play at the highest level. Here football coach Jerry Patridge chats with a NFL scout from the Redskins on Pro Day for Western’s NFL prospects. Tevin Harris | Photo Editor

being looked at for recruitment until Coach Smith showed up on my doorstep one day saying he wanted to talk to me about playing basketball for Missouri Western,” Mells said. “He told me that his assistant coach Mike Nicholson had been coming to my games and watching me. Coach Smith also recruited Tevin Harris out of Chicago and Freddie Manyawu from near Kansas City, both as freshmen too.” People assume that serious collegiate recruiting is something that only big name Di-

vision I schools regularly do but it is obviously not. People may also assume that smaller Division II schools such as Western are comprised of mostly local homegrown talent, and again they’d be wrong. The rosters of all the athletic teams on campus show an eclectic mix of players from all over the United States, and proves that Division II recruiting is a serious, time intensive process that’s comparable to recruiting at all levels of college sports.

Griffon Tennis faces tough “Love” Gary Smith | Staff Writer gsmith16@missouriwestern.edu

Missouri Western tennis showed promising signs in their hard fought battle against Evangel University, but fell 5-4 in their non-conference matchup on their home court at the St. Joseph Tennis and Swim Club. With this loss, the Griffons fall to 3-11 (0-6 MIAA) on the year and made it consecutive loss No. 10. Starting the day off slow, the Griffons pulled out one win from the doubles action by the pair Ceara Boldridge and Kelly Cochran, who defeated their opponents 8-4, but even after the win, the Griffons were still down 4-1 in match play. In singles action, the Griffons hit a spark and won No. 4, No. 5 and No. 6 but it was too late. The No. 3 matchup between Western’s

Denise Chiao goes for a back hand in the Griffon’s tennis match. Jason Brown | Photo Contributor

Denis Chiao and Meara Smith fell 8-1 in their matchup while Dysart and Alyssa Dougan fell in their match 8-4. The Griffons have one of

the youngest rosters in the MIAA with seven of its 10 on the roster being freshmen. The Griffons next matchup is on Wednesday, March 27 at 3 p.m. against Emporia

State University. Western still has nine matches before MIAA Tournament play begins April 19-20.

Softball extends winning streak Kyle Inman | Sports Editor kinman@missourwestern.edu Griffon softball stayed hot in cold weather over the weekend extending its winning-streak to eight games and overall record to 20-8 with a 4-0 showing at the Spring Sports Complex. “We are starting to put the pieces all together and feel really good about where we are,” Coach Jen Bagley said. “But I don’t feel really good about the fact that we have snow on our field again.” Western was scheduled to play several more games, but snow forced the cancellation of the Missouri Western Softball Classic and the Griffons were only able to reschedule four. Griffons defeat Lincoln University 8-3 After entering the third inning down by a run, the Griffon offense exploded for five runs in the bottom half. Tiffany Gillaspy scored after she hit a triple that drove in two runs and Michelle Stevenson hit a home run. Western tacked on two more runs as the game went on when Bree Fleschner stole home and Kendall Sorensen hit a triple and then made her way home after an error from the second basemen.

Pitcher Janie Smith got the win after pitching all seven innings and allowing just two earned runs and seven hits. Smith is off to a 9-3 start to her freshman season. Western edges Emporia State University 4-2 The Griffons pulled away in the fourth inning after three scoreless innings in this non-conference game between two of the top teams in the MIAA. In the bottom of the fourth, Sorensen hit a double that scored Gillaspy. Taylor Anding and Maegan Roemmich both singled to drive in runs and push the Griffons lead to 3-0. Emporia fired back with a two-run sixth inning, but it wasn’t enough as Western added another run off of a Roemmich double in the bottom half of the inning. Jackie Bishop pitched all seven innings and gave up six hits and two earned runs while striking out seven batters. “I felt really good about the way we approached the plate offensively,” Bagley said. “Their pitching is always among top in the league and we really made it seems easy. It was good it see.

SEE SOFTBALL PAGE 10

(Left) Kat Steponovich focuses on the ball as she tries to get a hit in the Griffons win against Emporia State University. (Top Right) Brooke Schaben highfives her teammate as they make their victory. (Bottom right) Griffons cheer on their teammates from the dugout in cold weather at the Spring Sports Complex. Gilbert Imbiri | Asst. Photo Editor


SPORTS

The Griffon News

Page 10

Two Griffons prepare for NFL draft

March 28, 2013

Baseball streak ends, stays on top of MIAA

Kyle Simpson gets a hit against the opposing team. Tevin Harris | Photo Editor

Christian Mengel | Asst. Sports Editor

cmengel@missouriwestern.edu

Michael Hill receives a pass during the NFL Pro-day on Friday, March 22.

Kyle Inman | Sports Editor kinman@missouriwestern.edu Pro scouts from most NFL teams showed up to the Griffon Indoor Sports Complex on Friday, March 21 to take a look at players from across the area with pro aspirations. For the second consecutive year, Western will most likely have a player chosen in the NFL draft, which starts on Thursday, April 25. Last year it was kicker Greg Zuerlein who was selected in the sixth round of the draft by the Saint Louis Rams. This year, it’s defensive end David Bass and runningback Michael Hill who are on the radar of the big leagues. Possibly getting Hill and Bass to the next level is more of an achievement than Zuerlein getting drafted last season for coach Jerry Partridge and his staff. While Zuerlein only spent one season kicking at Western, Bass and Hill were program players who each spent five years as Griffons. Both players were largely unrecruited by other universities coming out of high school, redshirted their freshman season and made huge strides in performance

at Western. ss, a 6-4 262 pound defensive end, came to Western weighing in at only 200 pounds and added 60 to his frame in the weight room. He started for four straight years and broke the all-time Western sack record with 39.5 for his career. “He looks the part,” Partridge said of scouts looking at Bass after he broke the record. “His measurements are good, he just needs to put some numbers up and he’s already done that throughout his career.” Scouts got a look at Bass already at the NFL combine and in the East West Shrine Bowl where he competed alongside FBS Division I prospects and showed promise. “Bass has room to refine his pass rush moves to be more effective, but he flashed in practice why he was able to be so productive in college,” said Dane Brugler of NFLDraftScout.com. Bass projects as a defensive end or an outside linebacker in the NFL and is projected to be drafted sometime in between rounds four and

seven. Hill’s future in the NFL is a little less secure, but the 5-10 204 pound runningback has been steadily climbing up the boards, which should be no surprise to those who have seen him play. Hailing from Central High School in St. Joseph, local product Hill broke the alltime and single season rushing record at Western, running for 4,601 yards in his career. He led the entire nation in rushing yards as a senior and was a finalist for the Harlon Hill trophy, awarded to the nation’s best Division II player. He was a power runner at Western who would hit defenses just as hard as they hit him. He would routinely send corners and safeties from opposing defenses out with injury from running into them. Scouts got a look at Hill at the Raycom College All-Star Classic, which featured 22 players from the SEC – widely considered the best football conference in the nation at any level. Hill took full advantage of his opportunity and busted off two long runs

Tevin Harris | Photo Editor

for 45 and 54 yards with two touchdowns. Even if he doesn’t hear his name called in the draft, Hill is likely to be invited to a pro camp and have an opportunity to make a team. The only thing scouts have doubts about with him is his speed. He doesn’t run the 40-yard-dash at blazing speed, but showed his speed on the field during the season when he broke off a 93yard run for a touchdown. Similar concerns were shown by scouts to Texans runningback Arian Foster, who went undrafted in 2009, but eventually made the NFL as a free agent and was the league’s leading rusher in 201 and a three-time pro bowler. Hill hopes to be a diamond in the rough for the team that takes a chance on him. Getting players to the NFL annually is just another sign that Western football is taking steps toward becoming a powerhouse in DII football. If the Griffons continue to win a lot of games every season, the pipeline to the highest level could be an every year thing.

Bishop breaks all-time win record SOFTBALL

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 10 All of those things came together and showed us what type of things we are capable of.” Western outscores Northern University 11-6, Bishop breaks record Western’s bats warmed up in game one of a doubleheader as the Griffons put two runs on the board in the first inning when Michelle Stevenson hit a double that scored Gillaspy and Fleschner. Northern responded and tied the game after a throwing error from the Griffons. Western took control of the game in the third inning with

four runs off of four hits to make the score 7-2. Kat Steponovich and Fleschner added home runs to extend the lead. Jackie Bishop went all seven innings for the win, which put her in the history books ahead of Cheri Kemp as Western’s all-time win leader. Bishop is only in her junior season and is 10-3 on the year. “Ever since I’ve been here people ask me if I know who Cheri Kemp is,” Bagley said. “To be able to take a record form her is something that Jackie should be very, very proud of because those records and her name have stuck with this program for many years.” Bishop is now just one win

away from the becoming the all-time wins leader. Griffons blowout Nothern University 15-1 in game two of doubleheader Fleschner continued her hot hitting by blasting a homer to right field to open up a 2-0 lead in the first inning. The Griffons scored six more runs in the first inning to make it 8-2 and the route was on. Smith pitched her way to her second win of the weekend by going all seven innings. Fleschner had four of the 12 hits for the game for Western and finished the two games against Northern hitting a perfect 8-for-8 with six runs batted in. “What we need is confi-

dence and consistency and I think we are starting to achieve that,” Bagley said. Weather hasn’t been kind to the Griffons so far this spring and they are forced to try and keep their momentum from the eight game winning-steak while practicing in the GISC. “You go into the indoor and we are grateful to have it, but it isn’t the surface we play on,” Bagley said. “Everything looks different when you have the roof on you. Taking the momentum of us being able to practice on the field is something I’m concerned about.” Western returns to action on Friday, March 29 at Missouri Southern.

Missouri Western’s 17game win streak may have ended, but the Griffons still pulled out a series win against one of the top teams in the MIAA, University of Central Oklahoma. Western’s one loss to Central Oklahoma came Friday evening and is the only conference loss it has had in their 15 MIAA games so far this season. The Griffons have been playing outstanding all season both offensively and defensively, and have shown every team they’ve faced thus far why they are sitting at the top of the MIAA. Westerns coach, Buzz Verduzco, has moved on from the win streak talk and is now looking on the bright side of entering into the middle of the regular season. “The streak is over, so I can say that now,” Verduzco said. “We’ve kind of gotten past that now but it was a great run. Now as far as how we talk to the team and what that means is, we try to get them to be a little bit more consistent minded during the middle part of the season.” Top pitcher Brandon Simmons saw that loss as a reminder for how bad losing feels, and motivated the team to not want to feel like that again. “This weekend was a good test for us,” Simmons said. “[Central Oklahoma] was a very competitive team and they gave us kind of a reality check. Their pitching was outstanding and really shutdown our hitters, who have been on fire. I think this past weekend really put the nasty taste of losing back into our mouth and no one enjoyed it.” Hitting for the Griffons has been off the charts so far in the first half of their season. Westerns hitting numbers are greater than their opponents in every statistical batting category. Runs have been the biggest standout

number, having a total of 221 runs scored, averaging out to the team scoring 9.6 runs per game, which is almost twice as many as their opponents 114 runs, at 4.9 runs per game. Western has scored 10 or more runs in 12 games. Simmons believes that teams that have such dominant hitting are capable of taking the pressure off of their pitchers. “Having a lineup such as this one it really makes the game so much easier,” Simmons said. “It makes you not afraid to go out and throw strikes and if you give up a run or two, then our team will come up a get them back. It really makes pitching a whole lot easier in general.” The key to their hitting seems to be coming from their power. The Griffon big bats have already hit 30 homeruns. With seven players hitting over .400, and five players slugging over .600, it’s hard not to get rack up the runs. Westerns own Michael Schulze, Kyle Simpson and Bubba Dotson are three of the top four hit leaders in the MIAA. Schulze and Dotson have been the MIAA hitters of the week these last two weeks. Schulze feels that the good hitting between players motivates everyone to elevate their game. “We are all just very confident and focused,” Schulze said. “Friendly competition is definitely there between all of us. Once one guy hits everyone wants to hit, so it’s actually a good thing. Offense in baseball is contageous so we all definitely feed off each other at the plate. In the end, we all have the same goal and that is to win.” Although the 17 game win streak ended, another streak still continues. Schulze is currently on a 16 game hit streak. Ever since the first game cancellation, he has recorded at least one hit in every game.

ATHLETE of the WEEK Bree Fleschner #14 - Outfielder

14

Bree Fleschner went 9-for-15 in four games over the weekend including a perfect 8-for8 with six runs batted in on Sunday in a two-game sweep over Northern University. She is batting .348 so far this season with five homeruns and 14 runs batted in on the season with a .573 slugging percentage.

Bree Fleschner Andy Inman and Chad Hammontree | Design Artist and Graphics Editor Andy Inman and Chad Hammontree | Design Artist and Graphics Editorr


It’s time to register for summer and fall classes! missouriwestern.edu/schedule SUMMER REGISTRATION DATES

FALL REGISTRATION DATES

Priority Registration: April 1- May 28 Early Registration: May 1- May 28 Walk-in Registration: May 23, 1-4:30 pm, Eder Hall Instructions: missouriwestern.edu/registrar/registration

Priority Registration: April 1- Aug 26 Early Registration: Aug 1- Aug 26 Walk-in Registration: Aug 20, 11-6:30 pm, Eder Hall Instructions: missouriwestern.edu/registrar/registration

SUMMER 2013 Online Classes

title...................................................... dates.............. location.............. hrs.. instructor............number/section...crn#

BIOLOGY biology

*Principles of Cell Biology.............. 5/28-7/18.....T R,9-12 PM, REM 205.....4...... Daggett...........BIO-106-40.....30468 *Principles of Cell Biology.............. 5/28-7/18..... T R,9-12 PM, REM 205.....0...... Daggett...........BIO-106-41.....30469 Pathophysiology................................5/28-7/18.....ONLINE..................4.......Casey.............BIO-375-40.....30357

BUSINESS accounting

Introductory Financial Acctg............. 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3...... Adkins............ ACC-201-40...30604

management

Management of Organizations........... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3.......West...............MGT-305-40...30605 Org. Beh., Leadership & Change...... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3.......Luthans..........MGT-401-40...30606

marketing

Principles Of Marketing..................... 6/24-7/18....... ONLINE...............3.......Scarfino.........MKT-301-46...30618

COMMUNICATION STUDIES, THEATRE & CINEMA communication

Oral Communication.......................... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3.......Bond..............COM-104-40...30466

COMPUTER SCIENCE, MATH & PHYSICS astronomy

Introduction to Astronomy................. 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............4....... Godfrey.........PHY-104-40....30068 Must sign up for a face-to-face lab.

computer science

Microcomputer Applications............. 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3....... Noynaert.......CSC-201-40....30031

mathematics

Foundations/Univ. Math I.................. 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3....... Moore............MAT-81-40......30463 Foundations/Univ. Math II................. 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3....... Moore............MAT-82-40......30464 Foundations/Univ. Math III............... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3....... Moore............MAT-83-40......30465

CRIMINAL JUSTICE, LEGAL STUDIES & SOCIAL WORK criminal justice

Intro to Criminal Justice................5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...................3.......Courtney........LAW-100-40...30157 Intro to Theories of Crime............5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...................3.......Godboldt........LAW-210-40...30479 Understanding Research in CJ......5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...................3.......Lindsteadt......LAW-255-40...30161 Criminal Law.................................5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...................3.......Courtney........LAW-260-40...30162 Practicum I....................................5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...................3.......Tushaus..........LAW-290-41...30608 Intermediate Criminal Law...........5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...................3.......Kopek............LAW-410-40...30165 Internship.......................................5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...................3.......Tushaus..........LAW-465-40...30171 Senior Seminar..............................5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...................3.......Katz...............LAW-470-40...30372 *Forensic Photography.................5/28-7/18....... W, 6:30-9:20 PM, NKC......3.......Rezzelle.........LAW-615-40...30620 Graduate Internship.......................5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...................3.......Tushaus..........LAW-670-40...30536

legal studies

title...................................................... dates.............. location.............. hrs.. instructor............number/section...crn#

EDUCATION education

Educational Psychology..................... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............2........Young...........EDU-225-40....30344 Psychology & Educ of Exc. Stu........ 5/28-6/20....... ONLINE...............2........Eicher...........EDU-315-45....30346 Assessing and Individualizing........... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3........Blake............EDU-360-40....30455 Behavior Management....................... 5/28-6/20....... ONLINE...............2........Claflin...........EDU-370-45....30149 Scrn Diag for Early Childhood.......... 5/28-6/20....... ONLINE...............3........Claflin...........EDU-418-45....30599 Policy Decisions................................. 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3........Eddins...........EDU-510-40....30133 Seminar Professional Writing............ 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3........Staff..............EDU-612-40....30331 Data Informed Analysis & Dec......... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3........Wall..............EDU-615-40....30131 Improving Outcomes: Document...... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3........Wall..............EDU-630-40....30314 Improving Outcomes: Document...... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............6........Wall..............EDU-630-41....30366 Improving Outcomes: Document...... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3........Frick.............EDU-630-42....30452 Improving Outcomes: Document...... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............1........Wall..............EDU-630-43....30532 Fundamentals of ASD........................ 5/28-6/20....... ONLINE...............3........Eicher...........EDU-650-45....30425 Beh. Int. for Stud. with ASD.............. 5/28-6/20....... ONLINE...............3........Bashinski......EDU-653-45....30273

tesol - teachers of english to speakers of other languages

Methods Tch Sec Lang Stu................ 5/28-6/20....... ONLINE...............3.......Dickerson......TSL-468-45.....30353 Methods of Teach L2 Students.......... 5/28-6/20....... ONLINE..............3.......Dickerson......TSL-660-45.....30354 Research in ELL................................. 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3.......Dickerson......TSL-663-40.....30355

ENGLISH, FOREIGN LANGUAGE & JOURNALISM english

College Writing And Rhetoric........... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3........Bartels..........ENG-104-40....30501 College Writing And Research.......... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3........Crain.............ENG-108-40....30493 Approaches To Literature.................. 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3........Bensyl...........ENG-210-40....30069 Approaches To Literature.................. 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3........Donaher........ENG-210-41....30406 Seminar Professional Writing............ 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3........Staff..............ENG-612-40....30330

HEALTH, PHYSICAL ED & RECREATION physical education

Fitness And Wellness......................... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3....... Kriewitz........PED-101-40....30227 Fitness And Wellness......................... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............0....... Kriewitz........PED-101-41....30229 Kinesiology........................................ 5/28-6/20....... ONLINE...............3....... Kraft..............PED-303-45....30236 Psychology Of Sport.......................... 5/28-6/20....... ONLINE...............2....... Russell...........PED-374-45....30577 Socio Aspects Sport Phys Act............ 5/28-6/20....... ONLINE...............3....... Russell...........PED-375-45....30461 Personal & Environmental Hlth........ 5/28-6/20....... ONLINE...............3....... Dodd.............PED-391-45....30370

MUSIC music

Perspectives in Music........................ 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3.......Gilmour.........MUS-101-40...30158 Perspectives In Music........................ 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3.......Edwards.........MUS-101-41...30160

NURSING & ALLIED HEALTH allied health

Introduction to Mediation.................. 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3....... Katz...............LAT-335-40.....30478

Medical Terminology......................... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............2.......O’Connor......ALH-106-40....30166 Applied Nutrition............................... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............2.......Nuckolls........ALH-352-40....30168

ECONOMICS, POLITICAL SCIENCE & SOCIOLOGY

Intro To Physical Therapy.................. 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............1....Raffensperger...PTA-100-40.....30226

economics

Principles Of Microeconomics.......... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3.......Courington....ECO-261-40....30565 Money And Banking.......................... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3.......Hamzaee........ECO-363-40....30566

political science

American National Government....... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3....... Euchner.........PSC-101-40.....30571

sociology

Introduction to Sociology.................. 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3.......Kibirige.........SOC-110-40....30567 Social Problems.................................. 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3.......Kamali...........SOC-230-40....30568 Criminology....................................... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3.......Kibirige.........SOC-430-40....30569 *blended course

Western Institute Classes

physical therapy

PSYCHOLOGY pyschology

General Psychology........................... 5/28-6/20....... ONLINE...............3...... Gerhart...........PSY-101-44.....30562 Life-Span Developmental.................. 5/28-6/20....... ONLINE...............3...... Deka...............PSY-240-44.....30581 Introduction To Forensic Psych......... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3...... Bargar.............PSY-290-41.....30179 Introductory Psy Statistics................. 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3...... Cronk.............PSY-300-40.....30580 Abnormal Psychology........................ 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3...... Bargar.............PSY-309-41.....30485

WESTERN INSTITUTE nutrition

Nutrition & Weight Control............... 5/28-7/18....... ONLINE...............3......Harrison..........CED-278-40....30009

Kansas City Classes

title............................... dates.......days.........times.................location..... hrs.. instructor......... #/section....... crn

title............................... dates.......days.........times.................location..... hrs.. instructor......... #/section....... crn

St. Joseph Classes

Kansas City Northland Campus

global positioning systems Gps Map & Nav........ 5/15-5/17...WRF........8-5:00pm........Spratt 212.....2... Chevalier.. CED 490-99...30551 *

healthcare

education

Mathematics Methods... 5/28-7/18.. MTWTh.... 9-11:50am......... KCN.....3....Foster....... EDU 351-25...30598 Math/Elem/Middle....... 5/28-7/18... MTWTh....11am-12:20pm...KCN....3...Anderson...MAT 352-20...30064

Skills/Success in Healthca..... 1/9-6/9...ARRG.....ARRG.................................3.....Ellis......... CED 139-25....30629

law enforcement academy

Cr Asp of Policing I.... 7/1-8/23...MTWRF..8-5pm...............Wilson 184...3..... Wilson......POL 100-01...30559 Cr Asp of Policing I.... 5/8-6/20...MTWRF..8-5pm...............Wilson 184...3..... Wilson......POL 100-02...30552 Cr Asp of Policing I.... 5/8-8/10...S..............8-5pm...............Wilson 184...3..... Wilson......POL 100-03...30558 Cr Asp of Policing I.... 5/8-8/10...S..............8-5pm...............Wilson 184...3..... Wilson......POL 100-05...30556 Cr Asp of Policing 2.... 7/1-8/23...MTWRF..8-5pm...............Wilson 184...3..... Wilson......POL 130-01...30560 Cr Asp of Policing 2.... 5/8-6/20...MTWRF..8-5pm...............Wilson 184...3..... Wilson......POL 130-02...30553 Cr Asp of Policing 2.... 5/8-8/10...S..............8-5pm...............Wilson 184...3..... Wilson......POL 130-03...30555 Cr Asp of Policing 2.... 5/8-8/10...MTR........8-5pm...............Wilson 184...3..... Wilson......POL 130-05...30557

* noncredit option available

Spratt Hall 105 Phone: 816-271-4100 Fax: 816-271-5922 wi@missouriwestern.edu

wi.missouriwestern.edu


FALL 2013 Online Classes

title...................................................... dates.............. location.............. hrs.. instructor............number/section...crn#

BUSINESS

title...................................................... dates.............. location.............. hrs..... instructor.........number/section...crn#

sociology

accounting

Introduction to Sociology.................. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3......Kamali............SOC 110-40.....12782 Introduction to Sociology.................. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3......Kibirige...........SOC 110-41.....12783 Introduction To Archaeology............. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3......Albright..........SOC 200-40.....12785 Social Problems.................................. 8/2-12/13....... ONLINE...............3......Kamali............SOC 230-40.....12786

business

EDUCATION

Introductory Financial Acctg............. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Staff...............ACC 201-41....12816 Introductory Managerial Acctg.......... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Fowler...........ACC 202-41....12817 Accounting Information Systems...... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Staff...............ACC 418-41.... 11828 Business Communications................. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3........Payne............GBA 220-40....12814 Business Statistics II.......................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3........Staff..............GBA 310-40....10550

finance

Personal Finance................................ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Scarfino.........FIN 210-40......12827

management

Management of Organizations........... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......West...............MGT 305-40...12815 Organizational Behavior.................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Luthans..........MGT 350-40...12809 Management Information Systems.... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Staff...............MGT 418-41... 11827

marketing

Principles Of Marketing..................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Hickman........MKT 301-40...10591 International Mkt. and Trade............. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Ertekin...........MKT 451-40...10596

COMMUNICATION STUDIES, THEATRE & CINEMA communication

Oral Communication.......................... 10/15-12/5..... ONLINE...............3...... Bond...............COM 104-40...12859

theatre

Introduction To Theatre...................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Lillie..............THR 113-40....12697

COMPUTER SCIENCE, MATH & PHYSICS astronomy

Introduction to Astronomy................. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............4.......Godfrey.........PHY 104-40.... 11210 Must sign up for a face-to-face lab.

computer science

Introduction to Web Graphics............ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Becker...........ACT 202-40....12590 Applied Database Systems................ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Hecker...........ACT 301-40.... 12113 Computer Systems and Archtres....... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Staff...............CSC 200-40..... 11575 Microcomputer Applications............. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Staff...............CSC 201-40.....10263 Microcomputer Applications............. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Staff...............CSC 201-42.....10261 Networking and Telecommunicati.... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Noynaert........CSC 294-40.....12317

mathematics

Foundations/Univ. Math I.................. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Moore............MAT 81-40......10614 Foundations/Univ. Math I.................. 9/9-12/13....... ONLINE...............3.......Moore............MAT 81-41......12723 Foundations/Univ. Math II................. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Moore............MAT 82-40...... 11678 Foundations/Univ. Math II................. 9/9-12/13....... ONLINE...............3.......Moore............MAT 82-41......12734 Foundations/Univ. Math III............... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Moore............MAT 83-40...... 11984 Foundations/Univ. Math III............... 9/9-12/13....... ONLINE...............3.......Moore............MAT 83-41......12762 College Algebra.................................. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Hegeman.......MAT 116-40....10301

CRIMINAL JUSTICE, LEGAL STUDIES & SOCIAL WORK criminal justice

Intro to Criminal Justice..................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Staff...............LAW 100-40.... 11504 *Juvenile Delinquency....................... 8/26-12/13..... W, 10-10:5, Wilson 170....3.......Staff...............LAW 110-40.... 11507 *Juvenile Delinquency....................... 8/26-12/13..... W, 11-11:50, Wilson 170...3.......Staff...............LAW 110-41....12166 *Juvenile Delinquency....................... 8/26-12/13..... T, 5:30-6:20, Wilson 170...3.......Huffman........LAW 110-42....12412 *Juvenile Delinquency....................... 8/26-12/13..... T, 6:30-7:20, Wilson 170...3.......Huffman........LAW 110-43....12413 Juvenile Delinquency......................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Lindsteadt......LAW 110-44....12414 Modern Police Procedures................. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Jang................LAW 130-40.... 11508 Criminal Investigation....................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Staff...............LAW 190-40....12848 Penology and Corrections.................. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Godboldt........LAW 200-40.... 11510 Intro to Theories of Crime................. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Godboldt........LAW 210-40....12399 Understanding Research in CJ........... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Staff...............LAW 255-40.... 11512 Practicum I......................................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Tushaus..........LAW 290-40.... 11527 CJ Communications........................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Charrette........LAW 300-40....12849 Senior Research.................................. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Lindsteadt......LAW 420-40.... 11535 Juvenile Law and Procedures............ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Kissock..........LAW 440-40.... 11537 Internship............................................ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Katz...............LAW 465-40.... 11540 Quantitative Analysis......................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Lindsteadt......LAW 520-40....12075 Criminal Law and Evidence.............. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Staff...............LAW 600-40....12078 Graduate Internship............................ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Tushaus..........LAW 670-40....12454 Research and Publication................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Tushaus..........LAW 680-40....12853 *blended course

legal studies

education

Educational Psychology..................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............2....... Young............EDU 225-40....10177 Applied Methods & Mgt.................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Eddins...........EDU 304-40.... 11482 Multicultural Education..................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............2....... Foster............EDU 308-40.... 11700 Secondary Reading Techniques......... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............2....... Flowers.........EDU 311-40....10127 Psychology & Educ of Exc. Stu........ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............2....... Eicher............EDU 315-40.... 11591 Sci and SS for Young Children.......... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Flowers.........EDU 333-40.... 11483 Mathematics Methods........................ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Foster............EDU 351-40....12303 Intro to Early Childhood Educ........... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............2....... Claflin...........EDU 358-40.... 11592 Behavior Management....................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............2....... Claflin...........EDU 370-40.... 11628 Teach Read in Elem Sch.................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............2....... Blake.............EDU 375-40....12337 Seminar in Elem. Ed.......................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Irvine.............EDU 403-40....10129 Sem. - Ed. & Human Relations......... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Staff...............EDU 404-40....10132 Language Development for Ed.......... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Bashinski......EDU 414-40.... 11593 Fam, Comm & Sch: Partnering......... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Claflin...........EDU 421-40.... 11629 Trends & Mgmt of Programs............. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Hagan............EDU 422-40.... 11959 Research Approaches in Assemen..... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Ellis...............EDU 530-40.... 11039 Improving Outcomes: Document...... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Wall...............EDU 630-40.... 11055 Improving Outcomes: Document...... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............6....... Wall...............EDU 630-41.... 11056 Improving Outcomes: Document...... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Frick..............EDU 630-42.... 11673 Improving Outcomes: Document...... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............1....... Wall...............EDU 630-43....12451 Tchg. Com. & Soc. Skills.................. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Bashinski......EDU 654-40.... 11625 Int. Erly Int. St. w/ ASD..................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Kalis..............EDU 655-40.... 11626

tesol - teachers of english to speakers of other languages

Second Language Acquisition........... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Staff...............TSL 467-40..... 11616 Methods Tch Sec Lang Stu................ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Staff...............TSL 468-40..... 11614 Methods of Teach L2 Students.......... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Staff...............TSL 660-40..... 11613 Second Language Acquisition........... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Staff...............TSL 661-40..... 11615 Language and Culture........................ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Staff...............TSL 664-40..... 11970

ENGLISH, FOREIGN LANGUAGE & JOURNALISM english

College Writing And Rhetoric........... 8/27-10/10..... ONLINE...............3....... Crain.............ENG 104-40....12715 College Writing And Rhetoric........... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Katchen.........ENG 104-41....12733 College Writing And Research.......... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Donaher........ENG 108-40....12739 College Writing And Research.......... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Bartels...........ENG 108-41....12740 College Writing And Research.......... 10/15-12/5..... ONLINE...............3....... Crain.............ENG 108-42....12860 Approaches To Literature.................. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Crain.............ENG 210-40....10472 Language Awareness.......................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Donaher........ENG 232-40....10696 Language Awareness.......................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Donaher........ENG 232-41....12741 Studies in Popular Literature............. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Donaher........ENG 334-40....12743

HEALTH, PHYSICAL ED & RECREATION physical education

Fitness And Wellness......................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Kriewitz........PED 101-40..... 11479 Fitness And Wellness......................... 8/26-11/1....... ONLINE...............0....... Kriewitz........PED 101-41..... 11480 Community Health............................. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............2....... Dodd.............PED 388-40..... 11104 Personal & Environmental Hlth........ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Dodd.............PED 391-40..... 11107

recreation sports management

Philos & Ldership In Rec. Adm........ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Hardy............RSM 300-40....10912 Recreation Law For The Practit......... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............2....... Blessing........RSM 325-40....10920 Promotion Sprt & Rec Agencies........ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Choi...............RSM 343-40....10927 Adv.Travel & Tourism Develop........ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Choi...............RSM 344-40....10928

MUSIC music

Perspectives In Music........................ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... Edwards........MUS 101-40....10950 Perspectives In Music........................ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... May...............MUS 101-41.... 11584 Perspectives In Music........................ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3....... May...............MUS 101-42.... 11585

NURSING & ALLIED HEALTH allied health

Medical Terminology......................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............2.......Yeh.................ALH 106-40....10684 Applied Nutrition............................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............2.......Nuckolls........ALH 352-40....10686

health informatics and information management

*Introduction to Law.......................... 8/26-12/13..... F, 9-9:50, Wilson 205....3.......Kissock..........LAT 101-40..... 11487 *Introduction to Law.......................... 8/26-12/13..... R, 5:30-6:20, Wilson 130...3.......Kissock..........LAT 101-42.....12840 *Introduction to Law.......................... 8/26-12/13..... R, 6:30-7:20, Wilson 130...3.......Kissock..........LAT 101-43.....12841 Introduction to Law............................ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Kissock..........LAT 101-44.....12842 Paralegal Studies................................ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Tant-Shafer....LAT 115-40..... 11489 Legal Computer Applications............ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Palmer...........LAT 250-40..... 11492 Introduction to Mediation.................. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Katz...............LAT 335-40..... 11850 Domestic Relations............................ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Soper..............LAT 370-40..... 11497 Civil Rights Law................................ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Tushaus..........LAT 420-40..... 11499

Health Data Management.................. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Dolan.............HIF 300-40...... 11945 Clinical Class Sys............................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Dolan.............HIF 310-40...... 11948 Legal and Ethical................................ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............2.......Dolan.............HIF 330-40...... 11950 Human Resources.............................. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Dolan.............HIF 410-40......12299 Clinical Data Management................ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Dolan.............HIF 420-40......12300 Applied Health Informatics............... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Dolan.............HIF 430-40......12301 American History Since 1865............ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Frieling..........HIS 150-40......12598 Health Care Delivery Systems........... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Dolan.............HIT 200-40......10673 Coding & Classification Sys I........... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Dolan.............HIT 275-40......10678 Coding & Class Systems I Lab.......... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............1.......Dolan.............HIT 276-40......10680

*Selected Topics In Social Work....... 8/26-12/13..... S, 9-4pm, Wilson 205....3...... Clary...............SWK 270-40...12847 Substance Abuse and Dep.................. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3...... Atkinson.........SWK 345-40...12419

Foundations Nsng Leadership........... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Donaldson.....NUR 501-40.... 11705

social work

DIGITAL MEDIA digital media

Project Management.......................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............2....... Bergland........ADM 525-40...12824

ECONOMICS, POLITICAL SCIENCE & SOCIOLOGY economics

Current Issues In The Economy........ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Lawson..........ECO 101-40....12653 Principles Of Macroeconomics ........ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Courington....ECO 260-40....12657 Principles Of Microeconomics.......... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Courington....ECO 261-40....12660 Economics Of Health Care................ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Lawson..........ECO 375-40....12664

nursing

PSYCHOLOGY pyschology

General Psychology (Online)............ 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Henry.............PSY 101-40.....12539 General Psychology........................... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Gerhart...........PSY 101-41.....12582 Social Psychology.............................. 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Henry.............PSY 365-40.....12567

WESTERN INSTITUTE nutrition

Nutrition & Weight Control............... 8/26-12/13..... ONLINE...............3.......Harrison.........CED 278-40....10100 *blended course

Western Institute & Kansas City Classes

title............................... dates.......days.........times.................location..... hrs...... instructor..... #/section....... crn

title............................... dates.......days.........times.................location..... hrs......instructor..... #/section....... crn

computer Microsoft Excel....... 10/28-12/2...M.............6-9 pm..............Spratt 212...1.. Readenour.. CED 147-01...12536 *

Concepts Of Sign Lang I... 9/9-10/14...M.............6:30-9:30pm.....Murphy 206...1.....Ballard..... CED 152-01...12537 * Concepts Of Sign Lang II.... 10/21-12/2...M.............6:30-9pm..........Murphy 206...1.....Ballard..... CED 152-01...12538 *

St. Joseph Classes

intensive english program

Beg Listening & Speaking... 8/26-12/13...MTWR....10:20-11:30......Spratt 208...3.....Mathies...... CED 86-01...10128 * Beg Grammar & Comp.. 8/26-12/13...MTWR....9-10:15am........Spratt 208...3.....Mathies...... CED 87-01...10133 * Beg Reading............ 8/26-12/13...MTWR....12:30-1:40........Spratt 208...3.....Voigt.......... CED 88-01...10115 * Beg Academic Writing... 8/26-12/13...MTWR....1:45-3:00 pm....Spratt 212...3.....Voigt.......... CED 89-01...10123 * Int Listening & Speaking.... 8/26-12/13...MTWR....10:20-11:30......Spratt 208...3.....Mathies...... CED 96-01...10130 * Int Grammar & Comp.... 8/26-12/13...MTWR....9-10:15 am.......Spratt 208...3.....Mathies...... CED 97-01...10136 * Int Reading.............. 8/26-12/13...MTWR....12:30-1:40pm...Spratt 208...3.....Voigt.......... CED 98-01...10117 * Int Academic Writing..... 8/26-12/13...MTWR....1:45-3 pm.........Spratt 212...3.....Voigt.......... CED 99-01...10125 * Adv Listening & Speaking.. 8/26-12/13...MTWR....10:20-11:30......Spratt 208...3.....Mathies.... CED 166-01...10131 * Adv Grammar & Comp...... 8/26-12/13...MTWR....9-10:15 am.......Spratt 208...3.....Mathies.... CED 167-01...10137 * Adv Reading........... 8/26-12/13...MTWR....12:30-1:40........Spratt 208...3.....Voigt........ CED 168-01...10121 * Adv Academic Writing....... 8/26-12/13...MTWR....1:45-3 pm.........Spratt 212...3.....Voigt........ CED 169-01...10126 * griffon edge Griffon Edge Orient...... 8/22-8/24...RFS.........9-5:00 pm.........ARRG........1.....Neeley..... CED 131-01...12869 leadership Gateway Leadership... 8/26-12/13...M.............12-12:50 pm.....Murphy 103....1.....Hodkins... CED 119-01...11664 Gateway Leadership... 8/26-12/13...W.............12-12:50 pm.....Murphy 103....1.....Tiner........ CED 119-02...11665 Gateway Leadership... 8/26-12/13...M.............2-2:5 pm...........Murphy 104....1.....Hodkins... CED 119-03...11666 Gateway Leadership... 8/26-12/13...T..............2-2:50 pm.........Murphy 113....1.....Clark........ CED 119-04...12119 Gateway Leadership... 8/26-12/13...R..............2-2:50 pm.........Murphy 113....1.....Clark........ CED 119-05...12120 Gateway Leadership... 8/26-12/13...W.............2-2:50 pm.........Murphy 108....1.....Bryant...... CED 119-06...12128 Gateway Leadership... 8/26-12/13...F..............12-12:50 pm.....Murphy 103....1.....Tiner........ CED 119-07...12468 law enforcement academy / criminal justice Police Mthds & Op... 8/26-12/13...MTWRF..8am-5pm..........Wilson 184...12....Wilson......POL 150-01...11589 Police Mthds & Op... 8/26-12/13...S..............8am-5pm..........Wilson 184....6.....Wilson......POL 150-03...12186 Police Mthds & Op... 8/26-12/13...S..............8am-5pm..........Wilson 184....6.....Wilson......POL 150-05...12437 photography and photoshop Photography............ 9/26-10/24...R..............6-8:30 PM........Poppl 102...1.....Callow..... CED 225-01...12527 * Photoshop for Photogs.... 10/31-12/5...R..............6-8:30 PM........Rem 108.....1.....Callow..... CED 325-01...12529 *

* noncredit option available

sign language

stress management

Stress Management.10/16-12/11...W.............6:30-9:30pm.....TBA............2..... Teliczan... CED 178-01...12589

volunteer training

Vol Train: Dom & Sex Viol Advo... 10/1-31...TR...........5-9pm...............YWCA.......2.....Turner...... CED 159-01...12532

Kansas City Northland Campus education

Exp in Teaching II.... 8/26-12/13...MTWTF..1-2:00pm..........NKC...........2....Kelly......... EDU 303-20...10111 Applied Methods & Mgt.....8/26-12/13...TTh..........10-11:00am......NKC...........3....Irvine........ EDU 304-20...11207 Intro to Reading...... 8/26-12/13...MW.........8-9:20am..........NKC...........3....Smith........ EDU 310-20...10113 Psych & Ed of Exc. Stu.... 8/26-12/13...W.............9:30-11:20am...NKC...........2....Eicher....... EDU 315-20...12105 Lang Arts Methods... 8/26-12/13...F..............8-9:50am..........NKC...........2....Smith........ EDU 320-20...10114 Soc Studies Methods Ele.. 8/26-12/13...M.............9:30am-2:20pm...NKC...........3....Irvine........ EDU 340-20...10118 Evaluation of Abilities..... 8/26-12/13...m.............9:30-11:20am...NKC...........2....Porter........ EDU 342-20...10119 Teach Read in Elem Sch... 8/26-12/13...Th............8-9:50am..........NKC...........2....Blake........ EDU 375-20...10122 Math/Elem/Mid Teach II....8/26-12/13...MW.........8-9:20pm..........NKC...........3....Anderson..MAT 353-20...10490

criminal justice

Biological Evidence....8/26-12/13...Th............6:30-9:20pm.....GKC...........3... Staff......... LAW 620-20...12851 Physical Evidence... 8/26-12/13...T..............6:30-9:20pm.....GKC...........3... Rezzelle... LAW 630-20...12405

MCC - Penn Valley Campus military science

Foun. Of Officership.... 8/26-12/13...T..............12:30-1:20pm...PVC............1... Bailey......... MIL 116-20...12464

nursing

Bridge to Bacc. Nursing.... 8/26-12/13...ARRG.....ARRG..............PVC............2... Harris........NUR 384-20...12648 Health Promo/Assess.....8/26-12/13...Th............1:30-5:30pm.....PVC............3... Quenstedt-Moe...NUR 385-20...12649 Nursing Research in Practice.... 8/26-12/13...ARRG.....ARRG..............PVC............2... Corder.......NUR 395-20...11957 Research Application.... 8/26-12/13...ARRG.....ARRG..............PVC............1... Quenstedt-Moe...NUR 459-20...11958 Nur Leadership/Mgt..... 8/26-12/13...Th............1:30-5:30pm.....PVC............3... Brose.........NUR 474-20...11956 Senior Capstone Clinical.... 8/26-12/13...ARRG.....ARRG..............PVC............7... Staff..........NUR 475-20...12407 Sel Topics In Nursing.... 8/26-12/13...ARRG.....ARRG..............PVC.........1-3...Staff..........NUR 492-20...12721


FEATURES

The Griffon News March 28, 2013

Page 5

Above Average

Western model bares all in pursuit of artistic expression JQ Dever | Staff Writer jdever@missouriwestern.edu The booth is set up. The make up has been dabbed ever so lightly on her face. She is nervous, but she is ready. This is a slice of the life of Katie McKnight, a Western

student who has been modeling since last July. Looking through her photos, you’d think modeling was her fulltime career. But it isn’t. Besides modeling, Katie also attends Western and she maintains good grades while balancing out school, modeling and being a member of Alpha Gamma Delta sorority. Katie is double majoring in economics and psychology and

minoring religion, so she doesn’t have a ton o f time to devote to the camera, but she makes it work. Katie says a big reason she loves modeling is because she is able to express her-

self in such a personal way. She takes the same personal approach with every artistic thing she does, whether it’s song writing, modeling, or creating any other form of art. She feels that expressing yourself through art allows you to be the most naked you could possibly be in front of others. It strips away all of your walls and shows people who you really are. “The hardest thing for me during a shoot, is to know what you look like, to know what your body position is. It’s difficult to know if what you’re doing is going to look good in a photo,” McKnight said. Katie chooses all of her outfits herself and does her own hair and makeup, which requires her to be very creative. Katie is really into alternative modeling. She loves the type of shots that are super interesting, that catch the eye right away. Katie has been photographed by very open, artistic photographers, and that is intentional. She prefers photographers who are artistic because they allow her to have more freedom and to do odd things. Although modeling is a big part of her life, she’s not sure it’s her main source of income in the future. She’s worked too hard at Western for that. “I’d like to continue modeling as long as I can, but in no way would I try to make

person to attend this year’s show. “It gets better every year,” Wiedmaier said. “The theme we’ve chosen is quite different from the years previous and should bring in a large crowd.” PRIDE chose a 1950’s theme for their drag show this year. Wiedmaier said the design and look for this theme is completely different from their burlesque theme from last year. The event will headline three drag queens which include Bianca Bliss, Catia Lee Love, Madison Elise and a few other surprise special guests. The organization plans to take donations from those who attend the event and

all tips that the drag queens collect will be donated to a group in need. Tyler Rhoad, former president of PRIDE and Wiedmaier said they would not release the organization they plan to donate the money they receive this year to. “All the tips that are donated to the drag queens will be donated to a charity,” Wiedmaier said. “You will have to attend the event to hear who our secret charity will be.” The event has been held for the last couple of years and has seen a significant number of large crowds. Keisha Davis, former president of PRIDE, plans to attend this year’s event. She believes the reason attendance has been so high is due to the event

in

*photos courtesy of Gene Starr

it my career,” McKnight said. Katie says that double majoring and working towards a minor is not easy, but she has learned how to balance everything out. The biggest help has been deciding to keep a strict schedule. She keeps not one but four different schedules, so if she forgets one for some reason, she’s got three back-ups. Katie is not able to do much modeling right now because she has so much to do for school and she puts that first. Katie has been photographed by four or five different photographers, some Saint Joseph based and others based in Kansas City, Missouri. A couple of them seem to think the same of her. Fred Byrd has been a photographer since 2009. He photographed one of Katie’s shoots and had a lot of good things to say about her. “Katie makes it easier to photograph her because she knows angles, what poses look good and she can go through them really quickly. We have similar personalities. We’re both kind of awkward so it makes the shoots really enjoyable,” Byrd said.

Byrd says Katie contributes to every look. She basically comes up with everything by herself. “Sometimes I like to give a couple ideas on how I want them to look but normally I just let them do what they do,” Byrd said. “I really liked that she’s gotten out there. It’s kind of hard to get into modeling in Missouri and I applaud her for doing so. She’s very different and she doesn’t make it boring.” Dansare Marks, another St. Joseph photographer, also photographed Katie. Marks was excited going into the shoot because she knew how beautiful and eager Katie was and how easy Katie would make it for Marks to photograph her. “It was an absolute joy. I’ve known Katie since we were young, so it was very comfortable spending time with her. She’s incredibly cooperative and is eager to make the shoot as creative as possible. It definitely shows in her poses and facial expressions,” Marks said. Katie’s creative, different and fun personality makes photographers and the cam-

era love her. Many people may think that a photo shoot is nothing more than just going in and moving around while someone takes pictures of you, but in Katie’s opinion, it’s not the easiest thing to do. “First, you go in and there’s that awkward moment when you first meet the photographer. While getting things situated, the photographer will usually put on music to make it more comfortable. You’ll get dressed, have your makeup on, and then you stand in a booth and that’s another awkward moment because you don’t know what to do for the first pose. Once you get going, within like five or ten minutes, it becomes almost like dancing. You start to get comfortable and it turns out to be really fun,” McKnight said. When it comes to modeling, Katie isn’t really doing it for any sort of personal gain. There is a message behind her modeling. She wants to show women that all sizes are beautiful, because beauty isn’t only found outwardly, but it lies within as well.

Drag out your PRIDE Matthew Hunt | News Editor mhunt8@missouriwestern.edu This year’s drag show will feature some “FLY” drag queens in this 1950’s theme event. The Pride Alliance will be hosting their annual Missouri Western Drag Show on April 2. The doors will open at 7:00 p.m. and the show starts at 8:00 p.m. PRIDE President Kayla Wiedmaier said the event will take place on April 2nd in the Fulkerson Center and believes this year’s event will bring in more students and members of the community. Western students will get into the drag show for free with their Western ID. The show will charge members of the community $3 a

being a unique cultural experience that students aren’t used to. Students should go because not only is it a lot of fun,” Davis said. “It’s educational and there’s something in it for everyone.” Sarah Matthews, member of PRIDE, said that students and those in the community should attend because it’s the one time of the year where everyone can come together for an exciting event. “Students should come to the drag show because it’s simply a fun and entertaining experience, that most people don’t get to see on a daily basis,” Matthews said.

(Above) Dirty Dorthy interacts with students at last year’s PRIDE Alliance Drag Show. *Courtesy of Will C Photography

How To: Eat healthy while living on campus Jourdan Ryan | Features Editor jhuffman10@missouriwestern.edu When you’re hanging out in your dorm room and you suddenly get hungry, where do you go? There’s the cafeteria, Einstein’s Brothers Bagels, or Quizno’s Subs. But how do you resist a mouthwatering everything bagel with extra cream cheese or an ice cream cone at the cafeteria when you’re trying to change your eating habits? Eating healthy on campus can be difficult, but when you take simple things into account, like the caloric intake of the foods you’re eating, keeping your waistline under control becomes much easier. Choosing to make healthy choices starts with break-

fast, and at Western, you have a lot of options to stifle your morning hunger while keeping track of the nutritional facts of the foods you’re eating. Western’s cafeteria, located in Blum Student Union, offers a handful of dishes for breakfast each day. There’s buttermilk biscuits, scrambled eggs, and fresh waffles. But don’t run up to the food counter with an empty plate in hand and pile all these tasty treats on just yet. Those buttermilk biscuits contain more than 162 calories per serving, not to mention over 21 grams of carbohydrates. The scrambled eggs are packed with more than 331 milligrams of cholesterol and 163 calories per serving. And those waffles, the ones that you’re

gonna drizzle with syrup and lather with butter, already contain over 568 calories per serving. The healthiest breakfast item on campus is the turkey sausage patty, weighing in with only 67 calories per serving. When lunchtime rolls around, don’t immediately rush to Einstein’s and grab yourself a pepperoni pizza bagel, which contains 440 calories. At Einstein’s, you can get a fresh garden salad, at only 220 calories, or chicken noodle soup, at 120 calories. The bagel thins at Einstein’s only contain 140 calories, so those are a good snack option. The only problem is that if you get a bagel, you might want to get cream cheese, and one plain container of cream cheese con-

tains 120 calories. The light option contains 80. For dinner, Western offers a lot of options, like healthy subs at Quizno’s. Here, you can find a whole slew of sandwiches, each under 500 calories. There’s the baja chicken sandwich, the veggie guacamole, the basil pesto chicken panini, the prime rib philly, the ultimate turkey club, and the honey bourbon chicken sandwich. If you’re not in the mood for a sub, Quizno’s also offers salads, wraps, grilled flatbreads, and soups. The peppercorn caesar chicken salad, broccoli cheese soup, honey mustard chicken salad, Mediterranean chicken salad, and the cobb salad are all also under 500 calories. Eating healthy can be

tricky, especially on campus. With all the junk food taunting you in the C-store, it’s hard to keep your taste buds in check and opt for healthier options instead of calorie-filled ones. Set a regular snack time for yourself and stick to it every day. That way, you aren’t just eating when you get bored or when there’s a lull in your homework schedule. If you cook anything in your dorm, keep in mind that the healthiest way to prepare foods is to steam them. Try to avoid add-ons like butter or oil if you can. Ultimately, finding healthy foods on campus can be done. You just have to know where to look.

How to:

Healthy Eating

Joe Snapp | Graphics Editor

The Griffon News: Issue 19  

The Griffon news is the student newspaper of Missouri Western State University.

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