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Greta Erba

PORTFOLIO

architect - selected works 2010-2015


Greta Erba 13/11/1986 | Giussano ITALY Via Nizza 93, Torino [+39] 3331636944 gretaerba@hotmail.it

01

Educational Background

sept 2015

Professional Qualification | Polytechnic of Turin

sept 2014

Master of Architecture | Polytechnic of Turin Honor Thesis “Learning from Tool-Houses. Urban alternatives from Delhi to Mumbai”. Realised in collaboration with URBZ and CURE India. 110L/110.

dec 2010

Bachelor of Architecture | Polytechnic of Turin Thesis “Representation’role in Architecture’s International Competitions: evolutions, aims and trends”. https://vimeo.com/20457750 104/110

jun 2005

02

High School Diploma | First Artistic School “Camillo Hajech”, Milan Votazione: 94/100

Publications and Activities G. Erba, A. Tonon, Learning From the Informal, Boundaries Magazine waiting for the issue

oct 2014

Master Thesis | http://www.architesi.polito.it/pdf/24538_it_abs.pdf

jan 2014

Lecture “Architectural Animations” | Singhad College of Architecture | Pune INDIA

2011 - 2012

Lectures “Architectural Animations” | Polytechnic of Turin, Digital Techniques of Representation Class


03

Workshops

jan 2014

Workshop “Building with Bamboo” | Auroville Bamboo Centre | Auroville INDIA

jan 2014

Workshop “Kinetics, Responsive Building Skins” | Sinhgad College of Architecture | Pune INDIA Recognition: First Prize

04

Architectural Competitions

2010

“Villa della Regina”. Competition for the new reception building | Turin

2010 ..........

Competition for the urban and aesthetic requalification of Borgo Villa | Acceglio CN

05 Work Experience dec 2014

- on

feb 2015

Michieli Design | Biassono - Rome - Turin Collaboration in designing and selling furniture during interior design exhibitions. Customer support in interior designing.

feb 2014

CURE INDIA ngo | Savda Ghevra, New Delhi, INDIA Collaboration on housing research projects. Studies on the resettlement colonies of New Delhi.

dec 2014

URBZ | Mumbai, INDIA Collaboration on housing and urban development research projects in the informal settlement of Dharavi. Participation in the design of a Mosque in Shivaji Nagar resettlement colony.

dec 2009 may 2010

ALBIARCH | Torino Collaboration in the studio’s activities and architectural competitions.

- on

-

STUDIO GET | Turin Co-founder of STUDIO GET, Eco-Design workshop.

feb 2009 - may 2009

ALBIARCH | Torino Internship


06

Skills Ps

Id

Ai

Pr

Ae

Photoshop

InDesign

Illustrator

Premiere Pro

After Effects

AutoCad

SketchUp

3ds Max

Revit

Dx

Ls

DIALux

Lightsolve

Office

07

Other Skills and Interests

Photography

Phisical Models

Hand Drawing

IT

EN

Italiano

English


contents:


01

Learning from Tool-Houses Master Thesis | Turin - Mumbai - New Delhi | 2013 - 2014 urban planning | architecture | informal settlements | sociology

02

Passive Stone Academic Work | Bozen | 2011 urban planning | architecture | residential | sustainability

03

Bicigrill Academic Work | Novara | 2011 urban planning | architecture | hotel | structural planning

04

Kinetics Workshop | Pune - INDIA | 2014 digital architecture | kinetic facade

05

Suspended and Complementary Competition | Turin | 2010 urban planning | architecture | museum

06

Piazza Competition | Acceglio | 2010 urban planning | urban furniture | lighting

07

Botero - Lampatta Furniture design | 2015 lamp | upcycling

08

Skyscrapers Furniture design | 2015 panel | upcycling


learning from tool-houses 01

Master Thesis | Turin - Mumbai - New Delhi | 2013 - 2014 urban planning | architecture | informal settlements | sociology

Within the asiatic context we can find urban, flexible formations, unusual housing typologies which connect different functions through new spatial arrangements. This phenomenon exists even in India with the Tool-House typology. It is the result of efficient, productive and lively places, a creative answer to housing and working needs for millions urban poor, the main connotative element of the informal neighborhoods’ identity. Tool-Houses are houses, tools of sustenance, production sites and a notable part of Mumbai city’s economy. These buildings optimize space and increase land value in a context of scarcity. They are architectures where multiple, overlaid and sometimes merging realities converge and they are spaces which guarantee cultural diversity, involvement and responsibility. Tool-houses are able to establish economic relationships both locally and globally, perfectly integrated with the global distribution network. They are easily convertible, highly adaptable, strongly sustainable and able to reuse resources. The deep enmeshing of the built environment and economic activity has generated a particular urban fabric that is at once resilient and flexible. The result is a self-sufficient, provocative incremental urban development model.


dharavi

MUMBAI


Even though Dharavi and many informal settlements are an efficient answer to housing and working needs for millions of urban poor, their models of development are not protected nor even examined by governments and public administrations. On the contrary, their attention is focused on the transformation of Indian megalopolis into “slum free” cities through the demolition of illegal settlements and making then the inhabitants move to new planned colonies. New Delhi proves the point: its urban boundaries are changing into shelter for the city’s rejects. In this process the access to the city is denied to the poorest population and the trend is to marginalize instead of supporting social mixitè, with the final result of increasing inequality, decreasing social mobility opportunities, and damaging transport system, increasing the demand.

savda ghevra

NEW DELHI


In order to reverse this trend it is important to look at and preserve the Informal Settlements spread all over the world. One layer at a time they reveal innumerable potential useful lessons for architects and planners to develop and protect alternative urban models. Understanding these places, for instance, could be the starting point to meet the new urban sustainability requirements of our future cities. They reduce land consumption through a low rise - high density urban development. They reject the alienation of industrial production through the adoption of an artisan, home based productive system. They opt for adhocratic organizational systems that pass bureaucracy in favor of non hierarchical processes. They reduce pollution levels through the spontaneous adoption of a virtuous mobility system that does not encourage the use of motorized vehicles. They reduce environmental impact of industrialized city's waste through an efficient recycling enterprise. They help not to compromise the environment through flexible buildings and reversible architectures based on an incremental growing. As a consequence, the urban habitat changes going hand in hand with the inhabitants' needs, absorbing the variables into the built environment through little upgrades. In conclusion, keeping the eyes open on those realities means also making them visible, stopping the exclusion process and spreading knowledge. It is then important to be able to subvert the traditional way of looking at informality and consider these places as solutions instead of problems, in order to contribute simultaneously to deghettoize them and build new urban alternatives.

collage

DETROIT - INFORMAL SETTLEMENTS


02

passive stone Academic work | Bozen | 2011 urban planning | architecture | residential | sustainability

The design concerns the construction of a zero emission and low environmental impact residential district in Bozen. In this context, I developed a detailed design of a residential building located in the central area of the neighborhood. As a co-housing typology, there will be not exclusive services, like: an educational gardening workshop; a cooking workshop with a small shop; some reading rooms and a bio-climatic glass house, working as energy saver. Strategic solutions were taken at different scales in order to decrease energy requirements and CO2 emissions. Soil permeability and rainwater collection had been solved at urban scale. On the contrary, strategic solutions at building scale, have been taken in order to reduce energy requirements and conusmption as: improve building envelope performance, arrange solar and photovoltaic panels, built a glass house and choose green systems like geothermal heat or mechanical extract ventilation with heat recovery.


LUXURY VILLA

HOUSING

GLASS HOUSE VERTICAL GARDEN CO-HOUSING SERVICES

RECUPERO DELLE ACQUE PIOVANE PER IRRIGAZIONE E SCIACQUONI DEI WC

STAIRCASE

COMMERCIAL

masterplan TIPOLOGY 1 38 m2

TIPOLOGY 2 70-80 m2

TIPOLOGY 5 100-150 m2

area building index building volume inhabitants type RIE electric power

TIPOLOGY 3 80-90 m2

with photovoltaic system

TIPOLOGY 4

hot water

duplex 130 m2

with solar panel

CO2emission VERTICAL GARDENING’S PRODUCTS SHOP

GLASS HOUSE, VERTICAL GARDEN AND CO-HOUSING SERVICES

with photovoltaic system

hot water

with solar panel COOKING WORKSHOP

HOUSING

2

3

2

3

29% 1,88 KgCO /ab 2

building area type n° of units inhabitants energetic class requirememts electric power

GARDENING WORKSHOP

51.800 m 3,5 m /m 181.300 m 1.671 residetial 94% commercial 6% 6,1 50%

building cost

2732 m co-housing 26 80 A 17 kWh/m /a 14% 2

2

50% 1317 euro/m

2


MASSIVO E ’

CO-HOUSING

()

PASSIVO

2732m2 slp 26 HOUSING UNITS

80 INHABITANTS

BUILDING COST

1317 €/m2

AN 1:1000

MASTERPL

A-A

B-B

GROUND FLOOR

FIRST FLOOR

EST FACADE


THIRD FLOOR

SECTION B-B

FOURTH FLOOR

SECTION A-A

FIFTH FLOOR

WEST FACADE

SOUTH FACADE


SIXTH FLOOR

NORTH FACADE

GLASS HOUSE - VERTICAL GARDEN

Reduction of energy consumption. Common space for recreational and educational activities. Facade with photovoltaic panels on windows.

SOLAR SAILS

Solar panels for hot water production. Placed on the roof, 30째 south oriented.


HORIZONTAL AND VERTICAL SECTION External cladding with local stone 1 External cladding Steel support structure 2 Double density insulation 3 Masonry 4 Plaster 5

VERTICAL SECTION roof section

Vertical Section

External cladding with local stone 1 Steel Support support structure for the ventilated roof 2 Double density insulation 3 Horizontal structure 4 Beam 5 Corten steel gutter eaves 6

Horizontal Section


ORGANIC WASTE RAINWATER COLLECTION

0 EMISSION CO 2 DISTRICT

COMPOST IRRIGATE

50%

OF HOT WATER REQUIREMENT FROM RENEWABLE ENERGY

SOLAR PANELS HOT WATER

RIE 6,1

URBAN GARDEN

29%

OF ENERGY REQUIREMENTS FROM RENEWABLE ENERGY

PHOTOVOLTAIC PANELS

INCENTIVIZE USE OF ALTERNATIVE TRANSPORT SYSTEMS

17kWh/m2 year S/V= 0,14

CASA CLIMA

A

ELECTRICITY

EE [MJ]

STEP I

Stone cladding Wood slats

Once completed the roof structure, the installation of the vapour barrier on the outside face of the horizontal structure starts.

GWP [kg/CO2]

Wood fiber insulation Waterproof wood fiber insulation Vapour barrier Horizontal structure (cement) Horizontal structure Raw earth plaster

ENERGY SOURCES [%] Renewable sources Not renewable sources

STEP 2 Laying of the first wood fiber insulation layer, proceeding from the gutter to the ridge of the roof. Panels should be connected each other by the tongue and groove joint. After the laying, panels shoud be fixed through zinc-coated, large head nails.


1. Stone plates | Name: Silberquarzit light. | Dimension: 60 x 40 cm. | Thickness: 30 mm. 2. Wood support structure | Thickness 30 mm. 3. Waterproof , wood fiber insulation | Name: ISOLAIR-L. | Dimension: 250 x 77 cm. | Thickness: 52 mm. 4. Wood fiber insulation| Name: PAVATHERM-PLUS. | Dimension: 160 x 80 cm. | Thickness: 120 mm. Vapour Barrier 5. Horizontal Structure | Thickness 30 6. cm. Raw Earth plaster | Thickness 150 7. mm

STEP 3 Laying of the second wood fiber, waterproof insulation layer. Proceed from the gutter to the ridge of the roof. Panels should be connected each other by the tongue and groove joint and fixed through zinc-coated, large head nails. Laying of the wood slats which protects insulation and support the gutter.

1:20

VERTICAL STRUCTURE

STEP 4 Laying of the external roof and wall cladding’s support structure. Wood slats shoud be nailed on the insulated panels of the roof. Later, gutter should be placed.

HORIZONTAL STRUCTURE 1:20 STEP 5 Laying of the external stone cladding on roof and walls. Roof’s stone cladding should be fixed to the wood sluts through metal hooks. Laying of the stones should proceed from the gutter to the ridge of the roof.

Stone plates | Name: Silberquarzit light. | Dimension: 60 x 40 cm. | Thickness: 30 mm. Steel support structure Waterproof, wood fiber insulation | Name: ISOLAIR-L. | Dimension: 250 x 77 cm. | Thickness: 52 mm. Wood fiber insulation | Name: PAVATHERM-PLUS. | Dimension: 160 x 80 cm. | Thickness: 120 mm. Vapour Barrier Masonry Termofon T 25,5 Raw Earth plaster

.1 .2 .3 .4 .5 .6 .7


03

bicigrill Academic work | Novara | 2011 urban planning | architecture | hotel | structural design

The design concerns a hotel along the Milan-Turin cycle path, next to the Cavour canal near Novara. Keeping the cycle path flowing and optimising the Bicigrill’s fruition according to the final user, were the main reasons in the distribution’s design of the building. The flow gently deviates from its path to lead directly into the building, becoming an infrastructure itself. The ramp enhances the continuity and highlights the hydraulic hub together. The spiral is closed and the aim of the curvy route is to explain the landscape and the cultural context through opening views, following on the way. The variation from the main path, was solved through a centripetal design, in which the building gathers and releases all the functions and the site’s problems. The “Bicigrill” shows only inside the complexity of its paths and functions, constantly talking and directly comparing with the complexity of the nearby hydraulic hub.


GROUND FLOOR

The building shows its framework made of brick bearing walls, spaced out at regular intervals. They are oriented from the centre of both the circumferences to the boundaries of the building, enhancing the Bicigrill’s geometry. The walls’ sequence highlights the fragmentary nature of the infrastructure, which turn out to be clearly divided into small sectors. Beacause of this, the users can clearly understand the building’s hierarchies.

area

2700 m2

type

hotel commercial

FIRST FLOOR

n° of rooms

double rooms 11

with private bike storage

dormitory 2

with private bike storage

services

reception info point internet point bike repair shop bike storage area relax reastaurant bar laundry


DISTRIBUTION

PUBLIC SPACES SEMI-PUBLIC SPACES PRIVATE ROOMS

CYCLING LANE ALONG THE CAVOUR CANAL SPACES ORGANIZED ALONG THE RAMP

RAMP, THE SERVANT SPACE OF THE BUILDING

SECTION A-A

SECTION B-B

NORTH-EST FACADE


TYPOLOGY

BEARING WALLS - PERFORATED BRICKS Factor of safety = 2,2 Mortar M10

fbk = 40 N/mm2 fk = 12 N/mm2 fvk0 = 0.3 N/mm2

wall thickness t > 200 mm t = 300mm

WINDBRACES AND OUTSIDE WALLS

PERIMETRAL WALL’S LAYERING External stone cladding 3cm Insulated panel 10cm Perforated bricks 30cm

BEARING WALLS

STRUCTURE

AXONOMETRY

SOUTH-WEST FACADE


BEARING WALL 6 TEST the most stressed ROOF STRUCTURE self-weight 300 KN permanent load 225 KN variable load 300 KN

FIRST FLOOR WALLS self-weight windbraces 1267 KN self-weight partition walls 446 KN permanent load windbraces 1267 KN permanent load partition walls 446 KN

HORIZONTAL STRUCTURE self-weight 544 KN permanent load 408 KN variable load 816 KN

GROUND FLOOR WALLS self-weight windbraces 563 KN self-weight partition walls 75 KN permanent load windbraces 19 KN permanent load partition walls 4 KN

BEARING WALLS

GDL = 54 GDV = 65 11 TIMES STATICALLY INDETERMINATE STRUCTURE FRAMEWORK

LONGITUDINAL SECTION

self-weight 2400 KN permanent load 80 KN

NORTH-WEST FACADE


04

kinetics

Workshop | Pune - INDIA | 2014 digital architecture | kinetic facade

The international workshop “Kinetics: responsive building skin”, led by Professor Pankaja G. Bagul (Sinhgad College of Architecture, M.Arch.) and Professor S.A. Kulkarni (Sinhgad College of Engineering), was focused on the design of a kinetic facade prototype, in collaboration with the students of the Sinhgad College of Engineering. The following project, and two more, were later selected to build an automated prototype for a kinetic facade. Due to this reason, the collaboration was extended to an indian company specialized in technological services and robotics components distribution, the “Campus Component”. The latter helped us to build the three prototypes through focused lessons and to choose the mechanical components for the physical model. The workshop ended with a presentation day. The jury, composed of Dr. M. V. Telang, the Sinhgad College’s Dean, the architect Jayant Dharap and the Professor S. A. Kulkarni, selected this project as the first prize winner.


“Villa della Regina� international architectural competition. Design in collaboration with: Giuseppe Marino, Alberto Samarotto, Alessandro Tonon, Sandro Volpi e David Sotomaior.

suspended and complementary 05

Competition | Torino | 2010 urban planning | architecture | museum

The big half-round garden, the small parterre in the honor courtyard, the remaining wood and vineyard area, were the main touchstone for the design, which is constantly in communication with the vegetable elements. This led to a determined continuity between the inside and the outside: the pure and conceptual upper volumes are part of both inside and out. Even from the ground floor, during stops or throughout different paths, the vegetable element is always there, as a favourite view. Those paths allow an integrated, however indipendent use of each space, depending on needs. The curving shape of the staircase, together with permeability and lightness of the hosting space, are huge references to the Baroque soul of the whole complex of the Villa, reflected in the new building.


first floor

ground floor


LONGITUDINAL FACADE

SUSPENDED AND COMPLEMENTARY

SECTION A-A

HIDDEN WALLS technical curtains

Beams - Rooftop Level

framework

Beams - Restaurant Level

In order to realize hidden partitions, we’ll use technical roll-up curtains, with mechanical components hidden in the ceiling. This system allows different room arrangements without wasting space for the storage of the hidding walls. This kind of partitions could be also uded as screen for projection.


06

piazza Competition | Acceglio | 2010 urban planning | urban furniture | lighting

The architectural competition “the arrangement of Piazza Nais in Acceglio� demands the design of a new central public space which reply to the cultural and recreational needs of Acceglio’s inhabitants and tourists; the lighting and urban furniture design; and the replacement of the Matteo Olivero statue. The design was made in collaboration with Albiarch architectural firm. It concern the partition of the Piazza in three thematic areas. The first one reply to the social aggregation need between different generations through the equipped green area; the second one is characterized by the presence of a permanent stage for traditional activities (cultural, commercial and sporting events); the third one, close to the turistic centre, is focused on tourism. Matteo Olivero statue have been relocated centrally in this area. The bike sharing point and the info board, are located here, as well. Building materials for pavement and urban furniture are local: Luserna stone, white Beola stone and wood.


MASTERPLAN 1:200


Pavement

Luserna stone plates Mixed colour - light

Luserna stone cubes Selected colour

Luserna stone plates Mixed colour - dark

Luserna stone cubes Mixed colour

Urban Furniture

BUILDING MATERIALS

Wood - fir (heat treated 190°C ) For bus shelter, info board and garbage bin’s protection

White Beola medium smooth stone plates Luserna stone plates Dark colour

ACCEGLIO

Round selected gravel Size 5/8mm.

Cross Section

Longitudinal Section USER 1 Adult Inhabitant Chair seats outline space and help to live the plaza and increase social interactions. They can be completed with horizontal wood panels or seatbacks.

USER 2 Aged Inhabitant

THEME 1 SOCIAL AGGREGATION

Chair seats and tables facilitate and increase social interactions.

USER 3 Young Inhabitant

USER 4 Children

Green spaces between the chair seats, outline relaxing and playing places. However they can become occasion to learn. Thanks to their flexibility, they can be used as urban vegetable gardens.


Borgo O Villa

Cross Section

on f visi RDEN line o ZA - GA PIAZ

N

CTIO

NE CON

tion nec TAIN n o al c N entr - MOU c n rde N - ga VISIO a z piaz OF E LIN

tue S sta - BU n N isio RDE v f A o G line ZA Z PIA


MASTERPLAN night view

LEGEND Built-in ground lights Built-in chair seat lights Bottom up lights Street light poles

Street light poles with banner support.

ATTRACTION 1 Bike Sharing

Sharing bikes it’s a turistic attraction and a sustainable mobility tool.

ATTRACTION 3 Info Board

The info board is located near the touristic centre.

Built-in chair seat lights.

Bottom up lights built-in the base.

Street lights

THEME 3 TOURIST ATTRACTIONS

ATTRACTION 2 Matteo Olivero statue

The Matteo Olivero statue is positioned in a dedicated central crossing point.

ATTRACTION 4 Turistic Centre


IDENTITY 1 Commercial Events

The wide open space facilitates the event organization like Christmas markets.

THEME 2 CULTURAL IDENTITIES

IDENTITY 2 Cultural Events

The permanent stage enhances cultural and sporting events as the alpine choral festival and the “miniaccegliadi”.

IDENTITY 3 Sporting Events


Botero it’s a table or floor eco-lamp, handmade with solid fir wood coming from industrial disused pallets, recovered from our cities’ supermarkets. Its upcycled percentage (the amount of recovered materials) is 95% for the biggest size and 93% for the smallest one. The grey energy is nearby zero. DESIGN AND PRODUCTION: studioGET.

07

botero Furniture design | 2015 lamp | upcycling BOTERO LAMP - M SIZE: 95% upcycled 18 cm x 18 cm x 47 cm LED light bulb fabric coloured electric cable BOTERO LAMP - S SIZE: 93% upcycled 18 cm x 18 cm x 23 cm LED light bulb fabric coloured electric cable


Lampatta it’s a table eco-lamp, handmade with solid fir wood coming from industrial disused pallets and tomato cans, recovered from our cities’ supermarkets and restaurants. Its upcycled percentage (the amount of recovered materials) is 91%. The grey energy is nearby zero. DESIGN AND PRODUCTION: studioGET.

07

lampatta Forniture design | 2015 lamp | upcycling

LAMPATTA LAMP: 91% upcycled 19cm x 19cm x 41cm LED light bulb fabric coloured electric cable


Skyscrapers it’s a decorative headboard for beds or couches. It represents a selected collection of the most meaningful skyscrapers of the world: from the Chrysler Building in New York to the Petronas Twin Towers in Kuala Lumpur. Each tower is manually engraved with its own name. It’s handmade with wood and nails coming from industrial disused pallets recovered from our cities’ supermarkets. Its upcycled percentage (the amount of recovered materials) is 99%. The grey energy is nearby zero. DESIGN AND PRODUCTION: studioGET

08

skyscrapers Forniture design | 2015 panel | upcycled

SKYSCRAPERS PANEL: 99% upcycled h 90 cm - l da 45 a 210 cm


Greta Erba | Architecture Portfolio  
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