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Material Lede GREG GETTMAN

ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO


experience

education

Steven Ginn Architects - Architectural Associate

U ni ve r s i t y of Nebras ka, LI ncol n M a s t e r s of Ar c hi tectur e g ra d ua t e d May, 2013 wi th a 3. 8 GPA

2013As a key member of a small, design-focused firm, I was fully engaged with all aspects of the design process. I often worked independently managing my own projects from the creation of a proposal to the crafting of initial design schemes, development through construction documents, observation of construction, and documentation/ promotion of the finished project. I also worked collaboratively with others, indexing into the design and detailing of larger projects, managing interns, coordinating with consultants, communicating with product reps, and meeting with clients. When not developing designs, I oversaw other aspects of practice management, including responses to client inquiries, updates to the firm website, and preparation of award submittals.

FOUND Architects - Design Intern 2013 Assisted in working through schematic design concepts, as well developing presentation material for clients and promotion. Both required ideas to be efficiently manifested in a way that not only captured the spirit of design intent, but also communicated the ideas in the most effective way possible. As a result, I spent time developing sketches, digital models, diagrams, renderings, and physical models. I was often required to independently organize my time to ensure that deadlines were met. University of Nebraska, Lincoln - Graduate Teaching Assistant 2012-2013 Worked closely with a professor to coordinate and present lectures, organize assignments, and provide feedback to students in a first-year design studio. Daily in-class responsibilities included explaining projects to entry level students from an array of design-related colleges, then engaging them individually to assist them in generating a process and refining their ideas. At the end of each project, I evaluated work and provided feedback during group critiques. Outside of class I was expected to prepare lectures, manage attendance, grade assignments, and meet with students who had questions. University of Nebraska, Lincoln - Design Research Assistant 2012 Collaborated with another student as a research/design assistant to develop a new way of engaging partitions in health care rooms and explored emerging methods of computational control and digital fabrication in realizing the project. Most of my time was spent working independently on research or design, though I was also expected to prepare a brief presentation of my progress for daily team meetings. At these meetings all project members collaborated on resolving the issues facing each participant and projecting where the process should go. The compressed time frame of the project necessitated a rapid acclimation to the extensive requirements of the healthcare environment as well as the learning of new software without losing productivity.

U ni ve r s i t y of Nebras ka, LI ncol n B a c he l o r of Sci ence i n Des i gn g ra d ua t e d May, 2011 wi th a 3. 7 GPA

skills A ut o C a d R hi no G ra s s ho pper S ke t c hup Re vi t A d o b e C r eati ve Sui te M a x we l l Render M i c ro s o f t Of f i ce

Phys i cal Model i ng Las er Cutti ng 3D pr i nti ng

c o nt a c t : gr eggettman@gmai l . com


projects alate: a backyard pavilion celebrating both sunny and rainy days

modern farmhouse: the traditional Nebraska farm compound, re-envisioned for a modern lifestyle

approach climbing gym: it’s a climbing gym

hill house: a hilltop campsite transformed into a playful home for a young family

fairacres bedroom: the clutter of a homeowner’s retreat, streamlined into a sleek form

embankment: poised on a tall mound at the edge of a river, a home both stitches itself into the landscape and soars above it


alate <c o m p l e te d a t Ste ve n Gi n n Ar ch i te cts> 2016 w i n n e r o f th e AIA C e n tr a l Sta te s A r c h i t e c tu r a l M e r i t Aw a r d fo r D e ta i l

project role: I managed the project through all phases of design, while independently producing all design schemes and construction documents. I organized client, consultant, and contractor meetings, conducted construction observation, and worked through issues that arose during the production process. Once completed, I supervised project documentation and oversaw the development of the submission for the AIA Central States Awards, in which it received an Architectural Merit Award. project description: Alate is designed to revive life for a tired and unused patio shared by a brother and sister living in adjacent duplex units. The translucent Polygal roof drifts over the space, held aloft by an array of steel trusses delicately balanced atop four airy columns. On sunny days, the pavilion softly filters the harshest midday sun rather than blocking it altogether, creating a cool, sheltered space without compromising the transmission of light into the home. When it rains, the roof comes alive as the movement of water creates living, dancing figures as it streaks down the surface into the cantilevered drain channel.


1’

2’

5’


steel joist beyond 3/4” diam. brace 1”x11/2” steel tab polygal up16 edge profile w drainage holes drilled @ 12” o.c. antidust tape @ polygal edge 16mm titan polygal sheet 1.9” o.d. steel tube 12 8 12

3/4” diam. steel rod 1” diam. steel rod 11/2” diam. steel column

12

21/2”

3/4” 21/4”

polygal up16 edge profile w drainage holes drilled @ 12” o.c. antidust tape @ polygal edge polygal 413 sheet anchoring screw @ 20” o.c. polygal 517 fixing button polygal hcp16 cap connector polygal hcp base connector 1.9” o.d. steel tube

1’-1”

1”

1”x11/2” steel tab steel joist

1.5

12

3”

12

3.75

3”

opposite top roof plan of the pavilion floating above the duplex patio opposite bottom transverse section through the pavilion

left cantilevered drainage channel top right section at roof fold bottom right section through drainage channel

6”

12”


approach climbing gym

<c o m p l e te d a t Ste ve n Gi n n Ar ch i te cts> 2016

project role: I was responsible for coordinating the project through each phase. This involved the development of construction documents, creating a schematic layout for the climbing walls, and coordination with the climbing wall fabricator, structural engineer, mechanical engineer, and contractor to ensure that each system worked together. I also worked to integrate the bold colors and forms of the climbing walls into a coherent language that would carry through the space, influencing material choices (like the battleship camouflage paint scheme), as well as the design of functional elements (as in the angular form of the reception desk). project description: With no public climbing gyms in the city, Approach sought to create a bright, welcoming environment that would capitalize on the growing popularity of climbing and allow Omahaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more adventurous residents a place to hone a new skill. To engage with that public, vibrantly colored walls were arrayed along the length of the space, each facing the broad glass façade and turning each climb into a spontaneous performance that draws in onlookers from the street.


procession through space


Serving as the first point of engagement with guests as they arrive, as a safe and comfortable place for climbers to take a break from the busy climbing area, and as the gear-drop for guests as they leave, the reception desk has to be both versatile and exciting. Carefully modulating these requirements under its undulating countertop, the sharp folds of the desk cling tightly to the point of sale space, the concealed equipment return, and the snack bar, twisting and oscillating in size to fit each function. The collective angular form seems to lunge outward at arriving guests in complimentary anticipation of the climbing walls beyond.

2 reception point the counter is set at 36â&#x20AC;? to allow for accessible use, as well as provide a low barrier to welcome guests

1 cross-section mimicking the jagged feel of the climbing walls, the desk rises and falls, adapting to the needs of each programmatic need

3 drop slot as guests pass by the desk on their way out, a drop slot for their rented gear conveniently projects out along their path. underneath, a pull-out cart allows for easy retrieval of the items by staff

4 bar area the counter is set at 48â&#x20AC;? to allow guests to sit at high stools and have a snack. below, a concealed shelf space and under-counter refrigerator allow for storage and preparation of food items


this page 1 cross section 2 reception point 3 drop slot 4 bar area 5 front elevation

opposite bottom perspective diagram of the relationship between the functional section conditions that inform the undulation of the desk

equipment slot

mineral fiber board fastened top and bottom to backing w 1” screws @ 6” o.c. 5

21/4” recycled bowling alley lane bartop 21/4” recycled bowling alley lane worktop

21/4” recycled bowling alley lane countertop 1/2” mineral fiber board

equipment slot

3/4” mineral fiber board

pull-out drop basket on 1” casters 2x4 framing (cut to allow for drop basket)

2x4 bracing @ 16” o.c.

2

3

21/4” recycled bowling alley lane bartop true mfg -tbb-24gal-72g refrigerator

1

2x4 horizonal bracing around refrigerator electrical outlet mounted to vert. 2x4 framing true mfg -tbb-24gal-72g refrigerator

4

equipment slot

21/4” recycled bowling alley lane worktop

scale: 1/2” = 1’-0”


fairacres bedroom <c o m p l e te d a t Ste ve n Gi n n Ar ch i te cts> 2016

project role: I worked collaboratively on the bedroom, but independently on the bed itself. I developed a series of design schemes for the bed, including digital model of the most promising schemes for presentation to the client. After getting approval for a design, I crafted drawings necessary for the fabrication of the bed. project description: One part of a larger remodel, the Master Bedroom is a retreat for the owners, where they can relax and watch a movie to close out a day. The focal point of room is the bed itself. Projecting out from the wall, the bamboo wrap of the frame folds over the tv lift at the foot of the bed, concealing the mass of the retractable screen, while simultaneously conversing with the bamboo casework that lines the wall along the head. Hidden underneath, large pull-out drawers are mounted on casters, allowing them to be completely removed for convenient access.


nightstand cubby a shallow niche at each side of the bed provides a way to conceal common bedroom clutter like clocks or phone chargers

tv lift concealed when not in use, the television rises at the push of a button and swivels 360 degrees

wood wrap both marrying the bed with the design of the bedroom casework and minimizing the visual mass of the tv lift, the folded bamboo wrap creates a striking framework for all of the elements concealed within slide-out shelf the top of the fabric side panel is coped for graspability so that a hidden pair of shelves glides outward with a soft pull

pull-out drawer blending smoothly into the rhythm of fabric side panels when closed, the drawers roll freely along casters, allowing for easy access to large items


1 section through bed 2 section through nightstand/cabinetry

3 detail at pull-out drawer 4 detail at tv lift raisable bamboo veneer cabinet top Nexus L-27S tv lift

bamboo veneer fixed panel

1/2” plwd. 3/4” bamboo veneer

1/8” reveal

31/2 x 3/4” wood slats 3/4” plwd. center support 3/4” plwd. center support (beyond) 1/2” plwd. 1x4 mounted under tv stand

fixed shelf

Hafele 651.13.906 base leveler 4

metal wiring channel leveler w/ rubber base 31/2” x 3/4” wood slats countersunk screw @ southernmost and northernmost slats 1/2” plwd. 3/4” bamboo veneer 3/4” plwd. drawer front wrapped w/ fabric Hafele 662.03.861 caster

magnetic latch bamboo veneer cabinet door outlet with usb ports 3cm stone counter top 3/8” x 1/2” reveal night stand extension Hafele 124.02.920 pull

3

slide-out shelf pull-out drawer

1

2

scale: 3/4” = 1’-0”


modern farmhouse <c o m p l e te d a t Ste ve n Gi n n Ar ch i te cts> 2015

project role: This project was a collaborative effort between myself, a Project Architect, and another peer to resolve a modern farmhouse through the Design Development phase. As part of that process, I assisted in the design of the exterior facades, configured interior spaces, and created details necessary for contractor pricing (including critical sections and details at unique conditions like the cantilevered catwalk and corn-crib cladding). I was also responsible for generating the renderings and graphics for the project. project description: Overlooking 300 acres outside Gretna, NE, the project is a modern interpretation of a traditional Nebraska farmhouse. Clustered with a rustic corn-crib inspired bedroom wing and a rugged metal garage linked by an airy glass breezeway, the long, narrow house forms the broadside of a notional workyard. Paired with simple gabled profiles, the raw nature of the materials lend an air of timelessness and allude to an agrarian heritage.


1 five car garage 2 laundry room 3 link 4 stair silo 5 dining room 6 sunroom 7 kitchen 8 powder room 9 office/pantry 10 great room 11 bedroom 12 bedroom 13 bathroom 14 courtyard 15 veranda

second floor plan


hill house <c o m p l e te d a t Ste ve n Gi n n Ar ch i te cts> 2017

project role: Though I largely played a support role during the development of the initial schematic schemes, I became far more involved as the project moved into the DD and CD phases, taking on a leading role in the origination of the key details of the design. All of the elements illustrated in the following pages (as well as many others) were fully conceived and detailed by me. project description: A saddle ridge projects out from the peak of the hill, tapering rapidly away at each side, and at its terminus punches a gap into the thick canopy of trees, lending a framed view of the river valley below. The owners, immediately captivated by the incredible sense of direction to the space, looked for a way to occupy it permanently. Rather than build directly on the ridge, which would forever alter the way that the space is experienced and ultimately generate an adulterated facsimile of the place that first beguiled the owners, the house is designed to straddle the ridge and enhance the frame instead of plodding over it.


this page section through main living space

opposite rendering by Sarah Schlegelmilch

Inspired by the same sense of whimsy that led them to purchase an old campsite for their kids to explore, the owners embraced a daring playfulness that extends into the design of many of the key elements of the home. Each, while drawing unique character from its function, is bound together by a sort of precarious adventure in its lexicon. The following pages flesh out a select few ideas in detail.

Belltower: Greeting guests as they approach the front door of the home, a weathered bronze bell is slung from a pair of cantilevered channels that project steadfastly outward from their perch at the top of a slender stone wall. A hearty pull of the rope that dangles through a hole in the entry roof sounds the bell and serves to announce their arrival. Above, the tower fills another purpose: accessed via ships ladder and operable skylight, a small observation area is the perfect place for an after-dinner cocktail, for watching the sunset, or for pelting unsuspecting victims with water balloons.


Pot Rack: Balanced delicately over the kitchen island, the pot rack is both sculptural and functional. Capitalizing on the cantilevered motif of the home, a grid of steel tubes is suspended asymmetrically from a regimented series of cables. The cables themselves, picking up on the slope of the ceiling extend past the steel tubes and terminate in a cascade of light bulbs that illuminate the counter top below.

Fireplace: Resting on top of a floating stone slab, the open-cornered fireplace engages the entire living room by virtue of being elevated and by allowing unhindered views to the flame from almost every angle. More than that, the fireplace is a linchpin that ties the interior and exterior together by bringing stone, steel, and zinc into the warmth of the wood-clad living space.


1/2” steel plate (p. to match zinc finish) chimney cap zinc cap

flashing + counter flashing standing seam metal roof ice and water shield 5/8” sheathing 4” spray-foam insul. blown-in cellulose insul. 1/2” t+g ceiling

1/2” steel plate (p. to match zinc finish) chimney cap zinc cap ice + water shield flashing and counter flashing zinc siding 1/2” sheathing batt insul. 2x6 frm’g chimney flue

zinc siding

1’-0”

1/2” sheathing steel studs c12x20.7

3’-0”

protective mesh gwb

1’-4”

8”

steel studs 1/2” conc. bd. 3cm stone hearth 2x2x1/4” steel angle w/ 2x2x1/4” welded back-to-back 2” stone veneer 3/4” hdwd. floor 3/4” subfloor duct (beyond) 1/2” gwb

81/2”1’-01/4”

1’-8”

3’-0”

1’-101/2”

1’-101/2”

truss (see struct.) wide flange (see struct.) glu-lam (see struct.)

1’-0”

3’-113/4”

2’-43/4”

1’-113/4”

5’-03/4”

1’-2” 53/4”

4”

through-wall flashing brake mtl. cap at t.o. drain bd. 23/8” insul. + drain bd. 4” cmu (step w/ grade) drain tile to sump 3/4” hdwd. floor on 3/4” sleepers 4” conc. slab 2” rigid insul.

fire brick precast fire box maintain 2” air space at firebox batt venting tray at firebox stone water course 4” pip conc. underlayment 3/4” ext. grade plwd.

4” stone veneer 1/4” drainage mat conc. foundation (see struct.) 31/2” spray-foam insul. treated 2x4 frm’g 1/2” mold resistant gwb


this page rendering by Sarah Schlegelmilch

opposite 1 west fireplace elevation 2 plan at fireplace 3 section through fireplace


1 north-south section through roof deck/hatch 2 east-west section through roof deck/hatch

3 detail at roof deck 4 detail at roof hatch

2’-21/2”

1’-11”

5’-11/2”

2’-21/2”

2’-93/4”

1’-111/4”

bell tower stone veneer steel channel

1’-0”1’-0”

steel channel

1

treated wood deck on treated wood sleepers (do not attach to roof)

3’-0”

3’-0”

2

3’-111/2”

bell w/ pull at entry door

1’-01/2”

1’-01/2”

roof deck t.o. slats el. 109’-11/4”

8’-03/4”

entry 101

powder 102

8’-03/4”

stone veneer entry 101

main level t.o. subfloor el. 100’-0”

media room 002

media room 002

lower level t.o. subfloor el. 89’-0”

1

scale: 3/16” = 1’-0”

2

scale: 3/16” = 1’-0”


stone cap w/ drips and sloped top (mechanically anchor to framing) backer rod + sealant (typ. both sides) mdo ext. plywood (p) 1/2” sheathing 1/4” drainage mat

flashing + counter flashing 4” spray foam insul.

batt insul.

roof hatch rain + ice shield (extend up and across roof access curbs) treated wood deck on treated wood sleepers (do not attach to roof) heat cable

stone cap w/ drips and sloped top (mechanically anchor to framing) backer rod + sealant (typ. both sides) stone veneer 1/4” drainage mat rain + ice shield (extend up both sides to stone cap) 1/2” sheathing batt insul. 1/2” mdo ext. plywood (p)

blown-in cellulose insul. 1/2” gwb

3/4” roof sheathing spray foam insul. 1/2” gwb

3

scale: 1/2” = 1’-0”

stone cap w/ drips and sloped top (mechanically anchor to framing) backer rod + sealant (typ. both sides) stone veneer flashing and counter flashing

rain + ice shield tapered insul. cont. butyl tape standing seam metal roof 3/4” roof sheathing 2x12 wood framing

4” spray-foam insul. blown-in cellulose insul. 1/2” t+g clng.

glu-lam beam (see struct.) 1/2” gwb

4

scale: 1/2” = 1’-0”

roof hatch stone cap w/ drips and sloped top (mechanically anchor to framing) backer rod + sealant (typ. both sides) 1/2” mdo ext. plywood (p) stone veneer 1/4” drainage mat rain + ice shield (extend up both sides over hatch curb and stone cap) 1/2” sheathing batt insul. bell tower ladder scupper


removable panel

4

3/8” steel cable friction fitting 1” steel tube

led edison bulb

2

scale: 1/2” = 1’-0”

scale: 1/2” = 1’-0”

wood blk’g (as req’d) roof joist

1/2” plwd.

1/2” plwd.

wood slat ceiling

wood slat ceiling

2x2x1/4 steel angle (fasten to roof joist (typ.)) roof joist

1x1x1/16 steel angle

1x1x1/16 steel angle threaded hole for fastener blackened metal wrap around vertical projection 41/4”

blackened metal wrap around vertical projection

2”

scale: 11/2” = 1’-0”

1/2” plwd.

friction fitting (typ.)

wood slat ceiling

2x2x1/4 steel angle to run continuously along wood panel (fasten intermittently to vertical angles)

wood panel to match ceiling

blackened metal wrap around vertical projection

3/4” plwd. wood panel to match ceiling

2”

3

wood blk’g (as req’d)

3/8” steel cable

z-clip

41/4”

1

2”

4

scale: 11/2” = 1’-0”


ceiling shroud

removable service panels

powered support cables

pot rack

led fixtures

kitchen island

this page pot rack elevated above kitchen island

opposite 1 pot rack transverse section 2 pot rack longitudinal section 3 detail at removable panel (top and bottom) 4 detail at fixed panel


embankment <c o m p l e te d a t Ste ve n Gi n n Ar ch i te cts> 2017

project role: I worked collaboratively through all phases of the design, including the creation of design schemes and refinement of those schemes at each stage. Since almost every detail is unique, extensive effort had to be invested into crafting and coordinating details to ensure that the end result was visually arresting, structurally efficient, and took maximum advantage of the natural beauty of its site. During the SD and DD phases, I worked broadly on a wide array of tasks, including drawing and presenting design schemes, developing a site plan that worked in tandem with the house design, organizing spaces to compliment the core design ideas, and meeting with consultants to determine the most practical and buildable strategies for the project. During the CD phase, I developed a variety of details, including among them, a complicated stair tower that anchors the front of the home. project description: Uniting the turbulent river oxbow to the west and the excavated lake to the east, Embankment strikes an axis between the natural and man-made worlds. This link acts as an according force, around which program, circulation, and views are bound.


visual barrier as the house opens to the south, it simultaneously directs views away from neighbors to the north diverging paths as it approaches the house, the driveway splits. to the left, guest parking is splayed out before the entry procession, while the right path appears to descend toward the river, then curves to enter the private parking court

solar angle deep overhangs at the heavily-glazed south side protect the home in summer while allowing warm winter light to penetrate

towertop views rising above everything in the area, the tower observation platform provides views in every direction

organizing axis the east-west axis of the home connects the pond and the river and serves as the governing element around which the entire house is formed

motocross track an undulating track weaves around the pond, leveraging a series of ramped hills to punctuate an otherwise flat terrain


11/2” o.d. pipe rail 6’-01/2” el. 1113.5

t.o.w. 1113.5

set handrail in high-grade epoxy #4’s @ 3” oc @ t.o. wall #5’s @ 12” oc ea. way pip wall - steel pan forms w/ s.s. ties, cut + lacquered

6 steps @ 6” rise ea. = 3’-0” total t.o.w. 1107.5

el. 1110.5

11/2” o.d. pipe rail 3’-0”

t.o.w. 1107.5

3’-6”

4” drain tile w/ filter sock 1/2” exp. joint

el. 1110.42

3’-0”

7 steps @ 6” rise ea. = 3’-6” total 2% slope

bent #5 @ 12” oc 3’-6” x 3’-6” #5 @ 12” oc ea. way

5 treads @ 12” = 5’-0”

#4’s @ 12” oc in center of wall 10”

6’-11/2”

4” drain tile w/ filter sock #5’s @ 12” oc ea. way

el. 1103.5

bent #4 @ 12” oc 3’-0” x 2’-0”

4’-0”

5’-0”

1

2

scale: 1/8” = 1’-0”

11/2”

1’-0” top soil

3

3

5/16” scale: 11/2” = 1’-0”

#5’s sloping w/ top ea. side

conc. slag block

#4 @ 12” oc x 6’-0” long on north face #4 @ 12” oc horizontal

1 section at top of front stair 3 detail at formed handrail

scale: 1/8” = 1’-0”

21/2” 3/4” 3/4” 1/4”

#5’s @ 12” oc ea. way bent #4’s @ 12” oc 3’-0”x2’-0”

1/4”

2% slope

11/2” o.d. pipe rail

6 treads 11” @ 1’-0” = 6’-0” 1’-0” 2’-0”

2 section at bottom of front stair 4 section through rear stair

bent #5 @ 12” oc 3’-6”x1’-6”

pea gravel 4” drain tile w/ filter sock

z

4 x

y

scale: 1/8” = 1’-0”


folded roof carried downward onto the sloped wall, the standing-seam roof helps to create a visual distinction between the openness of the social spaces and the privacy of the ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s personal space

glu-lam structure a series of glu-lam trusses span the living room, both opening up the space and allowing the walls to be composed almost entirely of glass

private space (upper level) accessed via a cantilevered catwalk, the master suite and study are provided a degree of separation while still overlooking the rest of the home social space (main level) designed for entertaining, the heart of the home is as open as possible. this concept extends seamlessly into the surrounding yard, as large doors give way to an outdoor room when opened

garage/utility (basement) buried into the hill, the utilitarian elements of the home are recessed from view, allowing the more dynamic elements of the home to occupy the most prominent locations

observation platform towering above the surrounding landscape, the observation platform atop the stairs commands views of the entire area. the operable skylight simultaneously allows light to filter down through the stair shaft, mimicking the aura of the grain silos that punctuate the landscape

detached garage peeking above the edge of the hill, the detached garage both provides storage for the ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s car collection and reinforces a private courtyard


The weathered steel wall that slices through the center of the home serves as more than a bold backdrop to the living space – it’s a delineating force that organizes not just the spaces within the house, but also extends into the surrounding site, co-opting the landscape into an overarching scheme. Guests experience a choreographed procession along the axis of the wall as they ascend Embankment’s mounded perch, rising above the adjoining fields as they’re teased with vignetted views of the surrounding landscape. As they advance through the heavy steel entry door, they are rewarded with a carefully framed view of the rugged landscape

to the west: extending through the glass wall at the opposite end of the living room, the axis recedes into the landscape as it descends the mound through cleft rows of prairie grasses, the surface itself transitioning from hard, manufactured materials to soft wood, then tapering off into only a narrow suggestion of a path through matted grass as it finally reaches the bank of the river. The materials of the house itself reflect this same connection, marrying natural and man-made wherever possible. Weathered steel, raw concrete, and earthly wood proliferate throughout the project, serving as a constant reminder of the reciprocity between the two worlds.


a

The north side of the home, on the other hand, is all about the owners. Recessed into the mound, the owners’ entry court is hidden from visitors’ view. The court grants access to the basement through cedar slat-clad doors (which blend into the side of the home when closed). From here, the residents can bypass the main living space and ascend a hidden staircase directly to the kitchen pantry or the master bedroom on the upper level. These private spaces, though they jut provocatively outward over the court, are designed to be inwardly focused, providing limited views to or from the neighbors to the north. In a house so intently open to its landscape, the owners’ wing provides a necessary retreat. 1 west elevation 3 east elevation

2 north elevation 4 south elevation

c

d

corrugated weathered steel

While the focus of attention is drawn to the procession along the main axis, each façade is stitched into the landscape so that it is both beautiful and functional. Along the south side of the home, tall sliding doors seamlessly extend the living room into a large patio that splays outward from around the double-sided fireplace. Beyond, an expansive yard is perched upon the top of the oblong mound, providing enough space to play a game of backyard football or simply lounge in the cool grass on a warm spring day. The entire south wall of the home is designed to entice its occupants outward, maximizing views through long stretches of glass, while a deep overhang minimizes direct sunlight, ensuring that the space remains comfortable year-round.

b

tower balcony f.f. el. 129’-0” metal chimney flue cantilevered gutter brake metal fascia glu-lam timber truss butt-glazed corner glass aluminum clad window rain chain

aluminum clad windows ipe wood top cap metal railing steel channel (p) @ edge of deck (see struct.) upper level f.f. el. 110’-0”

conc. slag block retaining wall

main level f.f. el. 100’-0”

pip wall - steel pan forms w/ steel ties cut + lacquered

1 d

c

tower balcony f.f. el. 129’-0” metal chimney flue brake metal fascia glu-lam timber truss snow guard butt-glazed corner glass aluminum clad window 2” stone veneer upper level f.f. el. 110’-0”

b

a

corrugated weathered steel (sloped face) corrugated weathered steel (plumb face) gutter d.s.

cedar siding

main level f.f. el. 100’-0”

lower level f.f. el. 88’-0”

3


7

6

5

4

3

2

15 .

1

corrugated weathered steel brake metal clad wd. fascia ab marine grade plwd. glu-lam timber truss corrugated weathered steel standing seam metal roof snow guard gutter d.s.

tower balcony f.f. el. 129’-0”

ipe wood top cap metal railing

upper level f.f. el. 110’-0”

steel wf (p) @ edge of deck (see struct.) pip wall - steel pan forms w/ steel ties cut + lacquered

pip conc. wall main level f.f. el. 100’-0”

lower level f.f. el. 88’-0”

hollow metal door + frame cedar siding flush garage door 1

15 .

2

3

4

5

6

2

7

corrugated weathered steel scupper tower balcony f.f. el. 129’-0” synth. stucco @ exterior underside of bedroom wing roof and wall cantilevered gutter

metal chimney flue

snow guard standing seam metal roof integral gutter snow guard

ss rain chain ipe wood top cap metal railing upper level f.f. el. 110’-0” steel wf (p) @ edge of deck (see struct.)

d.s.

ipe wood top cap metal railing metal catwalk butt-glazed corner glass aluminum clad window

main level f.f. el. 100’-0” corrugated weathered steel glu-lam timber truss butt-glazed corner glass aluminum clad window 2” stone veneer lower level f.f. el. 88’-0”

4


roof hatch

5

roof hatch 4

epdm membrane (extend over top of roof harch curb) tower balcony f.f. el. 129’-0” 12”x12” pavers on

5 treads @ 10” = 4’-2 ”

2.7

1/2” gwb

4’-41/8”

6’-107/8” 2.5

1/2” reveal

adjustable pedestals tapered insulation (slope to scupper 1/4” per ft.

1’-111/4”

30 risers @ 79/16” = 18’-111/4”

11 treads @ 10” = 9’-21/2”

epdm membrane (extend over top of roof harch curb) tapered cricket 3/4” roof sheathing 51/2”

2

1/2” gwb

2.6

2” rigid insul. on 3/4” sheathing

9 treads @ 10” = 7’-6”

4

5

scale: 3/4” = 1’-0”

scale: 3/4” = 1’-0”

c

3’-4”

11/2”

4” 4”

41/2”

center line scupper 3’-0”

6’-41/8”

7’-2”

corrugated weathered steel epdm membrane (extend over top of parapet) 1/2” sheathing 1/4” drainage mat

ing eil f c nd o o e lin bey

oof of r line yond be

metal flashing and counter flashing steel channel (see struct.)

4” 4” 13/4”

b.5

5’-85/8”

41/2”

4-5

10 treads @ 10” = 7’-6”

mdo panels (p) steel column (beyond)

lower level f.f. el. 88’-0”

b

13/4” 41/4” 8 treads @ 10” = 6’-8”

11/2”

9’-6”

3

main level f.f. el. 100’-0”

1

19 risers @ 75/8” = 12’-03/4”

41/2”

b

9’-9”

3’-0”

5 treads @ 10” = 4’-2”

metal pan stair steel stringer (4) pendant light fixtures 8’-71/4”

6’-3” 1.5

upper level f.f. el. 110’-0”

2

3’-9”

16 risers @ 71/2” = 10’-0”

9 treads @ 10” = 7’-6”

5”

5”

41/4”

4”

4’-2”

1

4”

6’-33/4”

6’-61/4”

steel handrail

scale: 1/8” = 1’-0”

2

scale: 1/4” = 1’-0”

3

scale: 3/4” = 1’-0”

41/2”


1 east-west section through tower 2 north-south section through tower top 3 parapet wall detail 4 detail at roof hatch bottom 5 detail at roof hatch top above post-processing by Sarah Schlegelmilch

The weathered steel-clad stair tower is the focal point that anchors the front of the house. While essentially a rectangular box, the east wall, canted along a diagonal fold, stretches subtly outward to turn a utilitarian shaft into a dynamic gesture. Executing the design in a way that looked graceful, yet was framed simply enough for a residential contractor to build required

extensive coordination with the structural engineer. Given its prominent placement, the tower also had to maintain slender proportions in order to feel â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;towerlikeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;. On the inside, this meant that the staircase had to be carefully threaded upward with careful attention to structure and clearances as it reaches upward toward the roof. The overall effect is evocative of scaling the inside of an old grain silo, as shafts of daylight filter down from the skylight above. At the roof level, the operable skylight opens to a private deck. Thirty feet above an already substantial mound, the deck towers above the surrounding landscape, providing sweeping views in all directions.


Professional Architecture Portfolio  

Professional Work 2013-2018

Professional Architecture Portfolio  

Professional Work 2013-2018

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