Page 1

   

        Annual Report 2010   


CONTENTS   

OUR MISSION  Message from the Principal ......................................................................................................................... 3  Message from the Chairman of the Board of Directors ............................................................................... 4  Message from the President of the Parents and Friends Association ......................................................... 5 

ANNUAL REPORT  About this annual report .............................................................................................................................. 6  Policy for educational and financial reporting ............................................................................................. 6 

OUR RESULTS  NAPLAN report ............................................................................................................................................. 7  School Certificate results Year 10................................................................................................................. 9  Higher School Certificate results Year 12 ................................................................................................... 10 

STAFF, STUDENTS AND COMMUNITY  Professional learning  ................................................................................................................................. 13  Staff qualifications ...................................................................................................................................... 14  Workforce composition ............................................................................................................................. 15  Staff attendance and retention rates ......................................................................................................... 15  Community satisfaction ............................................................................................................................. 16  Characteristics of the student body ........................................................................................................... 18  Student attendance .................................................................................................................................... 18  Management of student attendance ......................................................................................................... 18  Student retention to Year 12 ..................................................................................................................... 18  Post school destinations ............................................................................................................................ 19  Promoting respect and responsibility ........................................................................................................ 19 

POLICIES  Enrolment ................................................................................................................................................... 21  Welfare and discipline ................................................................................................................................ 21  Student conduct ......................................................................................................................................... 23  Bullying and harassment ............................................................................................................................ 23  Homework .................................................................................................................................................. 24  Complaints and grievances ........................................................................................................................ 24  Policy location and access .......................................................................................................................... 26 

OUR GOALS  Achievements in 2010 ................................................................................................................................ 26  Targets for 2011 ......................................................................................................................................... 27 

FINANCES  Income........................................................................................................................................................ 28  Expenditure ................................................................................................................................................ 28   

2


OUR MISSION  MESSAGE FROM THE PRINCIPAL  St Mary Star of the Sea College is an independent Catholic college for girls, owned by the Sisters of the Good  Samaritan and conducted by a Board of Directors. It was founded as a parish school in 1873 by the Sisters under  the guidance and direction of Archbishop Bede Polding, Australia’s first bishop. The college has a long history of  educating girls and we are very proud of their achievements throughout the college’s many years of service. The  college continues its commitment to offering a holistic education aimed at enabling all girls to achieve and develop  to their full potential. Through a range of programs and opportunities for involvement, girls enjoy experiences that  enhance their academic, social, emotional and physical wellbeing.  The college has a student population of 1080 girls and a staff of approximately 130. While the college is staffed by  lay teachers and administration staff, the Good Samaritan ethos is strong and the college works hard to maintain  its links with the congregation and its identity as a Good Samaritan school. The college has built on the wonderful  work of the Sisters in the transmission of faith, in providing an excellent education and in creating learning spaces  that are contemporary and able to adapt to the demands of the technology age. This has resulted in a modern  campus offering a 1:1 laptop program and enhanced learning and teaching opportunities for all members of the  school community.   The 2010 school year proved highly successful for the St Mary’s community. The girls achieved outstanding  academic results, they reached great heights in their sporting endeavours and they excelled in the areas of music,  dance and drama, culminating in the college production Sound and Fury, a rock version of Shakespeare’s Macbeth.  The 2010 school year has been a very busy year, with the college Board authorising and significantly contributing  to the development of a new strategic plan for the college. The college staff have focused on Quality Learning as a  means of further enhancing our Middle School Program and further development is taking place in the area of  technology.   The college has also maintained its commitment to maximising opportunities for girls in the areas of social justice  and in the extracurricular offerings available. Our pastoral care programs are strong and we attempt to provide a  holistic program of study for all girls that meets their needs. By doing so, the college actively lives out its values of:  love of God, love of learning, peace, hospitality and stewardship.  The college will continue to explore the possibilities that technology has to offer in the provision of enhanced  learning opportunities for our girls. We are also providing online learning resources, project‐based learning  opportunities and enrichment programs that allow students to work using a variety of mediums and in a variety of  learning environments. St Mary’s college is committed to a process of continuous improvement in all areas of  education and this is evident in the quality of teaching and learning in the college, the resources available to  students and staff, the facilities, and the opportunities offered as we strive to build and maintain a vibrant and  active education community.   St Mary Star of the Sea College continues to thrive as an excellent school. With  a dedicated staff and an excellent Board of Directors, the college continues to  grow and develop as an inclusive community that is focused on an education  which allows all students to realise their full potential and aspire to our college  motto of “I am born for higher things.”  

 

Frank Pitt, Principal   


MESSAGE FROM CHAIR OF BOARD  I make this report on behalf of the Board, conscious that I am acting in the role of Board Chair in the absence of  our Chair, Sr Margaret Keane. Margaret has been an outstanding leader of the Board and has provided great  wisdom, compassion and intelligence in her role. She modelled the values of Benedict in an authentic and heartfelt  manner and each of us has benefited from her leadership. On behalf of the St Mary’s Board I extend my thanks  and my great admiration for Margaret and the manner in which she led our college Board.   I also extend my thanks to the college Executive led by our Principal Frank Pitt and to Joan Lodding, PA to Principal,  who organised the hospitality and prepared excellent agendas and minutes for our meetings. Finally I would like to  thank my fellow Directors who have given so generously of their time and expertise in supporting the college. Their  contribution is greatly appreciated and highly valued and I offer them my grateful thanks.  During the 2010 school year the Board has been dedicated to serving the college in ways that ensure that all “have  a  treasury of knowledge from which (each) can bring out what is new and what is old” RB 64:9. In this endeavour  we have been strongly supported by a dedicated team of educators who have worked to provide our students with  opportunities to grow and flourish and to continue to remain faithful to our college motto “I am born for higher  things”.   There are numerous examples of the activities of the Board around its purpose. Among these are commitments  made to provide study support to staff, to enable families to enrol with significant fee discounts, to continue to  support the Good Samaritan ministries in East Timor and elsewhere, to enhance the environs with regular  maintenance and a commitment to providing an attractive work and social environment, and a commitment to  steward the property with action for sustainability and ecological justice.   A popular and innovative educational initiative that has continued at the college has been the community garden  project. Involving students, staff and parents, this project provides students with the opportunity to work and  learn in the garden while producing fresh produce for CHAIN (Community Health for Adolescents in Need) to be  used by the chefs at the centre to teach residents how to prepare healthy meals in preparation for independent  living in the community.  The college has also installed water tanks and solar panels to continue to create awareness of the need to take  care of our earth’s resources and to model principles of good stewardship for the students.    Attention continues to be paid to students who require educational adjustments and support to fulfil their  potential. In this area, the Diverse Learning Needs Coordinator has been supported with an increase in staff to  support students with special needs and there has been significant resources directed to the education of our  gifted and talented (GAT) students. It is anticipated that the college will continue to provide appropriate  educational opportunities for all students and there has been provision made in the 2011 budget to continue to  support such programs.   I conclude my report with thanks to each Director, to Frank, Joan and the college Executive and with great  gratitude for the work and fine leadership of Sr Margaret throughout the course of 2010 school year. To the Order,  I offer my thanks for the opportunity and privilege of being associated with such a fine school. I also extend my  thanks, on behalf of the Board, to the staff for the wonderful work that they do in educating future generations of  fine women leaders. The college motto “I am born for higher things” is a wonderful reminder, to us all, to aspire to  be the best people we can be and to fulfil our own inner potential. It is my belief that each member of the college  Community works toward the achievement of this ideal and that together we strive to make this inspiring motto a  reality in the life of our college. 

      Stuart Barnes, Chair of Board   

4


MESSAGE FROM PRESIDENT OF PARENTS AND FRIENDS ASSOCIATION  The 2010 school year was another great year for the P&F. We had a new committee and it was also the first year  for our new principal – Mr Frank Pitt. The year was one of getting to know each other and learning how to work  together.   Term 1 saw the Welcome BBQ and as always it was well run, well attended and the weather was fantastic. At this  time the P&F Committee started contributing to the school newsletter to inform parents of P&F related matters.   In a further initiative to promote a sense community, a Parent Business Register was introduced.   I imagine with a community the size of ours, every year we will have families suffering a crisis of some sort. I  personally know a number of families that experienced serious illness last year and I am proud to say that our  Pastoral Care program provided assistance and caring to many families last year. I would like to thank all families  who donated a meal so that another family could receive just a little pastoral support from our community.   Term 2 saw the first Formal Fashion Parade and Expo, a shared initiative between St Marys and Holy Spirit colleges.  The night was very successful and I know a lot of girls are waiting for their turn on the cat walk in 2011.   During 2009, the P&F did not spend the majority of funds due to the college not having a permanent principal. This  left us with two years of funds to spend in 2010 and we bought many things for the college to assist our girls. The  major items were more outdoor seating, resources for KLA areas and a budget for a new COLA.   We farewelled our 2010 Year 12 students at the end of term 3 and again our girls were prepared very well and  were sent off beautifully. As a cohort they performed exceptionally and we should be very proud of the girls and  grateful to the college staff for preparing them so well.   The 2010 school year also saw the development of St Mary’s new strategic plan. Mary Boyle and I represented the  parent body on this very important planning committee. The goal is to complete the plan in early 2011.   The year saw many other events such as the Mother’s Day Dinner, the St Mary’s production, Sound and Fury, our  annual Fathers Day Breakfast, Discos and Good Sam’s Day. The school year is always very busy and these events  help to develop our girls into community minded, well rounded and resilient young women.   I have really enjoyed my first year as P&F President and thank the P&F Committee, the school executive, our  wonderful staff and the girls and parents for their support and effort.  I know that 2011 is going to be another  great year at St Mary’s.      Helen Bow  President P&F Association 


ANNUAL REPORT  ABOUT THE COLLEGE ANNUAL REPORT  We are pleased to provide for our community an annual account of the college in a range of areas including  educational results, teacher training and financial responsibility. School reporting is mandated by the NSW  Education Act, and detailed in the Registered and Accredited Individual Non‐government Schools (NSW) Manual  (Section 3.10).  This report forms an important part of the college’s relationship with our community. 

EDUCATIONAL AND FINANCIAL REPORTING POLICY  St Mary Star of the Sea College will maintain the relevant data and comply with reporting requirements of the  NSW Minister for Education and Training and the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations.  This reporting will include public disclosure of the education and financial performance measures and policies of  the school as required from time to time. 

Procedures  Procedures for implementing the policy include:   Identification of the person responsible for coordinating the final presentation and distribution of the annual  report to the Board of Directors, Board of Studies and other stakeholders as required.   For each reporting area, identification of the staff member responsible for the collection, analysis and storage  of relevant data and for the provision of the relevant information to the coordinator for inclusion in the report.   Determination of the specific content to be included in each section of the report and its review each year to  ensure ongoing compliance, relevance and usefulness.   Preparation of the report in an appropriate form so it can be sent to the Board of Studies and be published for  the college community.   Setting the annual schedule for:    

delivery of the information for each reporting area to the coordinator  preparation of publication of the report  distribution of the report to the Board of Directors, Board of Studies, and the college community. 

Requests for additional data from the NSW Minister for Education and Training  To ensure that any requests from the Minister for additional data are dealt with appropriately, the college will  identify the staff member responsible for coordinating the college’s response. The person is responsible for the  collection of the relevant data and for ensuring it is provided to the Board of Studies in an appropriate electronic  form. 

DEEWR annual financial return  The college will identify the staff member responsible for completing the questionnaire. This person is responsible  for the collection of the relevant data and for ensuring it is provided to DEST in an appropriate form. Nominally,  this person is the enrolment and registrations officer.       

6


OUR RESULTS  NAPLAN REPORT 2010  LITERACY: Reading, writing, spelling, grammar and punctuation  NUMERACY: Number patterns and algebra, measurement and data, space and geometry  The NAPLAN results are reported on a common 10 Band scale from Year 3 to Year 9. Each year cohort has an upper  and lower limit to the bands in which students are placed. The Year 7 range is from Band 4 to Band 9 and the Year  9 range is from Band 5 to Band 10. Students in or below the minimum band for each year group are at risk of  adverse learning outcomes without urgent intervention. Students sitting at the top band are in need of enrichment  or extension. 

YEAR 7 2010  Our Year 7 data points to a relatively poor performance from students at the lower end of our Year 7 cohort, and  less than state averages at the upper levels of performance.  The table below indicates the percentage of students within the various domains of the NAPLAN tests and a  comparison to State average. 

Bands 

9  8  7  6  5  4 

Reading 

Writing 

Spelling 

Grammar,  punctuation 

15  above  30  above  34  above  15  below  4  below  3  below 

6  below  23  above  35  above  30  below  3  below  1  below 

12  equal  28  above  39  above  16  below  3  below  1  below 

15  above  25  above  30  above  20  below  6  below  4  below 

Data,  Number,  Measurement  Numeracy  patterns,  space,  algebra  geometry  8  below  23  above  37  above  26  above   4  below  1  below 

10  below  25  above  32  above  26  below  6  below  0  below 

13  below  18  above  34  above  24  equal  10  below  1  below 

Following is a comparison of means achieved in the different domains of the NAPLAN tests compared to all schools  in the State as well as a comparison against all girl schools in the State.  Comparing mean to schools in the State  Reading ‐ above  Writing ‐ above  Spelling ‐ above  Grammar and Punctuation ‐ above  Numeracy – above                                                                                                                                                                      Data, Measurement, Space and Geometry ‐ above  Number, Patterns and Algebra ‐ above        7 


Comparing mean to all girls in the State  Reading ‐ above  Writing ‐ above  Spelling ‐ above  Grammar and Punctuation ‐ above  Numeracy – above                                                                                                                                                                      Data, Measurement, Space and Geometry ‐ above  Number, Patterns and Algebra – above  Although one could assume this is a primary school legacy, it is certainly a source of quality data for us to be able  to tailor literacy and numeracy interventions for at‐risk students. The results at the top of the scale indicate a need  for us to challenge students and consolidate literacy and numeracy in the early months of Year 7, so that they can  launch into high school learning from a strong base. 

YEAR 9 2010  Students performed very well across all domains. Following is a table indicating the percentages of students within  the various domains of the NAPLAN tests and a comparison to state average 

Bands 

10  9  8  7  6  5 

Reading 

Writing 

Spelling 

Grammar,  punctuation 

7  above  27  above  31  above  23  below  9  below  2  below 

11  above  24  above  27  above  30  above  7  below  1  below 

8  below  26  above  36  above  20  below  9  below  2  below 

14  above  26  above  30  above  22  below  9  below  1  below 

Data,  Number,  Measurement  Numeracy  patterns,  space,  algebra  geometry  7  below  22  above  36  above  24  below  11  below  1  below 

7  below  20  above  32  above  28  below  11  below  2  below 

8  below  33  above  25  above  22  below  11  below  1  below 

Following is a comparison of means achieved in the different domains of the NAPLAN tests compared to all schools  in the state as well as a comparison against all girl schools in the State.  Comparing mean to schools in the State  Reading ‐ above  Writing ‐ above  Spelling ‐ above  Grammar and Punctuation ‐ above  Numeracy – above                                                                                                                                                                      Data, Measurement, Space and Geometry ‐ above  Number, Patterns and Algebra – above 

 

8


Comparing mean to all girls in the State  Reading ‐ above  Writing ‐ above  Spelling ‐ above  Grammar and Punctuation ‐ above  Numeracy – above                                                                                                                                                                      Data, Measurement, Space and Geometry ‐ above  Number, Patterns and Algebra – above  Conclusions  The college is well placed to support the literacy and numeracy needs of our students. Our placement tests,  regular assessment, academic care structures and, now, NAPLAN, provide us with rich data and periodic feedback  about student growth and development in these domains.  This current set of data provides granular evidence about the strengths and weaknesses demonstrated by our  students. This highly individualised information can feed successfully into tailored learning experiences for our  students. The students with the poorest results already are being supported through literacy and numeracy  workshops. This new data will feed into the identification process, as well as being a source of data for teachers  when planning differentiated and adjusted learning activities.  All teachers are teachers of literacy and numeracy. The profile given to these skills by this test is an important  reminder for us when that literacy and numeracy must be explicitly taught in the context of our course content. 

SCHOOL CERTIFICATE RESULTS ‐ YEAR 10 2010  The college obtained excellent results in the external School Certificate examinations.   Students performed above State level in the five School Certificate tests. In Australian Geography, the number of  students that received a Band 6 was approximately twice the State number and the number of students who  received a Band 6 in English is approximately twice the State number.  The percentage of students who received Band 5 and 6 in English was 58%, compared with 36% of the State.   The percentage of students who received Band 5 and 6 in Mathematics was 36%, compared with 27% of the State.   The percentage of students who received Band 5 and 6 in Science was 63%, compared with 41% of the State.   The percentage of students who received Band 5 and 6 in Australian History was 35%, compared with 18% of the  State.   The percentage of students who received Band 5 and 6 in Australian Geography was 48%, compared with 26% of  the State.   The percentage of students who received a Highly Competent in the Computing Skills Test was 80%, compared  with 55% of the State.    


School Certificate Results 2010  Number of  students 

Band 3‐6 

Band 1‐2 

English Literacy 

185 

100% 

0% 

Mathematics 

191 

98.43% 

1.57% 

Science 

185 

100% 

0% 

Australian History 

185 

96.22% 

3.78% 

Australian Geography 

185 

97.84% 

2.16% 

 

 

HIGHER SCHOOL CERTIFICATE RESULTS ‐ YEAR 12 2010  St Mary’s students enjoyed outstanding results in the 2010 Higher School Certificate. We are very proud of our  students and their achievements and congratulate them on the many academic goals they have achieved for  themselves at the end of last year. Average subject marks in the HSC were above the State mean for 29 of our  courses. 

HSC ALL‐ROUNDERS – RACHAEL ZUZEC, JESSICA TODD & AMY BOYLE  A HSC All‐Round Achiever is a student who achieves a mark of 90 or above in at least 10 units of her subjects. It is a  remarkable achievement for a student to be named on the HSC All Rounder’s list. 

TOP ATAR 99.60 – RACHAEL ZUZEC  The ATAR is a ranked score calculated by the University Admission Centre for the purposes of qualifying students  for admission to university courses.  

TOP ACHIEVERS LIST – HANNAH EDENSOR & JESSICA TODD  The Top Achievers in Course list shows the students in the top places in each course. Hannah was ranked second in  the State in Dance and Jessica was ranked second in the state in Studies of Religion I. 

DISTINGUISHED ACHIEVERS LIST  The Distinguished Achievers list contains the names of any students who achieved Band 6 for a course, or in the  case of extension courses, Band E4. In 2010, the college had 126 mentions on this list.   

 

10


HIGHLIGHTS OF HSC RESULTS IN SUBJECTS  Marks in Band 6 indicate a mark of 90 or above.   Subject 

Percentage of students in Band 6 

Ancient History 

18.18 

Business Studies  

20.00 

Chemistry 

11.00 

Dance 

33.33 

Drama 

14.28 

Economics 

21.42 

English Advanced 

20.89 

English Extension One 

37.50 

Food Technology 

14.28 

General Mathematics 

10.84 

Mathematics 

11.62 

Mathematics Extension 1 

16.66 

Mathematics Extension 2 

100.00 

Modern History 

14.28 

History Extension 

50.00 

Music 1 

29.41 

Music 2 

25.00 

Music Extension 

100.00 

Physics 

16.66 

Studies of Religion I 

19.28 

Studies of Religion II  

24.00 

Business Services 

10.00 

11 


The following course scored greater than 10% above State average: Food Technology   The following courses scored greater than 5% above State average: Ancient History, Business Studies,  Dance, Economics, English Standard, General Mathematics, Mathematics Extension 2, History Extension,  PDHPE and Textiles and Design.   Higher School Certificate results 2010      Studies of Religion I  Studies of Religion II  English Standard  English Advanced  Ancient History  Biology  Business Studies  Chemistry  Community and Family Studies  Design & Technology  Dance  Drama  Economics  Food Technology  Geography  Industrial Technology  Information Processes and Technology  Italian Continuers  Legal Studies  Mathematics General  Mathematics  Modern History  Music 1  Music 2  PDHPE  Physics  Society & Culture  Textiles and Design  Visual Arts  Business Services Administration  Hospitality   

Number of students  140  25  99  67  22  52  50  18  20  11  9  14  14  14  16  20  15  15  33  83  43  21  17  4  19  6  40  4  16  10  27 

Band 3‐6 Percentage  100  96  94.95  100  95.46  100  100  88.89  91.72  100  100  100  100  100  100  90  80  100  90.91  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  97.5  100  100  100  100 

Band 1‐2  Percentage  0  4  5.05  0  4.54  0  0  11.11  8.28  0  0  0  0  0  0  10  20  0  9.09  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  2.5  0  0  0  0 

 

12 


English Extension 1  English Extension 2  Mathematics Extension 1  Mathematics Extension 2  History Extension  Music Extension     

Number of students  16  3  12  2  4  2 

Band E3‐E4 Percentage  100  66.67  75  100  100  100 

Band E1‐E2  Percentage  0  33.33  25  0  0  0 

STAFF, STUDENTS AND COMMUNITY  PROFESSIONAL LEARNING  In 2010 the college provided a broad range of professional learning opportunities to enrich staff and build  the college’s capacity to provide quality teaching and learning to our students.  For a number of years, St Mary’s has provided a substantial amount of “in‐house” professional  development programs that enhance the capabilities and performance of individuals and teams. 2010 saw  the continuance of this approach as a way of providing highly relevant professional learning opportunities  to our staff.  In preparation for the introduction of Quality Learning in Year 7 2011, all staff participated in Quality  Learning Seminars. The seminars addressed the five standards within Element 5 of the Professional  Teaching Standards i.e. Teachers create and maintain safe and challenging learning environments through  the use of classroom management skills. Teachers developed knowledge and know‐how to apply tools  and strategies that embrace classroom management through increased student responsibility.  The college continued to run the Big Byte Breakfast seminars. These morning seminars provided staff with  an opportunity for on‐site ITC training, enabling staff to explore the wide variety of web‐based resources  the college possesses. Two excellent features of this type of approach to professional development is the  speed at which staff are able to implement the knowledge and skills they acquire into their regular  teaching practice and the ongoing support and encouragement staff receive from their colleagues who  run the seminars.   Also in the area of in‐house training, professional learning opportunities have been provided to staff  through the running of Master Classes. Master Classes involve teachers observing the lessons of other  teachers. After the Master Class lesson has been given, the teachers involved are given time to discuss the  lesson’s effectiveness in maintaining student engagement and achieving the desired student outcomes.  The college also supported a number of staff members who conducted school‐based Learning Projects.  These projects follow an action research approach and are supported by academic partners from the  University of Wollongong and University of Newcastle. In 2010 seven projects were run, namely:      13


      

Engaging young people in Studies of Religion  Empowering students with Special Needs  Bullying: Rational Dysfunction & Strategies to Minimise  Refreshing Year 9 Religious Education  Changing Attitudes and Practices to Better Embrace the Benedictine Value of Stewardship  Gifted and Talented Students: A Study  Designing for e‐Learning: A Visual Dialogue 

In addition, throughout 2010 staff members were able to access a vast array of external professional  development programs that promoted quality teaching and learning practice, built leadership capability,  supported professional networks and embraced new technologies.     

STAFF QUALIFICATIONS  In 2010 five staff engaged in postgraduate study with sponsorship from the college. One staff member  was completing a PHD and four were engaged in Masters programs. One staff member was engaged in  further studies at the undergraduate level, and one staff member was completing a Certificate 3 course.  During 2010 six members of St Mary’s teaching staff (4 temporary teachers and 2 permanent teachers)  embarked on the process towards obtaining their accreditation at the level of Professional Competence  with the NSW Institute of Teachers.    

 

  14


WORKFORCE COMPOSITION  Teaching staff  Full‐time equivalent teaching staff  Non‐teaching staff  Full‐time equivalent non‐teaching staff 

89.0  79.8  37.0  30.1 

     

STAFF ATTENDANCE AND RETENTION RATES  In 2010, the 78.5 teaching staff attended an average of 97.1% of the teaching year. This represents an  average of non attendance by a teacher of 5.58 days. In 2010 the college employed 78.5 FTE teachers with  an annual attention rate of 92.89%. This compares to 2009 77.9 FTE and a retention rate of 94.09%.    

  15


COMMUNITY SATISFACTION  During 2010 the college commissioned community satisfaction research, which was mailed to existing St  Mary’s families; with 160 replies incorporated into the findings. The sample accounts for approximately  one fifth of all families enrolled at the college during 2010, and as such, provides an adequate basis for  inferring results to the entire school population.  In response to the question, “How satisfied are you with the overall educational experience provided to  your daughter(s) this year?” the survey found that more than 9 out of 10 parents were satisfied (scores of  3 or higher out of 5). This shows a continued upward trend of increasing levels of satisfaction over the last  four years across all year groups. Parents of Years 7, 9 and 11 students were most satisfied, with 100%  indicating that they were satisfied with the educational experience provided to their daughters. A notable  improvement in satisfaction levels is apparent in Year 10, where satisfaction has increased by 20% since  2009. The majority of parents would recommend St Mary’s.  The most important features, as ranked equally by parents were: that discipline problems are well  handled, the college provides a caring environment, school reports give clear feedback, parents’ concerns  are taken seriously, the college is a happy place, subjects offered meet the needs of students and that  parents are able to contact teachers.  The mean (average) satisfaction scores for all areas of school life was high. Satisfaction scores were higher  for all of the 27 service areas measured when compared to the baseline measure in 2007.   

 

  16


EXPECTATION GAPS  The research indicated that gap scores have reduced across all service areas since the baseline measure in  2007. A reduction in the expectation gap is desirable as it indicates that the gap between the importance  of a service area and parent satisfaction has been reduced and thus the college is continuing to meet  parent expectations.   

       

  17


CHARACTERISTICS OF STUDENT BODY    ICSEA value (average ICSEA value 1000)  Total enrolment  Indigenous students  Language background other than English 

1077  1054  1%  31% 

 

STUDENT ATTENDANCE   Student attendance is recorded according to the requirements of the NSW Education Act.   Average attendance has been calculated as follows:    Year group  Year 7  Year 8  Year 9  Year 10  Year 11  Year 12 

Attendance  96%  95%  94%  95%  94%  95% 

 

MANAGEMENT OF STUDENT ATTENDANCE  1.

If a student is away from the college, parents/carers are required to ring student office to inform  them of the reason for the absence. This is then recorded on the school’s database.  

2.

Teachers electronically record the student absent from tutor group each morning. 

3.

Electronic rolls are also taken during each lesson. 

4.

The office generates a list of SMS messages which is sent to the parents/carers of the students who  have been marked absent with no explanation. 

5.

A note explaining absence is always required when a student returns to the college.   The system is updated and the notes are filed. 

 

STUDENT RETENTION  Year group  Year 10 2008  Year 12 2010  % Retention 

Total  192  172  89.5% 

    18


POST‐SCHOOL DESTINATIONS ‐ YEAR 12 2010 

    In 2010 74.3% of Year 12 students were accepted and are attending a University in 2011.  14.3% of  students are attending TAFE.  5.8% of students are employed in a full time position.  This includes participation in a Traineeship or  Apprenticeship.  14.3% of students are participating in a GAP Year and have deferred from University in 2011 and will  commence University in 2012.   

RESPECT AND RESPONSIBILITY  The college has undertaken a series of activities and initiatives to enhance and promote respect and  responsibility:   As a Catholic college, we explicitly teach the values of compassion and justice contained in the  Scriptures and through our Benedictine values.   Regular Reflection Days are conducted and each Reflection Day promotes and addresses Christian  values and social justice.   Each year level participated in wellbeing programs, such as Brainstorm, Sticks and Stones and RYDA  Youth Driver Awareness.    19


 Values Education is embedded in our Pastoral Care programs. SMC also displays posters and Pastoral  Care Coordinators attended professional development programs.   SMC became an Asthma Friendly School.   Alcohol and drug awareness education is incorporated across the curriculum.   A bullying survey of Year 7‐10 students was conducted to identify both areas of concern and areas of  strength as a community.   Moral decision making is a unit in the Year 10 Religious Education program.   A Year 7 Community Service program was launched in 2008.       

POLICIES  The table below is a summary of the revision status of the major college policies:  Policy 

Status 

Revision date 

Enrolment Policy 

Current (2005) 

2011 

Occupational Health and Safety Policy 

Current (2003) 

2011 

Pastoral Care Policy 

Current (ratified 2009) 

2012 

Teaching and Learning Policy 

Current (ratified 2009) 

2012 

Child Protection Policy 

Current (2002, 2004) 

2011 

Privacy Policy 

Current (2008) 

2011 

Grievances and Complaints Policy 

Current (ratified 2005) 

2011 

Homework Policy 

Current (2007) 

2011 

Notes: In 2009 the Student Welfare Policy was replaced with The Pastoral Care Policy, and the Teaching  and Learning Policy was introduced and ratified.   

  20


ENROLMENT  Preamble  St Mary Star of the Sea College is a Catholic secondary college for girls in the Good Samaritan tradition. As  a Catholic college we are committed to establishing a community, which is energised by the life and  teachings of Christ. St Mary’s aims to be a place where Gospel values are lived and where the Benedictine  ideals of: love of God, love of learning, hospitality, stewardship and peace are visible. The college  enrolment policy is based on the Good Samaritan philosophy of education and responds to the needs of  the children and parents in the Diocese of Wollongong. 

Principles  St Mary Star of the Sea College welcomes enrolments of young women from families seeking a Catholic  secondary education in Years 7‐12. Priority is given to Catholic students but depending upon the resource  capacity of the college, we welcome other students who are seeking to be educated according to the  ethos and the tradition of the college. Enrolment implies that parents/caregivers give a firm undertaking  that they will accept and support the Catholic foundations, values and practices of the college and the  importance of regular opportunities to affirm these values and practices in religious education classes,  liturgies and college masses. Retreats and reflection days are compulsory as they play a vital part in the  spiritual development of the students. 

Conditions of enrolment  Enrolment at St Mary Star of the Sea College is based on the following priorities:   Enrolment of siblings of children already attending the college is automatic, upon attendance at an  interview and completion of the enrolment application form.   Priority is given to students who are Catholic.   Children of other Christian faiths may be enrolled after the other priorities for access have been  considered.   Children of non‐Christian faiths may also be enrolled in keeping with the above principles.   Consideration will be made for students who transfer from interstate or from overseas.   Students with disabilities will be enrolled along with all other eligible students.   Catholic parents should understand that acceptance of their children at the Catholic primary school  level does not confer automatic enrolment at St Mary’s.  The Board delegates to the Principal the right to exercise discernment in the acceptance of individual  students in the enrolment process. 

WELFARE AND DISCIPLINE  Preamble  The Welfare Policy is concerned with the effects of college practices on students.  The policy encompasses all that the college does to meet the personal, social, spiritual and learning needs  of the students. It creates a safe and caring environment in which students are nurtured as they learn. It  also provides opportunities for students to enjoy success and recognition, to encourage self‐discipline    21


among its members, and to derive enjoyment from learning and curricular experiences. The policy also  acknowledges that the wellbeing of students, staff, parents and other community members is  interrelated. Everyone in the college community has a role in student welfare. The policy clarifies the  responsibilities of the college Executive, Year Coordinators, Subject Coordinators, Tutor Teachers and  those with a specific student support role. 

Rationale  St Mary Star of the Sea College is founded on the philosophy of the Good Samaritan Sisters under the Rule  of St Benedict. The college Welfare Policy draws on the qualities of charity, compassion, acceptance and  justice, which are integral to college life.  We believe that the subjects taught, the teacher, the teacher’s faith and the rules and practices of the  school day all combine to produce the result which we Catholics consider to be education and that this  desirable result “cannot be looked for without some combined action” (JB Polding, pastoral letter).  To adopt this vision as a way of approaching life requires an acknowledgement of the Gospel truth that  we are called to “have life and have it to the full” (John 10:10). As a result St Mary’s college has a  responsibility to develop the whole person. Therefore the framework for the college Welfare Policy  considers the context of relationships: relationship with God, relationship with others and relationship  with self. Community is at the heart of Christian education. The community at St Mary’s integrates faith  and culture through prayer, communication, knowledge and service.   The college through its Welfare Policy creates an environment where growth is nurtured through Jesus’  command to “love one another”. This is not just a concept to be taught but a reality to be lived. 

Aims  The Welfare Policy will develop within the college an empowering atmosphere that facilitates the dignity  and personal growth of all members of the community by focusing on three main areas:   Students: To provide support structures for student needs that contribute to the long‐term development  of the full potential of each student.  Parents: To recognise parents as the primary educators of their children and develop the partnership of  education between parents and teachers.   Staff: To encourage staff to demonstrate a positive attitude and caring approach when interacting with  students at all times. 

Outcomes  Community members will:        

have the opportunity to experience a sense of belonging  have the opportunity to express their faith in the spirit of the Good Samaritan Sisters  develop a sense of self, wholeness and self‐esteem  promote a safe and healthy environment  celebrate cultural diversity  be able to make decisions which balance individual rights with community rights 

  22


     

be perceptive of the needs of others and be active in service  be aware of and able to communicate needs  become active and self‐directed participants in the learning process  develop a self‐reliant, self‐disciplined character  see service to others as a positive means of promoting individual and community well‐being  promote equity and social justice throughout community life. 

STUDENT CONDUCT  Underlying assumptions  The Student Conduct Policy for St Mary’s college is but one aspect of the overall pastoral care of our  students. As such it is informed at all times by the charism of the Good Samaritan Sisters, the Benedictine  tradition and the Mission Statement of the college, which has at its heart that the college exists for the  good of all its students.  This policy is reconciliatory by nature. It recognises individual needs and places any dealings with students  in the context of developing the whole person to take her place in the community to which she belongs.  

Policy  The conduct of students at St Mary’s college is based on mutual respect for all in the school community,  and the recognition that all have an equal right to a stable and supportive environment in which to learn.  All students are accountable for their own actions and are responsible for their behaviour at all times. The  Conduct Policy steps are graded but not necessarily sequential. Within the steps there are possible  responses for teachers. The choice of the response by the teacher will depend on the severity of the  misdemeanour.  The college is committed to a pastoral approach to discipline and, as such, corporal  punishment in any form is expressly prohibited.   The full text of the policy and procedures, including the scheme of incremental punishments, can be  found on the college website and in the student diary. 

BULLYING AND HARASSMENT  Policy statement  St Mary’s college does not tolerate bullying or harassment in any form. All members of the college  community are committed to ensuring a safe and caring environment which promotes personal growth  and positive self‐esteem for all.   Bullying/harassment, in any form is unacceptable behaviour and will not be tolerated because it infringes  the personal rights of others.   If any member of the community experiences harm due to bullying/harassment, they are encouraged to  speak to an appropriate person for support. Under no circumstances is it advised to tolerate bullying or  harassment, especially out of fear of the matter getting worse. It is unlikely that bullying/harassment will  simply “go away”. There is little chance that bullying/harassment can be dealt with if names are not given  to the appropriate persons.    23


HOMEWORK  Introduction  The college mission statement states that the college community provides young women with a holistic  education characterised by the Benedictine values of: love of God, love of learning, hospitality,  stewardship and peace. It is in the spirit of these values that we acknowledge that all members of the  community are engaged in lifelong learning.  

Rationale  The Homework Policy endeavours to support the needs of all students and is a direct link to the learning  program at the college. Time given to homework is to be balanced so as to allow students to participate in  other activities.   Effective homework encourages in students a growing confidence in their capacity to learn and therefore  is not set for its own sake. It allows students to practise and consolidate work done in class and to develop  the key competencies of collecting, analysing and organising information. Homework provides an avenue  for students to reinforce research skills and to develop skills in time management. It also provides parents  with insights into what is being taught in the classroom and the progress of their children.   Research indicates that regularly revising new concepts and skills learned in class is far more beneficial  than attempting to revise only at the end of units. 

Principles  The policy is based upon the following principles. That homework:   has a direct link to the holistic learning program at school   is differentiated as learning occurs at different rates and in different ways   encourages in students responsibility for their own learning and to further develop in them  independent learning   occurs best where the student, home and school have a common goal and understanding   is balanced across all subject areas   is incremental and therefore relative to the age of the students   is regular and ongoing   is inclusive of all   is followed up by subject teachers. 

REPORTING COMPLAINTS AND RESOLVING GRIEVANCES  It is implicit within the college mission statement that a positive working relationship and partnership  between the college and families is the basis of our community. To this end a process to deal with  complaints and grievances is crucial in order to provide a fair and just approach to concerns raised.   In an organisation the size of St Mary’s college, complaints or grievances may cover a wide range of  issues. Parents and other members of the college community may, from time to time, wish to complain  about a college matter. They may, for example, be unhappy with a policy or a particular staff member. It is  important that such complaints are dealt with sensitively, confidentially and effectively. The matter must    24


be resolved as soon as possible and in a way which treats all parties with dignity and respect. It is  important to note that anonymous complaints will not be accepted or acted upon. 

Procedures  The vast majority of concerns which arise from parents and others need never take the form of a formal  complaint. The Principal, senior staff and teachers are available to discuss and resolve concerns in more  informal ways. If deemed necessary in the professional judgement of the Principal (or another senior staff  member), a complaint may be addressed in a more formal manner.   It is important that a concern is directed to the correct person. The first point of contact for parents can  often be the Receptionist or office staff. These staff members have a responsibility to direct calls to the  appropriate member of staff. Calls are noted in order to track the time, source and nature of the call.  Issues relating to academic concerns are directed initially to the Subject Teacher and then to the Subject  Coordinator. Issues relating to a pastoral or student management issue are relayed to the Tutor Teacher  and then to the Year Coordinator.  It is also important to note that the Assistant Principals and the Principal are available and can be  contacted if a satisfactory response or resolution is not reached through the above channels. 

Complaints against staff members  In the instance where a complaint is made against a staff member, the staff member concerned must be  informed of the complaint. Teachers and other staff members are entitled to know the details of the  complaint against them, including the name of the person raising the complaint as well as the specific  details of the complaint.  The staff member concerned must be given the opportunity to respond prior to any action being taken in  response to the complaint. Where there is a meeting of the staff member concerned with the Principal,  parents, student/s or other staff member in relation to the complaint, the staff member must be told in  advance the purpose of the meeting and who will be attending the meeting.  The staff member must be given the opportunity to be accompanied by a support person of their choice.  Where action is taken the staff member must be involved. If a matter is not raised with the staff member  involved, then the matter cannot be raised at a later date or as part of another incident, as the staff  member has not been given a right of reply. If the complaint is not resolved through the conciliation  process, the Principal must make a decision based on the substance of the complaint, all relevant  information and any relevant policy. 

Student grievance/complaint  Where students have a concern or grievance, it is important that they convey it to the appropriate staff  member. All academic issues concerning assessment, School Certificate or HSC information should be  directed to the Dean of Studies. The Dean of Studies also deals with appeals which are lodged with the  Board of Studies. If the complaint is not resolved, the Principal must seek resolution, as outlined above.   In the instance where a student has a pastoral or other concern, they should seek an appointment with  their Tutor Teacher or Year Coordinator to discuss the issue, or where necessary the Dean of Pastoral  Care. The Academic Care Coordinator and Pastoral Counsellor are also available for such discussions.    25


At St Mary Star of the Sea College, in all instances, the focus of effective complaint resolution is  conciliation and acknowledging the rights of all concerned. 

POLICY LOCATION AND ACCESS  College policies are available on the college website. Our procedures for the development and review of  policies are overseen by the Principal in partnership with the Board of Directors. The policies also form  part of the staff handbook and the student diary and are used in the induction of new members of staff.  The college website is http://www.stmarys.nsw.edu.au.  This annual report is available in Adobe Acrobat ® format from:  http://www.stmarys.nsw.edu.au/documents/annual_report_2010.pdf   The policies can be found at http://www.stmarys.nsw.edu.au/policies.htm.    

OUR GOALS  OUR ACHIEVEMENTS IN 2010  In 2010 the college set itself a number of goals in areas identified for further development or  improvement. The status of these goals is described below:   A stronger focus on staff formation.  This was an area identified for development in 2010 and, as a  result, opportunities were offered for formation in a variety of areas including retreat programs in our  Benedictine tradition, opportunities for immersion in the work of the sisters in the Philippines and in  outback communities, networking opportunities with staff from other Good Samaritan colleges, from  systemic schools and in‐house formation opportunities through whole staff PD.  Staff  were also  heavily involved in the development of the college strategic plan.   A focus on the development of sound pedagogical approaches in the use of computers in the  classroom. The college provided both professional development and staff support in the effective use  of technology in classrooms.  We also reviewed the use of technology in classrooms and investigated  and, where possible, resolved problems with technology.  We also committed to enhancing classroom  support for staff in this area through the provision of extra support personnel and greater access to  resources.   To foster a love of learning in all students through the provision of appropriate learning opportunities.  This area was addressed through the introduction of an enrichment component in all subjects.   Teachers were asked to review programs and ensure that all students had access to appropriate  learning opportunities and that strategies used catered for diverse learning styles.  Teachers were also  required to provide students with opportunities to use a variety of approaches in completing  assessment tasks and to begin to provide students with a degree of choice when designing learning  experiences.     To support students who are academically gifted.  Students identified as being gifted were provided  with opportunities for enrichment and acceleration.  The college appointed two Gifted and Talented  teachers in 2010 in the areas of Mathematics and English.  The teachers established programs to    26


provide opportunities to depth student knowledge in areas of interest and to engage in higher order  thinking.  Students in the maths area had the opportunity to access an accelerated program and we  have a number of junior school students undertaking Year 11 studies in mathematics.     To review provisions for special needs students.  This review was commenced in 2010 and adjustments  were made to the support team structure resulting in the provision of increased staffing to support  these students.  This program will continue to be enhanced in 2011.     To focus on the principle of stewardship in all areas of college life.  In 2010, the college committed to  further care of our environment, with an audit of our energy use undertaken, the installation of water  tanks and solar panels completed and staff support sought for reducing our carbon footprint by  turning off lights and fans and reducing the use of paper.  It is anticipated that further work will be  done in this area in 2011.   To work with parents to build on the wonderful sense of community that is present at the college. The  St Mary’s Parents and Friends Association did an outstanding job in this area with a very well attended  welcome celebration to meet the new principal, an excellent Year 7 BBQ, a fashion parade and various  education opportunities for parents.  The community building that took place in 2010 will provide a  very good platform for further work in this area in 2011. 

OUR GOALS FOR 2011  In the 2011 school year St Mary’s college will work toward the achievement of the following goals in  providing a teaching and learning environment that supports both students and staff to fulfil their  potential in all areas:    

To support the continuation and expansion of academic opportunities for all students through  the provision of a curriculum that is more student centred, provision of resources to support  students with diverse learning needs and increased resourcing to support student learning.  

 To maintain an on‐going commitment to our environment through a review of recycling  strategies in the college, the allocation of a budget to support environmental initiatives, and the  provision of forums for students to be active contributors to good stewardship at the college. 

To review our middle school model and to continue to develop programs that provide  opportunities for student centred learning and a degree of choice in teaching/learning and  assessment strategies.  

To continue to invest time and resources in supporting our laptop learning program, particularly  in the areas of teacher support and in the provision of appropriate hardware and software for  21st century learning. 

To complete and implement the college strategic plan in a manner that fully involves our  community and enhances opportunities for further consultation and collaboration for students,  parents, staff, the college board and our wider community. 

To review the college master plan in order to evaluate our current facilities in light of current  educational demands and to consider future possibilities, with a view to commencing a planning  process with an architect in 2011. 

    27


FINANCES   

Income 2010 4%

Tuition Income Capital Income and ICT Levies

21% 20%

Commonwealth Recurrent Income 7%

1%

Comm Govt Grants State Govt Grant Ancilliary

47%

 

   

Expenditure 2010

Salaries

Maintenance

31%

Capital Expenditure 4% 4%

61% Administration & Ancilliary

 

  28


/019_2010_Annual_Report_revisedOct2011  

http://www.stmarys.nsw.edu.au/attachments/019_2010_Annual_Report_revisedOct2011.pdf

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you