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GreenwichVisitor for residents & VISITORS since 2010

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V O N FREE FOOD DEC GFIARENET LOOK BILL’S” AT“NEWNEW LOOK JAN MAP - QUOTE -

LISTINGS INSIDE

NOVEMBER 2018 No 97

greenwich, Blackheath, eltham, charlton,Woolwich, LEE GREEN.

SUN, SEAL AND SAND DON’T be glum, chum! A seal lies in the sun next to the River Thames at Greenwich. Reader Bill Green captured a moment of natural wonder in one the world busiest cities. See Page 3.

CENTRE pages

Greenwich at heart of Remembrance TRIBUTE: The 20ft high poppy artwork in Greenwich. Picture: ANN CLARK

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ROBINSON CRUSOE YES IT IS! panto dame andrew baCK - P5

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unforgettable GREENWICH led the nation in Remembrance inspiring poppy-topped installation, whose strands this year – including 800,000 killed in World point the way to related artworks around the country. Greenwich was chosen as records of sailors who War One which ended a century ago this month. died in the conflict are held at the museum and This thought-provoking 20ft piece of public art in because it is the home of Greenwich Mean Time. the grounds of the National Maritime Museum The RBL is aiming to raise £50million in this launched the Royal British Legion’s 2018 Poppy year’s appeal to support veterans. Info: www.britishlegion.org.uk Appeal. Thousands of people have visited the

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NELSON’S COLUMN

id you enjoy the wonderful and FREE Blackheath Fireworks? They may be the last. Greenwich council stopped paying half the cost in 2010 – now Lewisham council funds it alone, even though 100,000 people from both boroughs and further afield enjoy them and local businesses get a boost. If you didn’t donate on the night you can at protect and tell its story to lewisham.gov.uk the next genreratons. A bit ur stunning like the Greenwich Visitor, if photos of you’re here for life or just a Greenwich day make the very most if it. Park on Page 7 et another worrying police show what a treasure we have on statistic. Greenwich has no our doorstep here. We’re thrilled police officers who live in the that we played our part in it’s – so borough, according to research by far – successful bid for Heritage the Green Party. It found that half Lottery funding for its Greenwich of Metropolitan Police officers live Park Revealed bid to improve,

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The Greenwich Visitor’s admirable social diary, brought to you by the spirit of Horatio Nelson

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outside the city – despite recommendations that more emergency staff should be able to afford to live closer. Is this alarming fact because there is not enough affordable housing? Is it because they feel safer commuting from somewhere local criminals don’t live? Or is the stat just wrong? If you’re a serving officer who lives in

Greenwich please help us with our enquiries. ill historic Enderby House avoid becoming a pub after all? Pub chain Young’s have wirthdrawn their licensing application – though this could just be a termporary measure while they rethink. A local craft brewer recently

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Users’ GVide

here’s what YOU ask US Why is Greenwich called Royal Greenwich? We have 1,000 years of Royal links – Henry VIII (below) and Elizabeth I were born here and christened at St Alfege Church. Their palace, Placentia, was here. In fact Elizabeth played under the oak that bears her name in Greenwich Park, one of London’s eight Royal Parks. Queen Elizabeth II granted us Royal Status in February 2012 to mark those links. Mary Mills explores Henry’s contribution to our industrial heritage on Page 8. I read that Greenwich is a World 2016 the Duke of York officially Heritage Site? Yes, it won World unveiled a major renovation. A Heritage Site status in 1997 – one new smaller Pavilion Market of only 29 in the UK which means caters for street food fans while the main one our treasures are so good, concentrates on arts, they’re protected by the crafts, designerUnited Nations. makers and Greenwich Market reenwich isitor collectibles. is famous isn’t it? Greenwich Yes, it’s one of the Market is open WANT TO ADVERTISE? oldest in London. seven days a HAVE A STORY? T h e r e ’s b e e n a week from market here since 10am to Call Matt on 07802 743324 the 1300s – and in 5 . 3 0 p m Matt@TheGreenwich including Bank Visitor.com Holidays. Is the Foot Tunnel working yet? There was a badly handled £11.4m refurb in 2012, but problems persist in the 116-year-old tunnel...including relations between pedestrians and cyclists. A friends group Fogwoft has pushed the Council for improvements. Lifts were said to be working better and online lift alerts and a new interactive

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KNIGHTS MINICABS Environmentally & Eco-friendly Minicabs

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movement management system were being trialled. But a lift failed recently with users trapped inside. The lifts remain a big issue here and we’re always keen to hear your experiences of it – good or bad. Please email details to Matt@TheGreenwichVisitor.com Is anyone using the cable car (left) yet? Cheek! The Emirates Air Line isn’t much use for getting about – although we’re assured some people use it to commute to work – and often shuts in high winds, but it is a futuristic attraction we love. It’s a great way to get to The Crystal at Royal Victoria Dock, where technology giant Siemens’ has built a showcase about life in future cities. Fascinating stuff! We’re visiting. What should we do today? You’ve picked up a Greenwich Visitor – good start. Next visit the Tourist Information Centre. Its award-winning staff are in the Discover Greenwich centre inside the Old Royal Naval College. Get advice, buy tickets for boats, tube, DLR, rail, buses and coaches, book tours and buy tickets for London attractions...if you really must leave Greenwich. Are museums free? Yes – except the Fan Museum, which has no public funding but has a worldleading collection of fans. And the Wernher Collection of art at Ranger’s House, run by English Heritage. There are some paid for shows at the National Maritime Museum. You pay to stand on the Meridian Line inside the Royal Observatory too. And it’s 20p to use the loos in Greenwich Park!

PETER KENT He lives on the river and writes about the river. His blog is free for all to see take a dip riverwatchreturns.com

www.peterkentgreenwich.co.uk

failed to get the permission it wanted to accommodate hundreds of people drinking al fresco close by. It would be nice if Youngs was more open about its plans and tried to work closely with those who care about our heritage. reak a leg, Andrew Pollard. Greenwich Theatre – and all of us panto fans – are lucky to have such a towering master of his art back on stage in Robinson Crusoe this year. He’s written, directed and performed in brilliant shows here for many years. And – no disrespect to others trying to fill his kneelength PVC thigh boots – without Andrew as the quintessential over-the-top Dame it’s not quite the same. he Greenwich Visitor is eight years old this month. Without getting too misty-eyed about it, thanks for reading 97 editions. It’s been a privilege.

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This is the place where groups and people tell us what they do, why, And how you can help. This month:

Lee Green Open Studios

LEE Green Open Studios is organised by local artists and designer makers to showcase our work and encourage greater interest in creativity in the area. Started 19 years ago by a small group of artists based at the then Stark Gallery in Lee High Road it has grown in size and scope every year. This is now one of London’s longest running studios events. This year we have introduced a children’s art trail with opportunities for children to draw at each venue. Over 40 artists and makers are exhibiting across 19 venues including private studios, community venues, galleries and cafes. Talks, demonstrations and workshops create an enjoyable day out with friends or family. Over two weekends paintings, prints, drawings, ceramics, textiles, photography and sculpture as well as jewellery, accessories and homeware will easily solve the problems of the Christmas present list. Collect nine venue stamps Various venues. Info: from artists you can enter a leegreenopenstudios.com prize draw to win a £100 LGOS art voucher or complete the survey to enter the draw to win a prize from a local business. Sat/Sun Nov 10&11 Lee Green Open Studios is on and 17/18 12-6 Saturday and Sunday 10/11 and 17/18 November (12-6pm). For a map and more details visit our website. We look forward to sharing our work with you.

WHY WE’RE HERE WHERE WHEN

Jenny Dennison White

Chair Lee Green Open Studios www.leegreenopenstudios.com


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a perfect day at the seal side

GreenwichVisitor

Celebration of women composers

A yEAr-lOnG season celebrating women composers is launched this month by Trinity laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance, writes MILEs HEDLEY. Venus Blazing, which takes its name from a violin concerto by Tl composition professor Deirdre Gribbin, guarantees that more than two-thirds of its programmed music – from classical to jazz – will have been written by women. Highlights include a new production of Thea Musgrave’s opera A Christmas Carol, symphonies by louise Farrenc and Grace Williams, the work of Tl alumna Avril ColeridgeTaylor and music by current students and staff including E r r o l l y n Wa l l e n , S o o s a n l o l a v a r, l a u r a J u r d a n d Gribbin herself. Tl chair and MP Harriet Harman said: “This celebration will encourage and inspire students – many of whom will shape the future of performing arts – to engage with the historic issue of gender imbalance in music by women and ensure it does not continue into the next generation. “I welcome this bold initiative to raise awareness of the disparity that has long existed in music and shine a light on music that has so frequently been overlooked.” And Dr Sophie Fuller, head of Tl’s masters programme and one of the architects of the season, said: “It is widely recognised that music created by women – whatever the genre – is heard much less often than music by men. “It is our duty to celebrate women’s music and to provide the structures, support and encouragement to ensure this is a lasting legacy for all future musicians and music-lovers.”

Bill’s fabulous photo of sea creature basking in sun here WE do like to see a seal beside the riverside here in Greenwich – so here’s another flippin’ fabulous reader’s nature picture for you. Bill Green pictured this pinniped lazing by The Thames at Blackwall Point with a Thames Clipper racing by and Canary Wharf’s latest towers in the background. He told us: “I was hoping to capture some of the birds that gather there at low tide and maybe, just maybe, a seal. As I approached the birds flew away, including the herons. But, there it was – a lone seal resting in the morning sun. I moved slowly so it didn’t see me as a

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threat and gradually got as close as I could without alarming it, or putting myself in danger.” Thanks so much for sending it to us, Bill. Last month Philip Rainbird sent us his brilliant images of a seal – almost certainly the same one – eating a flatfish at Deptford Creek (right). And In July we featured fantastic photos of an urban fox (left), captured by Kate Jaconello. Have you taken a wondeful nature shot Advertisers AppeAr on our GiAnt here? We love to see them – Email Matt@ superMApus Send TheGreenwichVisitor.com Terrible price paid

October 2018 Page 7

I’M ON A SEAL-FOOD DIET WHO doesn’t love a fish supper? flat fish got the seal of approval fromThis a...seal in the RIver Thames at Deptford. Greenwich Visitor reader, therapist and photographerhypnoPhilip Rainbird took these wonderful pictures. He told us: “The Grey Seal flatfish and surfaced 20 feet caught a river path at Deptford Creek.” from the Philip – whose pictures of cleaners on

HOOK: Seal catches his dinner...

the roof of the O2 and of magnificent Ships have graced our pages in the Tall past – says: “Apart from my hypnotherapy work I never leave the camera at home.” Lucky for us! In July we featured fantastic of an urban fox, captured by Kate photos Jaconello. Have you taken a wondeful nature shot here? Get in touch! Em TheGreenwichVisitor.com a i l M a t t @

SEND US YOUR PICTURE OF A PERFECT DAY

DINE: He prepares to swallow it...

...AND SINKER: Fish is gulped down whole

Info: www.trinitylaban.ac.uk

THE FAN MUSEUM

sEnD Us YoUr PICTUrE oF a PErFECT DaY

a photo. Email: REDS ROCK: Saxifrage Peter Pan

send us a photo. Email:

matt@thegreenwichVisitor.com

another chance to bowl up matt@TheGreenwichVisitor.com see Centre pages

by global migrants

A SIx-DAy festival of short plays, performances and workshops about the effects of global migration comes to the Albany this month. The season, called no Place like Home, looks at the terrible price many families and individuals pay as they try to flee to Europe to escape war zones, poverty and famine. Highlights include Castaways on October 16, Two little Ducks on the 17th and 18th, The Incident and Aviatrix on the 18th, Flights Of Fancy on the 19th and 20th, Borders on the 20th and HUH on the 21st. Info: thealbany.org.uk

for Mycenae soup funding

GET fed, be entertained – and vote homeless, for the cost of your meal to support a projects. unemployed and mental health October 19 (7pm). Food is sponsored by generous catering companies great idea in your community. Our last two events and

CHEQUE PLEASE: 2016 winners Greenwich Mencap

Mycenae Soup sees a number of local projects take two-minute turns to pitch their ideas to diners who then vote on which to support. The winner of the vote receives all the evening’s donations, writes Mycenae House Manager Mark JoHnsonBrown.The fun micro-granting concept comes from a similar idea from Detroit, USA, where monthly events and support

restaurants from the area. raised over £3000 and There is a suggested donation of supported a community £10 per head for diners. If you gardening project Mycenae House, have a great idea that we might from the Mental Blackheath sE3 7sE support there is still time Health Activity Trust to apply. and Greenwich Application forms are Mencap’s innovative Fri october 19 available at www. Support for Siblings 7pm mycenaehouse. pilot scheme. co.uk or email info@mycenaehouse.co.uk Dining Mycenae House hosts its Tickets are available at Mycenae House third Mycenae Soup on Friday or online.

wHErE wHEn


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Miles Hedley’s pick of this month’s best events. Our unique 3-month listings begin on Page 14

JACK RAKE

The life of this country GP and talented artist spans most of the 20th century yet he’s not as well-known as he should be. Greenwich Gallery may change that with an exhibition of his paintings, many on show – and on sale – for the first time. Proceeds to Freedom From Torture. Nov 2-22

enderby dwarfed... WELL, what’s your verdict? This is how historic Enderby House now looks – with a new glass and steel extension. The listed 1832 riverside building – once the home of the sub-Atlantic cable laying industry which led to today’s world wide web – has been refurbished by developers Barratt London who hope to turn it in to a “Gastro pub and cultural hub for Greenwich”. Campaigners want the building to be used to tell the important story of Greenwich’s part in global industry. The building is now dwarfed by the Enderby Wharf development – and one day is likely to have the controversial London City Cruise Port next door. Campaigners insist the terminal will only come if it is redesigned to include onshore electricty. Close by, the popular Thames Path is now completely open in East Greenwich after work including “ecological enhancement” (left) was completed.

REDS ROCK: Saxifrage Peter Pan

THE UNKNOWN SOLDIER

To mark the centenary of the end of the First World War, the Cutty Sark’s intimate studio theatre is hosting a production of writer-performer Ross Ericson;s coruscating tale of front-line loyalty, betrayal and comradeship under fire, with an after-show discussion about the issues raised. Nov 8

10 TO DO NOVEMBER

EARLY MUSIC FESTIVAL

The annual celebration of musical history returns to revamped Blackheath Halls with workshops, exhibitions, talks, performances by internationally-acclaimed stars like Dame Emma Kirkby and Silvia Berchtold and the chance to buy a classic instrument. Shawm or sackbut anyone? Nov 8-10

Info: enderbywharf.wordpress.com

JUNE CUNNINGHAM

The great choreographer’s company comes to Laban theatre to perform her new work To Be Me, a piece set to the poetry of local spoken word artist & rapper Kate Tempest which uses the Greek myth of genderswapping prophet Tiresias to explore the nature of personal identity. Nov 9

STEAM DOWN COLLECTIVE

As part of the London Jazz Festival, the Albany hosts what promises to be a stonking gig by this freewheeling group of Deptford-based artists who specialise in producing what they call spontaneous soundscapes reflecting life in the city. If you love music, you’ll love this. Nov 17

LOST IN A BOOK

The National Maritime Museum presents a two-day literary festival – its first ever– taking adventure as its theme. Authors, film-makers, animators, academics and children’s story-tellers take centre-stage, which means there will be something for everyone over the weekend. Nov 17&18

Museum curator will work with world experts

jacob is an english fan man in new york EXPERT: Jacob shows Duchess collection founded by Heléne Alexander (right). Smithsonian (inset).

TRINITY LABAN HARPS

If you’ve never been to a harp recital or visited the Queen’s House this is your chance to do both simultaneously. Inigo Jones’ great hall with its artwork by Turner prize-winner Richard Wright and its magical acoustics are the ideal setting for the conservatoire’s fabulous musicians. Nov 21

ROBINSON CRUSOE

He’s back – oh yes he is! After a year away, Andrew Pollard returns to Greenwich Theatre with his self-penned take on Daniel Defoe’s castaway classic. Expect raucous fun with songs, dances, loopy plots and plenty of jokes for young and old. A perfect Xmas curtain-raiser. Nov 23-Jan 13

SLEEPING BEAUTY

If even a five-star panto isn’t enough to get you properly into the festive mood check out this family-friendly ballet at Mycenae House with sublime Tchaikovsky score, a fairytale princess cursed by a wicked sorceress, glorious dancing and dazzling costumes. Must-see treat. Nov 24

SIMON PURCELL

Brilliant pianist and former head of jazz at Trinity Laban teams up with three exstudents who have since found artistic and critical success with Mercury-nominated band Dinosaur – trumpeter Laura Judd, drummer Corrie Dick and bassist Conor Chaplin. Great line-up, great gig. Nov 27

GREENWICH Fan Museum’s curator is in New York this month to work with experts at one of the world’s most famous museums.

Jacob Moss was awarded a study grant to spend time with conservator Lucy Commoner at the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum. He will spend time at its state-ofthe-art storage facility in Newark, New Jersey, and visit the Metropolitan Museum of Art and Museum of the City of New York to view highlights from their collections and meet colleagues also responsible for the

care and conservation of fans. The trip has been funded by a Jonathan Ruffer Curatorial grant funded by the Art Fund. Jacob said: “I am grateful to Art Fund for their generous support and look greatly to working alongside Lucy to learn more about Cooper Hewitt’s approaches toward the care and conservation of their own splendid fan collection. “Having reinforced the professional links and friendships between The Fan Museum and its stateside counterparts, I hope to return with fresh ideas and new knowledge to

share with my colleagues.” The Fan Museum – in a Georgian townhouse in Crooms Hill – has a worldrenowned collection of 4,500 fans including examples by artists Gauguin and Salvador Dali. One of its treasures is a unique embroidered Elizabethan fan dating from 1590. It was founded in 1991 by Helene Alexander and the Duchess of Cornwall has been the museum’s patron since 2009. Jacob is keeping followers updated on the Fan Museum’s website. Info: thefanmuseum.org.uk

2010

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and given a glass extension TOWERING: Enderby Wharf development rises above historic house

Celebration Greenwich Theatre panto legend Andrew returns as Dame HE’S BACK! Greenwich panto of Rossini legend Andrew Pollard returns OPERA icon Rossini died 150 years ago – you can discover more about the compsoer here this month. The Fan Museum is holding one of its popular In Celebration events with music from his most popular operas The Barber of Seville, La Danza and L’Italiana in Algeri performed by mezzo soprano Emily Kyte, tenor William Wallace and pianist Natalie Burch. Tickets for the event on Monday November 19 (7) are on sale at £15, including entry to current show The Romantic Age and light refreshments. Info & tickets 0208 305 1441 or thefanmuseum.or.uk

Advertisers appear onMUSEUM THE FAN our GIANT SUPESeeRMCentAP re Pages

Amnesty Book sale STOCK up on Christmas gifts this month at the huge annual book clearance sale run by Amnesty International. The groups has been running the legendary sale for around 40 years and has raised almost £300,000 for the charity. Doors open at 10am on Saturday November 17 at the Church of the Ascension, Dartmouth Row – just 10 minutes walk from Lewisham stations. Info:amnestybg.wordpress.com

to the stage as Dame this year.

FRIDAY THE 14TH!

Robinson Crusoe will be 14th time he has written and directed the annual sell-out – and the eleventh time he plays the dame. After a sabattical last winter, Andrew returns with his swashbuckling tale of pirates, romance, exotic creatures and songs – and a Man Friday with a twist.. “I had a year off last year but I missed it and can’t wait to come back,” said Andrew. “I’ve come back wanting it to be the best and funniest we can do.” In the show, Robinson battles the wicked Pirate Queen to find lost gold. Andrew plays Robinson’s mum Camilla Crusoe, who runs a fish barrow but has ideas above her station. As ever, the storyline has local links – Camilla was once a barmaid at The Gypsy Moth. Andrew adds: “Friday is still Friday but isn’t what you might expect. And the characters get shipwrecked in a very interesting place, but no telling, I’m afraid.” He explains: “Pantomime is so special because it encompasses so much – singing, dance, drama, spectacle and verbal and visual comedy. It is uniquely British and has such a rich history. I think its Greenwich Theatre, appeal is in its ability to Crooms Hill a kid, you’re likely to adapt to the times yet want to take your kids somehow stay familiar. to one too. It is a show “The songs reflect November 23 to where all the family can current trends, there are January 13 come and enjoy it together gags about what’s hap– which is very rare.” pened in the year but at the Other Greenwich favourites same time characters and plots follow traditional patterns and the return too – including Anthony Spargo slapstick comedy is as old as the hills. as Pirate Captain Gingerbeard and mu“People take comfort in the familiar sical director Steve Markwick. Others on stage include Lizzy Dive, and in troubled times, this becomes appealing. It’s also to do with family Arabella Rodrigo and James Paul tradition. If you are taken to panto as McAllister, new and up and coming

Pollard is back (as a fishwife!) in Robinson Crusoe

TOTALLY CUCKOO: Andrew (inset left) with Anthony Spargo in 2016 show

WHERE WHEN

musical theatre performers. With old and new songs – and jokes for every generation – the theatre says the show has the “feel-good factor needed for kids and adults alike.” James Haddrell, the Theatre’s director, said: “We’re delighted about Andrew’s return and, in a way, doing Robinson Crusoe is part of the celebration as it’s so far off the beaten track. “The story is a bit like Puss In Boots and Mother Goose in that people don’t really know the original but it makes

for a fantastic pantomime. It is a great adventure yarn – with a few new twists. Audiences can expect our usual mix of song, spectacle and slapstick.” Robinson Crusoe runs from November 23to January 13. Other festive shows there include a one-man version of A Christmas Carol, a Christmas Comedy Club for Kids and the world premiere of new studio production Knitmas: A Winter Yarn by the awardwinning SharkLegs Theatre Company. Info: greenwichtheatre.org.uk

nity newspaper made in greenwich clark TODAY ON 07802 743324 or email MATT@TheGreenwichVisitor.com

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chromE from home!

back to nature school New eco classroom opens

AN OUTDOOR classroom has opened at Greenwich Ecology Park so thousands of people can learn learn about wildlife close up.

It has room for up to 30 for a range of activities. Opening the “vital resource”, Euan Hall, chief executive of The Land Trust, said: “Spending time in green space is important for mental and physical well-being but being able to do that in cities like London is increasingly challenging. “The classroom will be the key link for the community to the wildlife habitats on their doorstep. Thames Path, Greenwich SE10 0QZ “ We ’ r e v e r y grateful to the funders, volunteers Weds to Sunday f u n d e d b y and community for 10-5 I k e a , Ve o l i a making this happen.” Environmental The park – next to Tr u s t , P e o p l e ’s the Thames on the Greenwich Peninsula – is Postcode Lottery, Bernard popular for pond dipping, Sunley Foundation, Friends d e n b u i l d i n g a n d of Greenwich Ecology Park conservation workdays run and donations. The ecology park still faces by The Conservation further challenges – Volunteers. The Land Trust took on especially from a 13 storey the site in 2011, and runs it tower block planned close by w i t h T C V w h o h a v e which would overshadow it and threaten the habitat. managed it since 2002. Info: tcv.org.uk The classroom has been

WHERE WHEN

PARK It In The Market has been drawing Motorcycle club and Krazy Horse Custom admiring fans for years now, as beautiful Bikes. You can see anything from a this 50s classic carsline up in Greenwich Market Ford Zephyr to a Model T or a Fiesta – a Recently the motors have Datsun to a Rolls Royce, or a 1973 moved out from under the Fiat 500L to 1954 Chevy Bel Air. covered roof with gleaming Photographer David chrome attracting crowds Levitt took these in Cutty Sark Gardens. fabulous photographs The event is run by at the event this the Mean Old Timers Thanks, David Send us a photo. Email: summer. Classic Car & – we love them!

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Amazing (and revealing) shots of Greenwich Park from sky

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fter nine years as Park Manager you would think I would know Greenwich Park but that is the thing about this place, you are always learning and seeing something new. Mind you, I have never had the opportunity to hover at 1,000ft above the park and take a 360 degree look around before. That’s what we did in July. Not literally, but just about as good as. he uncharacteristically long hot summer of 2018 has turned out to be a bonus, not just for sun lovers but for archaeologists as well. In hot summers when the grass turns brown buried underground artefacts are made visible as crop marks. The hotter and drier the summer, the better. As the dry weather extended week after week this summer we realised that there might not be such a good opportunity to get aerial photographs of crop marks in Greenwich Park for many years to come. We might even discover something new. e commissioned aerial archaeologist Adam Sandford to fly his drone high above Greenwich Park very early one morning. The low angle of the sunlight helped to throw shadows across low features on the ground making for some atmospheric photos. The downside of the park is the large number of trees which cast long shadows across the ground obscuring any crop marks. ur first survey was over Croombs Hill and we got some beautiful images of the Saxon Barrows that make up one of the parks Scheduled Ancient Monuments. Sadly, the image also illustrated how the barrows are suffering damage from erosion as the medieval trackway which crosses the cemetery is getting wider and cutting into a couple of mounds. This is something that we will try to correct. hat I hadn’t bargained for was Adam turning his

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ParkLife

By Greenwich Park manager

Graham Dear

camera north across the river and getting some truly wonderful images of the Isle of Dogs, showing Greenwich Park in its riverside setting, breath-taking. ut did we discover anything new? Well, yes, maybe. The archaeology boffins at Historic England in Bath are poring over our 500 photos now. It looks like we have discovered an outlying barrow on Rangers Field and there are some very Greenwich Park unusual lines on (You can’t miss it!) Bandstand Field. What these might be we don’t know but the Greenwich Open every day Park Revealed project does include some community from 6am archaeology projects so next year we may investigate these. alking of investigations, our consultant archaeologist, Graham Keevill and Historic England are doing a mini-dig on the Giant Steps below Wolfe Statue. Historical research has identified that the number of steps varied from six to nine to twelve, but we don’t know how they were constructed. The mini-dig should provide some of the answers. ike I said, you think you know a lot about the Park, but then you realise that you don’t know as much as you thought. That’s life!

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UNDER THREAT: Saxon burial mounds in Park show signs of damage

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SPECTACULAIR VIEW! TOWERING FEELING: Greenwich Park, historic Queen’s House and the Old Royal Naval College are set against the sweeping River Thames and the glittering glass and steel of Canary Wharf in the distance

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Even if you don’t have a helicopter or a drone, send us your photo. Email:

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How Tudor monarch turned Greenwich, Deptford & Woolwich into manufacturing powerhouses that changed our world

Greenwich’s amazing industrial past – stretches from the Bronze Age to the Industrial Revolution, as MARY MILLS explained in recent editions. But one wellknown figure dominates the entire story. And though he is famous, his contribution is often unrecognised.

Henry VIII is so strongly identified with Greenwich that he appears in every history of the area and tourist leaflet. Yet few mention his role in building industries that grew to change our world.

Like his father Henry VII, the new king was a micromanager and was involved intimately in setting up what was in effect a state-owned defence supplies industry – a major part of a process of consolidation and centralisation of the state by the Tudors. These institutions were long-lasting and evolved into a nationwide diaspora of state defence manufacturing. At the heart of his industrial hub were five places: Dockyards at Deptford and Woolwich, the Royal Armoury and the Woolwich Rope Walk and Placentia – his palace in Greenwich.

henry VIII the king of industrial england BUSTLING: Woolwich Dockyard

Deptford Dockyard

For Henry VIII it is said that “a standing Navy was a symbol of Royal authority and an instrument of power.” London needed to be defended and this meant a Thames-based system. It became the place where a new fleet was to be built as it offered easy access to ironworks in the Weald around the capital. Gunpowder manufacture began too. Under Elizabeth it became “the strongest battle fleet afloat” and “it was London more than any other part of England that broke the Spanish Empire with London-built battleships manned by London watermen and big London-owned privateers almost certainly built on the River.” Deptford is 35 miles from the sea and would have been seen as safe from attack and therefore a good place to build. Existing storehouses were extended in 1513 and 1514. A large pond here already in use was adapted as a dock basin in 1517 to provide a mooring for some of the King’s ships and later it was divided into three and made deep enough to take a 1,000 ton ship. The Tudor storehouses were demolished in the 1950s but in 2002 it emerged the foundation stones had survived and were in a wall at University College in Central London. Deptford became the most important Royal dockyard and he visited to inspect new ships there. That’s whay in 1550 Deptford High Street was paved.

‘Henry was a micromanager involved in setting up a state-owned defence industry. His dockyards, armoury, rope works and even his palace become hives of activity’ Bell Watergate – where the car park for the Leisure Centre was until recently. By the end of the 1530s Crown shipbuilding had moved to the eastern end of the later dockyard area – where blocks of flats now stand next to the ferry terminals. Here large ships were built and repaired and Woolwich dockyard became one of “ E u r o p e ’s p r i n c i p a l s h i p b u i l d i n g establishments.” Both dockyards closed in the mid-1800s. Deptford was broken up into a number of industrial sites – latterly Convoys newsprint warehouses, where a long-planned tower block development has still not been done. The Woolwich site was partly used as workshops for the Royal Arsenal Cooperative Society and is now a Council housing estate. Both were sites for innovation in shipbuilding, and much else – major contributors to the national story of how Britain “ruled the waves” as a superpower.

Henry VIII but have a very different history to the dockyards. They began as a small but very up-market works and evolved patchily into something completely different in the early 19th century. Henry and his principal courtiers wanted to look magnificent on the sports field, so Italian and Flemish craftsmen produced highly decorated and extremely expensive armour for them. A Royal workshop was set up near the church with a Master Armourer – this would have been somewhere near today’s Pepys Buildings east of Cutty Sark Gardens. There was also an associated mill which undertook the heavy, noisy part of the work and it is likely that this was the future Armoury Mill, based on the border with Lewisham – the site of today’s Tesco. It was upgraded in 1514 with a new millwheel. Under Henry VIII and Elizabeth it helped produce high fashion armour for the In 1512 Henry commissioned the largest wealthiest, but its future was in a variety of warship in Europe – the Henry Grace à Dieu weaponry for ordinary military use. (Henry, Thanks be to God). It was built in In the 1800s it moved to Enfield to become Woolwich on what became Gun Wharf east of The Royal Armouries were also set up under the famous Enfield Small Arms factory.

Woolwich Dockyard

Royal Armouries

SEAT OF POWER: Placentia – where the Old Royal Naval College now stands – was an industry of its own

Woolwich Rope Walk

Many people know about the Royal dockyards and some even know about the Armoury Mill. But the Woolwich Rope Walk – set up under Elizabeth I – tends to be overlooked. It was the first naval ropeyard in the country and was described as “England’s first state ropeyard” – an early state industry undertaken through a contractor. It supplied the heavy duty cables for naval vessels built at Deptford and Woolwich. Rope factories are called rope walks and there were many in London. To see how it was done go to the Historic Dockyard in Chatham where its rope walk is still in commercial production. The building is so long that you can hardly see one end of it from the other, and a machine trundles up and down the length of it twisting together long strands of material to make the rope. In Tudor times the rope makers walked backwards down the length of the “walk” with something like 40lbs of fibre twisted round their waists. As they went they twisted these fibres with the fingers of their left hands to make the rope. In every working day they would cover more than 20 miles. Rope Yard Rails was the name of a street in Woolwich which ran across the area and which now seems to be called Maribor Park – that’s near the roundabout on the corner of Warren Lane and Beresford Street. The rope walk itself was a covered building running the length of what is now Beresford Street. It had a grand entrance in the High Street and next to it were very nice houses for the master rope maker and his clerk. Together with dockyards in Portsmouth and Chatham, these institutions in Tudor England, provided a basis for the manufacture of defence items for and by the State.

Palace of Placentia

Apart from defence manufacture probably the biggest industrial site in Greenwich was Henry’s great riverside palace itself – Placentia. Henry VII had partly moved court and royal household functions here from Eltham. A Tudor Palace and Court was a workplace that must house all functions of government including an army of policy advisers and spin doctors and service departments for feeding and housing everyone. Archaeologists have found kitchens, bakehouses, brew-houses – and bee boles – while the King’s Slaughter house was near Deptford Creek. The Tudor palace needed a water supply and a network of conduits exists in Greenwich Park, although rebuilt in the 17th century. The Chantry House in Park Vista may be a part of a secure reservoir of 1515, later converted into a house. The logistics of keeping the palace going were amazing – think of the Turn to Page 12


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November 2018 Page 9

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November 2018 Page 10

Tourist Information/ Visitor Centre at Old Royal Naval College

7 7a

University of Greenwich Stephen Lawrence Gallery

Swing Bridge GREENWICH MARKET

BILL’S

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Trinity Laban

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New Haddo Community Centre GREENWICH GALLERY

THE FAN MUSEUM

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November 2018 Page 11

Greenwich Centre

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November 2018 Page 12

King of Industry

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FINEST: Henry Grace à Dieu

From Page 8

great feasts we read about in story books. All that produce had to be sourced, purchased, transported and stored as well as being cooked and served – that’s a lot of specialists, a lot of trades and a lot of organisation. There needed to be somewhere for all these people to live as well as housing for foreign and other delegations, some of whom were no doubt very picky about their accommodation and diet. Shoe menders, armourers and cooks, harness makers, chamber maids, wig makers and doctors, scribes, translators, carpenters, groundsmen, gardeners, stablemen, carters, road sweepers, and many many more. The Palace was an industry in itself...

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Other Tudor industries

Later expansion in Greenwich led to even more manufactories – including the Royal Arsenal in Woolwich itself and, later, other factories including Enfield, Waltham Abbey, Weedon, Greenock. But what other industry was there in Tudor Greenwich? For one thing all the problems of drainage and reclamation of the marshland areas continued. In 1527 there were floods in Plumstead which led to a tax being levied. This was the beginning of a system called the wallscot – to fund future flood defence systems. A wall was built from the River to the Plumstead uplands enclosing the marsh. In 1546 work was done on the drainage of Greenwich marsh. Later work on Plumstead Marshes was done by Jacobus Acontyus, a professional engineer who had left Italy because of his religious views. In 1566 John Baptista Castillion, one of E l i z a b e th ’s in n e r house hol d, wa s authorised to oversee the reclamation of Plumstead Marsh, although the recruitment of suitable workmen proved difficult and led to delays. Transport was also improving, based on the River. There were a number of crossriver ferries. Potters Ferry – from the Isle of Dogs to Greenwich – was probably set up at this time and there was also a ferry from the Isle of Dogs to Deptford. A ferry also ran from Blackwall to Greenwich and from Woolwich to the area we now call North Woolwich. A manufacturing industry which may have been sited in Greenwich in the 16th century was glass – no doubt helped by the incidence of glass-making sand in the area. Jacob Verzilini had come to England from Murano in 1570 and set up a manufactory in the City. When this burned down soon after, a licence for a works in Greenwich was issued. Glass was a luxury item. With the palace and the Court so near, luxury trades would do well and, like the manufacture of expensive armour, grow into something more commonly needed. Very little has been written on our amazing industrial heritage. But Greenwich Industrial History Society has had monthly meetings for the last 20 years. See our blog at greenwichindustrialhistory.blogspot.com We also have spin-offs like the Enderby Group which looks at the heritage of the local cable-making industry and other activities around the Arsenal, Plumstead and Deptford. Our unique industrial history should be better known. We’re on a mission to do that. marymillsmmmmm@aol.com

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DAN’S CURRY CORNER I

n the 2017 Greenwich Curry Club Awards it was no surprise when Kasturi in Charlton picked up the Best Newcomer Award. The Village is now home to a Indian restaurant of a quality you’ll rarely find outside central London, where Kasturi had operated previously. There’s a touch of glitz to the décor, with the wall lighting and light fittings balanced by dark wood lattice-work, tables and chairs. Get comfortable before tucking into Adraki Lamb Chops, which will have you chewing to the bone searching for more of the delicious meat. And while you’ll find the oldschool favourites like Butter Chicken (very creamy by the way) on the menu, I’d point you to super fresh Keema Nans with the Keema Muttar, meaty spiced mince with lots of peas, a proper Punjabi dish, as you’d expect from these North Indian Frontier specialists. esar has only been open a few months but it’s clearly proving a hit and building a regular client base in its Woolwich Road home already. It certainly hit the mark for the Curry Club on a recent night out, with one member declaring it was the best curry he’d had this year (he has quite a few, I can tell you). It’s not often you’ll find Panipuri on a menu, let alone homemade ones, so take advantage to dip into this delicious starter when you visit next. The popular Indian street snack is a hollowed out crispy fried ball made of flour (the puri) which is filled with chick peas, potato, onions and spice, to which you can add tamarind sauce. Then pop into your mouth and enjoy the mix of flavours in one hit. Such a delicate starter was followed by a meat feast as we next tucked into a Large Mixed Grill, a plate piled high lamb chops, tandoori chicken pieces, sheehk kebab and chicken tikka chunks with tasty fried onion. This was followed by Punjabi Goat Curry, Goan Fish Curry, Lamb Saag and, of course, a Lamb Vindaloo. All are highly rated and rich with flavour. Another touch of the delicate comes with the fluffy, crispy Bhatura bread, an excellent alternative for those who find nan bread too filling. here are so many good choices for curries around here, but one place that has been attracting us out and about lately is Bexleyheath’s superb Masala Inn. The medium-spiced railway Chicken Curry – a tribute to the famous curries enjoyed on the Indian railways every day – is a favourite and has got to be tried. But if you are looking for heat then prepare yourself for the Garlic Naga. Packed with sliced garlic and the chilli that made the tiny southeastern Indian state of Naga renowned, this will test even the hardened of spice lovers. The place is packed on weekends and with food like this it’s no surprise. We are also delighted to say that Masala Inn is the newest partner of the Spice Card, so holders can now enjoy savings at the restaurant. he 2018 Greenwich Curry Club Awards, which has been supported by the Greenwich Visitor since its inception in 2011, are fast approaching and we are asking you to vote for your top restaurant in the Greenwich Visitor Readers’ Favourite. The restaurant must be in an SE postcode or E14. Go to www.greenwichcurryclub.com to vote. The full list of winners will be announced in an upcoming edition of this newspaper. f you haven’t heard (where have you been?) the Greenwich Curry Club recently launched the Spice Card – a discount card for local curry lovers, which was set up after discussions with local restaurants. We support local business and reward regular customers who love curry at the same time. Spice Card holders can enjoy a full year of savings at a host of Indian restaurants and takeaways in Greenwich, Blackheath, Westcombe Park, Lewisham, Charlton, New Cross and the Isle of Dogs. Go to www.thespicecard. co.uk to find out more.

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Daniel Ford

greenwichcurryclub@gmail.com @greenwichcurry


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November 2018 Page 13

ForagE OUTRAGE

What sort of person fills a rucksack full of fruit from our Park’s orchard...and then comes back for more? A few years back, I went on a Fungi Foray in Greenwich Park. A mycologist helped us to identify mushrooms.

I remember marvelling at a beefsteak fungus – a deep red mushroom, shaped like a UFO. And a fungus as large as my hand shooting out from the tree-bark. I’d never seen anything like it before. This was an amazing connection with nature – a rare one for somebody who grew up in a concrete jungle. Forward to a month ago when I almost lost my temper. Actually, more than almost. I lost my temper on hearing that one of the Queen’s Orchard’s plum trees in Greenwich Park had been stripped bare of its fruits by a visitor with a large rucksack who helped herself to every single fruit... then came back for a second helping. We all enjoy eating in season, and we all know that the fresher the ingredients are the better they taste. Why should we pay over the odds for the fruits of nature if we can get them for free? Indeed there is nothing wrong with foraging. As a species, humans have foraged for as long as we’ve been around.

TARGET: Sweet chestnuts

The concern is about those gathering, picking or stripping hedgerows and trees bare for commercial purposes – people who are only after making a fast buck while ruining it for the rest of us. Foraging needs to be done mindfully. The Royal Parks recently warned that “flouting the ban on collecting mushrooms, sweet chestnuts and other increasingly popular wild ingredients depletes vital food sources for wildlife and may cause longterm damage to park biodiversity.” Foraging incidents are growing in the Royal Parks according to new figures,

which reveal that 35 police warnings were issued for plundering wild food last autumn alone – a 600 per cent increase on the previous year. One picker even ended up in court after ignoring a police caution and returning for a second round of pilfering. Julia Balfour, Head of Ecology for the Royal Parks, found this sharp increase extremely concerning. “Fungi play a crucial role in the balance of the eco-system as they are natural decomposers. “Fungi recycle vital nutrients from dead plants and make these available to living plants. “This process is especially important in nutrient-poor acid grassland, a fragile and important habitat found in several of the Royal Parks, which we are working hard to conserve and enhance.” Besides, Royal Parks and private lands are not our personal larder, the excessive removal of nuts, fruits, plants and berries deprive the wildlife of food, in some cases starving the animals to death. Foraging is fun – please let’s keep it that way.

come dine with GV

TARGET: Plums were taken from Queen’s Orchard in Greenwich Park

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elcome to The Vagabond Food Cafe – in a greenhouse by the Thames, believe it or not! Dishes cost between £5 & £8. Intrigued? Take a walk to the old coal jetty, near the Greenwich Ecology Park on the Peninsula. If you help with the gardening, you can get even 10 per cent off on food and drinks. Take your best secateurs. njoy your free starter or dessert at Bill’s in Greenwich this month. Take a look at our back pafe advert and just mention the magic words “New Look Bill’s.” And don’t forget to give us feedback on the experience. With Grind London coming soon the competititon in the town centre is hotting up again. he Pilot and The Sail Loft are going to have a little brother – The Windjammer. Since it’s a Fuller’s pub expect their own beers on tap: including London Pride, Frontier, Black Cab Stout. As for the food, it will be similar to the other two. The new pub will be located on the river path. But there is a the catch – it’s going to be on the other side of the river on Royal Wharf E16. A nice walk through the tunnel should build up your appetite! e were sad to see that Ye Olde Turk on Trafalgar Road has closed. The lack of patrons made for a quiet atmosphere – not something we have come to expect with a Turkish restaurant. But the food was good. ood luck to the new owners of a former Blackheath favourite – Khan’s is set to reopen any time now. A close friend some years ago who claimed he could handle the hottest of phalls then phall, sorry, fell hilariously at the first mouthful. Let us know your verdict. njoy Guy FawkesNight on November 5 – and don’t forget Stir-Up Sunday on November 25. That’s the last Sunday before Advent, when the family gathers to stir up the Christmas pudding.

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edited by

solange berchEmin Solange Berchemin, writer and blogger, is from Lyon, French capital of food, and has lived here since 1993. She blogs at www.pebble soup.co.uk

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miles hedley REVIEWS

MASK OF YOUTH SUPERB: Serin Ibrahim and David Hubball Cath and Phil

Animatronic Elizabeth is a brilliant new twist

Unique is a dreadfully overused word but I can’t recall anything else close to resembling Mask Of Youth, artist Mat Collishaw’s animatronic face of Elizabeth I which will face down her glorious Armada portrait in the Queen’s House for the next few months. Her glistening eyes follow the viewer as well as gazing at her own portrait, a spectacular propaganda piece depicting the ageing 55-yearold monarch as a vibrant, potent, decisive young woman. From time to time her lips part to reveal discoloured and missing teeth. Tiny hairs – from squirrels, apparently – sprout from blue-veined, scuffed skin. But the blemishes cannot hide Read Miles Hedley’s the face’s imperiarts blog on ousness. hedintheclouds. The eyes are wordpress.com darkly and impassively authoritarian and her mouth often seems to twist in what NOSTALGIA: Shelley memorably called a Kerry Joy sneer of cold command. Stewart You are left in no doubt as Pat that you are as nothing compared with the Faerie Queen. Put simply, Collishaw’s installation is magnificent, HERE/MICHAEL FRAYN capturing the loneliness and lure of power and encapsulatThere was a lot of audience laughter ing the myth that sustains during Michael Frayn’s philosophical comBritannia to this day. edy Here at Greenwich Theatre. In a post-truth, possibly It wasn’t the gales of laughter propost-Brexit world, this is art voked by the playwright’s great farces at its most relevant and corsuch as Noises Off. Instead it was that uscating. I urge you to see it. most satisfying of all outpourings depth and honesty that made for And while you’re there, – the laughter of recognition, great theatre. walk across the hall and look especially the recognition of And there were lots of at seven photographs of embarrassment. wonderful little touches to seven 18-year-old pupils from Frayn’s rarely-staged local Thomas Tallis School keep the here-and-now 1993 play is an intense which have been printed and theme in our thoughts – examination of what framed by German artist Betan ever-growing spider it means to live in the tina von Zwehl as if they are plant, a print of Dali’s here and now by way 17th century miniatures in the melting clocks adorning of human relationships, style of Nicholas Hilliard. retrospection, gender the wall and, best of all, They hang in a room politics, psychology and the final fade-out leaving of small portraits of royal quantum theory. only an alarm clock spotchildren which were painted It’s an amazing mix of lighted on stage. Q&A: Frayn to be sent to foreign courts erudition and humour. Frayn, who once lived in seeking marriage alliances But it also requires top-class Blackheath and had been a memwith Britain. acting because otherwise the bickerber of the Greenwich Theatre board, had But unlike the little princes ing couple at the play’s core, Cath and and princess, these 21st cenPhil, could be irritating whingers and their taken part in a Q&A session before the tury youngsters are not moopening night in which he revealed his nostaligia-obsessed landlady Pat would narchical commodities – they be little more than a cliché of bitterness. affection for what is one of his lesserare classless individuals free known works. Happily Serin Ibrahim and David Hubto make their own choices. And after watching this production, he ball as the lovers and Kerry Joy Stewart The display may be tiny but told the cast it was the best version of it were superb in director James Haddrell’s it‘s awash with life-affirming production, giving the play an emotional he had ever seen. Who am I to disagree? power.

Here, Here!

MILES HEDLEY

A charismatic modern classic Euripides may have been one of the inventors of playwriting nearly two and half millennia ago but his works are still relevant, as Dennis Of Penge showed so dramatically at the Albany. All the familiar tropes of Greek tragedy are there in Annie Siddons’ brilliant take on The Bacchae – loyalty, love, ecstasy, hubris, vengeance, suffering, obsession, magic, the implacable nature of the cosmos and the belief that the gods walk among us. And just to make the genre her own she has added a couple of contemporary leitmotifs – therapy and the joy of chicken wings. The result is a freewheeling, funny, heartfelt and fabulous story about Wendy, an overweight, out-of-work,

dennis of penge

Siddons herself played Wendy, Dennis was played by the multitalented acalcoholic Peckham woman, and her tor, singer, musician and dancer Jorell fight for what’s right against a system Coiffic-Kampala and Asaf Zohar, who geared to keep her under its thumb. composed the terrific soundtrack The gods are represented by and performed it live, helped voice Dennis, a black, possibly pansexual the rest of the characters, a roll-call childhood friend of Wendy who stands that included two gobby geezers in for joy-loving Dionysus, god of the who double for the traditional Greek instincts whose sacred creatures chorus. include bees. The three of them created someDennis leads a popular uprising thing truly extraordinary through a against the rationality of the combination of words, music and their establishment (the obcentre and its own dazzling charisma to make the ghastly boss Pratt) with the help of divine human and the human divine. Peckham’s downtrodden denizens, a This reinvention an ancient squadron of attack-bees and a couple classic was a triumph for Siddons of dinosaurs brought to life after being liberated from Crystal Palace Park. and another triumph for the Albany.

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Thurs November 1

ART Blackheath Art Society Autumn/Winter Exhibition Upstairs gallery at ORNC 10-5. Till December 2 MUSIC Trinity Laban Harps St Alfege 1.05 DRAMA Shakespeare Schools Festival Greenwich Theatre 7 MUSIC Omar Puente Ed Renshaw Award fundraiser. Albany 7.30 MUSIC Venus Blazing: Trinity Laban Symphonic Winds Blackheath Halls 7.30 JAZZ Malcolm Earle-Smith Oliver’s

Friday 2

MUSIC Emma Harding, Thibault Blanchard, Anna Asesano Flute, cello and harp recital. ORNC chapel 1.05 DRAMA Shakespeare Schools Festival Greenwich Theatre 7 MUSIC Andrea Bocelli O2 CELEBRATION Diwali Mycenae House 7 MUSIC Riot Jazz Brass Band Ed Renshaw Award fundraiser. Albany 7.30 PERFORMANCE Burlesque London Theatre 8 COMEDY James Loveridge, Joey Page, Stefano Paolini Up The Creek MUSIC Shredni Vashtar Pelton 9 JAZZ BATL Quartet Oliver’s

Saturday 3

FAMILY Art Exhibition St Mary’s Community Centre, Eltham High Street 10-4 DIWALI Day of Celebrations NMM 10-5 TALK Astronomy & Islam: Astronavigation Royal Observatory 10 FAMILY Rangoli Patterns For Diwali Cutty Sark 11.30, 2 MUSIC Jeremy Lowe, Jenny Hughes Clarinet & piano recital. St Alfege 1.05 FOOTBALL Charlton Athletic v Doncaster Rovers. The Valley 3 RUGBY Blackheath v Sale Well Hall 3 FILM Arrival (2016) Royal Observatory 6 PERFORMANCE Lewisham Fringe Festival London Theatre MUSIC Andrea Bocelli O2 MUSIC Transglobal Underground Ed Renshaw Award fundraiser. Albany 7.30 MUSIC John Tams, Barry Coope Cutty Sark 7.30 COMEDY Kevin McCarthy, Nick Dixon, Kae Kurd, Slim Up The Creek MUSIC Feel Good Band Pelton 9 JAZZ Hannes Riepler Quartet Oliver’s

Sunday 4

WHAT’S ON

GreenwichVisitor

FAMILY Rangoli Patterns For Diwali Cutty Sark 11.30, 2 KIDS Butterflies Albany 1, 3 TALK Undressing The Tudors & Stuarts Queen’s House 2 PERFORMANCE Lewisham Fringe Festival London Theatre TEA CONCERT Vanbrugh Ensemble Mozart, Schumann. St Margaret’s Church Lee. 4.30, £12 STORIES Shivers Greenwich Theatre 5 MUSIC Gillywood Rusty Bucket, Eltham. 5.30 MUSIC The Peas Pelton 6 TALENT Something For Sunday Vanbrugh 7 MUSIC Farhan Indig02 MUSIC GFMA Blues Earl of Chatham SE18 MUSIC Childish Gambino O2

Monday 5

MUSIC APPRECIATION Matthew Taylor Charlton House Library 10.15 MUSIC Tessa Uys & Ben Schoeman Piano recital Blackheath Halls 1.10 PUB QUIZ Vanbrugh 8.30 JAZZ Beats In The Bar Blackheath Halls 7.30 JAZZ Ladies Night Oliver’s

Tuesday 6

MUSIC Trinity Laban Recital ORNC chapel 1.05 PLAY Not I Albany 1.30 PERFORMANCE Lewisham Fringe Festival London Theatre MUSIC English folk Star & Garter JAZZ Johnny & Co Oliver’s

Wednesday 7

PLAY Not I Albany 7.30 PERFORMANCE Lewisham Fringe Festival London Theatre PLAY Lest We Forget Greenwich Theatre 7.30 WOOLLIES Knitting club Pelton JAZZ Jam session Oliver’s

Thursday 8

MUSIC London Int Exhibition of Early Music Blackheath Halls 10.30-5.30 MUSIC Trinity Laban Historically Informed Performance Part of Int Early Music Festival All Saints, Blackheath 1 MUSIC Venus Blazing: Rubythroat St Alfege 1.05 MUSIC Da Camera Part of Int Early Music Festival. All Saints, Blackheath 5.30


GreenwichVisitor THE

November

PERFORMANCE Lewisham Fringe Festival London Theatre MUSIC Lisa Knapp Albany 7.30 PLAY The Unknown Soldier Cutty Sark 7.45 MUSIC Chelys Viol Consort with Dame Emma Kirkby & Jamie Akkers Part of Int Early Music Festival. St Margaret’s, Blackheath 7.45 JAZZ Beats In The Bar Oliver’s

Friday 9

MUSIC London Int Exhibition of Early Music Blackheath Halls 10.30-5 MUSIC Early Music Young Ensemble Finals Part of Int Early Music Festival St Margaret’s, Blackheath 1 MUSIC Helena Svigelj, Jinah Shim Cello and piano. ORNC chapel 1.05 MUSIC Silvia Berchtold Part of Int Early Music Festival. All Saints, Blackheath 5 ASTRONOMY An Evening With The Stars Royal Observatory from 5.25 MUSIC 90s Fest London Vol 2 Indig02 PERFORMANCE Lewisham Fringe Festival London Theatre DANCE Julie Cunningham & Co Laban 7.30 MUSIC Hejira Albany 7.30 PLAY The Canaries GFMA event, Charlton House 8 MUSIC Alternative History Part of Int Early Music Festival. All Saints, Blackheath 8 COMEDY Andy Fury, Adam Hess, Simon Brodkin Up The Creek JAZZ Francesco Lo Castro Oliver’s

Saturday 10

SALE Books/Arts&Crafts Age Exchange 10-4 ART Lee Green Open Studios 40 artists at 18 venues. Free 12-6. leegreenopenstudios.com MUSIC London Int Exhibition of Early Music Blackheath Halls 10.30-5 MUSIC Junior Trinity Part of Int Early Music Festival. All Saints, Blackheath 1 MUSIC Olive Murray, Christopher Foreman Soprano & piano recital. St Alfege 1.05 PERFORMANCE Lewisham Fringe Festival London Theatre PLAY The Canaries GFMA event, Charlton House 2, 8 MUSIC Flanders Recorder Quartet Part of Int Early Music Festival. All Saints, Blackheath 5 ASTRONOMY An Evening With The Stars Royal Observatory from 5.25 FILM/OPERA Marnie From NY Met. Picturehouse 5.55 COMBAT Muay Thai GP Indig02 MUSIC Thomas Tallis Society Choir & Orchestra of The Sixteen Part of Int Early Music Festival. St Alfege 7.45 COMEDY Chris Mayo, Erich McElroy, Mike Gunn, Simon Brodkin Up The Creek MUSIC Dizzy Lizzy Pelton 9 JAZZ Nick Meier Oliver’s

Sunday 11

ART Lee Green Open Studios 40 artists at 18 venues. Free 12-6. leegreenopenstudios.com TENNIS Nitto ATP Finals O2 PERFORMANCE Lewisham Fringe Festival London Theatre FILM/BALLET La Sylpide From the Bolshoi. Picturehouse 3 MUSIC Jazzy Jeff Jam Pelton 6 FESTIVAL Diwali Celebrations Blackheath Halls 6.30 TALENT Something For Sunday Vanbrugh 7 MUSIC Wande Coal Indig02

Monday 12

MUSIC APPRECIATION Matthew Taylor Charlton House Library 10.15 TENNIS Nitto ATP Finals O2 DRAMA Shakespeare Schools Festival Albany 7 MUSIC Folk & Blues Bob Hope Theatre TALK Tobias Capwell: The King’s New Armour Arts Society Greenwich event, King William Court, University of Greenwich 7.45 PUB QUIZ Vanbrugh 8.30 JAZZ Ladies Night Oliver’s

Tuesday 13

TENNIS Nitto ATP Finals O2 MUSIC Jennifer Barwise, Chiara Naldi, Nedelina Zhleva Soprano, piano and guitar recital. ORNC chapel 1.05 DRAMA Shakespeare Schools Festival Albany 7 FILM Tkaronto Part of Indigenous Cultures Season. NMM 7 PERFORMANCE Lewisham Fringe Festival

London Theatre FILM/BALLET La Bayardère From Covent Garden. Picturehouse 7.15 MUSIC English folk Star & Garter JAZZ Beats In The Bar Blackheath Halls 7.30 COMEDY Tom Allen & Friends Cutty Sark 7.30 TALK David Waller: Henry Maudslay, Woolwich Engineer Greenwich Industrial History Society event, Age Exchange 7.30 JAZZ Johnny & Co Oliver’s

Wednesday 14

TENNIS Nitto ATP Finals O2 PERFORMANCE Lewisham Fringe Festival London Theatre DRAMA Shakespeare Schools Festival Albany 7 FILM/PLAY Troilus & Cressida From the RSC. Picturehouse 7 MUSIC Jette Parker Young Artists Blackheath Halls 7.30 SHOW Privates On Parade Bob Hope Th 7.45 DANCE Flawless Grand Finale Indig02 DANCE Marina Collard Laban 6.30, 8 MUSIC Jette Parker Young Artists Blackheath Halls 7.30 WOOLLIES Knitting club Pelton JAZZ Jam session Oliver’s

Thursday 15

TENNIS Nitto ATP Finals O2 MUSIC Venus Blazing: Trinity Laban Sinfonia Strings St Alfege 1.05 PERFORMANCE Lewisham Fringe Festival London Theatre DRAMA Shakespeare Schools Festival Albany 7 SHOW Privates On Parade Bob Hope Th 7.45 JAZZ Beats In The Bar Oliver’s

Friday 16

TALENT Something For Sunday Vanbrugh 7 STORIES Olivia Armstrong Cutty Sark 7.30

Monday 19

MUSIC APPRECIATION Matthew Taylor Charlton House Library 10.15 MUSIC Siân Phillips & Per Rundberg Violin and piano recital Blackheath Halls 1.10 MUSIC Rossini Concert Fan Museum 7 PUB QUIZ Vanbrugh 8.30 JAZZ Ladies Night Oliver’s

Tuesday 20

MUSIC Trinity Laban Recital ORNC chapel 1.05 FILM Angry Inuk Part of Indigenous Cultures Season. NMM 7 MUSIC Jess Glynne O2 FILM/PLAY The Madness Of George III From the NT. Picturehouse 5.55 MUSIC English folk Star & Garter JAZZ Johnny & Co Oliver’s

Wednesday 21

MUSIC Trinity Laban Harps Queen’s Ho 1 FAMILY Lantern Parade & Christmas Lights Greenwich Market 4 LIGHT OPERA The Pirates Of Penzance Albany 7.30 MUSIC Florence & The Machine O2 WOOLLIES Knitting club Pelton JAZZ Jam session Oliver’s

Thursday 22

ARTS London Design Festival Greenwich Market 10-5 MUSIC Trinity Laban Recital St Alfege 1.05 TALK Giles: His Life, Times & Cartoons Arts Society Blackheath event, St Mary’s Church Hall, Cresswell Pk 2.30 LIGHT OPERA Pirates Of Penzance Albany 7.30 MUSIC Florence & The Machine O2 MUSIC Trinity Laban Jazz Orchestra Blackheath Halls 8 JAZZ Ineza Quintet Oliver’s

Friday 23

ARTS London Design Festival Greenwich Market 10-5 MUSIC Sophie Webber Cello. ORNC chapel 1.05 PANTO Robinson Crusoe Greenwich Theatre 5 ASTRONOMY An Evening With The Stars Royal Observatory from 5.25 MUSIC Venus Blazing: Trinity Laban Symphony Orchestra Blackheath Halls 6 STUNTS Nitro Circus O2 LIGHT OPERA The Pirates Of Penzance Albany 7.30 MUSIC George Michael Tribute Indig02 COMEDY Luke Toulson, Thanya Moore, Jarred Christmas Up The Creek MUSIC Galileo 7 Pelton 9 JAZZ Pixie & The Gypsies Oliver’s

TENNIS Nitto ATP Finals O2 MUSIC Trinity Laban Guitars ORNC chapel 1.05 PERFORMANCE Stories In The Dark NMM 6 COMEDY Charged Tramshed 7 MUSIC Shatta Wale Indig02 PLAYS Lewisham Fringe Festival London Th MUSIC The King’s School Canterbury St Alfege 7.30 MUSIC First World War Commemoration Blackheath Halls 7.30 SHOW Privates On Parade Bob Hope Th 7.45 TALK Phillip Laurie: The Geology Of London Blackheath Scientific Society, Mycenae Ho 7.45 MUSIC Sea Shanties & Songs Mycenae Ho 8 COMEDY Marcus Brigstocke Saturday 24 Blackheath Halls 8 COMEDY Johnny Candon, George Zach, Gavin KIDS 3 Little Pig Tales Blackheath Halls 11, 3 FAMILY Drop-In Wildlife Centre, Greenwich Webster Up The Creek Park 1-4 JAZZ Maciek Pysz Quartet Oliver’s BALLET Sleeping Beauty Mycenae House 1, 3.30 Saturday 17 MUSIC Katherine Clarke Viola St Alfege 1.05 LITERATURE Lost In A Book Festival PANTO Robinson Crusoe Greenwich Th 2, 7 NMM 10.30-4.30 LIGHT OPERA The Pirates Of Penzance KIDS The Frog & The Princess Albany 2.30, 7.30 Blackheath Halls 11, 3 FOOTBALL Charlton Athletic v Bristol Rovers. ART Lee Green Open Studios 40 artists at 18 The Valley 3 venues. Free 12-6. leegreenopenstudios.com RUGBY Blackheath v Loughborough TENNIS Nitto ATP Finals O2 Students Well Hall 3 MUSIC Aimee Presswood, Neus Peris Soprano ASTRONOMY An Evening With The Stars & piano recital. St Alfege 1.05 Royal Observatory from 5.25 PERFORMANCE Lewisham Fringe Festival MUSIC Sounds Of The World Tramshed 7 London Theatre MUSIC Shalamar Indig02 COMEDY Charged Tramshed 7 MUSIC Blackheath Goes Gospel MUSIC Blackheath Halls Orchestra Blackheath Halls 7.30 Blackheath Halls 7.30 STUNTS Nitro Circus O2 COMBAT BKB14 Indig02 MUSIC BBC Singers, Tom Gardner Cutty Sark 8 MUSIC Steam Down Collective COMEDY Ian Smith, Jarred Christmas, Nick Part of London Jazz Festival. Albany 7.30 Dixon, Phil Butler Up The Creek SHOW Privates On Parade Bob Hope Th 7.45 MUSIC Modern Apes Pelton 9 COMEDY Johnny Candon, Fin Taylor, Gavin JAZZ The New York Jazz Exchange Oliver’s Webster Up The Creek Sunday 25 MUSIC SKAbretta Pelton 9 BIRDWATCHING Guided Walk Blackheath JAZZ Nick Meier Oliver’s Gate, Greenwich Park 8.30 Sunday 18 KIDS Mischief & Mystery In Moomin Valley LITERATURE Lost In A Book Festival Albany 1, 3 NMM 10.30-4.30 MUSIC Dennis Greaves’ Blues Jam Pelton 6 FAMILY Blackheath Christmas Fair CHAT Noel Fitzpatrick: Supervet O2 Blackheath Halls 10.30-4.45 TALENT Something For Sunday Vanbrugh 7 ART Lee Green Open Studios 40 artists at 18 MUSIC Acadelia Indig02 venues. Free 12-6. leegreenopenstudios.com Monday 26 TENNIS Nitto ATP Finals O2 MUSIC APPRECIATION Matthew Taylor KIDS The Chit Chat Chalk Show Albany 1, 3 FAMILY Low-Tide Walk Creekside Discovery Centre 2-4 PERFORMANCE Lewisham Fringe Festival London Theatre MUSIC Steve Boltz Rusty Bucket, Eltham. 5 MUSIC Royal Greenwich Brass Band St Alfege 5 Continued on Page 16 MUSIC Bruise Electric Pelton 6

November 2018 Page 15


GreenwichVisitor THE

November 2018 Page 16

Venues

Albany, Deptford Lounge: Douglas Way SE8 4AG. 020 8692 4446 thealbany.org.uk Bakehouse Theatre: Age Exchange, Blackheath Village SE3 9LA. 020 8318 9105 Blackheath Conservatoire: 19-21 Lee Rd SE3 9RQ. 020 8852 0234 conservatoire.org.uk Blackheath Halls: 23 Lee Road SE3 9RQ. 020 8463 0100. blackheathhalls.com Bob Hope Theatre: Wythfield Rd SE9 5TG. 020 8850 3702. bobhopetheatre.co.uk The Centre: New Eltham Methodist Ch, Footscray Rd. newelthammethodist.org.uk Charlton House: Charlton Rd SE7 8RP. 020 8856 3951 Churchill Theatre: High St, Bromley BR1 1HA. 0844 871 7620 Clarendon Hotel: Montpelier Row SE3 0RW. 020 8318 4321. clarendonhotel.com Creekside Discovery Centre: Creekside SE8 0208 692 9922 creeksidecentre.org.uk The Duke: 125 Creek Rd SE8 3BU. 020 8469 8260 The Eltham Centre: 2 Archery Road SE9 1HA. 020 8921 4344 Eltham Palace: Court Yard SE9 5QE. 020 8294 2548. english-heritage.org.uk The Forum: Trafalgar Rd SE10 9EQ. 0208 853 5212. office@forumatgreenwich.org Greenwich Communications Centre: 164 Trafalgar Rd SE10 9TZ. 020 8269 2103 Greenwich Dance: Borough Hall SE10 8RE. 020 8293 9741 greenwichdance.org.uk Greenwich Heritage Centre: Artillery Square, Royal Arsenal, Woolwich SE18 4DX Greenwich Theatre: Crooms Hill SE10 8ES. 020 8858 7755. greenwichtheatre.org.uk Greenwich West Community Centre: 141 Greenwich High Rd SE10 8JA Guard House: No1 Street, Woolwich Arsenal SE18 6GH Laban Theatre: Creekside SE8 3DZ. 020 8463 0100 www.trinitylaban.ac.uk London Theatre: 443 New Cross Rd SE14 6TA. 020 8694 1888. thelondontheatre.com Made In Greenwich: 324 Creek Rd SE10 9SW madeingreenwich.co.uk Mycenae House: 90 Mycenae Rd SE3 7SE 020 8858 1749 mycenaehouse.co.uk National Maritime Museum: Romney Rd, SE10 9BJ 020 8858 0045 www.nmm.ac.uk 02, Indig02, Building 6, Brooklyn Bowl: 0844 8560202 www.theo2.co.uk Old Royal Naval Coll, Discover: SE10 9LW. 020 8269 4799 oldroyalnavalcollege.org Oliver’s: 9 Nevada St SE10 9JL. 020 8858 3693 www.oliversjazzbar.co.uk Pelton Arms: 23-5 Pelton Street SE10 9PQ 020 8858 0572. peltonarms.com Prince Of Greenwich: 72 Royal Hill SE10 8RT 020 8692 6089 St Alfege: Greenwich Church St. 020 8853 0687. st-alfege.org Severndroog Castle: Off Shooters Hill SE18 3RT. severndroogcastle.org.uk The Star And Garter: 60 Old Woolwich Rd SE10 9NY. 020 8305 1144 Steinberg Studio: 137 Vanbrugh Hill SE10 9HP. steinbergduo.com Tramshed Theatre: 51-53 Woolwich New Rd SE18 6ES. 020 8854 1316 glypt.co.uk Trinity Laban: King Charles Court SE10 9JF. 020 8463 0100. trinitylaban.ac.uk Up The Creek (UTC): 302 Creek Rd SE10 9SW. 020 8858 4581. up-the-creek.com Woodlands Farm: 331 Shooters Hill Rd 8319 8900 thewoodlandsfarmtrust.org.uk

Long-term events

MARKETS Greenwich Market: 10-5.30. Sat and Sun: Arts & crafts, food, fresh produce. Tues, Wed: Food, fresh produce, homewares. Thurs: food, antiques & collectables, crafts. Fri: Food, arts & crafts, antiques & collectibles Greenwich Vintage Market: 8am-6pm Tues, Thurs, Sat, Sun. Moonlight market 8am-10pm last Friday of the month Clocktower Market: 166 Greenwich High Rd. Sat, Sun 10-4. 50 quirky stalls specialising in vintage, retro and antiques. 07940 914204 Blackheath Farmers’ Market: Blackheath Station, 10-2 every Sun. lfm.org EXHIBITIONS/CRAFTS/COMMUNITY Fan Museum: The Romantic Age: European Fans 1810-1840. Closed Mondays. 12 Crooms Hill, Greenwich. 020 8305 1441 fan-museum.org.uk Old Royal Naval College: The Visitor Centre, daily. ornc.org Blackheath Halls: blackheathhalls.com Age Exchange: Carers’ group Mon, knitters Thurs, preschool rhyme-time Fri. Old Bakehouse, Bennett Pk SE3 9LA. age-exchange.org.uk. National Maritime Museum: Insight Astronomy Photographer Of The Year, daily 10am-5pm. Till 5 May 2019. rmg.co.uk Royal Observatory: Hubble Vision, till 12 May 2019. rmg.co.uk Queen’s House: Mat Collishaw: The Mask Of Youth Pt 2. Daily. rmg.co.uk Blackheath Bowling Club: Practice every Thus 2.30 nr Ranger’s House The Forum: Disabled drop-ins, mums’ groups, kids’ classes, advice. Trafalgar Rd SE10 9EQ. 020 8853 5212 Greenwich Heritage Centre: Artillery Square SE18 4DX. 020 8854 2452 Greenwich Gallery: Exhibition & sale of Jack Rake paintings. Linear House, Peyton Place SE10 8RS Civil Service Retirement Fellowship: St Alfege Hall 3rd Tues each month 11am GWest Gallery: Greenwich West Centre 141 Greenwich High Rd SE10 9JA WALKS Greenwich Guided Walks: Local experts. Walks daily at 12.15 and 2.15 from the Greenwich Tourist Information Centre. £8, £7 cons. Greenwich Tour Guides Association 07575772298 guides@greenwichtours.co.uk Rich Sylvester: Guide, historian, storyteller. 07833 538143. richs@onetel.com Dotmaker: Alternative guided walks. dotmakertours.co.uk FAMILY ACTIVITIES National Maritime Museum: Explore Saturdays. Free. Performance and storytelling for over-5s from noon. Discover Sundays. Free. Activities for families from 11.30am. Play Tuesdays. Free. For under-5s from 10.30

Charlton House Library 10.15 PANTO Robinson Crusoe Greenwich Th 2, 7 MUSIC Colfe’s School St Alfege 6 MUSIC Celebrate Royal Greenwich Blackheath Halls 7 MUSIC Ennio Morricone O2 PUB QUIZ Vanbrugh 8.30 JAZZ Ladies Night Oliver’s

Tuesday 27

MUSIC Celebrate Royal Greenwich Blackheath Halls 7 FILM Tanna Part of Indigenous Cultures Season. NMM 7 MUSIC The Four Tops/The Temptations O2 PERFORMANCE A Christmas Carol Greenwich Theatre Studio 7.30 MUSIC English folk Star & Garter JAZZ Simon Purcell & Special Guests Oliver’s

Wednesday 28

PANTO Robinson Crusoe Greenwich Th 10 PERFORMANCE A Christmas Carol Greenwich Theatre Studio 2.30, 7.30 MUSIC Megan Storer, Noelia Cotuna Flute and harp recital. Blackheath Halls 6 WOOLLIES Knitting club Pelton JAZZ Jam session Oliver’s

Thursday 29

PANTO Robinson Crusoe Greenwich Th 10 MUSIC Trinity Laban Guitars St Alfege 1.05 MUSIC Venus Blazing: TL Chorus/ORNC Choir Blackheath Halls 7.30 FILM/MUSICAL The King & I From London Palladium. Picturehouse 7.30 JAZZ Beats In The Bar Oliver’s

Friday 30

MUSIC Trinity Laban recital Age Exchange 12 MUSIC Trinity Laban Harps ORNC chapel 1.05 PANTO Robinson Crusoe Greenwich Theatre 7 MUSIC Pete Tong Ibiza Classics O2 MUSIC The Stylistics Indig02 MUSIC High Masekela Tribute GFMA event, Mycenae House 7 COMEDY Sean Lock Blackheath Halls 8 COMEDY Johnny Cochrane, Hayley Ellis, Rudi Lickwood Up The Creek JAZZ Luna Cohen Oliver’s

SatDecember 1

CRAFT Lino Printing Card Workshop Charlton House 10, 2 KIDS Art & Design Club NMM 10-1 FAMILY Constellations Cutty Sark 11, 2 PANTO Robinson Crusoe Greenwich Th 2, 7 MUSIC Festive Family Sing-A-Long Blackheath Halls 3 FILM Star Wars: The Last Jedi (2107) Royal Observatory 6.45 MUSIC Pete Tong Ibiza Classics O2 MUSIC Taiko Meantime Blackheath Halls 8 JAZZ Wild Card Oliver’s

Sunday 2

FAMILY Constellations Cutty Sark 11, 2 MUSIC Palisander Blackheath Halls 11, 3 KIDS Pinocchio Albany 11, 2 FAMILY Xmas Fair Woodlands Farm Trust 11-3 PANTO Robinson Crusoe Greenwich Th 1, 5 TALK Undressing The Tudors & Stuarts Queen’s House 2 MUSIC Frankie Valli & The Four Seasons O2 MUSIC Simon Dominic, Elo, DJ Pumkin Indig02 TALENT Something For Sunday Vanbrugh 7

December

MUSIC Shane Hampsheir’s Christmas Swingalong Bob Hope Theatre 7.30 MUSIC Blues Night GFMA event, Earl of Chatham, Woolwich 7.30 COMEDY Rich Hall’s Hoedown Blackheath Halls 8

DISCO Haven’t Stopped Dancing Yet! Blackheath Halls 7.30

Sunday 9

Monday 3

KIDS Pinocchio Albany 10.30, 1 PANTO Robinson Crusoe Greenwich Th 2, 7 MUSIC Turning Of The Year Blackheath Halls 7 FILM/BALLET The Nutcracker From Covent Garden. Picturehouse 7.15 MUSIC Ms Lauryn Hill O2 PUB QUIZ Vanbrugh 8.30 JAZZ Ladies Night Oliver’s

Tuesday 4

KIDS Pinocchio Albany 10.30, 1 MUSIC PuzzlePiece Opera ORNC chapel 1.05 MUSIC Turning Of The Year Blackheath Halls 7 MUSIC English folk Star & Garter JAZZ Beats In The Bar Oliver’s

Wednesday 5

PANTO Robinson Crusoe Greenwich Theatre 10 KIDS Pinocchio Albany 10.30, 1 MUSIC Turning Of The Year Blackheath Halls 7 MUSIC Years & Years O2 WOOLLIES Knitting club Pelton PERFORMANCE Laika: Lost In Space London Theatre 8 JAZZ Jam session Oliver’s

Thursday 6

PANTO Robinson Crusoe Greenwich Th 10, 2 KIDS Pinocchio Albany 10.30, 1 MUSIC Trinity Laban Saxophone Dept St Alfege 1.05 MUSIC Turning Of The Year Blackheath Halls 7 FILM/PLAY Antony & Cleopatra From NT Picturehouse 7 MUSIC Def Leppard O2 CABARET Cocoa Butter Club’s Winter Wonderland Albany 8 JAZZ Beats In The Bar Oliver’s

Friday 7

MUSIC Trinity Laban recital ORNC chapel 1.05 PANTO Robinson Crusoe Greenwich Th 2, 7 MUSICAL Cabaret Laban 2.30, 7.30 ASTRONOMY An Evening With The Stars Royal Observatory, from 5.25 MUSIC Bee Gees’ Tribute Indig02 MUSIC Trinity Laban Symphony Orchestra Blackheath Halls 7.30 MUSIC KT Bush Band Mycenae House 7.30 CABARET Cocoa Butter Club’s Winter Wonderland Albany 8

Saturday 8

KIDS Knitmas: A Winter Yarn Greenwich Theatre Studio 10.30 KIDS Pinocchio Albany 11, 2 PANTO Robinson Crusoe Greenwich Th 1, 5 PANTO Snow White Tramshed 2, 5 TALENT Something For Sunday Vanbrugh 7

Monday 10

KIDS Pinocchio Albany 10.30, 1 KIDS Knitmas: A Winter Yarn Greenwich Theatre Studio 11, 2 CAROLS Trinity Laban Choir ORNC chapel 6 TALK Nigel Bates: In The Kingdom Of The Sweets Arts Society Greenwich event, King William Court, University of Greenwich 7.45 PUB QUIZ Vanbrugh 8.30 JAZZ Ladies Night Oliver’s

Tuesday 11

KIDS Pinocchio Albany 10.30, 1 KIDS Knitmas: A Winter Yarn Greenwich Theatre Studio 11, 2 MUSIC Mariah Carey O2 MUSIC English folk Star & Garter JAZZ Johnny & Co Oliver’s

Wednesday 12

KIDS Pinocchio Albany 10.30, 1 KIDS Knitmas: A Winter Yarn Greenwich Theatre Studio 11, 2 PANTO Robinson Crusoe Greenwich Theatre 7 MUSIC Josh Groban O2 WOOLLIES Knitting club Pelton JAZZ Jam session Oliver’s

Thursday 13

KIDS Pinocchio Albany 10.30, 1 MUSIC Trinity Laban recital St Alfege 1.05 PANTO Robinson Crusoe Greenwich Th 2, 7 MUSIC The Pretty Things & Guests Indig02 MUSIC The War On Drugs O2

Friday 14

KIDS Knitmas: A Winter Yarn Greenwich Theatre Studio 11 MUSIC Trinity Laban recital ORNC chapel 1.05 PANTO Robinson Crusoe Greenwich Theatre 2, 7 LECTURE Dr Jonathan Nichols: NASA mission to Jupiter Royal Observatory 6.45 MUSIC Madness O2 MUSIC Funda Arar Indig02 OPERA Thea Musgrave’s A Christmas Carol Laban 7.30 MUSIC Glenn Tilbrook Blackheath Halls 8

Saturday 15

Picturehouse 5.55 MUSIC The Dualers Indig02 MUSIC Icarus Club Blackheath Halls 7.30 MUSIC Jeff Wayne’s War Of The Worlds O2

Sunday 16

KIDS Knitmas: A Winter Yarn Greenwich Theatre Studio 10.30 KIDS Pinocchio Albany 11, 2 FAMILY Low-Tide Walk Creekside Discovery Centre 11-1 PANTO Robinson Crusoe Greenwich Th 1, 5 PANTO Snow White Tramshed 2, 5 TALENT Something For Sunday Vanbrugh 7 MUSIC Handel’s Messiah ORNC chapel 7 OPERA Christmas At Sea Cutty Sark 7.30 MUSIC Paul McCartney O2

Monday 17

KIDS Pinocchio Albany 10.30, 1 KIDS Knitmas: A Winter Yarn Greenwich Theatre Studio 11, 2 MUSIC Brandenburg Ensemble Blackheath Halls 1.10 PUB QUIZ Vanbrugh 8.30 JAZZ Ladies Night Oliver’s

Tuesday 18

KIDS Pinocchio Albany 10.30, 1 KIDS Knitmas: A Winter Yarn Greenwich Theatre Studio 11, 2 TEA DANCE Blackheath Halls 1.30 MUSIC English folk Star & Garter JAZZ Johnny & Co Oliver’s

Wednesday 19

KIDS Pinocchio Albany 10.30, 1 KIDS Knitmas: A Winter Yarn Greenwich Theatre Studio 11 PANTO Robinson Crusoe Greenwich Th 2, 7 MUSIC Nile Rodgers & Chic O2 WOOLLIES Knitting club Pelton JAZZ Jam session Oliver’s

Thursday 20

KIDS Pinocchio Albany 10.30, 1 MUSIC Trinity Laban recital St Alfege 1.05 PANTO Robinson Crusoe Greenwich Th 2, 7 MUSIC The Overtones Indig02

Friday 21

KIDS Knitmas: A Winter Yarn Greenwich Theatre Studio 11 PANTO Robinson Crusoe Greenwich Th 2, 7 ASTRONOMY An Evening With The Stars Royal Observatory, from 5.25

Saturday 22

KIDS Art & Design Club NMM 10-1 KIDS Knitmas: A Winter Yarn Greenwich Theatre Studio 11 KIDS Pinocchio Albany 11, 2 FAMILY Drop-In Wildlife Centre, Greenwich Park 1-4 PANTO Robinson Crusoe Greenwich Theatre 1, 5 PANTO Snow White Tramshed 2, 5 FOOTBALL Charlton Athletic v Gillingham. The Valley 3 ASTRONOMY An Evening With The Stars Royal Observatory, from 5.25

KIDS Art & Design Club NMM 10-1 KIDS Art & Design Club NMM 10-1 KIDS Knitmas: A Winter Yarn FAMILY Astronomy & Islam Royal Obs 10 Greenwich Theatre Studio 11 FAMILY A Stick Man’s Christmas KIDS Pinocchio Albany 11, 2 Woodlands Farm Trust 10-12.30 BALLET Sleeping Beauty KIDS Knitmas: A Winter Yarn Sunday 23 Blackheath Halls 1.30, 3.45 Greenwich Theatre Studio 11 KIDS Knitmas: A Winter Yarn PANTO Robinson Crusoe KIDS Pinocchio Albany 11, 2 Greenwich Theatre Studio 10.30 Greenwich Theatre 2, 7 PANTO Robinson Crusoe Greenwich The 2, 7 KIDS Pinocchio Albany 11, 2 PANTO Snow White Tramshed 2, 5 KIDS Card-Making Charlton House 2 PANTO Robinson Crusoe Greenwich Th 1, 5 OPERA Thea Musgrave’s A Christmas Carol PANTO Snow White Tramshed 2, 5 PANTO Snow White Tramshed 2, 5 Laban 2.30, 7.30 MUSICAL Cabaret Laban 2.30, 7.30 FILM/BALLET The Nutcracker From Bolshoi. FOOTBALL Charlton Athletic RUGBY Blackheath v Chinnor Well Hall 3 200year-old year-oldfarmhouse farmhouseininAndalucía, Andalucía,Spain Spain Picturehouse 3 200 v AFC Wimbledon. The Valley 3 ASTRONOMY An Evening With The Stars TALENT Something For Sunday Vanbrugh 7 200 year-old farmhouse in Andalucía, Perfect for family and group holidays year-old in Andalucía, Spain Perfect for family and group FILM/OPERA La Traviata Fromholidays NY Met. Spain Royal200 Observatory, fromfarmhouse 5.25

ALMOND HILL HILL HOUSE HOUSE ALMOND ALMOND ALMOND HILL HOUSEHILL HOUSE ALMOND HILL HOUSE

200Perfect year-oldforfarmhouse ingroup Andalucía, Spain Perfect for family and group holidays family and holidays Perfect for family and group holidays

ALMOND HILL HOUSE 200 year-old farmhouse in Andalucía, Spain Perfect for family and group holidays

Monday 24

KIDS Knitmas: A Winter Yarn Greenwich Theatre Studio 10.30 KIDS Pinocchio Albany 11, 2 ALMOND HILL HOUSE PANTO Robinson Crusoe Greenwich Th 1, 5 200 year-old farmhouse in Andalucía, Spain PUB QUIZ Vanbrugh 8.30 200 year-old farmhouse Andalucía, SpainSpainJAZZ Ladies Night Oliver’s 200 year-oldinfarmhouse in Andalucía, Perfect for family and group holidays

ALMONDHILL HILLHOUSE HOUSE ALMOND

Perfect family and group holidays Perfect for family andforgroup holidays

Tuesday 25

Setinintwo twoacres acresof ofolive oliveand andalmond almondgroves groves Set HAPPY CHRISTMAS, EVERYONE! stunning mountain views large pool––yoga yoga hut Set two acres of olive and pool almond groves Set in two acres of olive andinalmond groves stunning mountain views ––large hut Set in two acres ofviews olive almond stunning mountain views large poolNevada, – yoga hut KIDS Knitmas: A Winter Yarn stunning mountain –and large pool –groves yoga hut –the Explore Moorish villages, Sierra Explore Moorish villages, the Sierra Nevada, stunning mountain views – large pool – yoga hut and magical Granada Greenwich Theatre Studio 11 beaches of the Costa Tropical Explore Moorish villages, the Sierra Nevada, Explore Moorish villages, Nevada, and magical Granada beachestheofSierra the Costa Tropical PANTO Robinson Crusoe Greenwich Th 2, 7 Explore Moorish the beaches ofmagical theNevada, Costa magical Granada SetTropical in two acresand of olive and almond groves beaches of the Costavillages, Tropical andSierra Granada stunning mountain views – large pool – yoga hut FAMILY Disney On Ice O2 6.30 beaches of the Costa Tropical and magical Granada WOOLLIES Knitting club Pelton Explore Moorish villages, the Sierra Nevada, Set in two acresbeaches of olive groves of theand Costaalmond Tropical and magical GranadaJAZZ Jam session Oliver’s Set in two acres of olive and almond groves Set in two acres of olive and almond groves stunning mountain views – large pool – yoga hut stunning mountain viewsalmondhillhouse.com – large pool – yoga hut stunning mountain views – large pool – yoga hut FAMILY Disney On Ice O2 10.30, 2.30 Explore Moorish villages, the Sierra Nevada, Explore Moorish villages, the Sierra Nevada, Explore Moorish villages, the Sierra Nevada, beaches of the Costa Tropical and magical Granada beaches of the Costa Tropical and magical Granada beaches of the Costa Tropical and magical Granada

Wednesday 26

almondhillhouse.com almondhillhouse.com almondhillhouse.com almondhillhouse.com almondhillhouse.com

almondhillhouse.com

Thursday 27

almondhillhouse.com almondhillhouse.com

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GreenwichVisitor THE

November 2018 Page 17


GreenwichVisitor THE

November 2018 Page 18

LIFE IN

January

with GAYNOR WINGHAM elthamarts@aol.co.uk @ElthamArts

KIDS Pinocchio Albany 11, 2 FAMILY Storm Shakers Cutty Sark 11, 2 MUSIC Trinity Laban recital St Alfege 1.05 PANTO Robinson Crusoe Greenwich Theatre 2, 7

Friday 28

KIDS Knitmas: A Winter Yarn Greenwich Theatre Studio 11 FAMILY Storm Shakers Cutty Sark 11, 2 KIDS Pinocchio Albany 11, 2 PANTO Robinson Crusoe Greenwich Theatre 2, 7 FAMILY Disney On Ice O2 2.30, 6.30

Saturday 29 ENCHANTING: Eltham Palace lit up

N

ovember! With the shops full of ideas for Christmas and the weather getting colder it’s time to cosy up and to brighten up your home! There are lots of Festive Fairs in schools, churches and in the community. With Christmas decorations sparkling and twinkling for trees, mantle shelves and for the outside for sale, no excuse for an undecorated house this year. Reindeer, Santa, elves and lots and lots of lights. hristmas wreathes can look stunning on the front door. Buy a ready-made one at local florists or join in with a workshop and have something you have made and is original. There are plenty of ideas online including video workshops or join with a local workshop. highlight for the winter season must be Enchanted Eltham! Our lovely Eltham Palace is transformed into a magical experience with light, colour and sound. A very enjoyable family outing. This is the second year that English Heritage have organised this event which runs from December 6 and is open certain days until December 22. We’ve booked our tickets already. Book your tickets online now as it is not to be missed. Wrap up warm as it could be chilly! See the Palace in a different light! emembrance Sunday is on November 11 and ven more poignant as it is the centenary of the end of World War One. Both of my grandfathers were on active service. Fortunately they survived, but two of my great uncles died. It is always a significant time for me as it is for many local people. The Remembrance Day parade down Eltham High Street to St John’s church and the War Memorial inscribed with those we lost is an important event in our calendar. he Bob Hope Theatre has a busy Autumn. Do check out their programme and book tickets. The pantomime for January this year is Aladdin, so another good family night out. Watch out for details of more panto fun in Eltham and New Eltham. Have a good month!

C A R T

This column is your chance to share your passion for the arts in Eltham. Tell me your news and views on 07976 355398 or emil elthamarts @aol.co.uk

MILES HEDLEY REVIEWS: THIS REALLY IS TOO MUCH

Angst (in their pants) This Really Is Too Much risked being exactly that – too much. Part dance, part spoken word, part slapstick, part feminist tract and all existential angst, the genrehopping show at Laban Theatre flirted dangerously and wilfully with disaster. But thanks to the skill and dynamism of the four performers from the Gracefool Collective, it turned out to be an intriguing and electrifying evening. Kate Cox, Sofia Edstrand, Rachel Fullegar and Rebecca Holmberg – who all jointly devised the piece – took as their starting point the old political battle-cry “You’ve never had it so good.” Using music ranging from Barry White to Vivaldi via Moondog and Handel, they used spoken word and dance to look at the way women are treated at work and in the home. Mostly it

KIDS Art & Design Club NMM 10-1 KIDS Knitmas: A Winter Yarn Greenwich Theatre Studio 10.30 FAMILY Disney On Ice O2 10.30, 2.30, 6.30 KIDS Pinocchio Albany 11, 2 PANTO Robinson Crusoe Greenwich Theatre 1, 5

Sunday 30

BIRDWATCHING Guided Walk Blackheath Gate, Greenwich Park 8.30am KIDS Knitmas: A Winter Yarn Greenwich Theatre Studio 10.30 FAMILY Disney On Ice O2 10.30, 2.30 PANTO Robinson Crusoe Greenwich Theatre 1, 5 TALENT Something For Sunday Vanbrugh 7

Monday 31

PANTO Robinson Crusoe Greenwich Theatre 11, 3 FAMILY Disney On Ice O2 2.30 FILM/CONCERT Berlin Philharmoniker Picturehouse 4 PUB QUIZ Vanbrugh 8.30 JAZZ Hogmanay Party Oliver’s CLUBBING Kisstory Indig02 9

Tues January 1 FOOTBALL Charlton Athletic v Walsall. The Valley 3 MUSIC English folk Star & Garter JAZZ Johnny & Co Oliver’s

Wednesday 2

FAMILY Disney On Ice O2 2.30 PANTO Robinson Crusoe Greenwich Theatre 7 WOOLLIES Knitting club Pelton JAZZ Jam session Oliver’s

Thursday 3

MUSIC Trinity Laban recital St Alfege 1.05 FAMILY Disney On Ice O2 2.30 PANTO Robinson Crusoe Greenwich Theatre 7

Friday 4

FAMILY Disney On Ice O2 2.30 PANTO Robinson Crusoe Greenwich Theatre 7 PANTO Aladdin Bob Hope Theatre 7.30

Saturday 5

FAMILY Disney On Ice O2 10.30, 2.30, 6.30 PANTO Robinson Crusoe involved, much like reality, Greenwich Theatre 2, 7 a vicious cycle of patriarchal put-downs and patronisation PANTO Aladdin Bob Hope Theatre 2, 5.30 FOOTBALL Charlton Athletic interspersed with bursts of v Sunderland. The Valley 3 female empowerment. RUGBY Blackheath v Plymouth Well Hall 3

There were neat vignettes, at once funny and sad, featuring the cast posing in their underwear as models for household goods. Another had Fullegar running pointlessly round and round the stage in six-inch stilettos and later as a beauty queen spouting Marxist economic theory. Such paradoxes - sometimes depressing, sometimes absurd but always apt seem to be the lifeblood of Gracefool and certainly this fascinating and important work was completely appropriate in today’s #MeToo world. My only quibble was that the show felt slightly off-kilter, needing more movement and fewer words to give its crucial message greater heft.

Sunday 6

FAMILY Disney On Ice O2 10.30, 2.30 PANTO Robinson Crusoe Greenwich Theatre 1, 5 PANTO Aladdin Bob Hope Theatre 2 TALENT Something For Sunday Vanbrugh 7 MUSIC Blues Night GFMA event, Earl of Chatham, Woolwich 7.30

Monday 7

PUB QUIZ Vanbrugh 8.30 JAZZ Ladies Night Oliver’s

Tuesday 8

MUSIC English folk Star & Garter JAZZ Johnny & Co Oliver’s

Wednesday 9

PANTO Robinson Crusoe Greenwich Theatre 1, 7 WOOLLIES Knitting club Pelton JAZZ Jam session Oliver’s

Thursday 10 PANTO Robinson Crusoe

Greenwich Theatre 1, 7 MUSIC Trinity Laban recital St Alfege 1.05

Friday 11

PANTO Robinson Crusoe Greenwich Theatre 2, 7 ASTRONOMY An Evening With The Stars Royal Observatory, from 5.25 PANTO Aladdin Bob Hope Theatre 7.30

Saturday 12

PANTO Aladdin Bob Hope Theatre 2, 5.30 PANTO Robinson Crusoe Greenwich Theatre 2, 7 ASTRONOMY An Evening With The Stars Royal Observatory, from 5.25 FILM/OPERA Adriana Lecouvreur NY Met Picturehouse 5.55 MUSIC The First Dance Blackheath Halls 7.30

Sunday 13

PANTO Robinson Crusoe Greenwich Theatre 1, 5 PANTO Aladdin Bob Hope Theatre 2 TALENT Something For Sunday Vanbrugh 7

Monday 14

PUB QUIZ Vanbrugh 8.30 JAZZ Ladies Night Oliver’s

Tuesday 15

TALK Richard Albanese: Small Ships & Boats, Trinity Buoy Wharf Greenwich Industrial History Society event, Age Exchange 7.30 MUSIC English folk Star & Garter JAZZ Johnny & Co Oliver’s

Wednesday 16

PLAY Dinosaur Pieces Greenwich Th 7.30 WOOLLIES Knitting club Pelton JAZZ Jam session Oliver’s

Thursday 17

MUSIC Trinity Laban recital St Alfege 1.05 BASKETBALL Washington Wizards v New York Knicks O2 6.30 PLAY Dinosaur Pieces Greenwich Th7.30

Friday 18

MUSIC The 1975 O2 PANTO Aladdin Bob Hope Theatre 7.30 PLAY Dinosaur Pieces Greenwich Th 7.30 TALK Steve Colclough: The Recovery Of The Tidal Thames & Its Fisheries Blackheath Scientific Society, Mycenae House 7.45

Saturday 19

PANTO Aladdin Bob Hope Theatre 2, 5.30 FOOTBALL Charlton Athletic v Accrington Stanley. The Valley 3 RUGBY Blackheath v Ampthill Well Hall 3 MUSIC The 1975 O2 PLAY Dinosaur Pieces Greenwich Theatre 7.30

Sunday 20

PANTO Aladdin Bob Hope Theatre 2 FILM/BALLET La Bayadère Bolshoi live Picturehouse 3 TALENT Something For Sunday Vanbrugh 7 MUSIC Open Mic UK Final Indig02

Monday 21

PLAY Oresteia Greenwich Theatre 4.30, 7.30 PUB QUIZ Vanbrugh 8.30 JAZZ Ladies Night Oliver’s

Tuesday 22

FILM/OPERA The Queen Of Spades Covent Garden. Picturehouse 6.45 GONGS National Television Awards O2 MUSIC English folk Star & Garter JAZZ Johnny & Co Oliver’s

Wednesday 23 WOOLLIES Knitting club Pelton JAZZ Jam session Oliver’s

Thursday 24

MUSIC Trinity Laban recital St Alfege 1.05 TALK Judy Roe: Cartier, Jeweller Of Royal Observatory, from 5.25 Genius Arts Society Blackheath event, St MUSIC Snow Patrol O2 Mary’s Church Hall, Cresswell Pk 2.30

Friday 25

ASTRONOMY An Evening With The Stars Royal Observatory, from 5.25 PANTO Aladdin Bob Hope Theatre 7.30

Saturday 26

Sunday 27

FAMILY Low-Tide Walk Creekside Discovery Centre 11-1 PANTO Aladdin Bob Hope Theatre 2 TALENT Something For Sunday Vanbrugh 7 MUSIC Davido O2

FAMILY Drop-In Wildlife Centre, Monday 28 Greenwich Park 1-4 PANTO Aladdin Bob Hope Theatre 2, 5.30 PUB QUIZ Vanbrugh 8.30 ASTRONOMY An Evening With The Stars JAZZ Ladies Night Oliver’s

Tuesday 29

MUSIC English folk Star & Garter JAZZ Johnny & Co Oliver’s

Wednesday 30

FILM/OPERA La Traviata Covent Garden Picturehouse 6.45 WOOLLIES Knitting club Pelton JAZZ Jam session Oliver’s

Thursday 31

MUSIC Trinity Laban recital St Alfege 1.05 FILM/PLAY I’m Not Running National Theatre


GreenwichVisitor THE

November 2018 Page 19

hanging out on cutty sark

HERE’S a wonderful photograph capturing the precarious work that goes in to keeping Cutty Sark looking ship shape through the seasons. Phillip Rainbird – whose images have graced our pages from time to time – took the shot of craftsmen suspended Send us a photo. Email: in mid air as they give the world-famous 139-year-old tea clipper in the heart of

SEND US YOUR PICTURE OF A PERFECT DAY

THINK of a team name and test yourself against our legendary quizmaster Deke. Still not authentic enough? Get off the sofa

Q: WHAT does £2million buy nowadays? A: This four-bed detached house in E g e r t o n D r i v e , We s t

and catch his leg-end-ary quiz at the Morden Arms in Circus Street, Greenwich, every Weds evening (except the first one each month).

Greenwich, built over three storeys. You’ll be pillars of the community! Call John Payne on 020 8012 4156.

DO YOU VINTAGE?

VINTAGE & CRAFT WINTER FAIR

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BUSHMOOR CRESCENT, SHOOTERS HILL LONDON, SE18 3EG Entry £2 (£1 with flyer/NUS card) Children under 16 free

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Wordsearch

Like it? Live it!

1 Who wrote Twilight series of novels? 2 Who wrote the novel Revolutionary Road, which was made into a successful feature film? 3 How old was the title character in the novel Lolita? 4 Who wrote the Waverley novels? 5 In the Harry Potter novels, who is the author of The Dream Oracle? 6 The film Trainspotting is from a novel by which author? 7 What was the name of the first full novel written by Charles Dickens? 8 Who wrote the novel Sex And The City? 9 Which 1969 film was based on Barry Hines’ novel A Kestrel For A Knave? 10 In which novel would you find Jo, Beth, Meg and Amy? Answers: 1 Stephenie Meyer. 2 Richard Yates. 3 12. 4 Sir Walter Scott. 5 Inigo Imago. 6 Irvine Welsh. 7 The Pickwick Papers. 8 Candace Bushnell. 9 Kes. 10 Little Women

The Pub Quiz

novel-ember BY BIRTHDAYQUIZ.CO.UK

Mystery object

matt@TheGreenwichVisitor.com

Greenwich some TLC. Thanks for your picture, Phillip. We love to see images of a memorable day here. Please email your photos and your details to Matt@ TheGreenwichVisitor.com. This edition marks the eight anniversary of our first edition, way back in November 2010. We’re proud to have been read by residents AND visitors every day since then. We hope you’ve enjoyed us!

GreenwichVisitor WANT TO ADVERTISE? OR TELL US YOUR STORY? Call Matt on 078O2 743324 Matt@TheGreenwich Visitor.com

HERE’S a remarkable yet unpreposessing part of our history. You’ll find it by the Thames Path. I repeat, you’ll find this by the

B E R O I I T P I J S A H C GK C H WA MU N A

C B I O R E K A R E S I

N I V L Y B R E D N E N

AR N S Y R L A B Y F Y B L K Y F A O A UM O S

IF you’ve read The Greenwich Visitor carefully this Wordsearch should be fairly easy: REMEMBRANCE; ROYAL; BRITISH; LEGION; SEAL; ECO; HENRY VIII; ARMOURY; ROPE WALK;

Thames Path. But what is it? Email your answer to Matt@ TheGreenwichVisitor.com. Last month: Ravensbourne University.

BMEME R ON E C OO N E H P F Y R D E R R A EW I UN L ADON E A AMY GWE R B I R U S E O S U R C N D R EWU NK R O YD H T I MS Z ROBINSON; CRUSOE; FRIDAY; ANDREW POLLARD; FAN; MUSEUM; S M I T H S O N I A N ; N E W; Y O R K ; ENDERBY; WHARF; JACK; RAKE; – Happy hunting. SCF

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GreenwichVisitor November 2018 Page 20 THE

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@billsrestaurant 30/10/2018 10:22

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The Greenwich Visitor November 2018  

Free newspaper guide for residents AND visitors to Greenwich, Blackheath, Eltham and neighbouring parts of south east London

The Greenwich Visitor November 2018  

Free newspaper guide for residents AND visitors to Greenwich, Blackheath, Eltham and neighbouring parts of south east London

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