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Energy Poverty In Growing Nations For many, having the energy we need to power our lives and work seems ordinary. However, the utilities we take for granted are still not available in places suffering from energy poverty. The International Energy Agency defines a lack of modern energy services—meaning household access to electricity and clean cooking facilities—as energy poverty. There are over one billion people in the world who do not have electricity in their homes, and over two billion people who cook with fuel sources that create indoor air pollution, such as wood or coal. The majority of energy poor people are in sub-Saharan Africa or Asia, with eighty-five percent affected living in rural areas. Energy poverty is a severe impairment to the economic and social growth of developing nations, as populations without energy access will continue to live in extreme poverty. Those without access to reliable, affordable sources of energy remain without even necessities needed to successfully live in the modern world. No lights to study by at night. No appliances to help preserve and prepare food. No power to charge a cell phone or run a medical test. In an increasingly globalized and interconnected world, these are not trivial luxuries. Energy access can connect the world’s poorest to the opportunities and resources they need to achieve a higher quality of life. Solutions to energy poverty vary, depending upon the location and needs of a household. The highest increases in energy access have been due to people moving into urban areas, so the majority of electrification projects are rural. The cost of grid extension to rural areas is most often prohibitive, so renewables are a common solution. Solar photovoltaic (PV) cells and wind turbines charge batteries to provide power at night or pump irrigation systems for more efficient food production. To meet greater energy demands, biomass or small hydropower systems may be deployed. These technologies have the advantage of having extremely cheap sources of fuel, but the high upfront costs discourage implementation. To fully eradicate energy poverty by 2030, the International Energy Agency estimates that the equivalent of forty-nine billion U.S.


Greenshine New Energy http://www.greenshine-solar.com

dollars would have to be invested in energy access projects every year. There has already been some reduction in energy poverty; between 2011 and 2013 an estimated nine million people gained access to electricity. Brazil and China have successfully moved toward universal electrification, with only one percent (Brazil) and three percent (China) of their total populations lacking access to electricity. Actions to relieve energy poverty are gaining traction. Current recommendations include creating universal modern energy access in the U.N.’s Post-2015 Development Agenda. In June 2013, the United States pledged to help double electricity access in Africa over the next five years with the Power Africa initiative. It has become apparent that in order to successfully lift people out of poverty, they need the energy access that so many of us in the developed world hardly notice. About GreenShine: http://www.greenshine-solar.com/ Greenshine New Energy, LLC. Specializes in developing and manufacturing customized solar powered lighting systems for a wide range of lighting applications. At Greenshine we specialize in solar street lights, garden lights, and lawn lights for outdoor applications. Our lights can be installed anywhere, especially areas where grid tied electricity is not available.


Energy poverty in growing nations