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GREENSBORO BOYS & GIRLS CLUB phase 1 project proposal

Rural Studio

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RURAL STUDIO | AN INTRODUCTION Auburn University Rural Studio began in 1993 as a component of its School of Architecture. The Rural Studio campus is located in Newbern, Alabama, ten miles south of Greensboro, Alabama. For the last two decades, Rural Studio has enabled small, supervised teams of students to design and build community projects and housing across West Alabama.

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HISTORY

Auburn University Rural Studio began as a program to improve living conditions in rural Alabama, simultaneously educating architecture students through a design and build process. The program was founded by Samuel Mockbee and Dennis K. Ruth, and is now in its nineteenth year. The current director, Andrew Freear, has built upon the original mission of the program by shifting the Studio’s focus toward community projects. A legacy of unique projects has helped develop students’ social conscience by providing them with first-hand knowledge of the necessary social, cultural, and technological concepts of designing and building within the framework of a community. Rural Studio has designed and built over one hundred structures in West Alabama and has educated more than five hundred architecture students in a service learning model that has received both national and international attention. The legacy that Rural Studio has created is also one of building knowledge. Previous projects serve as examples of not only what has been accomplished, but also the knowledge of how they were accomplished. Many projects completed by Rural Studio have a strong sense of sustainability: often materials are donated or come

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from left-overs of manufacturers. The use of these materials combined with the creativity of the students pushes the donations to places never imagined before. Lucy’s house, pictured on the following page, is one such example. The walls of the residence were constructed with carpet tiles donated from a major flooring compay. Above all, the studio has a strong sense of responsibility. All projects go through a mock-up phase that tests all aspects of structure and aesthetics. Therefore, when construction starts on the final building there is no question or mystery as to how everything will work.


Lucy’s/Carpet tile house Akron Boys & Girls Club Joanne’s House

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Architectural Record magazine cover, Lions Park Playscape, March 2012

Victoria & Albert Mesum 1:1 Exhibition London, England, Summer 2010

Museum of Modern Art, Small Scale Big Change Exhibition New York City, New York, October/January 2010/2011

RECOGNITION

Metropolis Magazine cover, 20K House XII, July/August 2009

Documentary film, By Big Beard Films 2010

Through the years Rural Studio has been recognized for pushing architectural and social limits. The projects and the program have received many awards and have been featured in numerous museums, galleries, magazines, tv and radio shows, blogs, and even a documentary.

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GREENSBORO BOYS & GIRLS CLUB The Greensboro Boys & Girls Club started when local citizens recognized a need for after-school activities. Many children were left unsupervised at home or in the streets. The club currently operates in two rooms of the Greensboro Recreation Center, a re-purposed National Guard Armory. Club programs and services promote and enhance the development of boys and girls by instilling a sense of competence, usefulness, belonging and influence. The club offers tutoring and homework help which provides children with one-on-one attention. The club also provides a recreation time which teaches life skills such as patience, sharing, and sportsmanship. Free play also encourages physical activity for kids. One of the most rewarding aspects of getting to work on this project has been being able to volunteer at the club on a weekly basis. We, the student design team, have been there since the club opened and have seen the club grow to fifty kids. The club goal is to reach one hundred daily members.

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In order to accommodate the growth and development of this new organization, we are proposing a new facility for the Boys & Girls Club. This new facility will be completed in two phases. The first phase will provide a learning center accompanied by administrative spaces. The second phase will complete the building with a recreation room and multipurpose activity space. As the first student design team, we are designing and building the learning center, a facility of 2,700 square feet. We would like to construct this building using ALPOLIC.


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HOW WE UNDERSTAND ALPOLIC ETHICS OF ALPOLIC

It is with great honor and appreciation that we have received the interest of ALPOLIC in making this project possible. We feel a partnership with ALPOLIC is appropriate for many reasons: ●● WE BELIEVE IN THE COMPANY’S ATTITUDE TOWARD SUSTAINABILITY -No waste policy reuse/repurpose old panels -Made of recycled material -Sustainable manufacturing process no VOC’s emmited -Finish reduces energy consumption of building ●● A PHILANTHROPHIC COMPANY -Donates material to: urban renewal projects disaster shelters educational groups ●● THE PRODUCT IS DURABLE -weatherproof -reduces maintenance cost -a finish material ●● EXCELLENT FIRE RATING ●● THERMAL CAPABILITIES

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OBSERVATIONS

We as the student design team made two main observations

about ALPOLIC:

●● 1. ALPOLIC is typically used as a flat

cladding system

●● 2. Even in non - cladding applications ALPOLIC is used as a sheet material applied to a structure


DIMENSIONS We understand that the available dimensions depend on the products, but ALPOLIC/fr is available with the following dimensions: Total thickness: 3mm, 4mm, or 6mm Standard panel sizes: 50” x 146” 62” x 146” 50” x 196” 62” x 196” Range of sizes: Width: 32.5" - 62" Length: 6' - 24' 2"

MANIPULATION | INSTALLATION

standard

panel

cut

custom

route

bend

fold

We understand that ALPOLIC can be processed in various manners to fabricate sharp angle bends or curves. Processes involve routing or cutting grooves in the ALPOLIC and then using a plate or break press to bend.

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HOW ABOUT FOLDING? As a team we began brainstorming about how the limits of the use of ALPOLIC could be pushed further. We believe the material has great untapped potential. With the donation of ALPOLIC sheets that the Rural Studio had already received, we were excited to immediately begin testing our assumptions. Initially, we performed several (crude) creep tests to observe the strength of the material. We then proceeded to test some alternative methods of joining multiple sheets of ALPOLIC in such a manner that could allow the material to act structurally.

FOLDING

Folding ALPOLIC already happens. It is a method to create a smooth seemless facade. However, we believe folding yields a much greater potential for the material by offering: 1. Rigidity 2. Structural stability 3. Insulative cavity 4. Interior and exterior finish

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ALPOLIC: A SYSTEM OF BUILDING BY FOLDING We found inspiration in the cover image of the ALPOLIC website. We knew that in order take the material to the next level we would need to bend it and fold it, a treatment of ALPOLIC that is already done with the typical cladding system.

There are many reasons why ALPOLIC would be great used as an entire building material:

In trying to do more with the material we also considered the sizes available to us and found them to be acceptable for constructing the framework of a building.

●● As a cladding material it allows us to expose

Using ALPOLIC will allow us to ceate a system that is STRUCTURE and CLADDING

●● Folding can create cavities that allow be infilled

●● By folding the material we can create a structure that will support the building

structure on the exterior

●● It will be a light

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weight building

the

for insulation to


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FOLDING A "KIT OF PARTS" Proceeding with the idea of folding ALPOLIC to create traditional construction framing members we have developed a "kit of parts." After many revisions, this "kit of parts" has evolved into a simplified system of columns and beams. The following calculations prove the structural effectiveness of each member. We are excited to pursue this idea as we believe the notion of maximizing the use of a single material may revolutionize building construction while creating durable as well as visually captivating architecture.

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COMPOSITE FOLDED COLUMNS & BEAMS

These columns and beams comprised of many parts create air spaces that allow for venting, waterproofing, and insulating. Also, multiple surfaces provide sufficient area for load bearing as well as fastening. *The colors represented are for diagrammatic purposes only

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A1

C1

GENERAL EQUATIONS M = w ∙ (L² /8)

σA = TAl / AAl T(d) = RL ∙ L

/2 - (w ∙ L /2 ) ∙ L /4 ∙ tributary area

TAl = M /d DEFINITIONS

σA = tensile strength of ALPOLIC = 6,344 psi

TAl = tensile force acting on aluminum in ALPOLIC AAl = area of aluminum in 1 foot of ALPOLIC How much aluminum is in 1 foot of ALPOLIC? 1 sheet of aluminum = 0.5 mm 0.5 mm (x2) = 1 mm thickness 1 foot of ALPOLIC = 304.8 mm AAl = l x w = 304.8 mm ∙ 1 mm = 304.8 mm2 AAl = (304.8 mm2/1 ft) ∙ (1 in2/645 mm2) = 0.47 in2/1 ft Dead Load = 20 psf Live Load (Wind) = 31 psf

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C2


N AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

beam section

beam sheet plan

A1 L = span of beam = 24 ft M = w ∙ (L² /8) ∙ tributary area

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL P M = (31 # /1 ft2 + 20 # /1 ft2 ) ∙ ((24 ft)2 /8) ∙ 1.334 M = 39,187.6 #∙ft2 /8 ft2 M = 4,898.4 #

σA = TAl / AAl σA ∙ AAl = TAl AAl = TAl / σA AAl = (304.8 mm2 /1 ft) ∙ (1 in2 /645 mm2) = 0.47 in2 /1 ft 0.47 in2/1 ft = TAl / (6,344 #/in2)

TAl = (0.47 in2/1 ft) ∙ (6,344 #/in2) TAl = 2,981.68 #/1 ft TAl = M /d

TAl(d) = M

d = M / TAl

d = 4,898.4 # / (2,981.68 #/1 ft) d = 1.64 ft = 19.7 in Resulting Dimensions: 12" x 20" *actual size of structural members is increased for insulative purposes and constructability

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beam axonometric


N AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

column 1 section

column 1 sheet plan column 1 axonometric

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PR

C1 L = height of column = 8 ft [Compressive Strength]

[Wind load]

TAl = tributary area x 51 #/1 ft2

RL= 31 #/1 ft2 ∙ (L / 2) ∙ tributary area

tributary area = 1.3334 ft ∙ 12 ft = 16 ft2 TAl = 16 ft ∙ 51 #/1 ft 2

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TAl = 816 #

σA = TAl / AAl σA ∙ AAl = TAl AAl = TAl / σA AAl = 816 # / (6,344 #/1 in2) AAl = 0.128 in2 AAl = 0.128 in2 ∙ (645 mm2/1 in2) = 82.96 mm2 required

AAl = 82.96 mm2 / 4 sides = 20.7 mm2 per side of column AAl = 20.7 mm2 ∙ 1 ft/304.8 mm2 = 0.068 ft = .8 in per side

RL= 31 #/1 ft2 ∙ (8 ft / 2) ∙ 1.3334 ft RL= 165.3 #

/2 - (w ∙ L /2 ) ∙ L /4 ∙ tributary area T(d) = 165.3 # ∙ 8 ft /2 - ((31 #/1 ft ) ∙ (8 ft /2)) ∙ (8 ft /4)∙ 1.3334 T(d) = RL ∙ L

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T(d) = 330.52 #∙ft

σA = TAl / AAl TAl = σA ∙ AAl TAl = (6,344 #/1 in2) ∙ 0.47 in2 TAl = 2,981.68 # T(d) = 330.52 #∙ft 2,981.68 #(d) = 330.52 #∙ft

d = 330.52 #∙ft / 2,981.68 # d = 0.111 ft = 1.3 in ∆ columns: 12 in x 12 in. = OK

Resulting Dimensions: 12" x 12" *actual size of structural members is increased for insulative purposes and constructability

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N AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

column 2 section

column 2 axonometric column 2 sheet plan

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PR

C2 L = height of column = 14.5 ft [Compressive Strength]

[Wind load] RL= 31 #/1 ft2 ∙ (L / 2) ∙ tributary area

TAl = tributary area x 51 #/1 ft2 2

tributary area = 1.3334 ft ∙ 12 ft = 16 ft TAl = 16 ft ∙ 51 #/1 ft 2

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RL= 31 #/1 ft2 ∙ (14.5 ft / 2) ∙ 1.3334 ft RL= 299.68 #

TAl = 816 #

T(d) = RL ∙ L /2 - (w ∙ L /2 ) ∙ L /4 ∙ tributary area T(d) = 299.68 # ∙ 14.5 ft /2 - ((31 #/1 ft2) ∙ (14.5 ft /2)) ∙ (14.5 ft /4)∙ 1.3334 ft T(d) = 1,086.33 #∙ft

σA = TAl / AAl σA ∙ AAl = TAl AAl = TAl / σA AAl = 816 # / (6,344 #/1 in ) AAl = 0.129 in2 AAl = 0.129 in2 ∙ (645 mm2/1 in2) = 82.97 mm2 required 2

AAl = 82.97 mm2 / 4 sides = 20.74 mm2 per side of column AAl = 20.74 mm2 ∙ 1 ft/304.8 mm2 = 0.068 ft = .817 in per side

σA = TAl / AAl TAl = σA ∙ AAl TAl = (6,344 #/1 in2) ∙ 0.47 in2 TAl = 2,981.68 # T(d) = 6,250 #∙ft 2,981.68 #(d) = 1,086.33 #∙ft

d = 1,086.33 #∙ft / 2,981.68 # d = .36 ft = 4.37 in

Resulting Dimensions: 12" x 12" *actual size of structural members is increased for insulative purposes and constructability

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QUANTITY SUMMARIES FOR A MOCK-UP The following tables indicate the quantity of ALPOLIC material required to construct a section of the building's structural system.

Why build a mock up? 1. to test precision and tolerances 2. to analyze details 3. to evaluate overall aesthetics 4. to observe waterproofing of seams 5. to physically load test the structure - in accordance to the International Building Code

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1- fold structural column (blue) and super shingle (grey)

2- interlock column and super shingle, fold spacers (orange)

COLUMN WALL CONSTRUCTION

*colors represented are for diagrammatic purposes only

3- attach spacers to create a column wall unit

4- raise column wall unit and attach

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* * * * * *

*colors are for diagrammatic representation purposes only

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GREENSBORO BOYS & GIRLS CLUB a building made entirely of ALPOLIC ~58,000 square feet of material

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APPENDIX FOLDING A CODE-COMPLIANT BUILDING

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INTERNATIONAL BUILDING CODE (IBC)

This document is a comprehensive building code that establishes minimum regulations for building systems using prescriptive and performance-related provisions. It is founded on broad-based principles that make possible the use of new materials and new building designs. This edition is fully compatible with all the International Codes published by the International Code Council (ICC).

This is the document that will govern the determination of: Building Use and Occupancy Classification, Means of Egress, Construction Type, Fire-Resistance-Rated Construction, and Structural Design.

USE AND OCCUPANCY CLASSIFICATION

CODE (IBC) SECTION 305.1 EDUCATIONAL GROUP E. Educational Group E occupancy includes, among others, the use of a building or structure, or a portion thereof, by six or more persons at any one time for educational purposes through the 12th grade. CONCLUSION

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The primary occupants inhabiting this building will be members and staff of the Boys & Girls Club of West Alabama (Greensboro District). The primary use for the building will be a learning center for children for grades K-12. According to Chapter 3 Section 305 of the IBC, the use of the building is classified as Educational Group E occupancy.


MEANS OF EGRESS

CODE (IBC) SECTION 1004.1 DESIGN OCCUPANT LOAD. In determining the means of egress requirements, the number of oc cupants for whom means of egress facilities must be determined and follow in accordance with this section. TABLE 1004.1.1 TABLE 1004.1.1 (MAXIMUM FLOOR AREA ALLOWANCES PER OCCUPANT) FUNCTION OF SPACE EDUCATIONAL CLASSROOM AREA

FLOOR AREA IN SQ. FT. PER OCCUPANT 20 NET

60 occupants × 20 ft² per occupant = 1200 ft²

OK

CONCLUSION

The maximum number of occupants is determined by the use and amount of space provided. The use of the space is a classroom for 60 people with a floor area of 1,344 ft². Table 1004.1.1 (IBC) designates that a classroom must allow 20 ft² per occupant totaling to a minimum area requirement of 1,200 ft².

CODE (IBC) SECTION 1019 MINIMUM NUMBER OF EXITS. All rooms and spaces within each story shall be provided with and have access to the minimum number of approved independent exits required by Table 1019.1 based on occupant load of the story. TABLE 1019.1 TABLE 1019.1 MINIMUM NUMBER OF EXITS FOR OCCUPANT LOAD

CONCLUSION

OCCUPANT LOAD (persons per story)

MINIMUM NUMBER OF EXITS (per story)

1-500

2

501-1,000

3

More than 1,000

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According to Table 1019.1 the 60 person occupant load for the classroom space requires two exits with a maximum travel distance of 200 ft.

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CONSTRUCTION TYPE The determination of the Construction Type is contingent upon three criteria represented in Chapter 5 Table 503 of the (IBC). Those criteria are the Use and Occupancy Classification, the building height, and the building area per story. The specific criteria for the proposed building are as follows: 1.

The use of the building is Group E occupancy.

2.

The building is 1 story tall and is a maximum of 16’ above the ground plane.

3.

The building area is 2,700 ft².

This information in compliance with Table 305 classifies this proposal as Type VB construction.

FIRE-RESISTANCE-RATED CONSTRUCTION

CODE (IBC) SECTION 602 CONSTRUCTION CLASSIFICATION. Buildings and structures erected or to be erected, altered or extended in height or area should be classified in one of the five construction types defined in Sections 602.2 – 602.5. The building elements shall have a fire resistance rating not less than that specified in Table 602.

TABLE 601 & 602 FIRE-RESISTANCE RATING REQUIREMENTS FOR BUILDING ELEMENTS (hours) BUILDINGELEMENT

TYPE III

TYPEIV

TYPE V

B

A

B

A

B

HT

A

B

Structural Frame

3

2

1

0

1

0

HT

1

0

Bearing Walls Exterior Interior

3 3

2 2

1 1

0 0

2 1

2 0

HT

1 1

0 0

Nonbearing walls and partitions (ext)

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

0

Nonbearing walls and partitions (int)

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

2

2

1

0

1

0

HT

1

0

0

1

0

HT

1

0

Roof construction

CONCLUSION

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TYPE II

A

Floor construction

TYPE I

Fire resistance is determined by the type of building element being examined and the construction type. Those building elements consist of: structural frame, bearing walls, nonbearing walls and partitions, floor construction, and roof construction. The construction type for this building is classified as Type VB and for non combustible materials in Type VB construction no building elements require a fire rating.


STRUCTURAL DESIGN

CODE (IBC) SECTION 1601.1 The provisions of this chapter shall govern the structural design of buildings, structures and port- ions thereof regulated by this code. (IBC) SECTION 1603.1.4 WIND DESIGN DATA. The following information related to wind loads shall be shown, regardless of whether wind loads govern the design of the lateral-force-resisting system of the building: 1.

Basic wind speed

2.

Wind Importance factor and occupancy category

3.

Wind exposure

4.

The applicable internal pressure coefficient

5.

Components and cladding

CONCLUSION

This section aids in determining the wind pressure capacity for the structural elements of the building. The primary factor in determining the wind pressure is the basic wind speed. The appropriate wind speed for the Southeastern United States can be found in Chapter 16 Figure 1609 (IBC). In figure 1609 Hale County Alabama lies within the contour that has a wind speed of 100mph. To calculate the live load the chapter outlines this equation:

(wind speed) ² × 0.00256 = wind pressure

(110* mph) ² × 0.00256 = 30.976 psf

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Live load = 31* psf

The wind pressure 31 psf can then be applied appropriately to ALPOLIC structural members.

*designed with a safety factor of +10%


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Introduction to Alpolic Packet  

A packet designed to introduce the Rural Studio Greensboro Recreation Center- Boys & Girls Club team to Alpolic, a Mitsubishi company.