Page 19

Lifestyle continued overwhelmed? Consider asking for help from family and friends. Or consider hiring a professional. The money you invest for the services of an organizer will come back to you many times over. Remember, you’re worth it! Sources: World Watch Institute, United Nations Development Program, Bread for the World, Our Ecological Footprint, State of the World’s Children 2005 (Unicef), US Census Bureau. Diane Luck is a personal organizer in Portland. For more info visit http://dianeluck.com

Building Live Well in Less than 1,000 Square Feet By Carol Venolia

Welcome to the world of authentic, fresh, localvore publishing.

Early May, August, November and February.

541.374.5454

susan@greenlivingjournal.com

GreenLivingPDX.com

A Practical Journal for Friends of the Environment

Columbia River PDX c Green Living Journal d No. 12 Spring 2011

19

www.greenlivingpdx.com

During the past 60 years, the size of American homes has exploded, but the trend is now moving in the opposite direction, proving once more that bigger isn’t always better. In 1950 the average American home size was 983 square feet; by 2009 the average home was 2,343 square feet — even as family size shrank. Finally, it appears people are rethinking housing size. In 2010, aver“ “ age home size is down 9 percent, and many comPublished Quarterly by Season: munities — such Summer, Fall, Winter & Spring. Deadlines: as California’s

Marin County and Georgia’s DeKalbe County — have enacted laws limiting new home size. A moment’s thought yields a multitude of reasons to consider living in less than 1,000 square feet. Smaller homes generally cost less and require less maintenance than larger ones. A small house consumes fewer natural resources in construction and requires less energy for heating and cooling. But perhaps the most compelling reason for going small is that it feels good. People who live in small, welldesigned houses say their homes feel cozier, and they love having everything they need within reach. Design makes all the difference. A poorly designed 900-square-foot house can feel smaller than a well-designed 400-square-foot house. Homes feel cramped when they have small, dark rooms and insufficient storage space. Welldesigned small spaces feel open, efficient and cozy. As architect and small-space specialist Henry Yorke Mann proves in his homes, living in a cozy space doesn’t mean sacrificing convenience or livability. “You don’t want to get too mean about things,” he said.

Green Living Journal PDX Spring #12  

A Practical Journal for Friends of the Environment. Small Houses, National Bike System, Warre Bee Hive, Organic Manifesto, Credit Unions, Bu...

Green Living Journal PDX Spring #12  

A Practical Journal for Friends of the Environment. Small Houses, National Bike System, Warre Bee Hive, Organic Manifesto, Credit Unions, Bu...

Advertisement