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Christmas Charity Appeal December 2011 – January 2012

February 2012

www.greenhousecharity.org

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See a video of James at www.youtube.com/GreenhouseCharity Read James’s story on page 14

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CONTENTS Page 2: An introduction to the Times Appeal Page 3: An introduction to Greenhouse Page 5: Increasing sports participation amongst girls – Basketball Page 6: Coach who chose Greenhouse over the Olympics – Volleyball Page 7: Sport helping young people with their education – Basketball Page 9: Competition in sport helping young people succeed – Table Tennis Page 11: Greenhouse Coach and 2012 Olympian using sport to teach discipline – Judo Page 12: A Sporting Chance – Times Leader Page 13: Artist Michael Craig Martin meets Paralympian Ashley – Table Tennis Page 14: Boy with special educational needs grows in confidence through sport – Table Tennis Page 15: Former football players return to coach the next generation – Football Page 17: Sport helping young people to stay out of gangs & trouble – Football Page 18: Using sport to cut obesity and create sporting champions – Table Tennis

News Charity

Christmas Appeal Why we are supporting these causes, by the Editor of the Times The bleak economic climate means that charities are struggling as never before to raise funds and meet the demand for their services. Last year Times readers helped to raise more than £700,000 for good causes whose work changes the lives of millions of people at home and abroad. But your generous support is even more pressing now. This year we have chosen to support three charities that operate in areas that have featured prominently in the news in 2011. British troops departed from Iraq in May, and are preparing to leave Afghanistan in two years’ time. Civil and guerrilla wars in Africa have also featured prominently in our pages. Readers rightly want to know what the UK is doing to help to rebuild these war-torn nations. One small British charity, War Child, has been at the forefront of this work. As Martin Fletcher reports opposite, War Child does not seek to stop wars, or reform hopeless governments. It gives help directly to children whose lives have been wrecked by conflict, those who have been left homeless, with no education or prospects of any kind. It works in perilous places where major non-governmental organisations often refuse to go, to find the most vulnerable children and help to improve their lives. Our second charity, Greenhouse, also works on the front line, but here in the UK with teenagers in some of the most deprived areas of the capital. This summer London experienced days of rioting and looting, much of it at the hands of young people. Greenhouse works in the areas worst affected by the riots and is guided by a simple principle that if teenagers have no goal in life, they have nothing to aim for. It uses

sport, including basketball, table tennis and football, to turn young lives around. The charity does not believe that sport cures social ills. Packing kids into a sports hall to whack around a shuttlecock does nothing for social outcomes. Sport transforms lives only if it is harnessed in the right way, by inspirational men and women who are as much life coaches as sports coaches. Greenhouse has parachuted these coaches into some of the toughest schools. The youngsters play sport and learn about life. Its results show that Greenhouse children focus more on their school work, their self-disipline and their ambitions as a result. Our third charity, the Alzheimer’s Society, will already be familiar to many of you. Dementia is probably now the greatest fear of all older people and one in three of us will have it in one form or another. The Alzheimer’s Society believes that you can live well with dementia and offers local and national services to help families to cope with the condition. It has also won battles on behalf of the public to secure greater access to new medication. Over the next few weeks Times writers and photographers will bring to life the outstanding work that these charities perform every day of every year. Please do show your support for their work by donating what you can. You can follow our appeal each day in the paper and give money to your chosen charity at www.thetimes.co.uk/timesappeal or by using the coupon.

To donate to The Times Christmas Appeal Visit thetimes.co.uk/timesappeal Call 0870 043 3764 Or complete the form below

Please send to The Times Christmas Charity Appeal, Charities Trust, Suite 20-22, Century Building, Tower Street, Liverpool L3 4BJ I wish to donate £................................. to the Christmas Charity Appeal. The money raised by the Times Christmas Charity Appeal will be used by the charities for their general charitable purposes. All donations will be split equally between the appeal’s three causes unless specified in the circle(s) below

Greenhouse

Alzheimer’s Society

War Child

Please include a cheque or postal order made payable to: The Times Christmas Charity Appeal or complete the Mastercard/Visa/Amex details

Gift Aid Declaration

www.greenhousecharity.org

I would like the Charities Trust to reclaim tax on this and any future donations and to pass it on to the charity/charities specified. I confirm that I pay UK income tax at least equal to the amount which the charity may reclaim. Please ensure you provide us with your full address Mr/Mrs/Ms/Other........................................................................................................................................................................................................ Forename................................................................................................ Surname................................................................................................. Address.................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. Postcode.................................................................................................. Date............................................................................................................... Credit card details CSC no Valid from

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Telephone number for confirmation purposes Please note Charities Trust will appear on your bank/credit card statement

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Calls to The Times donation line are charged at the national rate of no more than 8p per minute from a BT landline. Charges from other networks will vary. Donations will be administered by Charities Trust (no 327489) on behalf of Alzheimer’s Society (no 296645) Greenhouse (no 1098744) and War Child (no 1071659). Charities Trust will use your information for claiming Gift Aid. We will not send your details to third parties, other than your nominated charity/


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Friday December 2 2011 | the times

News Charity

It’s sport, but with a prize bigger than a mere trophy Christmas Appeal

Schoolchildren in some of the toughest parts of the inner city are tackling complex and deep-rooted problems with help from a team of inspirational coaches, Matthew Syed reports

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athan was your average delinquent. Impossible to control in class, feared on the local estates, and aggressive. When one boy annoyed him in class in Year 8, Nathan, then 12, stabbed him in the arm with a pencil. “He was getting on my nerves and that is the way I thought you were supposed to react,” he says. Khaled had different issues. Regularly beaten by his stepfather, he was listless at school. Fatima was struggling to juggle her school work with caring for her young brother after her father walked out, while Adam found it difficult even to get into school. He had fallen in with a gang that pressured him to bunk off so that he could run errands. You only have to spend a few hours with the youngsters helped by Greenhouse, chosen by The Times for this year’s Charity Appeal, to get a sense of the diversity of inner-city youth. These aspiring adults have a multiplicity of challenges, anxieties, hopes and moral sensitivities. Some are in danger of ending up in a life in crime. Others are in with a shot of further education. Most have the potential for either. But what decides which road they take? Greenhouse seeks to “change young lives through sport”. That is the slogan, at least, but it gives little insight into the extraordinary work that this organisation is doing in some of the nation’s

A group of supporters led by the Alan Cristea Gallery in London will match the first £100,000 of donations made to Greenhouse through The Times Christmas Appeal. toughest neighbourhoods: the deep impact they have had on thousands of young people; the lives that have been turned around; the skill of the coaches who are trained to understand the complexities of contemporary youth experience. Sport is, in many ways, a red herring. Michael de Giorgio, who heads the charity (after a career in finance, he retired ten years ago to devote himself unpaid to Greenhouse), chaired a report for the Centre for Social Justice this year in which he poured scorn on the idea of sport as a panacea for all our social ills. He pointed out that cramming kids into a hall and getting them to whack a shuttlecock did nothing for social outcomes. Sport would only make a difference, he said, if it were harnessed in the right way. And that means inspirational social workers masquerading as sports coaches. These are the men and women that Greenhouse has sent into the toughest schools in London. They work 48 weeks a year, 40 hours a week, providing pre-school, curriculum, afterschool and holiday sports programmes with a difference. The youngsters play sport, but learn about life. “If a youngster re-engages with school, that is a triumph,” Mr de Giorgio said. “Sport is not my driving passion. It is merely a tool to change lives.” Predrag Krneta, a former international basketball player from Bosnia, is now coach at Nathan’s school in Bermondsey. “He is more like a mentor than a teacher,” Nathan says. “We

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Duke pays tribute to ‘empowering, remarkable’ charity


TIMES PHOTOGRAPHER, KI PRICE

Basketball is just one of the sports that the Greenhouse coaches turn into a life-changing experience

To donate to The Times Christmas Appeal Visit thetimes.co.uk/timesappeal Call 0870 043 3764 Or complete the form below

Please send to The Times Christmas Charity Appeal, Charities Trust, Suite 20-22, Century Building, Tower Street, Liverpool L3 4BJ I wish to donate £................................. to the Christmas Charity Appeal. The money raised by the Times Christmas Charity Appeal will be used by the charities for their general charitable purposes. All donations will be split equally between the appeal’s three causes unless specified in the circle(s) below

Greenhouse

Alzheimer’s Society

War Child

Please include a cheque or postal order made payable to: The Times Christmas Charity Appeal or complete the Mastercard/Visa/Amex details

Gift Aid Declaration I would like the Charities Trust to reclaim tax on this and any future donations and to pass it on to the charity/charities specified. I confirm that I pay UK income tax at least equal to the amount which the charity may reclaim. Please ensure you provide us with your full address Mr/Mrs/Ms/Other........................................................................................................................................................................................................ Forename................................................................................................ Surname................................................................................................. Address.................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. Postcode.................................................................................................. Date............................................................................................................... Credit card details CSC no Valid from

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Expiry date

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Issue no

If applicable Switch only Debit card only

Telephone number for confirmation purposes Please note Charities Trust will appear on your bank/credit card statement Calls to The Times donation line are charged at the national rate of no more than 8p per minute from a BT landline. Charges from other networks will vary. Donations will be administered by Charities Trust (no 327489) on behalf of Alzheimer’s Society (no 296645) Greenhouse (no 1098744) and War Child (no 1071659). Charities Trust will use your information for claiming Gift Aid. We will not send your details to third parties, other than your nominated charity/ ies. If you do not want your details shared with your nominated charity/ies, tick here

have spent the past few years working on technique and developing a brilliant school basketball team. But he has also taught us about our lives beyond the court. Without him, and without basketball, my life would be completely different. I would have been expelled for a start.” Nathan no longer pokes holes in his classmates with pencils. Under Krneta’s guidance, he has reached international level in basketball and has won plaudits for his work ethic. He is about to embark on A levels in biology, chemistry, business studies and psychology. “I want to go on a basketball scholarship to university in America,” he says. “I can’t wait.” Chaatouf, a 12-year-old boy on the judo programme at a school in Wandsworth, has enjoyed a similar transformation. He is coached by Winston Gordon, who is a member of the British team. “I train before school and at weekends and I have competed at international level,” Chaatouf says. “But it has also had a brilliant impact on my school work. It makes us feel like we can achieve outside of judo, too.”

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he Duke and Duchess of Cambridge today give their backing to Greenhouse and praise The Times for selecting the charity for this year’s Christmas Appeal. Earlier this year, the couple picked Greenhouse as one of 26 charities for their wedding list, so that guests and wellwishers could donate to the charities rather than send the Duke and Duchess

gifts. The couple were applauded at the time for championing a range of challenging and often unpopular causes such as disengaged teenagers and young offenders. More than £1 million was distributed between the 26 charities after the wedding. In a statement to The Times to mark the

start of our appeal, the Duke said: “Greenhouse is an outstanding charity. Through sport and the performing arts, it empowers vulnerable children and young

people to improve self-confidence, raise aspiration and realise their true potential. Its results are remarkable. “Greenhouse’s intensive programmes, not to mention their inspirational coaches, make a huge difference to some of London’s most disadvantaged youth. We are thrilled that The Times has now also chosen to highlight this charity’s great work.”

port is a powerful vehicle for change not just because so many youngsters care about it, but because it provides a wonderful environment for disguised learning. “They do not see me as a teacher, so I can connect in a unique way,” Krneta says. “They call me ‘Coach’ and confide in me. While they are on the court, I can introduce lessons about punctuality, discipline and dedication. It is the payoffs beyond the court that matter.” A recent independent evaluation of Greenhouse’s work bears this out. It found that, across the board, teenagers who went through the Greenhouse programme improved their school attendance and timekeeping. Teachers said their effort in class increased and behav-

Choices: Adam Wahab, a Greenhouse table tennis coach

iour improved. And they outperformed their peers in English and maths. This year problems in the inner cities spilt over into riots that shocked the nation. Greenhouse operates in the areas most affected by the looting — Hackney, Haringey and Wandsworth. The charity cannot say for certain that none of its teenagers was involved, but it can say that the young people carried on turning up for training and matches that terrible week. It is in organisations such as Greenhouse that we may hope for an antidote to gang life and the culture around it that disfigures so many sink estates. Greenhouse has grown quickly and now operates in 48 schools with 60 full-time coaches specialising in a range of activities including basketball, table tennis, football and dance. But the organisation is not about statistics; it is about changed lives. Take Wahab Adam and Charlie Beck, who used to attend Geoffrey Chaucer School in Southwark. Wahab became involved in the Greenhouse table tennis programme when he was 12, found new purpose in his life and went on to do a B.Tech in sports science. He is now a full-time coach on a table tennis programme at George Green School on the Isle of Dogs, helping a new generation. Sadly, his classmate, Charlie, took a different path. Short of money and lacking hope, he walked into the Staples shop in Old Kent Road with a replica automatic weapon and raided the till. He was convicted at the Old Bailey in September of armed robbery and sentenced to ten years in prison. A tragic waste. “It is incredible the choices that shape your life,” Wahab says. “I have seen many friends make bad choices, not because they are bad people, but because they had the wrong role models and got in with the wrong crowd. The reason that I wanted to work for Greenhouse is because I can identify with young people. I don’t want to see people taking the path that Charlie did.”

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Charity

Help level the playing field for girls TIMES PHOTOGRAPHER, DAVID BEBBER

Greenhouse, one of our nominated Christmas charities, is aiming to increase sporting participation among teenage females, reports Alyson Rudd

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port changes lives. Many leading athletes will admit that but for their love of running or football, they would have taken the wrong path in life. And so a charity that aims to ensure that schools in the toughest communities can offer their pupils access to wellorganised sports coached by full-time, inspirational mentors will inevitably help disadvantaged children. But there is a problem. Boys will turn up for a training session. Girls tend not to. Greenhouse, one of the three charities chosen by The Times for this year’s Christmas appeal, aims to empower London’s disadvantaged children through sport. However, they are helping more boys than girls. At present, only 22 per cent of the pupils they coach are female. It is a disparity that the charity wants to address and, according to Michael de Georgio, its chief executive, Greenhouse aims to double the number of girls who are helped by the organisation’s sports programmes. Having established a successful basketball team at Stockwell Park School, in Lambeth, South London, both the school and the charity were disappointed that girls at the school were not inspired to take part. Just under a year ago, that changed.

Christmas Appeal Greenhouse advertised for a female coach to run girls-only sessions and the school cleverly approached friendship groups to give basketball a go — thereby preventing girls who were keen being dissuaded by their friends from turning up. “We thought we’d give it a go and started to enjoy it,” Sarafina, 15, said. “When you’re on court you feel the adrenalin and when you score and you hear people cheering it’s a nice feeling.” Girls respond to a female role model and feel less intimidated if there are no boys around. Halfway through the training session I watched, though, one of the walls of the gym became lined with teenage boys waiting for the court to be free for a match they were about play. None of the girls skulked away, but they would have preferred the lads not to be there. “They’ve been playing basket ball for loads of years and if I make mistakes I’ll get embarrassed,” Sonia, 15 said. “The majority of the time they don’t laugh at me but they might laugh about me afterwards. “I don’t mind if we’re training with them because they won’t be focused on me. I think lots of girls would be embarrassed just being watched in gym kit. I actually feel comfortable in my kit and I don’t care who sees me. And when I get sweaty and my hair starts coming out I don’t really mind if people see me like that.” Basketball has become an integral part of Sonia’s life. Since the school set up the girl’s basketball team, she has

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joined the Brixton Topcats and represents their under-18 girls’ side. After her own match she stays on at the club to watch the Topcats’ men’s side in action. “I just kept going back to training and kept improving,” Sonia said. “I feel more energetic after a training session. I don’t feel tired; I feel I could do more. Definitely my homework is better.” Stockwell Park does not have a sixth form, so Greenhouse is keen to ensure that when the girls leave they do not abandon their sport. Sonia leaves this summer but plans to keep playing at her club and at her new college in Richmond upon Thames. She even says she would like to try to coach young children. Sarah, 11, is the perfect example of how sport can turn school into an enjoyable experience. She started at Stockwell Park this year and felt a little overwhelmed but Jenny Ridgway, the basketball coach appointed by Greenhouse, helped her settle in. “She’s my BFF,” said Sarah. “I came to the school and felt a little bit shy and I met her and felt more comfortable at the school.” “I didn’t know that; I’m very touched by it,” Ridgway said. “I’d like to think she knows I’m there for her. She has massive potential; she’s my exciting pupil.” If Sarah gives up sport when she becomes a teenager, as so many girls do, it would be both a shame and a surprise. “I really want to be an athlete,” she says. She likes running, cricket and tennis as well as basketball and she is captain of her football team. “There’s trophies for boys but we need trophies for girls,” Sarah said. “In four years I think the girls will get more of the attention.” The difference between scoring in basketball and

Inside today

Greenhouse effect transforming lives Holding court: girls hone their skills during a basketball class organised by the Greenhouse charity at a London school

Greenhouse effect School attendance Greenhouse participants’ school attendance is 94.8 per cent, 3 per cent higher than their school peers. This means that Greenhouse participants are now spending six days more in school than their peers every year. Behaviour Greenhouse participants are now receiving 13.1 per cent fewer poor behaviour reports than their school peers. Effort Effort grades awarded by teachers to the young people have improved 7.6 per cent faster than their school peers, with participants now 11.5 per cent ahead of school peers, with an average effort score of 89.3 per cent. Happiness in school Seventy-eight per cent were happy in school at the start of the year, compared with 91 per cent at the end of the year. Achievement in school Some 80 per cent thought it was important to get good grades in school at the start of the year, compared with 89 per cent at the end of the year. In school testing, participants have improved their achievement scores in maths, English and science by 13.2 per cent and are now 3 per cent ahead of their school peers in the three subjects.

To donate to The Times Christmas Appeal Visit thetimes.co.uk/timesappeal Call 0870 043 3764 Or complete the form below

Please send to The Times Christmas Charity Appeal, Charities Trust, Suite 20-22, Century Building, Tower Street, Liverpool L3 4BJ I wish to donate £................................. to the Christmas Charity Appeal. The money raised by the Times Christmas Charity Appeal will be used by the charities for their general charitable purposes. All donations will be split equally between the appeal’s three causes unless specified in the circle(s) below

Greenhouse

Alzheimer’s Society

War Child

Please include a cheque or postal order made payable to: The Times Christmas Charity Appeal or complete the Mastercard/Visa/Amex details

Gift Aid Declaration I would like the Charities Trust to reclaim tax on this and any future donations and to pass it on to the charity/charities specified. I confirm that I pay UK income tax at least equal to the amount which the charity may reclaim. Please ensure you provide us with your full address Mr/Mrs/Ms/Other........................................................................................................................................................................................................ Forename................................................................................................ Surname................................................................................................. Address.................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. Postcode.................................................................................................. Date............................................................................................................... Credit card details CSC no Valid from

/

Expiry date

/

Issue no

If applicable Switch only Debit card only

Telephone number for confirmation purposes Please note Charities Trust will appear on your bank/credit card statement Calls to The Times donation line are charged at the national rate of no more than 8p per minute from a BT landline. Charges from other networks will vary. Donations will be administered by Charities Trust (no 327489) on behalf of Alzheimer’s Society (no 296645) Greenhouse (no 1098744) and War Child (no 1071659). Charities Trust will use your information for claiming Gift Aid. We will not send your details to third parties, other than your nominated charity/ ies. If you do not want your details shared with your nominated charity/ies, tick here

Leading article, page 2

football, is, according to Sarah, that; “Basketball is yeah, and football is whoo, hoo.” Greenhouse ensures that the pupils regard their chosen sport as a commitment. The girls train every morning bar Mondays from 7.30. Coaches liaise with teachers to make sure the youngsters juggle the demands of course work with their training. “I help them to plan their time better,” Ridgway said. “I expect them to be up with their homework as well so we try to work with the teachers. “The morning sessions are brilliant for stimulating the mind. The girls say they would just be watching telly with their breakfast otherwise.” Sharon Simpson, line manager of PE at Stockwell Park, has been in education 25 years and watched as the introduction of league tables pushed sport off the curriculum. “Schools were judged on grades and sport took a back bench. Now sport is a mechanism to maintain the focus of children in the classroom. You work hard and sweat on the pitch or on the basketball court and you will sweat and work hard in the classroom. “I’ve despaired of girls failing to get involved in sport. Aged 13 and 14, they tend to switch off. Here at Stockwell Park we have recognised that and embraced the Greenhouse project to help us to readdress the imbalance.” 6 A group of supporters led by the Alan Cristea Gallery in London will match pound for pound donations made to Greenhouse through The Times appeal.


the times | Monday December 5 2011

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Uplifting tale at top Davis days of look selfless numbered coach afterhappy O’Sullivan to races say ‘No’ toto victory the Olympics

STEVEN PASTON / ACT TIMES PHOTOGRAPHER, ALAN WALTER

Snooker

Hector Nunns

great pressure player, and he gets going

quickly.” ThanksSteve to the backing of Greenhouse, Davis took his leave of the The Davis and O’Sullivan eras have Championship night, warning only overlapped at all because of the DariusUK Setsoafia haslastdecided to help the rest of the field that the event’s extraordinary longevity of the sixothers shorter fulfil their format dreams is playingrather to the than times world champion. Going into of Ronnie O’Sullivan, his yesterday, O’Sullivan, who never faced pursuestrengths his own fame, Owen Slot says conqueror, and insisting that his Davis when he was at his peak, held a

own time on the biggest stages is not 16-6 advantage in the personal yet up. head-to-head, and had not lost to him The baton was passed on some time for 13 years. ago by the record six-times winner of Although displaced as tournament the tournament sponsored by favourite in the past couple of days by williamhill.com at the Barbican Centre, Mark Selby, the world No 1, the UK in York, but there were indications in Championship has often brought the the manner of his 6-1 defeat that best out of O’Sullivan. He won it as a suggested the 54-year-old may 17-year-old in 1993 and has lifted the struggle to be back at this level. trophy four times, more than for any Leap ith a little more O’Sullivan showed histhan boyhood idolof faith: other ranking event. hands seven months to mercy, go Setsoafia, plenty of respect but little as he Live play on the other table led to an on hips, watches and the hysteria steadily raced into last 16 and confirmed awkward half-silence as the popular his volleyball weand bring youhave been pair entered the arena, with a sell-out most ofrising, what he others students therecent story of — the saying in months that he is in at crowd desperate to give an ovation, but Ernest Bevin athlete who said no to theform Olympic dangerously good and seemingly prevented from doing so, with Stuart College Games. at ease with himself for an event that goBingham on a break against Marco Fu through their It is not has that he does not like the idea been trimmed to a best-of-11 a few feet away. of competing in aformat home Olympics. It is paces, a serious frames until the semi-finals. “It would have been lovely to have commitment just that he “Ifeels thatlike he to can achieve would think that I can still the he big build-up, but that couldn’t be has had no more by helping others reach get to the final to stages of their tournaments,” and it wouldn’t have been right,” Davis Hands-on approach: O'Sullivan, left, accepts the congratulations of Davis after winning their first-round match 6-1 sporting fulfilment rather pursuDavis said. “It’s than just that these doubts days I about said. “The crowd still gave us a decent putting above ing his own. need a bit of a following wind against cheer, and that was really nice.” O’Sullivan said. “He may not be keen to shift the spotlight back Results at Meet Darius an England the topSetsoafia, players. You need them personal to not glory Notions of an upset to rival Davis’s playing with so much confidence, but O’Sullivan — a possible final oppo London 2012. volleyball perform player whose attitude to do, life you’re up win over John Higgins at the World you can still learn so much watching well; when they — despite an impressive 6-0 def First round and his against sport it.sometimes sounds It was one-way trafficFunding in the from Championship 18 months ago were him. I’m used to playing big matches, Ryan Day, of Wales, who is a t the as the “Nugget” cleared to the England unless stated impossiblyend magnanimous. and Ronnie was hitting the Greenhouse, ball as raised but obviously it’s different playing a times finalist in ranking events. charity, a bigwith a 54 to move 1-0 ahead. Yesterday’s results: M Fu (HK) bt S Bingham 6-4; Setsoafia is 23 a full-time coach well as and I have ever seen him. He was is pink legend. “Ronnie has been impressive la M Selby bt R Day (Wales) 6-0; R O’Sullivan bt factor in the at Ernest cueing Bevin College, a secondary beautifully, and I told him that However, O’Sullivan, who is “I’ve got a couple of days off now, Selby, 28, said. “He will be hard to S Davis 6-1; A Carter bt R Milkins 6-4; S Murphy school on at thethe edge of Wandsworth and once troubled leads Li Yan (China) 4-2; M Gould leads P Lines 5-2. end. celebrating his 36th birthday today, and I’ll probably go for a run on my for anyone here. I think he is sti school’s Tooting in South London. He was a the Saturday’s results: J Higgins (Scot) bt R Mcleod 6-5; “You make mistakes against top progress shrugged off that early setback to forge birthday tomorrow and maybe treat one to watch out for. Ding Junhui (China) bt M Davis 6-5; G Dott (Scot) bt pupil at the schoollike only five years ago Higgins into a 4-1 lead, aided by breaks of 54, myself to a new pair of running players Ronnie and John “Ryan was just about the tou M Selt 6-1; N Robertson (Aus) bt T Ford 6-1; and although could reached Setsoafia a push byDavis’s an inspirTeam Wandsworth and he they are have magnified. You’re not was 123 given and 97. With error count trainers. It was nice to get a win and I’m draw Ito could have got in the first r M Stevens (Wales) bt M Campbell (Scot) 6-2;assistant coach S Maguire (Scot) bt S Hendry (Scot) 6-3. for the Olympic he elected John Lowney. “He showed in the London Games (the very boyspleas doing aheights, lot wrong, but youtohaveing toteacher, be mounting, O’Sullivan quickly closed very pleased to be through with a few so toYouth win like that was Today’s schedule: from 12.30pm: J Trump v D Dale remain grounded in hishe roots. meHe’s what volleyball have wonhave thea couple volleyball for off three perfect and overpowered me. things outwas,” withSetsoafia runs of 53said. and 62 in the decent breaks.” of days now, so (Wales); M Allen (N Ire) v A Gunnell. From 7pm: It is a story of the compelling power When he was 14 he was sent to straight years, the girls are London wingoing to be tough to beat. I actually seventh frame for victory. If the bookmakers believe that Selby heading back to Leicester to rela M Williams (Wales) v J Jogia; S Lee v R Walden. of sport asthink a forceit for good. is the kind England but was told Steve he ners, too).get Sosome when Britain and the suits him,Itthe best-of-11s. He’s a cadet “It trials was great to play here,” looks a good thing in this event, he was practice.” of story that the pro-sport lobby “wouldn’t be good enough”. He made Olympics came calling, this is how his preaches, but which rarely makes noise the grade the next year, progressed mind worked. “I looked around me and Or complete the form below Results at government level. The difference into the national leagues and made his thought: ‘I don’t want to leave here. Please send to The Times Christmas Charity Appeal, Charities Trust, Suite 20-22, here is that it has the backing of Green- full England debut a year ago. This area has got so much to give and Century Building, Tower Street, Liverpool L3 4BJ house, the charity that helps young Before full England honours came no one’s pushing it. And yes, it would I wish to donate £................................. to the Christmas Charity raised by 22 Clifton Richmond 35; Shelford 33; Southend Svindal (Nor)a1:18.91; 3, B Feuz Women’s international match:Appeal. England 8The New money New Zealand: Firsthe Innings 295already (D L Vettori people inAmerican London’s disadvantaged along, though, had been be great if I went1:18.97. and was superstar. football Golf Zealand 8 (at 14 Hartpury College 66; Westcombe Park 10 Giant slalom: 1, M Hirscher ( 96, D G Brownlie 77 not out; N M Lyon 4 for the Times Christmas Charity Appeal will beEsher). used by the charities for their general communities and is one of The Times’s “tapped up” for an even bigger concept: ButAlbanians if there 20 people from Redruth 33; Worthing 13 Old 41. were2:38.45; 2, T Ligety (US)here 2:38.61; 3, F 69) NFL Nedbank Challenge Aviva Premiership charitable purposes. All donations will be split equally between the appeal’s three (Ger) 2:39.07. Cup positi Principality Building Society Welsh Premierchosen charities this Christmas. Great Britain Olympic team. HeSun City, South Africa: Final scores: 273: L Westcompeting for that sameLeading spot,World that Innings (overnight 10-1) Buffalo 17 Tennessee 23; Chicago 3 Kansas theSecond per-G: 1, Lund Svindal 180pts; 2, D Exeter Chiefs 15 Worcester Warriors 9 causes unless specified in the circle(s) below ship: Llanelli 20 Aberavon 11. wood (GB) 68, 70, 62, 73. 275: R Karlsson (Swe) City 10; Houston 17 Atlanta 10; Miami 34 J Guptillto c Khawaja b Pattinson where 12 the Setsoafia started at Ernest Bevin in wasMasked go to Sheffield, would be even better. If I 3,can inspire (Switz) 109; Viletta 108. Giant sl Exeter: Pens: Mieres 5. Worcester: Pens: 69, 69, 69, 68. 277: G McDowell (N Ire) 70, 67, 14; Minnesota 32 Denver 35; New RBS Scottish Premiership: Third division: D A J Bracewell c Haddin b Pattinson 2 Ligety 180; 2, Hirscher 140; 3, A Pintur 1999. TheOakland school, he remembers, was squad would be training, and when he them to that, then I am happier than Alzheimer’s Society Greenhouse War Child Carlisle 2, Goode. HT: 9-6. Att: 7,331. 70, 70; J Dufner (US) 70, 68, 70, 69. 280: Kim KyEngland 31 Indianapolis 24; Pittsburgh 35 Greenock Wanderers 31 Morgan Academy FP K S Williamson c Ponting b Pattinson 0 109. Overall: 1, Lund Svindal 294; 2, Cu ung Tae (S Kor) 70, 70, 70, 70. 282: C Schwartzel Cincinnatisunny 7; Tampa Bay 19“ItCarolina not a notably place. was 38; asked 13; Haddington 20 Ardrossan Academicals 15; the results: Yesterday: Saracens 15 London England manager actually doing Olympics myself. *L R his P L Taylor c Haddin b Pattinsonfor advice, 0 3, Feuz 246; 4, B Miller (US) 197; 5, Lig Please a cheque or71, postalOther order made payable to: The Times Christmas (SA) 68, 74, 68, include 72. 283: L Donald (GB) 70, Washington 19 New York Jets 34. Irish 11; London Wasps 16 Harlequins 22. Howe of Fife 20 Dumfries 16; Kirkcaldy 41 J D Ryder c Hussey b Lyon 36 horrendous,” he said. “The police were he was told to follow his dream to YorkI’ve just got too involved.’ ” 70, 72.Charity 284: M Kaymer (Ger)or 70, complete 68, 70, 76. 287:the Mastercard/Visa/Amex Appeal details Perthshire 15; Lasswade 32 GHA 17. Saturday: Bath 13 Sale Sharks 16; Leicester 30 Women’s World Cup events D G Brownlie c Warner b Siddle 42 S Dyson (GB) 70, 70, 75, 72. 288: A Hansen parked outside the school every day. Hedivision: looksSecat theLake schoolboys and says: 1, L Vo Basketball Northampton 25. D L Vettori c Clarke b Hussey 17 Louise, Canada: Downhill: Ulster Bank Irish League: First Gift Aid (Den) 72, 69, 77, 70. 295:Declaration F Molinari (It) 72, 77, †R A Young not out 11 6 Table on page 69 1min 51.350sec; 2,brothers M Marchand-Arv tion A: Cork Constitution 16 Young Munster There were ambulances coming in. “I feel like they’re my little BBL Championship D Clarke (N Ire) 74, 69, 76, 78. like the boys are80 73, 73.I 297: T G Southee c Warner b Lyon 1:53.030; 3, E Görgl (Austria) 1:53.260 23; Garryowen 20 Blackrock 13; Old Belvedere would like the Charities Trust to reclaim tax on this and any future donations and Gang fights, general fights.” his 85 ‘I feel RaboDirect PRO12 and I am taking care of them.” Yesterday: Cheshire 93 DurhamAnd 90; Glasgow C S Martin c Starc b Lyon Chevron World Challenge -giant slalom: 1, Vonn 1:20.21; 2, A Fe 13 Dolphin 20; Shannon 16 Lansdowne 25; St Newcastle Guildford Worcester 98; to pass it on to the charity/charities specified. I14confirm tax22 atClontarf 20.At 21 classmates? The 89;ones he93 stayed in Ply- Extras (lb 15, w 2, nb 4) Ernest Bevin, Greenhouse fund- (US) (Austria) 1:20.40; 3, J Mancuso NG Dragons Glasgowthat I pay 14UK income Mary’s College Section B: Ballymouth 84 Leicester 62. Saturday: Durham 77 my little brothers and I Thousand Oaks, California: Scores after three World Cup positions: mena 6 Ballynahinch Belfast helps Harle- toLeading roundsleast (United Statestounless stated): 208: Z Total (49.4 overs) 150 Newport Gwentmay Dragons: Try: Riley. Pens: equal the amount which the charity reclaim. Please ensure you provide 3; Bruff touch withSheffield were 93; those who93made it to 84. ing10 now run volleyball, judo Dow Worcester Mersey Tigers Vonn 200pts; 2, T Weirather (Liech) 1 quins 6; Buccaneers 33 Dungannon 20; GalweJohnson 73, 67, 68. 209: T Woods 69, 67, 73. S Jones, Tovey 2. Glasgow: Try: Wight. Pens: Fall taking of wickets: 1-10, 2-17, 3-17, 4-17, 5-28, care of them’ us with your full address university. The others? He says that 80 am and table tennis programmes. The Gisin (Switz) 105. Super-G: 1, Vonn 100 gians 41 UCC 18; UCD 24 UL Bohemians 20. 211: K J Choi (S Kor) 66, 73, 72. 213: H Mahan Jackson 3. HT: 0-3. Att: 5,267. 6-69, 7-121, 8-123, 9-141. Boxing ninger 80; 3, Mancuso 60. Overall: 1, V 72, 68,Mr/Mrs/Ms/Other........................................................................................................................................................................................................ 73; G Woodland 73, 70, 70; M Kuchar per cent of his class have either been in volleyballFijicertainly works as a model. IRB Dubai Sevens: Cup: Quarter-finals: 34 Bowling: Pattinson 11-5-27-5; Siddle Ospreys 19 Munster 13 2, V Rebensburg (Ger) 286; 3, Görgl 243 72, 67, 74. 214: P Casey (GB) 79, 68, 67. 215: B Robin Park Centre, Wigan Australia 7; England 10 New Zealand 7; Argen16-3-44-1; Starc 6-0-33-0; Lyon 11.4-2-19-3; jail, are on their way in or have had shire. However, he had, by then,Watson Ospreys: Tries:Surname................................................................................................. Fussell, Webb. Pens: Morgan The boys queueninger up 203; to 5,play before Forename................................................................................................ M Höfl-Riesch (Ger) 18 75, 70, 70. 216: W Haas 78, 69, 69; R tina 7 Wales 5; France 19 South Africa 5. Hussey 4-1-7-1; Warner 1-0-5-0. British Light-middleweight Championship: B 3. Munster: Try: Howlett. Con: Keatley. Pens: some altercation with the 71, 70, 75. 217: B Van Pelt 74, 72, 71; M had a taste of another side ofFowlerAddress.................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... school, at lunch Semi-finals: Fiji 12 England 19; Argentina 5 and after school. Rose (Blackpool) bt law. P Arron (Droylsden, already Australia: First Innings 427 (M J Clarke 139, Keatley, O’Gara. HT: 6-10. Att: 5,783. Laird (GB) 77, 74, 66. 218: S Stricker 69, 76, Squash France 24. Third place: Fiji 26 Argentina 21. pts. No one holder) is pretending that volleyball sport. Off the court, Setsoafia he has used B J Haddin 80, R T Ponting 78) Championship: Yesterday: Bristol 33 Leeds ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 73; J Furyk 71, 74, 73. 219: J Day (Aus) 74, 68, Final: England 29 France 12. Plate: Semi-fiMen’stoChallenger 15 Coronation Square There Garden, New has savedMadison a school. canYork be no Second Innings He said: “I was helping with a girls’77. 220:Postcode.................................................................................................. sport to help integrate into Londo Carnegie 19; Cornish Pirates 42 London W Simpson 73, 79, 68. 222: N Watney nals: Australia 26 New the Zealand 12; South Date............................................................................................................... Scottish 10. Saturday: London Welsh 25 BedCumberland Club: Semi-finals: 71, 78, 73. 225: K Bradley 76, 75, 74. WBA Super-middleweight P J Hughessession c Guptill bone Martinday and watch7 Africa 22 Wales 7. Final: school Australia life 17 South doubt, though, that sport hasChampionship: played a M volleyball boys who did not find thatB Golan ford 24; Moseley 17 Doncaster 15; Rotherham C Simpson (Eng) 11-9, 11-6, 11-5; S Co Cotto (P Rico, holder) bt A Margarito (Mex) rsc Credit card details D A Warner not out 12 Africa 14. Bowl: Quarter-finals: Canada 26 Sapart. girl’s technique and thinking: easy. On the court, he has already had Ice hockey Titans 20 Plymouth Albion 8. (SA) bt K A Gawad (Egypt) 11-8, 11-9 10th. WBA Lightweight Championship: B Rios ingUthis T Khawaja not out 0 moa 17; United States 41 Zimbabwe 7; Scot(US, holder)is bt conducted J Murray (Manchester) This interview nextrsc to11th. ‘This she could do so much students reach 5; Portugal 24 representative levels. SSE National League One: Blackheath 32CSC Bir- noland 40 United Arab Emirates Totalis(1wrong, wkts, 2.2 overs) 19 Elite League Kenya 12. Semi-finals: United States 33 Canamingham & Solihull 5; Cinderford 20 MacclesCenter, Anaheim, the schoolHonda sports hall, an California impressive, better.’ I took Ernest Bevin is not, he said, anything Fall of So wicket: 1-11. her aside and said,Yesterday: Cardiff 2 Belfast 4; Edinburgh 2 CovIfdaapplicable 17; Scotland 19 Portugal 17. Final: United field 31; Ealing Trailfinders 31Issue Fylde 29; Southee 1-0-11-0; Martin 1-1-0-1; 3Valid (shoot-out); 2 Super-bantamweight Championship: from Fife 5 Braehead / 4; HullExpiry date / noJersey Debit Switch only Fixtures cavernousWBA facility that has been recom- A ‘TryBowling: this and this.’ She was like, ‘Wow,entry likeSemi-finals: the school of five years ago. Its only 26. Shield: Statescard 0 Scotland Sa29 Coventry 3; Rosslyn Park 34 Blaydon 30; Bracewell 0.2-0-8-0. Sheffield 3 (OT); Nottingham 5 Dundee 4. SatMoreno (Pan, holder) bt V Darchinyan (Arm) moa 21 Zimbabwe 12; Kenya 35 UAE 5. Final: report rates it outstandSedgley Park 23 Barking 8; Stourbridge 26 Cammended aspts.a training camp venue for A thisUmpires: worksAleem so well.’ ” recent Ofsted Dar (Pakistan) and Asad Rauf IBF Bantamweight Championship: urday: Braehead 2 Edinburgh 0; Belfast 5 Hull Samoa 31 Kenya 17. Leading series positions: Telephone number for confirmation purposes bridge 18; Wharfedale 39 Tynedale 5. League (Pakistan). MaresGames. (Mex, holder) bt J Agbeko (Ghana) pts. the Olympic When Setsoafia That was the turning point for1; Coventry 7 Dundee 2; Sheffield 4 Cardiff 2. Two: North: Harrogate 22 Kendal 13; Hull 17 1, Fiji 39pts; 2, England 32; ing,equal noting that “the sports specialism 3, France, Please note Charities Trust will appear on24; your bank/credit statement 6 Australia “That lead two-match New Zealand and South Africa 29. an outstanding contribution to was a student here, the sports hall was a Setsoafia. gaveseries me1-0the firstRugby Hull Ionians Luctonians 24 Caldy 20;card Nuneamakes union Cricket Other sport tonthe10national Loughborough 50;8pPreston Calls to The Times donation line are charged at rate of noStudents more than per minute from a BT landline. Secondhe one-day quarter of the size, a room now given spark.” said.international “I had passed on know-International every aspect of the college”. This is Wales 18 Australia Grasshoppers 10 Huddersfield 17; Sheffield Skiing Charges match: from other networks will vary.24Donations will be administered by Charities TrustTi(no 327489) on behalf of First Test match Snooker: Barbican Centre, York: wil Dhaka:toPakistan 262-7 (Umar Akmal 59); over to table tennis, another of the ledge someone and it benefited (at Millennium Stadium). partly because of UK the power of gers 17 Leicester Lions 6; Stockport 31 Otley com Championship. Alzheimer’s Society (no 296645) Greenhouse (no 1098744) and War Child (no 1071659). CharitiesMen’s TrustWorld will use your Bangladesh 186-7 (Nasir Hossain 100; Umar v New Zealand Cup events Westoe 24 Bromsgrove 21. South: J. P. Morgan Heroes Challenge sports thatAustralia Greenhouse funds here. them. tried to do that every Greenhouse and 6why The Times feels information for claiming Giftmatch: Aid. WeH4H will not0;send your details to third parties, other Dings than your nominated charity/ Gul 4I’ve for 36). Pakistan won by 76 runs. day.” Today’s football fixtures in the Brisbane (fourth day of five): Australia beat Crusaders 19 Hertford 12; Henley 44 Barnes Northern Hemisphere XV 22 Southern Beaver Creek, Colorado: Super-giant slalom: 1, ies. If you do not want your details shared with your nominated charity/ies, tick here Like many a start in this sporting life, He started coaching properly at 16 as that the charity is worth its full support. 6 Pakistan lead three-match series 2-0 page 18 New Zealand by nine wickets 21; Launceston 42 Taunton 15; Lydney 35 Hemisphere XV 36 (at Twickenham). S Viletta (Switz) 1min 18.71sec; 2, A Lund

Christmas Appeal

W

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28

Friday December 9 2011 | the times

News Charity

Gym rocks to the rhythm of young lives being changed Christmas Appeal

These teenagers are not at ease with authority, but thanks to their coach they know about respect and discipline, Greg Hurst reports

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oom. Boom. Boom. Pounding noise echoes around the high walls of the gymnasium, drowning out speech. Its incessant rhythm serves to focus the minds of the teenagers within it. Around they circle, concentrating utterly on the source of the crashing sound: a basketball in each of their hands. Dribbling with a basketball each, they warm up before splitting into groups to work on elements of their game — shooting, defence, passing. They joke and jostle with one another as they break away for individual duels beneath the hoops, but when one of their coaches calls out a command they comply instantly. Usually, these young teenage boys are not comfortable with adult authority. Yet their coaches, employed by the charity Greenhouse and posted fulltime in schools, have managed to overcome their urban belligerence and inspire total respect. Training sessions such as these, taking place after school in a deprived part of southeast London, often last until the evening. They start again the next morning before school, from 7.30am until classes begin. Basketball gives these boys much more than fitness, companionship and fun. For some it is an escape route from delinquency; for others it offers a structure on which to develop academic achievement at the highest level. With his slight build and engaging smile, Ibrahim, 14, is an example of the former. Two years of basketball training with Greenhouse staff have changed him totally, he says. “Before I used to be, after school, going home, getting changed and going out doing things I shouldn’t be doing in the roads,” he says, his voice

Ibrahim, aged 14, has found a mentor

trailing off. “I was rude, later and later for school . . . Now I couldn’t go a day without playing basketball. It’s like a drug, it is just addictive.” The attraction, he says, is that no player or move is perfect. There is always room to practise, improve, learn from mistakes. Basketball has taught him discipline, he adds. It has also given him a mentor, his softly spoken Greenhouse basketball coach, Predrag Krneta, a former international player from Bosnia who has taught Ibrahim how to work towards achieving his

To donate to The Times Christmas Appeal Visit thetimes.co.uk/timesappeal Call 0870 043 3764 Or complete the form below

Please send to The Times Christmas Charity Appeal, Charities Trust, Suite 20-22, Century Building, Tower Street, Liverpool L3 4BJ I wish to donate £................................. to the Christmas Charity Appeal. The money raised by the Times Christmas Charity Appeal will be used by the charities for their general charitable purposes. All donations will be split equally between the appeal’s three causes unless specified in the circle(s) below

Greenhouse

Alzheimer’s Society

War Child

Please include a cheque or postal order made payable to: The Times Christmas Charity Appeal or complete the Mastercard/Visa/Amex details

Gift Aid Declaration I would like the Charities Trust to reclaim tax on this and any future donations and to pass it on to the charity/charities specified. I confirm that I pay UK income tax at least equal to the amount which the charity may reclaim. Please ensure you provide us with your full address Mr/Mrs/Ms/Other........................................................................................................................................................................................................ Forename................................................................................................ Surname................................................................................................. Address.................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. Postcode.................................................................................................. Date............................................................................................................... Credit card details CSC no Valid from

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Expiry date

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If applicable Switch only Debit card only

Telephone number for confirmation purposes Please note Charities Trust will appear on your bank/credit card statement Calls to The Times donation line are charged at the national rate of no more than 8p per minute from a BT landline. Charges from other networks will vary. Donations will be administered by Charities Trust (no 327489) on behalf of Alzheimer’s Society (no 296645) Greenhouse (no 1098744) and War Child (no 1071659). Charities Trust will use your information for claiming Gift Aid. We will not send your details to third parties, other than your nominated charity/ ies. If you do not want your details shared with your nominated charity/ies, tick here

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PHOTOGRAPHS: TIMES PHOTOGRAPHER, KI PRICE

broader goals. “My coach Predrag is not only teaching me basketball but also lessons of life,” he says, with admiration. Gregory, 16, has come a long way since he started playing basketball with Greenhouse five years ago when the charity arrived at the school. Articulate and quietly confident, he is now taking A levels in economics, maths, biology and geography and wants to study politics and economics at the London School of Economics. He talks of working as a banker. Greenhouse, one of the charities chosen to benefit from The Times Christmas Appeal, helped him to apply the discipline of the game to his studies and break down the defence to his academic work. “It helps you structure things, gives you a good method with which you can work, helps you problem-solve,” Gregory explains. “It is like maths — to tackle a question you have various methods. In basketball the aim is to score and you have various methods which you use.”

T in Predrag Krneta, right, and says that he is learning about life as well as sport

he school’s director of sport, Sue Ponulak, testifies to the transformative effect of Mr Krneta’s coaching. “He has been able to engage some of the most challenging children at the school, get them more onside and where they are supposed to be, and help with focusing them on their studies,” she says. Suspension from basketball training has proved a powerful deterrent to pupils whose attendance or behaviour worsens. Mr Krneta acknowledges that his approach is tough, but says that children respond to his refusal to offer false praise. Sometimes parents seek his advice on bringing up their children. One father even asked him if he

would tell his son to clean his bedroom. “I have seen some kids change from being nearly excluded from school to going on to basketball camps [at national level],” he says. “I am personally trying to be very honest with kids. If I need to be strict I am very strict. I would say kids know where the line is.” In the background, 90 minutes after the school day ended, the pounding noise continues. Boom, boom, thump, swish. It is the sound of purpose, of commitment, of lives being changed.

A group of supporters led by the Alan Cristea Gallery is matching donations made to Greenhouse through The Times appeal

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Tuesday December 20 2011 | the times

body&soul

Bat-wielding youths serve up a sporting lesson

TIMES PHOTOGRAPHER, RICHARD POHLE

Ed Smith visits a project where table tennis is transforming young lives

I

f I said that I’d just been given a proper beating by a group of teenagers near the Hackney Road in East London, you might not be surprised. But it’s not what you think. The beating was not administered with fists and boots. Instead, they were armed with nothing more than rubberised table tennis bats. And they beat me fair and square — with perfect manners and sportsmanship, not to mention some seriously whippy topspin winners — over a series of table tennis matches at their school in Bethnal Green. I was left licking my wounds, but the only real damage was to my sporting pride. How did a bunch of teenagers in East London fall in love with table tennis? It is all the work of Greenhouse, one of the charities supported by this year’s Times Christmas Appeal. Their mission is to use the power of sport to transform lives, and I pitched up in Bethnal Green to watch them in action. The entrance to Raine’s Foundation School — nestled in a downbeat corner of Newham and Tower Hamlets, one of London’s poorest and most challenging boroughs — doesn’t suggest a hotbed of sporting excellence, let alone table tennis. But I’m greeted by a surprise as

soon as I walk through the security gate. Two table tennis tables have been squeezed into the entrance hall, and eight students are playing doubles. By way of welcome, a forehand winner fizzes past my right ear. Hang on a minute, I think to myself: that wasn’t a casual ping-pong knockabout, that was a serious bit of sport. First impressions tell you a lot about a school, and my first impression today is defined by busyness and urgent competitiveness. It’s now 3pm, and I’m taken into the assembly hall. Ancient gymnastics equipment — wooden scaffolds with ropes dangling downwards — clings to the walls. In fact, the atmosphere could easily feel forbiddingly Victorian if it weren’t for the competitive energy that is emanating from the middle of the room. Around eight table tennis tables, 25 students — all wearing the same sports uniform — are playing a series of matches. There is no swearing and no arguing, just the unmistakable heat of competition. Will Cooney, 26, coaches the kids 40 hours a week, 48 weeks a year, both holiday and term-time. Once a leading British junior, he is now part coach, part social worker. “This might be the only positive element of the kids’ lives. At

To donate to The Times Christmas Appeal Visit thetimes.co.uk/timesappeal Call 0870 043 3764 Or complete the form below

Please send to The Times Christmas Charity Appeal, Charities Trust, Suite 20-22, Century Building, Tower Street, Liverpool L3 4BJ I wish to donate £................................. to the Christmas Charity Appeal. The money raised by the Times Christmas Charity Appeal will be used by the charities for their general charitable purposes. All donations will be split equally between the appeal’s three causes unless specified in the circle(s) below

Greenhouse

Alzheimer’s Society

War Child

Please include a cheque or postal order made payable to: The Times Christmas Charity Appeal or complete the Mastercard/Visa/Amex details

Gift Aid Declaration I would like the Charities Trust to reclaim tax on this and any future donations and to pass it on to the charity/charities specified. I confirm that I pay UK income tax at least equal to the amount which the charity may reclaim. Please ensure you provide us with your full address Mr/Mrs/Ms/Other........................................................................................................................................................................................................ Forename................................................................................................ Surname................................................................................................. Address.................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. Postcode.................................................................................................. Date............................................................................................................... Credit card details CSC no Valid from

/

Expiry date

/

Issue no

If applicable Switch only Debit card only

Telephone number for confirmation purposes Please note Charities Trust will appear on your bank/credit card statement Calls to The Times donation line are charged at the national rate of no more than 8p per minute from a BT landline. Charges from other networks will vary. Donations will be administered by Charities Trust (no 327489) on behalf of Alzheimer’s Society (no 296645) Greenhouse (no 1098744) and War Child (no 1071659). Charities Trust will use your information for claiming Gift Aid. We will not send your details to third parties, other than your nominated charity/ ies. If you do not want your details shared with your nominated charity/ies, tick here

9

first there is often some resistance to the idea of discipline. But I have clear rules. If they are rude or don’t bring their kit, they don’t get to play. I could lend them a bat, but they’ve got to learn discipline.” I’m in for more surprises. While I might think I’m interviewing the kids, they have other ideas. They want to show me how good they are at table tennis, and what better way than by trouncing me? It normally takes a lot of persuading to get me to try my hand at a new sport. But today — faced with the mixture of politeness and jaunty competitiveness of the Greenhouse kids — I just can’t say no. Up go the sleeves, down goes the notebook: this is clearly going to be a table tennis tournament, not a series of sit-down interviews. Dami, aged 12, is my first opponent. I offer little resistance, wiped off the table 11-7, 6-4. Worse, I’m even beaten at etiquette. When a lucky net cord produces one of my rare winners, I shout with delight. When Dami gets a similarly lucky break a few minutes later, he politely apologises for his unearned good fortune. I must admit to feeling more hopeful about playing Charlotte, 13. But when she starts with a vicious forehand winner, I decide to try to distract her with questions about the scheme. “It makes me calmer,” she says, whipping a cross-court back-hand winner past my flailing defence. “It’s a mind game. You learn to trust yourself, you gain in confidence. You can’t blame anyone

Clockwise from top: young table tennis players at Raine’s Foundation School in Bethnal Green, East London; Ed Smith is put through his paces; Coach Will Cooney helps Charlotte Devlin to improve her technique

This might be the only positive element of the kids’ lives else. And I think I can be really good at it.” Having been demolished 11-2, I definitely agree. Charlotte is unusual in two ways. First, Greenhouse admits that it has struggled to attract as many girls as boys. Of the 25 kids in the room, only three are girls. In response, it has set up girls-only classes — they’ve found that more girls turn up when there’s no risk of being edged out by the boys. Charlotte is also unusual because she is clearly highly motivated about her whole school career. I expect she is someone who always drags up the level of discipline and attentiveness, whatever she is doing. Kayleigh, 12, faces a more challenging situation. She spends much of her time away from school helping to look after her one-year-old brother. This is her release. “Playing table tennis makes me happier because I’ve got something to do. At home, I’d be sitting indoors, unhappy, arguing with my mum. But with table tennis, I can look forward to beating my friends at other schools.” At the mention of victory, Kayleigh’s face lights up with a smile for


body&soulhealth the first time in our conversation. My next opponent, Ed, aged 13, is bright-eyed and slightly mischievous. “I like to joke around,” he says, introducing himself. I expect it is an understatement. If I was his teacher, I’d pay special attention to what he was up to. Ed talks about Will as a mentor rather than just a sports coach. “Will used to get into trouble when he was young. He understands. He’s an inspiration to me. If I wasn’t playing table tennis, I’d be in trouble.” Will actively recruits the needier students from the Learning and Support Unit, the separate classroom for kids who are struggling with conventional lessons. Table tennis acts as a bridge, helping them back into the mainstream. Greenhouse recruits inspirational coaches, many of whom have represented their country. They mentor 8 to 18-year-olds in 45 programmes across London. Table tennis is just one of the eight disciplines they offer — the others range from judo to drama, and from swimming to dance. But serious questions remain about schemes such as Greenhouse. First, it needs to learn to appeal to girls as well as boys. The girls-only classes have made progress but there is clearly more work to be done. Second, what about the students who aren’t suited to playing competitive sport? Michael de Giorgio, the former financier who founded Greenhouse, believes we should reassess the way we think about sport in education. “There is too much stress on counting heads and not enough emphasis on changing lives,” he argues. There is a serious difference, de Giorgio believes, between one hour of unfocused physical activity once a week and the serious development and inter-school competition that Greenhouse provides. “The first challenge is getting them to attend; the next is encouraging them to compete not just against each other, but also against other schools. That’s a vital tool for breaking down the inward-looking reluctance to leave their own patch, their own postcode.” Revealingly, de Giorgio does not believe that sport per se is inevitably a force for good. “Just getting youngsters to play sport is not the point. You will get results [in social/educational terms] only if you have inspirational coaches who use the sporting environment to teach lessons that have an impact beyond sport.” He is not part of the sports lobby. He is an educator who uses sport as one of his tools. Perhaps that is a false dichotomy. Looking back on my own professional cricketing career, I can now see that my best sports coaches were, by nature and inclination, really teachers. They may have encouraged me to compete fiercely. But that was always part of a broader canvas. If I’d played cricket well and hated the rest of my life, they would have felt they had failed me as teachers. That spirit, I suspect, underpins the success of Greenhouse. Its focus on competition may not suit everyone. But it is providing serious ladders of opportunity where they are needed most. I have another chat with Ed — the lively, difficult one — as I’m leaving Raine’s. “I know a lot of people in very different circles to this. Now I try not to get involved with them. Instead, I am going to win championships and travel the world.” A group of sponsors led by the Alan Cristea Gallery in London will match donations made to Greenhouse through The Times Appeal.

An Apple a day EmmaWoolf Now I remember why I don’t usually bother with a Christmas tree. I risked life and limb getting it back from the market, precariously balanced across my bicycle, and now the damn thing won’t stay upright. Plus it’s shedding pine needles all over the place; my flat is crunchy underfoot. By the time the doorbell goes I’ve wedged it into a large tub. My friends, like the three wise men, arrive bearing gifts: two bottles of wine, a load of tinsel and baubles and a box of mince pies (I am not famed for my catering skills). We pour wine and set about devising a colour scheme for the tree. “If this thing is going to stand in my living room for the next few weeks, I can’t be doing with the shiny red stuff,” I say. “I think silver and white only. And no chocolate Santas.” Someone puts on my Bon Iver album (the heartbreaking one) and we begin to deck the boughs, comparing artistic skills and chatting about our holiday plans. It’s festive, this chaos all around me. I don’t even mind about the pine needles. As we sort the silver baubles from the green and gold, my mind drifts back to another December, two years ago in Cape Town, just me and T in a beautiful old hotel on the waterfront. It was strange to be 2,000 miles from home at Christmas, so we decided to make our own celebration. We borrowed a stuffed reindeer from the hotel lobby and strung tinsel around a large fig tree in the corner of our room. On Christmas morning we drew the curtains to blazing sunshine over Table Mountain and a deep blue sky. T brought me breakfast in bed and we sat beneath the fig tree unwrapping each other’s presents. Later, we drove to Cape Point and climbed up to the lighthouse, looking out over the waves where the Atlantic and Indian oceans meet. Instead of roast dinner and the Queen’s speech, we had a picnic on the beach and swam in the sea. That evening we lit candles and opened a bottle of champagne to mark our first Christmas together. Back in North London we’ve nearly finished our yuletide decorations. The tree won’t win prizes for style, but it has a lopsided charm. We recharge our wine glasses and prepare to switch on the fairy lights. Lo and behold, the tree springs to life, magical. So, there goes 2011; see you in the new year.

To follow Emma Woolf’s diary online, go to thetimes.co.uk/appleaday

Foods that combat wrinkles Amanda Ursell

Pecking order Christmas chocolates If you love chocolates but are keeping an eye on calories and fat, check out the options below — and remember, moderation is key

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Q

What I really, really want for Christmas is an anti-wrinkle plan for 2012. Please don’t just tell me to stay out of the sun. I want to know if there is anything I can eat or take that will make a difference? There is not a great deal of scientific evidence in this area, but smaller studies are beginning to shed light on foods and supplements that may help to combat wrinkles. Pierfrancesco Morganti, Professor of Applied Cosmetic Dermatology at Naples University, has discovered a link between consumption of the yellow antioxidant pigment lutein, found in vegetables and fruits, and levels of hydration in the skin. He studied 120 women, aged 25 to 50. Some took 10mg supplements of lutein, some took supplements and also applied lutein topically in a cream, and others had placebos of both the supplements and cream. The lutein-consuming groups showed significant improvements in skin hydration, which in practice helps to reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles. The good news is that you can get 10mg of lutein through food. Just 50g of kale provides this amount, as will 100g servings of spinach and watercress, or a large red pepper or 200g of romaine lettuce. Fruit and vegetables also increase our intake of antioxidant vitamins, minerals and other supernutrients. For example, antioxidants such as vitamin C help to zap free radicals before they are able to damage proteins and fats in the skin, a process that can lead to skin-thickening and the formation of lines. Taking the antioxidant theme one step farther, you may want to add AmeriSciences AS10 liquid formula to your Christmas gift list. It contains ingredients such as acai, cupuacu and acerola berries, and was developed by Nasa and the Johnson Space Centre in Houston to help protect astronauts from low-level radiation. However, a small, as yet unpublished, study on 180 women by the cosmetic dermatologist Dr Aaron

Q

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Matchsticks

20 calories, 0.9g sugar per matchstick These are slim sticks of mint-flavoured chocolate with tiny pieces of boiled sweets for added crunch. They are one of the lowest-calorie chocolates and are free from artificial colours and flavours. Each stick contains 0.9g of fat.

Terry’s Chocolate Orange

31 calories, 3g sugar per segment These contain 2g of fat per slice and are made with milk chocolate and essence of real oranges, something that makes them especially tasty and especially hard to limit to just one piece, so be careful.

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After Eights

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Quality Street

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Dark chocolate cherry liqueurs

35 calories, 6g sugar per piece I’m always surprised that you get away with only 35 calories per After Eight, because their peppermint fondant makes them feel more naughty. It is the fondant that makes them higher in sugar than other choices, but lower in fat with only 1g per serving.

44 calories, 5g sugar per sweet This calorie-count is the average for three sweets, although some toffees will be slightly lower and some of the filled chocolates slightly higher. The manufacturer says that the tin can be recycled, but that doesn’t excuse eating its contents in one go to look green.

55 calories, 6g sugar I am assured that you would have to eat several boxes of liqueur chocolates to get one unit of alcohol inside your system. That’s just as well, considering each chocolate provides 2.5g of fat.

Read all Amanda’s past columns on thetimes.co.uk/ amandaursell

Barson, of the Surface Medical Spa in Utah, found that it reduced wrinkles by 17 per cent in trial participants who took it twice daily. Obviously this work needs to be repeated with larger numbers of women, but it is interesting nonetheless. Last, I think it is important to cut right down on sugary treats. Research has shown that high blood sugar levels in people with diabetes trigger increases in the skin of substances known as “advanced glycation end products” (AGEs), which are thought to damage the skin’s bounce and elasticity. If you have a nutrition question, e-mail amanda.ursell@thetimes.co.uk

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TIMES PHOTOGRAPHER, RICHARD POHLE

Mat finish: Gordon, who progressed to the judo semi-finals of the Athens Olympics in 2004, was introduced to the sport at Ernest Bevin College and now acts as an instructor and mentor there

Bevin Boys captivated by gripping yarns Christmas Appeal Patrick Kidd visits a South London school where judo classes are providing a pathway towards a better life

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s long as there have been lunch breaks, schoolboys have spent them wrestling with each other, but the fights that break out at Ernest Bevin College in Tooting, South London, are controlled and encouraged by the staff. Welcome to the Phoenix judo club, breeding ground of Olympians. Judo has been on the curriculum at Ernest Bevin for almost 40 years, the result of a former teacher feeling that the sport would provide a good outlet for his boys’ excessive energy levels, but it has grown into far more than just part of PE lessons. Voluntarily and in large numbers, boys who are introduced to the sport in class choose to spend much of their spare time perfecting their grips and throws. It beats belonging to a gang. “It has taught me respect and manners and how to present myself in a good way,” Aaron, a pupil at Ernest Bevin, said. “I know quite a few people who would have got in trouble if they hadn’t been coming to judo club.” With the assistance of Greenhouse, a charity that The Times is supporting

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this Christmas and which aims to use sport and the arts to help children in disadvantaged communities to realise their potential, Ernest Bevin has been able to employ coaches to train the children in lunchtime and evening clubs in the school’s dojo. This is not just a gym by a fancy name with a few mats thrown down before each class but a proper dedicated room for martial arts with permanent mats covering a large floor area and the walls. Hanging around the room are portraits of Bevin Boys: not of conscripts who were sent to work down the mines but the pupils of the school who learnt judo there and went on to achieve national and international fame. One of them is Winston Gordon, the Commonwealth Games middleweight gold medal-winner in 2002 and a two-times Olympian who was introduced to the sport more than 20 years ago and now comes back to teach it. “I remember in one assembly a PE teacher, Margaret Hicks, said that she was going to demonstrate the art of judo and wanted a volunteer to try and escape from a hold-down,” he said. “I put my hand up to give it a go and couldn’t escape.” Uncowed by the mocking laughter of the children who watched him wriggle without joy, he resolved to learn how to escape. By 1993 he was a bronze medal-winner at the Youth Olympics. Gordon, 35, lost in the semi-finals of the Athens Olympics, but was hampered by injury in Beijing four years later and was eliminated early on. Having lost his lottery funding, he decided to give something back to his old school by joining the Greenhousesponsored programme. It is part sport, part social work, with Greenhouse paying for the coaches to attend courses in mentoring. “We try and help disadvantaged kids, help them with financial worries,

take that burden off them,” Gordon said. “But for me it’s not just about creating more judokas, I want them to be nice people, too. “Those who don’t shine at sport can still get involved through learning to be coaches or officials. Many attend the class just to watch. This is a place of respect. If anybody is out of line, I don’t

want to see them. If I hear they are bad in class or rude to their teacher, I tell them they are not doing judo.” The threat tends to work. Gordon tells a story about one boy who was going badly off the rails and was saved by judo. “He was bad at home, shouting and swearing at his mum, misbehaving at school,” Gordon

To donate to The Times Christmas Appeal Visit thetimes.co.uk/timesappeal Call 0870 043 3764 Or complete the form below

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War Child

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said. “I got wind of it and went to the home and sat down with him and his mum. We came up with a plan and ever since then the boy has been an angel. He comes to the club every lunchtime and after school. Obviously he slips up now and again, but I slap him on the wrist and put him back in line.” Jack Williams, a teacher at the school for more than 30 years and now head of PE, recalls Gordon’s schooldays. “He was a typical 11-year-old from Tooting, dead keen to be involved in physical activity,” he said. “The outlet was what attracted him to judo. “There is no point denying it, there are dangers for boys living in South London. We know kids who are in gangs. But judo gives an outlet for their

‘There is no doubt that judo has helped to save any number of kids’ aggression and frustration in a safe and controlled environment. “Unlike in the gang culture, which corrupts the idea of respect, here there is genuine respect. There is no doubt that judo has helped to save any number of kids. It teaches them balance, co-ordination, suppleness, endurance, strength but above all character. There is no hiding place to blame someone else.” It was that lesson in resilience that attracted Gordon to the sport and keeps him coming back. After his disappointment in Beijing, he hopes to have another crack at the Olympics. “I’m in the squad and we will know in March or April who is going to the Olympics and who will be watching it on TV,” he said. “I don’t plan to be watching TV.” 6 A group of sponsors led by the Alan Cristea Gallery in London will match pound for pound donations made to Greenhouse through The Times appeal.


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Tuesday December 20 2011 | the times

Leading articles INSIDE 2 TODAY

Welcome to your brilliant daily pullout section Opposite page 34

Bleed, Poor Country An apparently absurd figure, Kim Jong Il ranks among the most monstrous tyrants in history. His legacy is a people impoverished, incarcerated and broken The appearance of Adolf Eichmann in a Jerusalem courtroom half a century ago gave rise to the phrase “the banality of evil”. Those words come unbidden when considering Kim Jong Il, who died yesterday. They are misleading, even so. Rotund of figure and bacchanalian in appetite, Kim appeared a faintly ridiculous, Chaplinesque dictator. But there was nothing commonplace about the life and crimes of a man who ranks among the most monstrous killers in history. Owing to North Korea’s isolation, observers tend to concentrate on its most visible features: nuclear adventurism, bellicosity and sponsorship of terrorism. These are terrifying threats, and diplomatic efforts to defuse them have so far proved futile. But the passing of a tyrant should focus attention even more on the condition of a people. Combining absolute rule and a fanatical cult of personality, the regime of Kim Il Sung and his son Kim Jong Il achieved even greater catastrophe for North Koreans than suppression and mass starvation. It has left a population of some 24 million people physically stunted owing to malnutrition, and emotionally and intellectually impoverished. Like the characters in Nineteen Eighty-Four, published in the same year as the founding of North Korea, the Kims’ subjects are not only

imprisoned but broken. The country is run (or more accurately, run down) on a bizarre set of ideas known as Juche. Often euphemised as “selfreliance”, this is a quasi-mystical farrago of turbid platitude and ferocious xenophobia. Its author, Hwang Jang Yop, was once the regime’s principal ideologue, before becoming the most prominent of the very few North Korean defectors. In exile, he compared Kim Jong Il’s rule to Hitler’s. Parallels with Nazism are almost always hyperbolic; but not in the case of North Korea. There are credible accounts that the regime annually kills prisoners by the thousand at a hellish place known as Camp 22, in the remote town of Haengyong. Witnesses say that these atrocities include incarcerating entire families in glass chambers and gassing them. The repression of North Koreans is so complete that almost no samizdat literature exists. The few who have escaped recount tales of such torment that they almost defy the imagination. In a recent book published in English as Long Road Home, Kim Yong, a former camp inmate, claims that starving prisoners perform acts of cannibalism to survive. When, one day, North Koreans emerge from tyranny, stories such as these may well be surpassed. But the most chilling aspect of the ignoble

life of Kim Jong Il is not the repression that he instituted or the famine that he engineered, in which perhaps three million people died in the 1990s. It is that North Koreans’ ululations on his death are almost certainly sincere. For a culture in which there is no information, and nothing to read or listen to apart from systematic lying, has convinced a people that they are blessed to live this way and amid these horrors. North Korea is not strictly a dynastic tyranny but a necrocracy, in which Kim Il Sung remains head of state. Kim Jong Un, his grandson, is likely now to succeed to power. It will be merciful if his rule is more limited in scope and years. There is, alternatively, the possibility of misery transmuting into national collapse and a refugee crisis. That prospect will alarm China, which is the one external actor that might be able to alleviate North Koreans’ plight. In the 1990s, when North Korea’s nuclear programme first became an international crisis, the United States unavailingly took responsibility to resolve the problem. The best hope now for the stability and peace of the Korean Peninsula is that China uses what leverage it can on the North’s new rulers. There is little other chance of easing and eventually dispelling a people’s long, apocalyptic nightmare.

The Revenue’s Customs The Public Accounts Committee reports shadowy incompetence at HMRC “Taxation”, wrote Terry Pratchett, “is just a sophisticated way of demanding money with menaces.” Not that sophisticated. According to a report from the Public Accounts Committee, published today, almost £25 billion is outstanding in unresolved tax bills. The committee declares, also, that procedures used to resolve disputes are ad hoc and erratic, and that Her Majesty’s Revenue & Customs “has consistently failed to give straight answers to our questions about specific cases”. Of all government departments, Revenue & Customs perhaps has the greatest direct impact on the lives of the British people. Yet, compared with almost all other government departments, it operates under an opaque veil. Tax settlements, whether they be with companies or individuals, are privileged. At the head of HMRC is not a directly elected politician, answerable to the electorate, but a chief executive. All of this is permissible — and arguably even desirable — when it allows Britain’s tax system to operate in a manner trusted and respected by those with a stake in it. But when it does not, it is not. Making sense of tax is proving increasingly

taxing. Today’s report is not the first blow to the integrity and competence of HMRC. Last month, The Times revealed the extent of avoidance on stamp duty on house purchases, which is thought to be costing the Treasury as much as £1 billion a year. This takes place, usually, by means of a loophole so simple that a child could understand it, yet the Revenue maintains it would be more complex and costly to see it closed. Among those cases considered by the PAC were those of Goldman Sachs (in which an error cost the taxpayer nearly £10 million) and that of Vodafone (in which a deal is thought to have saved the company £8 billion). Both of these occurred under the watch of Dave Hartnett, acting head of HMRC. Margaret Hodge, who chairs the PAC, complains that confidentiality rules shield these decisions from scrutiny, even retrospectively. “It is absurd”, she says, “that we had to rely on the media and the actions of a whistle- blower to find out about the details of individual settlements. Parliament and the public have legitimate concerns that large companies are being treated more favourably than ordinary taxpayers.”

Mrs Hodge is quite right. Common sense dictates that companies must have confidence that they will not be subjected to a public kangaroo court every time they pay a tax bill, and a negotiated tax settlement is not, of itself, always a bad thing. Yet the public must have confidence in those to whom they pay tax. At present, HMRC appears to be unacceptably self-governing. Those who negotiate deals are, too often, the same people who approve them. Mr Hartnett’s departure as chief executive, expected next summer, is already overdue. His replacement, Lin Homer, faces a formidable task. Not only must she get to grips with the damaging chaos of her predecessor’s reign. She must also implement the overhaul of tax credits and the rollout of the PAYE2 computer system, which is essential to the introduction of the Government’s flagship universal credit. Cack-handedness here would have enormous and damaging impact. Both competence and transparency are required at HMRC, with urgency. It is not enough for the public to be told that we are all in it together. We must believe it, too.

A Sporting Chance

Dinner tonight Lindsey Bareham’s lemon roast chicken legs with artichokes and peas Page 3

times modern The new poverty: life trapped in the middle-class debt spiral Pages 4, 5

body&soul

No get up and go? You might be ill, or maybe just tired Pages 9, 10

first night Reviews of pop classical, jazz and ballet Pages 12, 13

TV&Radio Today’s listings, plus last night’s reviews Pages 14-16

MindGames All your favourite games and puzzles Pages 18-20

Subscribe to the 7-day pack and save 43% Call 0800 068 4938 and quote L490911G or visit timespacks.com/jointoday

Today’s weather 5

Greenhouse is a charity that is succeeding in using sport to recast teenage lives Earl Warren, the US Chief Justice who helped to end school segregation and led the commission into the assassination of President Kennedy, spent a long career peering at life’s underside and seeking to make the best of the world around him. It prompted him always to turn first to the sports section of his newspaper, because, he said: “The sports page records people’s accomplishments; the front page has nothing but Man’s failures.” Greenhouse, one of the charities supported in The Times Christmas Appeal, strives to put stories that have the potential to scar the front pages of

the press into triumphs worthy of the back pages. By deploying inspirational social workers camouflaged as sports coaches, the charity establishes in schools in deprived corners of the country a culture in which young boys and girls who might be shambling down a path towards delinquency can glimpse the possibility of a fork in the road. Through seizing these children’s attention for long enough to instil in them a commitment to sport, Greenhouse succeeds in planting the seeds of classroom discipline, dedication, social responsibility, happiness and academic achievement.

Children suddenly find that they not only have ambition, but also the wherewithal to achieve it. Michael de Giorgio, who heads the charity, says that while the fruits of Greenhouse are evident in the gym, its true success is measured far beyond it (see Times 2). “The first challenge”, he says, “is getting them to attend; the next is encouraging them to compete not just against each other, but also against other schools. That’s a vital tool for breaking down the inward-looking reluctance to leave their own patch, their own postcode.” This is a charity transforming lives. It deserves support.

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Dull and drizzly in the West, bright in the East, wintry showers in the Highlands Full report, page 55

First Night 19 Opinion 21 Peter Brookes 23 Letters 24, 25 Daily Universal Register 26 World 27 Business 33 Register 51 Court Circular, Law Report 53 Sport 56 Crossword 67

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the times | Wednesday December 21 2011

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News

Charity’s sport training helps children to reach for the stars Christmas Appeal Ben Hoyle Arts Correspondent

Michael Craig-Martin was a mentor to the Damien Hirst generation of Young British Artists. Like many artists, Craig-Martin rather likes table-tennis, although he calls it ping-pong. His postage stamp for the 2012 Paralympic Games depicts a bat and ball. He fell silent and stared when Ashley Facey-Thompson and his coach Grant Solder started playing each other, fizzing the ball hard and low over the net from their opposite corners with vicious precision in the new table tennis room in a school in one of Britain’s most deprived areas. Craig-Martin, 70, is thinking about what he recognises in Facey-Thompson, 16, a prodigy at a Morpeth School, a comprehensive in Bethnal Green, East London, who moves with the languid grace of a serious athlete and seems supremely unbothered by having only one working arm because of a condition called Erbs palsy. Greenhouse, one of the Times Christmas charities, introduced FaceyThompson to Solder six years ago. The charity runs sports training in schools around London that turn disadvantaged children into enthusiasts and even international players. It is an approach that makes the pupils better, more confident, more motivated people. It transformed Facey-Thompson. Three years ago he was drifting, Solder said. “He was challenging, he would do some daft things. I gave him a few bollockings and had to get his mum involved. Now he’s doing so well as a person.” Facey-Thompson qualifies for the

Paralympics, but Solder thinks that with enough effort, he could become the first Paralympic table-tennis player to compete in the full Olympics. Solder should know: he used to be the England Juniors coach. When Craig-Martin took on FaceyThompson at the table, they were an odd couple. But when they talked, the common ground was obvious. Facey-Thompson said that he was always sporty but that table-tennis “felt different right from the beginning”. Craig-Martin understands: “There is something about doing something when you just feel some kind of connection with it. It just feels natural.” Two things struck Craig-Martin about Facey-Thompson’s success. The role of a strong single mother in unpromising circumstances reminds him The Paralympic stamp designed by Michael Craig-Martin

of his most famous pupil. “Damien Hirst,” he said. “Same thing.” Then there’s the coach. “If you are really interested in something, and you meet somebody who’s a real pro . . . it changes everything. That’s what Greenhouse does. It puts people together.” The challenge is for Greenhouse to offer more children that opportunity. Facey-Thompson’s school also boasts the national girls’ Under-16s team, who represented England at a recent world championships. The Great Britain boys’ Under-17 team are also Greenhouse-trained. Thousands of children are doing better with their schoolwork because they do not want to be kicked off their Greenhouse classes. Michael de Giorgio, who quit a lucrative City career to found Greenhouse in 2002, believes that any school in the

To donate to The Times Christmas Appeal Visit thetimes.co.uk/timesappeal Call 0870 043 3764 Or complete the form below

Please send to The Times Christmas Charity Appeal, Charities Trust, Suite 20-22, Century Building, Tower Street, Liverpool L3 4BJ I wish to donate £................................. to the Christmas Charity Appeal. The money raised by the Times Christmas Charity Appeal will be used by the charities for their general charitable purposes. All donations will be split equally between the appeal’s three causes unless specified in the circle(s) below

Greenhouse

Alzheimer’s Society

War Child

Please include a cheque or postal order made payable to: The Times Christmas Charity Appeal or complete the Mastercard/Visa/Amex details

Gift Aid Declaration I would like the Charities Trust to reclaim tax on this and any future donations and to pass it on to the charity/charities specified. I confirm that I pay UK income tax at least equal to the amount which the charity may reclaim. Please ensure you provide us with your full address Mr/Mrs/Ms/Other........................................................................................................................................................................................................ Forename................................................................................................ Surname................................................................................................. Address.................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. Postcode.................................................................................................. Date............................................................................................................... Credit card details CSC no Valid from

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Expiry date

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Telephone number for confirmation purposes Please note Charities Trust will appear on your bank/credit card statement Calls to The Times donation line are charged at the national rate of no more than 8p per minute from a BT landline. Charges from other networks will vary. Donations will be administered by Charities Trust (no 327489) on behalf of Alzheimer’s Society (no 296645) Greenhouse (no 1098744) and War Child (no 1071659). Charities Trust will use your information for claiming Gift Aid. We will not send your details to third parties, other than your nominated charity/ ies. If you do not want your details shared with your nominated charity/ies, tick here

13

TIMES PHOTOGRAPHER, DAVID BEBBER

country could emulate that success, given usable space and a coach with the “wow factor”. “A mentor who is technically good but can also be a social worker in a tracksuit will change the lives of a lot of children,” he said. “We need many more of them.” 6 A group of sponsors led by the Alan Cristea Gallery in London will match donations made to Greenhouse through The Times Appeal.

Ashley Facey-Thompson, 16 and Michael Craig-Martin, 70, play table tennis


TIMES PHOTOGRAPHER, BEN GURR

Boy is a smash hit thanks to special talent spotter’s help Christmas Appeal Rhoda Buchanan

Wendy Hoyte, Greenhouse’s head coach, helped James to master the sport

Wendy Hoyte knows how to spot a winner. As a double Olympian sprinter with two sons playing professional foot-

ball, she was not surprised when her instincts proved to be right about a certain 11-year-old boy. Two years ago, Mrs Hoyte was in the gym of a special needs school in South London. Among the children who walked in to the table tennis session that she runs for the Greenhouse charity was James, a boy new to the school, with Asperger’s syndrome. “He came in, a Year 7, with his woolly hat and a bat and ball. We were told that he must not lose his hat. But the way that he was holding the bat and ball, you could just tell. There was something special. “The only thing was his behaviour. He was a bit angry and a bit wild. Every stranger who walked into the room he called ‘trespasser’ and he would hide my keys because he thought it was funny. When James first met Earl Collins [the school PE co-ordinator] he threw balls at him for three weeks. But less than a month later he had mastered the sport.” Asperger’s syndrome is a form of autism with some of the same traits, including difficulty with social interaction and preoccupation with routine. But James, now 13, has grown from a tricky child with a disability into one of the capital’s most promising young table tennis players who is knocking on the door of the England team. It is thanks to Greenhouse, which brings top sports coaches to some of London’s most disadvantaged young people and is one of the beneficiaries of The Times Christmas Appeal. James has become a different person. “At first, James couldn’t lose,” Mrs Hoyte said. “He would only play with selective members of staff. When he was losing he would get very upset so we had to let him win. Gradually we started to let him lose some sets. Everything, even his posture, has changed. He’d just stand there with his hands in his pockets, slouching. But I said, ‘You’ve got to be ready to play’.” And these days, James can really

play. He takes on one, then two, of his teachers with ease. He doesn’t even look as if he is trying. James is reserved, but he said that taking part in a recent competition at Bacon’s College, Bermondsey, was “easy”, and that “it felt good” to do well in the contest (he only lost one match). He wasn’t nervous and he looked forward to the competition for two weeks. James trains twice a week for two hours with Chris Lewis, a former under-18 England player, having outgrown Mrs Hoyte’s sessions. With the resources at its disposal, Greenhouse was able to push James, moving him into the competition circuit of mainstream schools. Still a little too young for the 2012 Olympics, James hopes to compete in the 2016 team and perhaps become a table tennis coach himself. The impact of the intensive coaching and nurture from Greenhouse, however, is most keenly felt at home. “He will talk to me more,” said Karen, James’s mother. “Table tennis has given him a basis for conversation. He’s come a long way. It’s a fantastic growing experience for him. Developing a specific skill, he has learnt that he can achieve as much as anyone. Greenhouse has been really good.” Steph Lea, the deputy head teacher, explained how important it was for children with special needs to feel the thrill of competing on an even keel with other children, who do not have special needs. “It makes a difference that he is confident this is a genuine challenge — it’s real,” she said. “It is about who he is. From the support he has had from Greenhouse, he’s been able to develop his talent and as a consequence he’s more confident. We can see that in other parts of his learning. It’s great to see him happy.” 6 A group of sponsors led by the Alan Cristea Gallery in London will match donations made to Greenhouse through The Times Appeal

To donate to The Times Christmas Appeal Visit thetimes.co.uk/timesappeal Call 0870 043 3764 Or complete the form below

Please send to The Times Christmas Charity Appeal, Charities Trust, Suite 20-22, Century Building, Tower Street, Liverpool L3 4BJ I wish to donate £................................. to the Christmas Charity Appeal. The money raised by the Times Christmas Charity Appeal will be used by the charities for their general charitable purposes. All donations will be split equally between the appeal’s three causes unless specified in the circle(s) below

Greenhouse

Alzheimer’s Society

War Child

Please include a cheque or postal order made payable to: The Times Christmas Charity Appeal or complete the Mastercard/Visa/Amex details

Gift Aid Declaration I would like the Charities Trust to reclaim tax on this and any future donations and to pass it on to the charity/charities specified. I confirm that I pay UK income tax at least equal to the amount which the charity may reclaim. Please ensure you provide us with your full address Mr/Mrs/Ms/Other........................................................................................................................................................................................................ Forename................................................................................................ Surname................................................................................................. Address.................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. Postcode.................................................................................................. Date............................................................................................................... Credit card details CSC no Valid from

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Telephone number for confirmation purposes Please note Charities Trust will appear on your bank/credit card statement Calls to The Times donation line are charged at the national rate of no more than 8p per minute from a BT landline. Charges from other networks will vary. Donations will be administered by Charities Trust (no 327489) on behalf of Alzheimer’s Society (no 296645) Greenhouse (no 1098744) and War Child (no 1071659). Charities Trust will use your information for claiming Gift Aid. We will not send your details to third parties, other than your nominated charity/ ies. If you do not want your details shared with your nominated charity/ies, tick here

14


22

Monday December 26 2011 | the times

News Charity

Club gives kids Christmas Appeal

Two men who grew up on a rough London estate know the vital role played by mentors, Murad Ahmed reports

O

n a freezing December night, Tobi Makinde, 24, is overseeing six young boys as they play football. The kids, aged about 12, have formed two teams of three as part of a training match. The objective is to keep passing the ball to their team-mates, while their opponents try to retrieve the ball. Mr Makinde lets the game go on for a couple of minutes. It’s a bit of a mess. The 12-year-olds bash into each other with intensity. There is little room for manoeuvre or passing. Mr Makinde, looking the part of a professional football coach in his smart tracksuit, exudes authority. He stops the game. “You need to find space,” he says to his young charges, motioning his arms out to his sides. The players have focused their passing in a small corner of the pitch, meaning the game has become congested. He instructs the players to spread out. The children respond instantly. The boys with the ball form a large triangle and start using the whole width of the pitch. Suddenly, tackling is not so easy. The passing gets better, and a recognisable game of football breaks out. Mr Makinde understands these children. He was once one of them. When he was a youngster, he too played at the club where he is now a coach: Greenhouse Bethwin FC. The club is run by the Greenhouse charity, and made up of 27 teams of various age

Matthew Shobande and Tobi Makinde

groups and abilities, with boys and girls from around the South London area. Ten years ago, there was just one team, Bethwin FC, before it merged with the Greenhouse in 2005. The club organises training sessions and matches for children. It also pays for coaches such as Mr Makinde to attend professional courses so that they also improve. On the night I go to visit, there are dozens of children of all ages, all playing on a floodlit ground on a high-quality astroturf pitch. Several Greenhouse coaches are watching over them. Mr Makinde

To donate to The Times Christmas Appeal Visit thetimes.co.uk/timesappeal Call 0870 043 3764 Or complete the form below

Please send to The Times Christmas Charity Appeal, Charities Trust, Suite 20-22, Century Building, Tower Street, Liverpool L3 4BJ I wish to donate £................................. to the Christmas Charity Appeal. The money raised by the Times Christmas Charity Appeal will be used by the charities for their general charitable purposes. All donations will be split equally between the appeal’s three causes unless specified in the circle(s) below

Greenhouse

Alzheimer’s Society

War Child

Please include a cheque or postal order made payable to: The Times Christmas Charity Appeal or complete the Mastercard/Visa/Amex details

Gift Aid Declaration I would like the Charities Trust to reclaim tax on this and any future donations and to pass it on to the charity/charities specified. I confirm that I pay UK income tax at least equal to the amount which the charity may reclaim. Please ensure you provide us with your full address Mr/Mrs/Ms/Other........................................................................................................................................................................................................ Forename................................................................................................ Surname................................................................................................. Address.................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. Postcode.................................................................................................. Date............................................................................................................... Credit card details CSC no Valid from

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If applicable Switch only Debit card only

Telephone number for confirmation purposes Please note Charities Trust will appear on your bank/credit card statement Calls to The Times donation line are charged at the national rate of no more than 8p per minute from a BT landline. Charges from other networks will vary. Donations will be administered by Charities Trust (no 327489) on behalf of Alzheimer’s Society (no 296645) Greenhouse (no 1098744) and War Child (no 1071659). Charities Trust will use your information for claiming Gift Aid. We will not send your details to third parties, other than your nominated charity/ ies. If you do not want your details shared with your nominated charity/ies, tick here

15


some space, and not just on the pitch TIMES PHOTOGRAPHER, CHRIS HARRIS

grew up on the nearby North Peckham estate, a notorious block in South London where there are dangerous gangs and high levels of depravation. He was brought up by his mother, Adeola, and said that although he knew “the bad guys on the estate”, he found an outlet for his energies by joining the football club, something he was encouraged to do by other players. “I started playing for Bethwin when I was in Year 7,” he said. “I was a right back. I remember my first game still. I had a shocker. I played with this guy called Julian. He was a very good player. I looked

‘I was a bit of a wild child. I wanted to come back and let the youngsters know there is a way out too’

are both coaches at Greenhouse Bethwin FC, a club that prides itself on good behaviour as well as its results

up to him. He kept me in check, telling me what to do. After a season, I got the hang of it. I was one of the best players.” Mr Makinde says he was relatively lucky as a child. He had role models including his mother, friends and team-mates such as Julian. He is now studying at London South Bank University, and hopes to become a professional football coach. He has come back to Greenhouse Bethwin because he feels a connection with these kids and wants to be a role model for them. Another coach on the ground that night is Matthew Shobande, 24, who also grew up on the North Peckham estate. He

admits to having been a bit of a wild child. “Growing up on the North Peckham estate was rough,” he said. “ One of my favourites [pranks] was playing ‘knock down ginger’. I would throw stones at people’s windows and run. Sometimes I’d break people’s windows.” Again, under the direction of his strongwilled mother, Olusheye (“Typical West African parent, always banging on at me,” he says), he found focus through football at Greenhouse Bethwin. Mr Shobande is now studying at the University of East London, and hopes to make a career as a sports therapist and masseur. Both Mr Makinde and Mr Shobande say the coaches are not there to improve the children just as players, but also as people. There is a lot of excitement at Greenhouse Bethwin, which already has plenty of league titles and cups in its trophy cabinet, about a different kind of record for the club. So far, not a single player in any of its teams has picked up a yellow or red card this season. “I had a kid join my team recently, just cause his dad liked the ethos we have here,” Mr Makinde said. “The ethos is attitude, attendance and punctuality. The parent said ‘You know what? That’s how I want my kids to be brought up’ and brought him down here. It’s more than football results, it’s about learning and making sure these kids are growing.” Mr Shobande adds: “I wanted to come back, and be a voice for the kids. I want to help them improve, let them know there is a way out too. There are other things apart from football. I am someone they could talk to, a mentor. I didn’t have that.”

16


16

Saturday December 31 2011 | the times

News

Helping troubled children get off the streets and on the ball Christmas Appeal Jill Sherman

Victor Alaneme was stabbed in the face when he was 18 after a row over a mobile phone with a local youth. The

wound, which needed 72 stitches, still divides his left cheek and the incident sent him spiralling into depression, leaving him scared and isolated. “I was in hospital for three or four days. It made me feel very angry at the time,” said Victor, now 31. “All my mates were going out and having a good time but I was scared. I stayed indoors and became a recluse for months.” Five years ago violence came back to

TIMES PHOTOGRAPHER, CHRIS HARRIS

haunt him when his younger brother Christopher, also aged 18, was stabbed to death by a gang of boys who chased him after shouting racist remarks. “He went out with a group of friends in Sheerness. He got heckled by some guys there and they chased him for whatever reason and stabbed him and a bystander who helped him got stabbed too. But he survived and my brother died and that was it,” said Victor, struggling to control his emotion.

Victor Alaneme with some of the 520 young Greenhouse Bethwin footballers

The irony was that his mother moved away from Penge, southeast London, where they had lived since their arrival from Nigeria in 1984, to protect her family from gang activity. But things have changed dramatically for Victor, who tells his story on a floodlit pitch at the Greenhouse Bethwin Football Club in Peckham, South London. Greenhouse is one of the charities chosen to benefit this year from The Times Christmas Appeal. Victor went from job to job for years after his recovery, feeling generally out of place. But after being told he was “brilliant with kids” while working at a leisure centre, he eventually got involved with Greenhouse. The charity runs the Bethwin club’s 27 teams for boys, girls and young adults mainly

from disadvantaged backgrounds. It believes that sport can transform lives and keep vulnerable children out of gangs and off the streets. Gang slogans or uniforms are kept off the pitch. Only the yellow and blue G slogan is allowed on sportswear, symbolic of “the Good Gang,” said Victor, who has been trained by the charity in mentoring and working with difficult children. The key, he added, was to instill strict discipline and send troublemakers packing. Children who are late or misbehave get a match ban and those that play up at school are not picked for the team. A group of supporters led by the Alan Cristea Gallery will match donations made to Greenhouse through The Times Appeal.

To donate to The Times Christmas Appeal Visit thetimes.co.uk/timesappeal Call 0870 043 3764 Or complete the form below

Please send to The Times Christmas Charity Appeal, Charities Trust, Suite 20-22, Century Building, Tower Street, Liverpool L3 4BJ I wish to donate £................................. to the Christmas Charity Appeal. The money raised by the Times Christmas Charity Appeal will be used by the charities for their general charitable purposes. All donations will be split equally between the appeal’s three causes unless specified in the circle(s) below

Greenhouse

Alzheimer’s Society

War Child

Please include a cheque or postal order made payable to: The Times Christmas Charity Appeal or complete the Mastercard/Visa/Amex details

Gift Aid Declaration I would like the Charities Trust to reclaim tax on this and any future donations and to pass it on to the charity/charities specified. I confirm that I pay UK income tax at least equal to the amount which the charity may reclaim. Please ensure you provide us with your full address Mr/Mrs/Ms/Other........................................................................................................................................................................................................ Forename................................................................................................ Surname................................................................................................. Address.................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. Postcode.................................................................................................. Date............................................................................................................... Credit card details CSC no Valid from

/

Expiry date

/

Issue no

If applicable Switch only Debit card only

Telephone number for confirmation purposes Please note Charities Trust will appear on your bank/credit card statement Calls to The Times donation line are charged at the national rate of no more than 8p per minute from a BT landline. Charges from other networks will vary. Donations will be administered by Charities Trust (no 327489) on behalf of Alzheimer’s Society (no 296645) Greenhouse (no 1098744) and War Child (no 1071659). Charities Trust will use your information for claiming Gift Aid. We will not send your details to third parties, other than your nominated charity/ ies. If you do not want your details shared with your nominated charity/ies, tick here

17


14

Tuesday January 10 2012 | the times

News Charity

Charity finds serving up a challenge means net gains for pupils Christmas Appeal David Rose

A year ago, Jo had never picked up a table tennis bat. Today he is a junior champion, with hopes of representing England. The 13-year-old from Hackney, East London, embodies the pledges surrounding London’s Olympics bid, which aimed to inspire youngsters to get off the sofa and take up sport. Instead of boosting participation, the number of 16 to 19-year-olds regularly playing sport has fallen by more than 104,000 since 2007, raising fears that the promise of a healthier, fitter nation after the 2012 Games will fall flat. But where local authorities and sports clubs have failed, Greenhouse — a beneficiary of this year’s Times charity appeal — has stepped in. The London-based charity places inspiring coaches in inner-city schools to provide training sessions that complement regular PE. The intervention is needed, especially in London’s five designated Olympic boroughs, where almost 40 per cent of 11-year-olds are overweight or obese. At 7.30am on a winter’s day, the enthusiasm of pupils at the Bridge Academy in Hackney is obvious as they gather before school for a training session. Andrew Rushton, 28, the Greenhouse table tennis coach,

puts the team through their paces with shuttle runs and jockeying exercises before they move on to some rallies and games. The former British champion introduced the sport to the Academy less than two years ago, but progress has been swift, with the girls’ team winning the Jack Petchey London Schools Table Tennis championships, and the boys’ team reaching the semi-finals. In a project part-funded by the Mayor’s Fund for London and UBS, Mr Rushton does not solely focus on those with sporting talent. He works with a mixture of pupils — including some struggling with schoolwork — to help to boost learning, improve school attendance and raise aspirations. “It’s not just about table tennis, it affects the whole school, and the kids are more focused in lessons and achieving better grades,” he says. Jo, winner of the Sussex 4 Star under-18s tournament in September, said: “I was not very happy at school before and probably was very naughty, but once you play table tennis, the more you pay attention. “It helps you keep quiet and concentrate because when you lose a point in table tennis you have to keep calm and focused — I’ve learnt to do that in class.” A group of supporters led by the Alan Cristea Gallery will match donations made to Greenhouse through The Times Appeal. To donate to The Times Christmas Appeal Visit thetimes. co.uk/timesappeal Call 0870 043 3764 Pupils who play table tennis find it easier to focus in class

TIMES PHOTOGRAPHER, RICHARD POHLE

Your money changing lives To donate to The is Times Christmas Appeal Visit thetimes.co.uk/timesappeal Christmas Appeal Rosemary Bennett Call 0870said: 043 3764 eaders of “We are disadvantaged young

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Or complete the form below

The Times

incredibly grateful to

people,” he said.

Michael de Giorgio, Greenhouse chief executive of

girls in Goma, DRC, War Child where they receive

Please send to The Times Christmas Charity Charities Trust, Suite 20-22, have Nigel Wilson, chief The Times andAppeal, its Century Building, Tower Liverpool 4BJ helped to Street, readers for L3 their executive at War I wish to donate £................................. to the Christmas Charity Appeal. Thesaid money raise generous support, Child, thatraised the by the Times Christmas Charity Appeal will be in used theirprovide general £446,417.68 so far in particularly thisby the charities moneyfor “will charitable purposes. All donations will be split equally between the appeal’s this year’s Christmas tough economic sanctuary in ourthree causes unless specified in the climate.” circle(s) below Charity Appeal. drop-in centres for

Donations are coming Alzheimer’s Society in and there is still

Please include a cheque or postal order made payable to: The Times Christmas time to support the Greenhouse, the education and Charity Appeal or complete the Mastercard/Visa/Amex details

John Longole, 15, a former kraal boy

erished region thanks to War Child, one of the charities to benefit from The Times Christmas Appeal. But the charity’s work is far from easy, or without controversy. “We have been accused of social engineering and destroying the traditions. Some of our staff have been threatened, even though they are from the area,” said Ebrima Saidy, programme director of War Child in Uganda. “But there is no doubt this lifestyle cannot be retained. The number of cattle is depleting. The conflict itself has led to fewer animals, so many are lost in the raids. And the raids are becoming more organised, with cattle dis-

work of War Child, smallest of the three training. It will Gift Aid Declaration Greenhouse and the charities, said that the provide numeracy and Alzheimer’s hadtax raised theand any literacy forand I would like theSociety. Charities Trustappeal to reclaim on this futureclasses donations Jeremy organisation’s children Uganda.” to pass it onHughes, to the charity/charities specified. profile. I confirm that I pay UKin income tax at chief executive of the which “This is reclaim. Please To make donation, least equal to the amount the money charity may ensureayou provide Alzheimer’s fantastic and will please fill out the us with your fullSociety, address said that the money allow us to set up new coupon below left, or Mr/Mrs/Ms/Other........................................................................................................................................................................................................ had helped to secure programmesSurname................................................................................................. to visit thetimes.co.uk/ Forename................................................................................................ frontline services. He change the lives of timesappeal. Address.................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. Postcode.................................................................................................. Date............................................................................................................... close to impossible in the dry season. dirt with the mosquitoes and tics. We Credit card details And this area has been devastated by are not paid and we are at the mercy of climate change with soil erosion and anyone with a gun since ours were CSC no drought. Disarmament has left the taken away.” If applicable Valid from / Expiry date / Issue no Switch only boys very vulnerable and many have Village elders take the boys out of Debit card only already been orphaned.” school when they reach seven or eight Telephone number for confirmation purposes The charity’s work is painstaking, to start looking after the cattle, Robert Please note Charities Trust will appear on your bank/credit statement with local staff negotiating with village added. “They card have no choice. The Calls to The donation charged atschool. the national rate of no cattle more than per minute from a BT landline. elders toTimes allow boyslinetoareattend clan’s is8p everything.” Charges from other networks will vary. Donations will be administered by Charities Trust (no 327489) on behalf of In some cases have John spendsCharities his evenings down Alzheimer’s Society arrangements (no 296645) Greenhouse (no been 1098744) and War Childstill (no 1071659). Trust will use your made so for that boysGift can cattle partattothe friends. charity/ He has information claiming Aid.tend We will not send your details thirdkraal parties,with other his than old your nominated ies. If you do notstudying. want your details shared with your nominated tick here of them want to be at time while nocharity/ies, doubt many Robert Ojumla, 14, longs to be one of school but do not have the option. them. His father was also killed by raid“Children have no value here. They ers and now he is trying to sell milk one have no right to go to school. Those at day a week to save money to study. “It the top of the clan have no interest in is no life. We walk five hours out and changing things,” he said.

www.greenhousecharity.org

18


If you would like a copy of this document in another format such as large print, audio or in a different language, please call 020 8576 6118 or email mail@greenhousecharity.org

GREENHOUSE

Unit 2D Woodstock Studios 36 Woodstock Grove, London, W12 8LE Registered Charity No: 1098744 Company Registration No: 4600790

Tel 020 8576 6118 Fax 020 8746 0925 Email mail@greenhousecharity.org

www.greenhousecharity.org


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