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AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2016 • GreeneScene Magazine

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GreeneScene Magazine •

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2016


AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2016 • GreeneScene Magazine

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Sp o r t Sh or t s

by Tara Kinsell

High Point Raceway photos by mxsportsproracing

Motocross legend Ricky Carmichaels flies over the track at High Point Raceway.

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estled in a grove of trees in an inconspicuous area of Perry Township for 40 years now is a thrill-seekers paradise known as High Point Raceway. It is always amazing when we learn that someone who lives in Greene County has never even heard of the venue that attracts thousands of motocross racers, spectators and has been featured on ESPN and most recently, NBC. Not having been there makes more sense than not knowing of its existence. It is well off the beaten path and beaten path would be quite telling of the road that leads to the clearing where the premiere race track can be found. For those who have never been to a race there, it is a high energy, loud, and definitely exciting thing to see. The way the track is set-up, there isn’t a bad location to position oneself for the jumps, spills, and thrills of a race. High Point is located on the farm of the Holbert Family who are the caretakers for the venue. It got its start when an enterprising race promoter, Dave Coombs, Sr. was looking for a piece of property to build a race track. When he was invited by brothers Jack and Carroll Holbert, racers themselves, to see their property, it was a match made in racing heaven. Their farmland offered the perfect combinations of hills and dells where a track could challenge riders. The track held its European-style design, inspired by the Maico Factory racing team, until 2008 when Marc Peters, a noted track designer, came in to create bigger jumps for longer hang times, placing them right in the face of spectators. Did

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we mention how exciting watching a race at High Point is? High Point has seen some of the biggest names in motocross soar over it in the 40 years it has been in existence along with youngsters just starting out on the amateur circuit. Racing fans will know the names Ricky Carmichael, Kevin Windham, and Travis Pastrana who have raced in the High Point Nationals, today held in honor of Dave Coombs, Sr. who passed away in 1998. Perhaps somewhat ahead of his time, when Dave, Sr. was setting up the raceway, he sought a company to pay for corporate naming rights. The deal was for much, much less than the ones we see today for places like Heinz Field and PNC Park, but nonetheless innovative. He was apparently so sure that Hi Point Racing Products would get on board that he went ahead and printed signs. As the rest of the story goes, Dave got some plywood and paint and created the “gh” to affix to the signs, thus Hi Point became High Point. There is no doubt Dave would be as happy as we are that his venture with the Holberts is still thriving today. As they say, a picture is worth a thousand words. Although it isn’t quite like being there with bikes flying past you and well over your head in the jumps, there are plenty of videos from High Point that can be watched on YouTube. We encourage you to check them out. And, even more so, keep an eye out at www.mxsportsproracing.com for the 2017 racing schedule when it appears, buy a ticket, or two and see for yourself what High Point Raceway is all about.

GreeneScene Magazine •

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2016


G ree n e Sce n e of the Pa st

Ragin’ Cajuns Football Team

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Front Row (Left to Right) 23-Unknown 12-Mike Hopkins 20-Kevin “Kip” Amos 42-Aaron Hunter 16-Chad Sellers 26-Bruce Jones 48-Brian Mitchell 46-Damon Sellers

24-Unknown 17-Brett Staggers 10-Danny Rush 2nd Row (Left to Right) 11-Jeff Rush Unknown #-Dave Rishell 49-Greg Stiles 3-Pat Haught

15-Mike Blair 43-Craig Maley 18-Kerry Marisa 34-Tim Kackovic 45-Seth Wilson 27-Steve Stuck 44-Lanny McCann 15-Jan Morris 21-Scott Farris

3rd Row (Left to Right) - Coaches Dick Rush Dick Stuck Phil Amos Rick (Herd or Hearn) Bob Rush Porky Kiger

s we get deep into football season, this 1980 picture really grabbed our attention, showing all the excited young faces of the Greene County Youth Football League Champions as they took their victory stance after the game. The picture belongs to Steve Stuck, member of the team way back then and also a well-known Waynesburg business man today as president of Jacobs Petroleum and Stuck Enterprises headquartered in Waynesburg. Steve still gets excited when he talks about that day, as clear in his mind as if it were yesterday. “We were all so excited. We had lost the championship to our big rival, the Mt. Morris Black Hawks the previous year, and they beat us in regular season that year. We were tied 8-8 when we went into overtime and won the Championship game 148, on the Waynesburg College field. It was really something, because a lot of the kids who played on the Mt. Morris team ended up going to school with

us later when they consolidated with Waynesburg – many of them ended up being great friends.” Steve also reminisces about how the “Ragin’ Cajuns” looked during that championship game, in their brand new, bright red uniforms. “We didn’t have very nice uniforms until that year when my dad, who was the head coach, and Ed Stiles, who was president of Gallatin Bank at the time, got together and did fundraisers to get us new uniforms – we were so proud.” He talks about leaving the field after the game and heading to the Waynesburg Moose, where Helen & Roger Haught had promised to serve a spaghetti dinner to the team, win or lose. “When we got there everyone was cheering – we felt like we were Super Bowl Champions…” Steve recalls with a smile. We’re sure our readers will recognize many of the faces. With the help of fellow team member and friend Seth Wilson, Steve has identified most of them here. Enjoy.

If you have an interesting old photo from the area you’d like to share, just send it to: GreeneScene of the Past, 185 Wade Street, Waynesburg, PA 15370. Or email to: info@greenesaver.com with GreeneScene Past in subject line. The GreeneSaver can even scan your original in just a few minutes if you bring it to our office. We are particularly interested in photos of people and places in the Greene County area taken between 1950 and 1980, though we welcome previous dates, too.

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2016 • GreeneScene Magazine

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BLACKSVILLE POTTERY

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Clay-Battelle High School student, Marvin Phillips, creates a piece of Blacksville pottery in the late 1940s. Photo courtesy of Goldenseal Magazine via Mildred Gerling.

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hile writing about several of the towns for the I Love This Place feature, we have learned that pottery played an important role in the development of each one at various times. In these locations the pottery trade was in its heyday primarily in the 1800s into the early 1900s. I was rather surprised when a friend who grew up near Blacksville, WV enlightened me on the pottery produced there, as I had never heard of Blacksville pottery. When I began to research it I found the story to be interesting on multiple levels. On first glance, it became evident that this was not our forefathers’ 17th and 18th century style of pottery. Most unusually, it seems this pottery came about in a sort of accidental way. And, the fact that it drew the attention of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt makes it all the more intriguing. Starting from the beginning, in the early 1930s industrial arts instructor, Charles Tennant, stumbled upon the vein of clay in Blacksville that would become the source of Blacksville pottery. As the story goes, Charles found the vein after a mudslide occurred that exposed the clay. Charles recognized the clay’s usefulness in making pottery. Goldenseal magazine in West Virginia graciously permitted us to use a photo showing a student working the clay at the local High School. The Goldenseal article dates the Blacksville clay somewhere in the vicinity of 20,000 years old. That may seem like a long time, but other clay deposits in the area date back many millions of years. At a time when World War II was taking place and the Works Progress Administration was putting Americans to work, the Blacksville pottery trade thrived for roughly 25 years. It is said that nearly everyone in the town of Blacksville owned a pot or two of the pottery at some point. In fact, many of those people were involved in the making of it. Students at Blacksville High School (consolidated as Clay-Battelle High School in 1939) and area residents created the pieces after receiving instruction in the art. It was student-turned-instructor Ed Richardson who taught many of these people how to work the clay into the oftentimes colorful and always sleek pieces that were developed in the latter part of its run. Ed learned from Charles who coincidentally was the cousin of Ed’s wife, Bess. As the instructor, Ed would teach the craft to his students at Clay-Battelle High School during the day and then offer classes for adults in the evenings a couple of times a week in Morgantown. Blacksville Pottery came to the attention of the first lady in 1938. In her own words, “I had been asked some time ago to visit a pottery project at Blacksville, West Virginia, and so it was decided that, if I was willing to start early in the morning, I could go both to Blacksville and Arthurdale.” Mrs. Roosevelt was somewhat late on this morning but made the effort to get to both places. “I was much interested in the ingenu-

By Tara Kinsell

ity they have shown in starting the pottery project. Their machinery is made from parts of old cars and washing machines,” she noted. “In fact, all they could do for themselves, they have done. Mr. Tennant, under whose direction the work is being carried on, is certainly an inspiration.” She left that day with a “lovely blue tea set,” which she remarked she would “always enjoy using.” It would be only the first gift of the pottery that she would receive. Students at the school would also send her a Christmas gift of their work in the gray clay. The photos included with this story show but a tiny example of what was produced when Blacksville Pottery was being made. That it brought Eleanor Roosevelt to Blacksville, West Virginia, albeit for a brief moment, is a testament to the ingenuity and creativity of the instructors and the potters who brought it to life. Though our readers in Blacksville are surely aware of its story, we thought the rest of our readership would find it as fascinating as we do.

GreeneScene Magazine •

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2016


Urban Forest Trail

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aynesburg University recently received a $20,000 grant from the EQT Foundation to fund the Waynesburg University Urban Forest and Walking Trail project. “The EQT Foundation is pleased to partner with Waynesburg on the development of this natural resource for both the University and the community at-large,” said Charlene Petrelli, EQT Foundation President. “EQT is committed to developing natural gas responsibly in order to protect the environment and preserve the area’s natural beauty. This trail will create an inviting space on campus that will educate our region’s students, and connect them with the environment in a way they haven’t

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2016 • GreeneScene Magazine

experienced on campus before.” The Waynesburg University Urban Forest and Walking Trail consists of approximately 2 square miles, including 1.5 miles of walking trails and wooded areas that will be preserved for student research and environmental restoration. “The Waynesburg University Urban Forest and Walking Trail will provide educational opportunities for University students, K-12 students in the borough and community members to have a place to enjoy nature while learning about natural species and restored ecosystems,” said Dr. Janet Paladino, assistant professor of biology. Funds from the grant will help provide an outdoor classroom; construction of a foot bridge along the walking trail; the clearing of invasive species, undesirable vegetation and debris; signage for the development of a 0.5 mile interpretative trail; walking trail improvements and additions; bird feeders; additional native trees and vegetation; and student internships. The University’s goal is for the forest and walking trail area to be a place for students to learn, research and spend time with nature, while also

offering the greater Waynesburg community the opportunity to enjoy and appreciate nature in an urban setting. “This project provides a chance for the University and the community to work together to create a valuable resource for both educational and recreational opportunities in a forest ecosystem,” said Paladino. About the EQT Foundation: EQT Corporation and the EQT Foundation are committed to the social and economic vitality of our operating regions. For more than the past decade, the EQT Foundation has made a difference by supporting local programs and initiatives that involve education, community and economic development, the arts, and the environment. Together with a variety of non-profit organizations, the EQT Foundation develops strong partnerships that enrich the diversity and viability of our communities, sustain the principles of continuous learning, and focus on environmental protection efforts. About Waynesburg University: Founded in 1849 by the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, Waynesburg University is located on a traditional campus in the hills of southwestern Pennsylvania, with three additional sites located in the Pittsburgh region. The University is a member of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU) and is one of only 21 Bonner Scholar schools in the country, offering local, regional and international opportunities to touch the lives of others through service.

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New Assistant Chaplain at WU

New Assistant Chaplain Joshua Sumpter, along with his wife, Jessica, and daughter, Adalynn, enjoy taking “Malkin” their 7-year old white husky on a walk through town.

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native of Madison, Ohio, Joshua Sumpter was first called to Waynesburg in 2010, when he became the Director of Youth Ministries for the First Presbyterian Church here. Serving in that role for the next six years gave Josh several opportunities to partner with Waynesburg University campus ministries and interact with students and faculty. He actually joined the adjunct faculty in 2015 when he taught a class on Youth Ministry, and remains today an instructor of Biblical & Ministry Studies. This summer, Josh was called to fill a new position for the University serving as Assistant Chaplain. His role is to support the Chaplain, Reverend Jim Tinnemeyer, in the ministries and development of Christian life and leadership at Waynesburg University. While Josh’s responsibilities include specific tasks like assisting the chaplain in the leading of prayer, teaching and sometimes preaching at the weekly campus worship service at Robert’s Chapel every Tuesday, he describes his role with a wider perspective: “Primarily, I am a resource on the campus to our students as they explore the Christian faith and become connected with one or more of our campus ministries.” Examples of the many campus ministries to which Josh refers include The Upper Room, a student led contemporary worship service held Sunday

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nights at Robert’s Chapel. The 8pm service usually sees about 175 students each week. The Fellowship of Christian Athletes meets on Monday nights at the Stover Center, a ministry both to and through all the athletic teams on campus. The Newman Club meets weekly to minister to the large population of Catholic students on campus, led by Father Mike Zavage of the Pittsburgh Diocese. There are multiple campus bible studies that meet regularly in various dorms, and many other focus groups, programs, organizations and activities too numerous to mention, and Josh is quick to point out that their efforts do not stop at campus boundaries. “The level of our student’s service in the local communities speaks well for itself – so many serve area charitable efforts and organizations such as the Corner Cupboard Food Bank, the Crisis Pregnancy Center, St. Ann’s food ministry… our students invest a great many of hours in service,” he explains. “And they are active in local churches, contributing to youth and music ministries and more, which is also helpful to the community. We do not have a church service here on Sunday mornings because we encourage our student body to visit the local churches and become invested in Greene County communities and service to the people here,” Josh adds. Waynesburg University’s mission includes this introductory statement: “Waynesburg University educates students to make connections between faith, learning and serving so they might faithfully transform their communities and the world.” Josh Sumpter underscores that statement when he speaks of the goals he has an assistant chaplain. “In the work I share with Rev. Tinnemeyer is our hope that Waynesburg University will be a transformational place for students… so that they aren’t the same when they leave here. It’s a place where they grew – in their relationship with Jesus and their faith in a way that will impact their life long vocation.” Josh earned his undergraduate degree at Ashland University in Ohio, and Masters of Divinity at Ashland Theological Seminary. Now, he calls Waynesburg home, and resides near the university with his wife, Jessica and “almost two-year-old” daughter Adalynn. He says, “This is where the Lord has called me, where my life and connection to school, church and family is. I am happy and blessed to be here.” Right back at ya, Josh Sumpter - we’re happy to have you.

GreeneScene Magazine •

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2016


I Love this P l a ce

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ith a population that typically hovers under 200 people and just a handful of businesses, we sought to find the history of Blacksville, West Virginia, not to be confused with Blacksville, Pennsylvania, in Greene County, although, the two sort of blend together. The line between the counties and the two states are so intermingled that when one drives in the area it would be easy to think you were in one state and actually be in the other. A friend who grew up a few miles down the road in Pennsylvania shared with me that Blacksville was actually a destination for young people and families looking for outdoor entertainment in the not too distant past. He recalled enjoying minigolf, batting cages, pizza and ice cream in Blacksville. One can still find pizza and ice cream, and even a real golf course just down the road, but the mini golf and batting cages are gone. For equine enthusiasts, the Hinerman Arena in Blacksville hosts International Barrel Racing Association shows. And Dunkard Creek, which divides the community, remains a popular place to canoe or row boat

on a pretty day. So, what came to light when we researched the town of Blacksville’s history? First, it was named after David Black, who incorporated it in 1829. David was quite the business man according to newspaper accounts from Morgantown in the day. He had 300 tickets drawn up, one for each of the 300 lots he had divided the town into. He advertised for people to come and receive a ticket if they wished to live in Blacksville. There were of course certain conditions that had to be met. For his part in establishing the town, David would erect a store house and stock it with $1,500 in goods. It seemed that David lived in a home just outside of town. After building his store on one of the lots, this left 299 lots to be awarded at a cost of $1,500 each. That was a pretty nice sum for the era both to be paid by the investor and for David to receive for the land. To sweeten the pot further, David enticed doctors, mechanics, and inn keepers with the promise to pay them a one-time fee for coming to the town. The amounts ranged from $25 to $50 each.

BLACKSVILLE, WV

For the first five residents to finish a brick or frame house within a years’ time, he also gave a onetime incentive from $25 to $40. To bring a church to Blacksville, David offered a lot to any Methodist congregation plus $75 providing a structure of brick or frame, suitable as a church, was erected there within one year. Not to forget the educational needs of such community, David further offered to convey a lot to the trustees of any school that was willing to complete construction of a schoolhouse on the lot within six months. David also offered an additional 125 lots that were located on the outlying area of town, each not less than a quarter acre or more than four acres, to be distributed by lottery. The lucky winner would receive a lot with two water springs, a farm house, and a large working distillery for the total cost of $1,200. This seems like a bargain compared to the town lots. The newspaper quoted David as saying that he pledged himself to a drawing that was fairly conducted and “hopes that the public will feel an interest in raising up a village that will hereafter prove to be of general benefit to the surrounding country.” His vision seemed to be realized when a post office, several stores, a wagon maker, marble business, undertaker, and the Strosnider Hotel, and others were built. Just 58-years after Blacksville was established by David, it became home to the first telephone company to operate in Greene County. The Waynesburg and Blacksville Telephone Company organized on Jan. 20, 1887 with the first of two phones being placed inside the Strosnider Hotel and the other in the J. T. Rogers Drug Store in Waynesburg. It would be two years later before Jefferson, Carmichaels, Waynesburg and Rices Landing would be joined by telephone. Although the

by Tara Kinsell

Waynesburg and Blacksville Telephone Company was the first, it wasn’t long before others popped up to grab their piece of the pie. Since they didn’t work together, if you were with one company you couldn’t talk to someone who was subscribed to another. Eventually, the nearly 40 companies that had set up shop in the vicinity joined to become the South Penn Telephone Company. But, only Waynesburg and Blacksville could stake claim to being the first. What else can it stake claim to? Well, for those who seek directions from outside of town it often includes a mention of an F-84F plane that is a bit of a landmark. It can be seen in the front yard of one Fred “Carly” McCoy who bought it in the 1960s from someone in Morgantown. It makes quite the lawn ornament. And, finally, perhaps not a first, but, the town is the birthplace of Sarah Benedum who, along with her husband, Michael, established the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation in memory of their son who passed away at the young age of 20. The Benedum Foundation is responsible for awarding more than $410 million dollars in grants for causes in West Virginia and Pennsylvania. This was made possible by Michael’s business acumen in the oil and gas industry. From the plan of David, to Carly’s plane, to the first telephone and the awe inspiring gifting of the family of one of Blacksville’s native daughters, we find many reasons to Love This Place.

Blacksville High Student Body, 1935 - 36.

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2016 • GreeneScene Magazine

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SATURDAY NIGHT TRIVIA EVENT!

??? Are you a trivia fan?

Do you like trivia games like Jeopardy or Trivia Pursuit? Are you just a plethora of useless information? Then you should put those smarts to work or maybe you could just use a fun night out with some refreshments. Gather some friends, enter a team(s), and join us in the excitement during the 4th Annual TRIVIA CONTEST.

WHEN: October 8th, 2016 @ 6pm WHERE: Waynesburg Central High School WHY: $1,000 for the winning team’s charity of choice Sponsored by: Central Greene Education Association

C.G.E.A.

THE AMERICAN LEGION

James Farrell, Inc., PA Post 330

For more information call 724-557-8201 or 724-255-3478

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GreeneScene Magazine •

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2016


AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2016 • GreeneScene Magazine

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Little Free Library

arlier this year, we shared a story about Little Free Libraries in our May/June issue; telling you about the ones in Greensboro and Colonial Drive in Waynesburg; and another being planned by the Department of Recreation in Greene County for a permanent spot in downtown Waynesburg. That’s the one pictured here, now a reality and in use. The Department of Recreation is hosting their first Greene County registered “Little Free Library” in downtown Waynesburg. A wooden house painted red, white and blue and titled “READ, WRITE and BLOOM” displays a variety of book interests for adult and child readers. Located near 108 Greene County Department of Recreation hosts its first registered Little Free Library in partnership with East High Street and residing in a Greene County Library System with a donation provided by Debbie Bristor. Picture from l. to r., are Nicholas Rennie, Waynesburg Borough Police Department; Commissioner Dave Coder; Jill Peth, Greene landscape area at the Waynesburg County Library System; Chief Robert Toth, Waynesburg Borough Police Department; Pam Blaker, Greene Borough parking lot 4, individuals County Department of Recreation; Debbie Bristor; and Commissioner Blair Zimmerman.] are encouraged to take a book, read and then either return it to the book a book; there is nothing wrong with a child taking a book to call house or keep it – all for free and without a library card. The library is listed on a world mapping network at www. their own and unable to give one back,” said Therese Barry, System littlefreelibrary.org under the membership charter number 39949. Administrator of the Greene County Library System. “What matTotal funding for the Little Free Library was made through a ters is getting a book to the person in need.” Library outreach coordinator Jill Peth currently organizes generous donation by the Carmichaels Crusaders, a group of Carmichaels Area School District teachers. Retired teacher and school and transports books to the department to be distributed to each bus driver, Debbie Bristor, helped raise the money through a busi- of the remote libraries. “The library has taken off tremendously,” says Bristor. She ness learning tool by offering students a chance to purchase school takes books from these libraries to her school bus where she has a stationary items off a cart. “As a thirty-five-year veteran elementary teacher, I know how book nook inside so kids can read on their way home. “The kids vital reading is in a young child’s life - from reading math prob- love them especially the joke books. I’ll never stop contributing to lems, traffic signs, science books, signs at amusement parks and this life-enhancing idea.” Bristor, speaking from personal experience, tells students a advertisements at the mall. Reading books enables students to feel confident in themselves while laughing, crying, learning, being true reader loves to breath in the special smell of the book’s paper before they start reading. spooked and gathering information on topics,” says Bristor. To further promote literacy and the love of reading, the proThe Little Free Library serves as an addition to the Canary Library that was first introduced in 2014 as collaboration between gram organizers are searching for sponsors to help them become the department and the Greene County Library System. Through- stewards of a Little Free Library, and purchase hand-crafted book out the summer, carts containing library books for all ages are houses to be placed throughout the county for public access. For more information on the Little Free Library, visit www. available at each of the three Greene County pool sites – Alpha Aquatic Center in Waynesburg, Carmichaels Pool in Carmichaels littlefreelibrary.org or call the Department of Recreation at 724852-5323. and Mon View Pool in Greensboro. “While the idea behind a free library is to take a book, leave

GreeneScene by Jeanine Henry

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Duda’s Farm Word Search

WINNERS

Meg Wilson of Rogersville was our puzzle winner. She received a $50 gift certificate to Duda’s Farms.

M.J. Moore, front end manager at Waynesburg Giant Eagle, right, joins Bob Keener of Greensboro, center, the lucky winner of a pair of tickets to see the Steelers play the Jets on Oct. 9, and Mary Lou Fox, left, who won the tailgate party including wings, meatballs and subs from Waynesburg Giant Eagle. GO STEELERS!!

WINNER

GreeneScene Magazine •

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2016


Bowlby Bits Fall Story Hours begin Monday, Oct. 3, for infants, toddlers & preschoolers - ten weeks of story time fun. Young adult programming for ages 13-18 also offered. Call for schedules. Yoga Classes for children & adults begin in October. Children age 2-5 on Tuesdays 11:30am; adult beginner’s on Tuesdays 5:30pm. FREE American Red Cross CPR Certification training Monday, Oct. 3 at 5pm. Space is limited; please preregister. Wild Kratts Book Bandits story time on Friday Oct. 7, 10am-1pm, for children 3-8 years. Includes critter-themed games, crafts, and a presentation on native animals in Western Pennsylvania; light lunch provided. Please preregister. Bowlby Book Club meets Monday, Oct. 10, 6pm. Discussion on “Glory Over Everything” by Kathleen Grissom. After Hours Fall Festival Friday, Oct. 21, 4-8pm, with fall-themed activities like pumpkin bowling, bobbing for donuts, games, crafts & snack foods for the whole family. Please preregister. (TAG) After-After Hours on Friday, Sep. 16, 8-10pm for teens 13-18. Suggested $2 donation; please preregister. Haunted Mansion Tours Sat., Oct. 29, 6-8pm. A guided tour through four floors of the library, viewing different ghastly spectacles that only appear after dark. Free. NOT recommended for children under 10. Friends & Authors Evening Thursday, Oct. 20, from 5:30-7pm to meet and talk with several local authors from Greene County. Free &open to the public. Bowlby Library hosts many free activities and programs including Computer and Software classes, Adult Coloring, T.O.P.S. weight loss, and more. The library also provides access to online tutoring, online language learning, mobile apps for free books, magazines & music to enjoy on your phone, tablet or computer. To learn more or register for any of the above visit or call Bowlby Public Library 724-627-9776.

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2016 • GreeneScene Magazine

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Catholic Charities meets a Variety of Needs also situational matters like relationship conflicts. Yaquinto points out that “in a complex world, many people can benefit from supportive counseling, even though some avoid seeking help because they can’t afford it, they’re not sure how to get it, or they fear being stigmatized.” CCG counselors guide clients through their times of trouble with compassion and respect. Catholic Charities also offers special services for expectant mothers and parents of children up to age two at no cost whatsoever. Parents and parents“Roller Coasters Lady” Lorie Zator, left, and Program to-be can consult staff for education Director Gary Yaquinto and guidance, and know that they will leave every monthly visit with essential reene County elementary students all know about Catholic Charities. Many infant-care items. Even better, there are no inhave been through “Roller Coasters,” come eligibility requirements: all you need to do an innovative program designed to is show up. CCG has one sixteen year-old client who is guide kids through upheavals like divorce, loss, very satisfied. “She and her boyfriend first came and parental incarceration. The “Roller Coaster Lady,” Licensed Clini- to us three months into her pregnancy,” explains cal Social Worker Lorie Zator, is passionate about Case Manager Brittany Vihlidal, who visited the the program: an eight-week course that teaches young woman in her home, bringing baby neceschildren invaluable coping skills through play. sities and gentle advice. “My main goal was to “It makes me so happy to know that I am help- give them a sense of the reality of parenting,” says ing children cope with major transitions in their Vihlidal, “and to nurture their success as a couple and as parents.” The couple is now engaged, lives,” says Zator. But Roller Coasters is only one of several and the delighted (and responsible) parents of a free and almost free services offered to all, re- six month-old girl. The young mother describes gardless of religion, at Catholic Charities’ Greene Brittany as “my angel”: “I don’t know where we’d County Outreach (CCG), located at 72 East High be without her,” she says. CCG also offers services for those who are Street in Waynesburg. “One of the things that I really love about struggling with financial need. By providing what we do here is the variety of our services,” food, clothing, utility assistance, and disaster says Program Director Gary Yaquinto; “you can relief, they help local residents survive times of come in for counseling and leave with diapers, a trouble. And they help those in need to emerge from coat, and your heat turned back on.” At CCG, counseling is available to all their misfortunes. CCG’s “Working for Greene” Greene County residents for a very reasonable supplies job seekers and new employees with esrate, with a sliding scale. CCG is also able to bill sential items to help them find and keep jobs. By select insurance companies, but offer the option providing professional clothing, transport vouchnot to invoice the insurers of clients who prefer ers, and specialty items, CCG gives its clients to protect their privacy. “We’re always happy to their best shot at long-term success. “I love the fact that we give people things,” accommodate clients who have limited budgets,” says Yaquinto; “nobody has to pay what they can’t Yaquinto says: “advice is priceless, but you can’t touch or hold it.” afford.” Catholic Charities’ Greene County OutYaquinto is a Licensed Psychologist with decades of experience who oversees a highly trained reach is open Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays, staff of counselors that help individuals, couples, from 8am to 12pm and 1pm to 4pm. For more infamilies, and children. They are trained to treat formation, call (724) 627-6410 or email gyaqui@ illnesses, such as depression and anxiety, and ccpgh.org.

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GreeneScene Magazine •

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ox Ford of Waynesburg, recently hosted the Happy Tails Event, a month long sales event to benefit the Greene County Humane Society. The Humane society is in current need of cat supplies, including food, newspapers, cat litter, and volunteers to interact with the animals. Ron Fox of Fox Ford is pictured (center) presenting a check for $3,121 to Vicki Duvall, humane society volunteer, left and Mike Gyurke Humane Society President, on right. For more information on how you can help, visit www.greenepet.org or call 724-627-9988.

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2016 • GreeneScene Magazine

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$2,000 Grant for Patient Transportation

Waynesburg University

Waynesburg University has been selected by U.S. News & World Report as a Best Value School in their 2017 “U.S. News Best Colleges” ranking, under the “Regional Universities – North” category. The ranking identifies the top 15 Best Value Schools in the northern region of the country. Ranked at No. 7, Waynesburg qualified as a Best Value School due to the high quality of academic programs combined with low costs.  “Our commitment to both quality academics and high value has consistently led us to be recognized as a top value school,” said Waynesburg University President Douglas G. Lee. “A Waynesburg University education provides students with a strong foundation for successful careers and lifelong fiscal responsibility.” According to U.S. News & World Report, the Best Value School rankings take in to consideration a school’s academic quality, based on its

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U.S. News Best Colleges ranking, and the 2015-16 net cost of attendance for a student who received the average level of need-based financial aid. As described by U.S. News & World Report, only schools in or near the top half of the ranking categories are included in the value rankings because U.S. News considers the most significant values to be among colleges that perform well academically. During the 2015-16 academic year, more than 90 percent of Waynesburg students received some form of financial aid, and 98 percent of 2015 graduates reported working full-time or attending graduate school within one year of graduation. Additionally, tuition, room and board at Waynesburg is more than $11,500 below the national average for private, non-profit, four-year colleges. The University processes aid from a wide variety of sources, including federal, state and institutional aid programs. In the 2015-16 academic year, it awarded more than $36 million in aid to its students. This aid included academic scholarships, federal, state and institutional grants, work-study opportunities and student or parent educational loans. For first-time freshman students, the University offers two types of renewable, four-year scholarships: Achievement Awards and Competitive Scholarship Programs. Achievement Awards range between $6,000 and $15,000 annually and are based on the combination of each applicant’s cumulative high school GPA and SAT or ACT scores. Competitive Scholarship Programs can cover from $1,000 to full tuition, room and board annually.  For more information on financial aid and scholarships at Waynesburg University, contact the University’s Office of Financial Aid at 724852-3208 or finaid@waynesburg.edu.

From left to Right: Dr. Morris Harper, Board Chairman, Community Foundation of Greene County (CFGC), Terry Wiltrout, President, Washington Health System Greene (WHSG), Joy Eggleston, Director of Operations, WHSG, Bettie Stammerjohn, Executive Director, CFGC.

The Community Foundation of Greene County (CFGC) has awarded a grant of $2,000 to help kick off a new project at Washington Health System Greene (WHSG) to help with a new patient transportation program. “We sometimes have patients who do not have a ride home from the hospital,” explained Terry Wiltrout, President of WHSG. “This funding will allow us to help qualified patients when there are no resources available to transport them to the next step in their healing process. We hope this pilot program is just the first step in helping to break down the transportation barrier for our community.” WHS Greene is Greene County’s only acute care hospital. The facility has 49 beds dedicated to acute and behavioral health care. The facility also has a full service emergency department, surgical department and a full array of outpatient care services. “CFGC is pleased to partner with the Washington Health Systems Foundation to help ensure that discharged WHS Greene patients have a means to return home safely,” said CFGC board chairman, Dr. Morris Harper. “Overcoming trans-

portation barriers is a significant issue in our community. We certainly hope this seed money will help make a difference.” Funding for the grant came from three discretionary funds held at CFGC: the Fund for Health and Human Services, the Good for Greene Fund and the Bradford/Forever Greene Fund. The Good For Greene Fund, started at CFGC in 2008 by Mrs. Dolly Throckmorton in memory of her parents, the late James A. and Mary Goodwin, is an unrestricted fund whose the purpose to enhance the discretionary grantmaking of the Foundation. This allows the CFGC board of directors to meet emerging needs in the community. The Community Foundation of Greene County (CFGC) is a private, non-profit 501(c)(3) organization founded in 2000 whose purpose is to serve the needs and philanthropic aims of donors who wish to better their community, both now and in the future. CFGC currently manages $4 million in assets through more than 65 different funds. For more information about the Community Foundation contact Bettie Stammerjohn by phone at 724627-2010, email cfgc@gmail.com, or visit www. cfgcpa.org.

GreeneScene Magazine •

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2016


50’s Fest & Car Cruise

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ith a day full of sunshine, the weather seemed custom made for the 15th Annual 50s Fest & Car Cruise presented, as always, on the 2nd Saturday of September in downtown Waynesburg. More than 150 classic or hot rod vehicles were present and hundreds of spectators turned out for the event, which is coordinated by Waynesburg Prosperous & Beautiful, Inc. Each year the committee honors the driver of the vehicle that traveled the most miles to get to the cruise with a prize supplied by sponsor WANB Radio. Happy & Diane Kiger of Wakeman Ohio traveled 244 miles in a ’56 Pontiac and happened to also be the very first exhibitors to register early that morning. Some of the other somewhat distant participants came from Salem, Ohio; Pittsburgh, Sewickley and Greensburg, PA; Bridgeport, Shinnston and Wileyville WV and many other communities in our tri-state area. Waynesburg resident Bill Gensler was the winner of the 50/50 drawing, taking home $242 cash. Bill drove his bright red 1964 Volkswagon Bug to the event. “It’s always a great day in downtown Waynesburg during 50s Fest,” said Shelly Brown, Chairperson of WP&B’s Promotions Committee. “We’ve been hit with less than perfect weather in several recent years, this was a very welcome change. We had tremendous participation and constant spectator traffic as well. Each year it seems like we have more people dressing in 50s styles also – that is really getting into the spirit of things. We had some impressive vehicles – cars, trucks and motorcycles.

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Bill Gensler of Waynesburg is pictured here with the $242 he won in the 50/50 drawing at the 15th Annual 50s Fest in downtown Waynesburg on Sep. 10. The winning ticket was drawn by “Elvis” who made his much anticipated appearance at the event.

With Doug Wilson’s Greene County Gold Show broadcast from the courthouse steps, and parking right on the main drag like we do – it’s just a very unique event for classic car enthusiasts. The shopping was great, too – there are so many cool stores in downtown Waynesburg.” Shelly also noted that a limited number of the 2016 collectible t-shirts & the collectible magnets featuring the 1926 LeFrance pumper truck belonging to the Waynesburg / Franklin Twp. Volunteer Fire Company remain available for purchase. If you missed getting yours, call her at 724-627-2040.

2016 • GreeneScene Magazine

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A Sweet Experience By Tara Kinsell

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s I was heading to East View to meet with a beekeeper at 8:30 in the morning, I wasn’t sure what I was getting myself into. After having the experience, however, calling the process fascinating is somewhat of an understatement. As it turned out, I knew beekeeper Dan Moore and his wife, Linda, which helped ease my nervousness; as I was convinced I wasn’t escaping this excursion without being stung at least once. Turns out, I was wrong. When Dan initially showed me what he calls the “honey house,” the door was closed. I somehow envisioned it to be like the butterfly sanctuaries I have visited, fully occupied. I imagined a loud buzzing being emitted when that door was opened. In actuality, there were no bees inside the “honey house,” so named because that’s what is found there - honey. However, I am getting ahead of things. We began our meeting on the patio with Dan sharing his knowledge of beekeeping. Admittedly, I was in the dark on this subject. So, I took copious notes, starring the terminology with which I was unfamiliar. Before I even made it home, Dan had sent me a link to beekeeping information www.betterbee.com/Fun-Facts to help me out. Of course I wondered how he got into beekeeping in the first place. “I visited Arizona frequently to see my aunt, and I would stop at the Verde Valley Honey Shop. I got in the back of my mind that I was going to do something about the collapse of the bees,” Dan said, referring to a well-publicized decline in the numbers of honey bees. “I went in…talked to the manager’s mother and he (the manager) pushed me over the edge (and into beekeeping),” Dan explained. Linda said she knew she was in trouble when Dan kept stopping every time they passed the store in Arizona. “I’m not real crazy about bees and I was wor-

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ried they would bother us when we had friends over,” she recalled. She has since learned the bees don’t want to harm anyone. They are focused only on finding food when they leave their hives. “They will ping you on the head to make you go away from them,” she added. Even so, she still hasn’t gotten to the point where she will handle them, choosing instead to assist with the “labeling of jars for honey,” she said. There is so much involved in beekeeping that we can only give the broad strokes of it here, yet one part of the honey making process I must share is the “waggle dance.” When a forager bee returns to the hive after discovering nectar and pollen, it performs the waggle dance - figure eight motions in a specific sequence to indicate how far and in what direction from the hive the others can find the field of flowers where the nectar and pollen are located. As honeybees typically travel within only three miles of their hives, the dance moves lead the others within that range. As crazy as this may seem, one honeybee only produces around 1/12 of a teaspoon of honey in its lifetime. Think about that. It takes a dozen bees for you to have that spoonful of honey in your tea. Yet one beehive produces more than 400 pounds of honey per year! Dan was happy to show me how this process works. Off to the honey house we went where we both donned head-to-toe beekeeping apparel. Dan then broke out a smoker to “calm the bees.” This looks somewhat like an oilcan with a hole in its spout and an accordion-like attachment to push out the smoke. Dan uses pine needles to burn inside his smokers. “It isn’t hot. It produces just the

Dan’s Honey Farm owner, Dan Moore, displaying a frame from one of his bee hives at Eastview.

right amount of heat,” he tells me before having me place my hand in front of the spout to feel for myself. Call it temporary bravery, momentary insanity, or trusting my guide, but I agreed with everything Dan suggested I do. I didn’t hesitate when he said, “You don’t need gloves.” Of course, I didn’t know he was going to open one of the dozens of green boxes in his yard and take out a tray polluted with bees and honey and hand it to me. “Don’t drop it,” he said as I suddenly realized it was much heavier than I anticipated. Linda was

content remaining at a reasonable distance snapping photos. Handing the camera back to me she marveled at how close I got to a full hive taking photos. That was only because through the lens I couldn’t tell I was actually getting that close. It was an attempt to photograph the queen in this particular hive. Dan marks his queens with a type of pen so they are easy to locate among the rest. You can imagine just how tiny the dot is on the back of a bee. The queen, the drone, and the worker are the three types of bees that make the whole pro-

GreeneScene Magazine •

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2016


Tara accepts the surprisingly heavy frame from Dan.

cess work. The queens are the lucky ones, living for three to four years. Drones typically die upon mating. And, the worker bees hang around for a few weeks or a few months, depending on the time of year, preferring colder temperatures. One hive can

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contain from 20,000 to 80,000 worker bees! That’s why honey doesn’t take years to make at the rate of 1/12 teaspoon per bee. Dan gets his bees through the mail and locally from Mark Bedillion of Bedillion Honey Farm in

2016 • GreeneScene Magazine

Hickory. You can too. In fact, he hopes that you will. “The cost to start from scratch is $400-$500 per hive,” he said. “He thinks everybody should have a beehive in their yard,” Linda said before parting. Dan agreed wholeheartedly. This is the time of year to consider it if you want to start beekeeping or perhaps help someone else get into it, maybe as a Christmas gift. Heading back to the honey house, we shed our beekeeping apparel and Dan talks about the benefits of honey in nutrition and for medicinal purposes. Honey is the only food that will not spoil. If it crystallizes you simply place the container in warm water to return it to its original state. He doesn’t like to overheat however. This is what Dan said happens when honey is processed to be sold in grocery stores. Heating over 130 degrees removes all of the good enzymes, he explained, “Local honey is definitely better.” He shows me the beeswax he sells in large chunks and smaller bars that he will market to fly fishermen. The wax, when rubbed on the fishing line, helps to keep it afloat. Also located inside the honey house is the small commercial set-up where Dan extracts the honey and distills it into glass jars to sell. Before I leave, he breaks out tiny plastic teddy bear containers and fills them with honey for me to take home to the kids. Only one bee landed on me the entire time I was there. The urge to swat it away wasn’t there. It probably had to do with my new found respect for all of the work it goes through so I can have a little honey now and then. If you would like to know more about beekeeping and how you might start your own backyard hive, contact Dan’s Honey Farm at 724-710-5124.

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Cool at Sch o o l

by Tara Kinsell

STEAM Olympics at Bobtown Elementary

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hen the technology committee at Bobtown Elementary School began discussing its annual technology night, a new idea emerged. It was around the time of the summer Olympics and Principal Rick Menear saw an opportunity to incorporate the games into something educational but fun at the same time. This was how the STEAM - Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Math - Olympics came to be, according to sixth grade teacher, Bobby Kennedy. The event will be held on Sept. 29, beginning at 5:30pm, with students from each grade involved in some way. “Each level from third through sixth grades will be competing. Each grade chose something different for their STEAM activities,” Bobby said. Unlike typical science fairs and the like, students won’t be working on projects prior to the STEAM Olympics. Instead, they will come in and find their designated project waiting for them. With the skills they have already learned, the students will use problem solving to complete the task before them. “When they arrive there will be a kit for each participant that is bagged up with the directions. They don’t receive any help. Just like the Olympics, they need to power through,” Bobby said. “We decided to have only one subject for each grade because we decided having a student do every subject

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for every grade level would be too much.” The STEAM Olympics will most likely become an annual event with students having an opportunity to compete in a different discipline each year as they progress to a new grade level, she said. At the end of the evening prizes will be awarded for gold, silver and bronze with classroom teachers overseeing the competition. Each grade level will participate in an artsrelated portion, along with their grade-specifically assigned discipline from science, technology, engineering or math. The entire event has been created to cost as little as possible by using recyclable materials already available in the elementary school. “We are using products and objects that are in every day use, like straws, rubber bands, soda cans and marshmallows,” Bobby said. To involve all of the students in the school, those in kindergarten through second grades are creating banners for each grade competing. They, along with the participants, will also take part in an opening ceremonies pep rally during the school day on Sept. 29, complete with a torch carry. “There will be different podiums for the medals and we’re going to make it look as much like the Olympics as possible. Different grade levels have different colors and the kindergarteners through second graders have made the banners in those colors,” Bobby said. “The public is welcome to come and watch.” GreeneScene Magazine •

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2016 • GreeneScene Magazine

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Parks and Plants Shane Miller (left) and Allan Johnson were program presenters at the August meeting of the Town and Country Garden Club. Miller discussed invasive plants such as Japanese knotwood, oriental bittersweet, tree of heaven, which are non-native in the United States. Miller is an Environmental Educator Specialist in Botanical Education at Raccoon Creek State Park in Beaver County. Johnson, Park Manager at Ryerson Station State Park, described the present and future improvements to the park in absence of Duke Lake: new swimming pool, campground upgrades, and restoration of the stream channel. Ryerson Station State Park is a 1,164-acre park among the 124 state parks within the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. The Town & Country Garden club maintains the Rices Landing Triangle, the Carmichaels

Town Square, Flenniken Library grounds, and the “Plant-it-Pink” garden at the Cornerstone Care Clinic in Greensboro, PA. Other activities such as the annual Cookie Walk support a college scholarship awarded by the club annually. Those interested in learning more about the club may call 724-966-5856 or email teba@windstream.net

Timber Harvest Workshop Greene County Conservation District is hosting a free Timber Harvest Workshop on Wednesday, Oct. 12 at 7 p.m. on the lower floor of Building #10 at the Greene County Fairgrounds. The workshop is open to the public. Tony Quadro, a forester with the Westmoreland Conservation District, will help guide participants through the process of selling timber. Topics include how to mark trees for sale; estimating the value of trees; drawing up a written contract; placing trees up

for bid; minimizing soil erosion and sedimentation; obtaining stream crossing permits; hiring a private consulting forester; and closing out the sale when the timber harvest is completed. Russell Gibbs, a service forester with the Pennsylvania Bureau of Forestry, will discuss services the state has to offer land owners harvesting their timber. Reservations are not necessary, but encouraged. FMI: 724-852-5278.

The Anonymous People Showing The Community Recovery Committee is presenting a showing of a documentary called The Anonymous People, which shines a light on the personal and societal value of recovery through the moving stories of real people who share their stories of life in recovery. The show-

Nursing as a Career Day

Waynesburg University will host Nursing as a Career Day for high school students interested in pursuing nursing on Thursday, Oct. 6. The day will highlight Waynesburg’s Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing; it will include tours, meetings with faculty, financial aid information and lunch. Students will also have the opportunity to explore the University’s sophisticated simulation lab with Waynesburg University nursing faculty and nursing students. Specifically, students will learn how Waynesburg’s nursing students experi-

ence complex patient care in simulated situations and discover how the simulation lab provides an effective environment for students to learn and apply cognitive, psychomotor and decision-making skills for clinical practice. For more information or to register, call 1-800-225-7393 or go to waynesburg.edu/visit and select Group Visit. For complete information about Waynesburg University’s undergraduate nursing program, visit www. waynesburg.edu/undergraduate/undergraduatemajors/nursing.

Say What?

ing is on Fri., Sep. 30 at 6pm at the First Baptist Church, 303 W. High St. in Waynesburg. A light meal and beverage will also be served. Admission is free. Donations will be accepted, with proceeds benefitting the Oxford House development. Everyone is invited, encouraged to come.

9/11 at Charlotte

Patty Jones of Waynesburg posts this group picture of the Greene County Chapter of PA School

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Retirees and many friends who visited the Charlotte Motor Speedway on September 11 this year. Thank you for sharing your salute.

Thank you to Tammie Dunlap of Dilliner, Pa who shared this picture she managed to snap of a bird bathing in her backyard. It gave us a smile as we imagined what we might hear if a bird could talk. We invite you to submit a caption for this

photo. You can email to: info@GreeneSceneMagazine.com or find our Facebook page (search Direct Results) and post it there. We will share all responses on our Facebook page, the one with the most likes will win $25 cash. Have fun!

GreeneScene Magazine •

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2016


5th Annual Senior Fair

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tate Rep. Pam Snyder, Greene County Commissioners Blair Zimmerman, Dave Coder, and Archie Trader, the Southwestern Pennsylvania Area Agency on Aging and state Sen. Camera Bartolotta will serve as hosts for the fifth annual Greene County Senior Fair from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, Oct. 7, at the Greene County Fairgrounds, Waynesburg. “The Senior Fair provides county residents convenient access to a wealth of information about programs and services,” said Rep.Snyder. “It’s a free, one-stop event that offers health screenings and flu shots coupled with free refreshments, lunch and door prizes.” Rep. Snyder said resources available at the expo will include information about the state Property Tax/Rent Rebate Program, PACE and PACENET prescription-drug plans, heating assistance and other state programs and services geared toward older adults. “Seniors are reminded to bring their medical insurance cards to take full advantage of the services available at the fair from the many vendors and sponsors,” she added. Highlights of the fair include: ■ Flu shots provided by Cornerstone Care; ■ Lunch prepared by Greene County Career and Technology Center and sponsored by CONSOL Energy; ■ Two free door prize tickets per person with registration; ■ Grand door prize – registration required - of a flat-screen television, donated by Wal-Mart. More information is available by calling Rep. Snyder’s Carmichaels office at 724-966-8953. The Greene County Fairgrounds is located between Route 21 (Roy Furman Highway) and Route 188 (Jefferson Road), at 107 Fairgrounds Road, Waynesburg.

GreeneScene by Jeanine Henry

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2016 • GreeneScene Magazine

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GreeneScene Magazine •

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2016

Sep Oct GreeneScene 2016  

From the Road Rally to the holiday craft shows, we have the upcoming major events of the area. Make sure you visit the Fright Farm for their...

Sep Oct GreeneScene 2016  

From the Road Rally to the holiday craft shows, we have the upcoming major events of the area. Make sure you visit the Fright Farm for their...

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