Page 1

SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2015

• GreeneSaver

1


2

GreeneSaver •

SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2015


50’s Fest & Car Cruise

Pictured with his 1950 Ford Shoebox and 2015 Miss Rain Day Claire Kredier is Carl Swogger of Carnegie, PA who won the furthest travel award at this year’s 50’s Fest & Car Cruise in downtown Waynesburg.

A

lthough storm crowds threatened all day, the rain let up by mid-morning for the 14th Annual 50s Fest & Car Cruise presented, as always, on the 2nd Saturday of September in downtown Waynesburg. More than 65 classic or hot rod vehicles were present and hundreds of spectators turned out for the event, which is coordinated by Waynesburg Prosperous & Beautiful, Inc. Each year the committee honors the driver of the vehicle that traveled the most miles to get to the cruise. Honorable mention was made of Happy & Diane Kiger of Wakeman Ohio, who traveled 248 miles in a ’75 Lincoln Continental to be the #3 car registered that morning, but left the festival early before the awarding of the prize. The car care kit & commemorative T-shirt & hat were presented to Carl Swogger of Carnegie, Pa who drove nearly 50 miles in his 1950 Ford Shoebox. “It’s always a great day in downtown Waynes-

SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2015

• GreeneSaver

burg during 50s Fest,” said Shelly Brown, Chairperson of WP&B’s Promotions Committee. “Even though the weather was less than perfect, everyone who came out had a good time. I think we had more people dressed in 50s style than usual, and quite a number of spectators. Lots of sidewalk chalk drawing – the kids had fun and we had some impressive vehicles, cars trucks and motorcycles. With Doug Wilson’s Greene County Gold Show broadcast from the courthouse steps, and parking right on the main drag like we do – it’s just a very unique event for classic car enthusiasts. The shopping was great, too – there are so many cool stores in downtown Waynesburg.” Shelly also noted that a limited number of the 2015 collectible t-shirts & the first ever custom caps created for the 50s Fest & Car Cruise remaining and available for purchase. If you missed getting yours, call her at 724-627-2040.

3


I

G h o st Stor i e s

t began with a loud explosive sound in the attic. Tom Laskody had no idea what caused it but he knew what he heard. When he couldn’t pinpoint the source and nothing else happened (at that time anyway) he dismissed it. That was in 1980. Thirty-five years later, Tom is convinced that was the day the haunting of the house he shares with his wife, Kay, began. “When I came home from work late one night, after showering, I got a plate of cookies and a cup of milk and sat down at the kitchen counter. I heard a noise on the ceiling. It eventually came around to me and the plate went up around the ceiling, circled the light and came down to rest in the same place where I originally set it,” Tom said. “You don’t talk about it to too many people because they think you are crazy.” It would be easy to dismiss what Tom saw as simply the cause of fatigue after working an afternoon shift in the mine. Many of the following instances could perhaps be rationalized away as well. But, Tom is not the only person to see, hear, and feel the presence of something that seems to follow he and Kay, even when they’ve been away from their home. “I’m not afraid of it,” Kay said, smiling and then becoming visibly upset as she began to share the one time she truly was frightened by ‘it’ (whatever ‘it’ is). “We were at the park up by Greensboro [MonView] for the Laskody Family Reunion,” she said. When Tom walked under the pavilion the sign they’d hung fell on his head. Everyone

laughed. As Tom and Kay made the trip home, passing through a valley in Headlee Heights where the road narrows and very little light passes through the trees, it started. “All of sudden someone was pounding on the windows of the car. It was a bashing, not just a knock, knock. It was so loud. We both turned and looked behind us but didn’t see anything,” Kay said. “It scared us so badly we could hardly talk.” They just kept driving until they reached the former Junction Deli in Carmichaels where they pulled over. “We were shaking and the hair was standing up on our arms. We checked in the trunk, underneath, checked the wheels...everything we could think of,” she said. “There was nothing there. It never happened again. It’s hard for people to believe that but I will never forget it.” There was the time Kay smelled the faint odor of a scented candle while she was in the bedroom. She had lit one earlier in the living room, located across the house. “I was sleeping and the smell woke me. I thought, ‘That’s impossible to smell it all the way from there.’ Then it got stronger. I walked into the living room just in time to see a flash,” she said. A flame shot out of the candle, burned nearly down to the very bottom of the sconce. “If I hadn’t been there it probably would have caught the curtains on fire,” she said. She believed it was a nicer presence alerting her of possible danger, rather than a warning. There have been plenty of those along the

way, warnings that is. Tom began keeping records in calendars and on notebook paper. References to holy water, speaking with priests, random instances of crackling sounds in the walls, visions of demonic-like figures, the sensation of a cloth brushing across his face, a hand squeezing his leg and the throat of his daughter-in-law, Tina, are all recorded. Tina said she will not sleep over in the house ever again. Tom’s late aunt, Leontia, who was a nun in Pittsburgh, brought her nephew holy water from Jerusalem. It didn’t stop the happenings. In fact, warnings came to move or die. Paranormal investigators came to the house in 2001 and again in 2005 to record what they found. There are six video tapes of what appear to be flashes of light, or orbs, bouncing off walls and ceilings and following the occupants in the house and an apartment Tom and Kay lived in for a brief time after he underwent heart surgery. A cleaning lady abruptly quit her job cleaning the Morrisville home in 1996. She left the couple a note with her apologies. It reads, in part, “Today is my last day. I just feel it is for the best. You had nice things and every time I touch them I get this feeling coming over me, hard pain in my hands, and I drop them.” A second cleaning lady told the couple, ‘There’s just too much stuff happening in your house. I can’t work for you anymore.” Tom believes there is definitely more than one presence making itself known to them. One of them he is sure is a child, most likely a little girl. Only two others owned the home prior to Tom

by Tara Kinsell

and Kay and they knew both of them. Nothing bad happened there, to their knowledge. The land was a vacant field before the home was built. It is possible the sands of time swept away memories of any negative instance that took place on that field. “We just take it as it comes. Sometimes the dead is just not always dead,” Kay said.

Public invited to experience after-hours in the GCHS museum

O

ne never knows what they might encounter at the Greene County Historical Society’s Museum on Rolling Meadows Road, especially at night. It isn’t often that the public has the opportunity to be inside

4

the 1860s era building that once housed the county’s indigent. However, with Halloween fast approaching, there are two upcoming opportunities to visit it after hours, if you dare. The first, is the now annual Flashlight Fright Night with “lights out tours” of the museum, haunted walks, costume contests, treats and more. The board of the historical society beckons guests to visit after trick-or-treating to play with the ghouls, ghosts and goblins of the museum. This is a family-friendly event. For the more adventurous, a paranormal investigation will take place from 6 pm to 12 pm on Nov. 7 inside the museum. Led by Ghost N’at Paranormal Adventures of Pittsburgh, roughly 20 guests will have an opportunity to purchase tickets for the event. The cost is $35 per person, or $70 if a guest would like to rent equipment for the evening to get hands-on in the investigation. “It is more scientific and less new age mumbo jumbo,” said Eben Williams, executive director/ad-

ministrator of the museum. “We were originally doing a raffle for spots but people wanted a guaranteed spot so we changed it so they can purchase a ticket. It is limited to about 20 people in total.” Williams said past paranormal events, led by Ghosts N’at in the museum have been so successful that the group has added additional dates in the past due to the demand. The November date is one such addition, stemming from the requests after the last event, held in September. “They added a second day in September but even after that second day people were still begging for more spots. That is why we added the date in November,” Williams said. “It is a good money maker for us. We need it with all of the funding cuts we’ve experienced.” Ghosts N’at gives back $500 of the $700 raised by each date to the historical society. They keep enough to cover the costs of the Ghosts N’at staff, Williams said. “When there are two dates in one weekend that is $1,000 for the historical society,” he added. For more information about either event, contact the Greene County Historical Society at 724-627-3204. GreeneSaver •

SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2015


From left, Destiny and Lexi Keller are two of the thousands of reasons to slow down, stay alert, and keep your eyes on the road in Greene County.

W

ith all five Greene County School Districts back in session, the usual discussions of how to get people to slow down on county roadways led the Greene County Pomona Grange to initiate a new service project. Grange member, Mary Jane Kent said the idea of offering "Drive Like Your Kids Live Here," signs for sale seemed like a good place to start. "These are a not-for-profit endeavor for us, we

SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2015

• GreeneSaver

are charging what we are paying for them. We just want to protect our children," Mary Jane said. When Mary Jane shared the idea with Beth Downey, president/master of the Pennsylvania State Grange, she was enthusiastic and is even considering enacting it as a state-wide grange project. The cost of the signs are $13 each. Those interested in purchasing a sign may contact Mary Jane at kentmaryjane@yahoo.com.

5


6

GreeneSaver •

SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2015


Nine Selected to Receive County Scholarships

Scholarship recipients, from left, Pictured, William VanNorman, Taylor Horr, Allie Christopher, Matthew Desrosiers, Devan Doman, Emily Wagner, Caitlin Brooks, Madison Dupont, and Meghan Wolfe.

N

ine Greene County students have been awarded the 2015 County of Greene West Penn Power Scholarship. These $1,000 scholarships are awarded annually to eligible graduating seniors who plan to attend Waynesburg University for each student’s first year of enrollment.

Recipients for 2015 are: Caitlin Brooks, Waynesburg Central High School. Brooks, the daughter of Valerie and Carl Brooks of Waynesburg, will study mathematics. Allie Christopher, Carmichaels Area High School. Christopher, the daughter of Tamara and Kenny Christopher of Carmichaels, will study exercise science. Matthew Desrosiers, Waynesburg Central High School. Desrosiers, the son of Danielle and Michael Desrosiers of Waynesburg, will study criminal justice. Devan Doman, Carmichaels Area High School. Doman, the daughter of Patricia and Thomas Doman, Jr., of Carmichaels, will study biology. Madison Dupont, Jefferson-Morgan High School. Dupont, the daughter of Helen and Duane Dupont of Clarksville, will study nursing. Taylor Horr, West Greene High School. Horr, the daughter of Nancy and Mark Horr of Holbrook, will study human services. William VanNorman, West Greene High School. VanNorman, the son of Darlene and David VanNorman of Wind Ridge, will study athletic training. Emily Wagner, Mapletown High School. Wagner, the daughter of Jennifer and Donald Wagner of Garards Fort, will study English-secondary education. Meghan Wolfe, Jefferson-Morgan High School, Wolfe, the daughter of Suzy Trueblood of Waynesburg, will study business.

Greene County Commissioner Chuck Morris extended congratulations to the students on behalf of the board of commissioners. “Congratulations to the recipients for all of their hard work throughout their academic careers. We wish them the best in their future at Waynesburg University,” Morris said. Scholarship criteria included, a cumulative high school GPA of at least 3.0 and acceptance to Waynesburg University as a new, non-transfer student for the Fall 2015 semester. Applicants also had to submit a list of honors and activities and responses to two essay questions. The scholarship is funded through monies secured in 2008 as part of an agreement between Greene County and Trans-Allegheny Interstate Line Company (TrAILCo), a subsidiary of then, Allegheny Energy. Allegheny Energy later merged with FirstEnergy Corp., requiring a change to the scholarship name to reflect the merger to include FirstEnergy’s Pennsylvania subsidiary, West Penn Power. According to the agreement, TrAILCo was

SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2015

• GreeneSaver

required to contribute $750,000 to the county for educational, environmental, public health and community infrastructure projects. Over the two year period of 2009-10, Waynesburg University was presented $200,000 to get the scholarship going. A final donation of $50,000 was presented to the university in 2011, bringing the total to $250,000 and ensuring the scholarship’s permanent endowment at Waynesburg University. To date, $53,000 has been awarded to Greene County students attending the university. Applications for the 2016 scholarships will be available this winter for members of the 2016 graduating classes of Carmichaels Area, JeffersonMorgan, Mapletown, Waynesburg Central and West Greene school districts. For more information on the County of Greene/West Penn Power Scholarship, contact the Greene County Commissioners’ office at 724-8525210, or Bob Barnhart in the Waynesburg University Admissions office at 724-852-3346.

7


D

I Love this P l a ce

riving through the town of Sycamore today it might surprise passersby to learn that it was once a stop for passenger trains on the Waynesburg and Washington Railroad. There isn’t much indication of such, except for its namesake, WW Railroad Road, that runs through the town. The station, which consisted of a freight room, waiting room, and wash house sat next to the current Sycamore Post Office. A platform connected the station to the general store, next door. Earnie Funk was born and raised on a farm passed down from his maternal great-grandparents. His mother, Ethel Rush Funk, ran a grocery store and Sinclair Service Station and his father, Charles, was the postmaster. “Dad built the store in 1950 and mom ran it until her retirement the year Emerald Mine opened. Back then people didn’t go to town much. They didn’t drive a lot. They had Weaver’s store and mom’s store,” Earnie said. “These were single lane dirt roads for a long time.” When the roads began to be paved and cars improved, people started to go into Waynesburg more often. It was the opening of the Giant Eagle that made it hard for Ethel to compete but Earnie said she was getting close to retirement at the time anyway. “It just got moved up a little bit,” Earnie said. “When I was growing up mom would tell us [he and his late brother, Terrence] to go out and play. We’d be up and down the road at the neighbors’ houses playing with the other kids.” Earnie said all the moms in town would call each other to make sure everyone knew where each other’s kids were. “The whole village raised the kids. We’d buy a half hog off of a neighbor, chickens, butter, eggs--we [the neighborhood] were self-sufficient,” he said. Later, in the mid 70s to the late 80s the Funk’s ran an electric shop and a radiator shop in buildings next to each other (see our Greene Scene Contest winner story). Today, Earnie still tinkers in the buildings. Inside the electric shop hangs a reminder of the W&W Railroad that ran along the family’s property. Earnie managed to be at the right place at the right time when a company was scrapping the rails and signs and one that hung near Iams Station remained. They let him take it. Earnie is too young to recall the Dairy Delite, which was operated by Ruth Fonner and where auctions were later held in Sycamore, but Linda Polen Iams, JoAnn Wright and Gary Orndoff remember it well. “When Fred (her late husband) and I were going together, that was one of our main stops,” Linda said.

8

Members of the Bates Fork Baptist Church (see our Shining the Light feature elsewhere in this issue) Iams, Wright and Orndoff have seen many changes in the town through the years. Orndoff said his parents brought him to the church since his birth, 68 years ago. They decided he is close to being the longest living member of the church but said Roy Inghram probably holds the record. These last names can be tied to the pioneering families that built Sycamore, farmed the land there, and even cleared the large groves of Sycamore trees from where the town got its name. While talking to Earnie Funk, the horn of a passing freight train breaks through the conversation. Earnie recalled the last effort to keep the right-of-way for the W&W in tact. “I can’t remember the locomotive being on it (the W&W track) but I do as a young kid remember every Thursday morning the 2-man cart being run from Waynesburg to Washington and back,” Funk said. “It would head north on Thursday. It was just to maintain the rightof-way and then one day they just gave it up.” There was no fanfare, just the end of an era when one could find members of the Iams, Fonner, Funk, Wright, Orndoff and Inghram families boarding the W&W for a trip into town, perhaps even Coach 6 (see the story about its return to Waynesburg elsewhere in this issue).

SYCAMORE, PA

by Tara Kinsell

Hogs have a snack. Behind the old Sycamore Station, a patron stands on the back porch of the general store next door.

Funk’s Grocery, site of Sycamore Post Office, 1952-1954. Photo Charles E. Funk II. Pictured in rear, left to right, Ethel Rush Funk, Postmaster Charles E. Funk, in front Charles E. Funk, II and Terrence L. Funk.

GreeneSaver •

SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2015


SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2015

• GreeneSaver

9


Bates Fork Baptist Church from Swarts to Sycamore

P

assengers on the Waynesburg and Washington Rail Road who passed through Swarts in the late 1800s were given a sort of come-to-Jesus-meeting as part of the ride. In 1877 when the track was being laid for the W&W Rail Road, an abandoned church was on the right-of-way. Instead of tearing it down, the rail road removed both ends of the building and it became one of two so-called ‘tunnels’ along the W&W. That church was the original Bates Fork Baptist Church, near Fonners Run. Imagine taking a ride on the train and suddenly the car begins to ebb closer and closer to a church up ahead; then, like a ride at Disney World, it car passes right through this church. So it was until May 22, 1880 when the remainder of the church was torn down to permit the passage of the Welsh and Sands Great New Orleans and San Francisco Railroad Circus and Royal English Menagerie as it made its way to Waynesburg for a performance there. The roof of the church sat too low for the circus cars to pass through with the “All-Overshadowing, Stupendous Railroad Show” with the only Royal Japanese Gymnasts, Great French Family Acrobats, the only Troupe of Russian Athletes, and double the rare and curious beasts, sea lions, aerial acrobats and elephants of any other railroad circus as it was billed. Although this anecdote predates the history of

10

the current church, located on the hill overlooking Browns Creek Road, church members included it in a 100th anniversary history written in 1967 to commemorate the 1867 dedication of the new location. It isn’t clear why the early congregation abandoned the Swarts location for one in Sycamore ten years before the railroad officially came through. However, it is just one in many changes the Bates Fork Baptist Church has undergone, many of them reflecting the changing community surrounding it. Today, the church’s upbeat pastor, Christy Wise, said the eyes of the church are “on the future” as it welcomes a congregational shift in recent years to primarily older members. Flip boards in her office are a visual representation of the work being done to embrace and enhance what is currently offered by Bates Fork Baptist, an American Baptist Church in the Ten Mile Association. Rather than dwell on past accomplishments or practices, the focus is on meeting the needs of not only their own congregation, but all the people in their community, with emphasis on the elderly. The church’s soup ministry, with homemade soups delivered to those who can’t make it out for one reason or another, is one such offering. Wise welcomes anyone in the area who would like to experience Bates Fork Baptist for themselves to attend its 11 am Sunday service. Adult Sunday School precedes it at 10 am.

GreeneSaver •

SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2015


SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2015

• GreeneSaver

11


Pi

z zl e W in n

er

e Pu r u ct

Karen Crawford of Waynesburg, PA

Winner of a CLASSY CUTS GIFT CERTIFICATE Last Month’s Picture Puzzle Answer: School Bus

12

GreeneSaver •

SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2015


The Long Journey Home for W&W Coach 6

T

he fact that Coach 6 of the Waynesburg and Washington Railroad exists at all today is an amazement. That it has made its way back to Waynesburg, once more, is nothing short of astounding. “When the railroad stopped passenger service, it sold the cars to other rail roads or burned them. There are pictures of them being burned in the Waynesburg yard,” said Jim Weinschenker, a local expert on the W&W and the facilitator of its return to Greene County. “They were left with scrap metal. Who needs a narrow gauge box car? It had no intrinsic value.” Tens of thousands of these cars were stripped across the country, he said. “By my estimation, it is only one of around 75 narrow gauge passenger cars in Coach 6 in its Heyday existence in the country,” he added. Passengers enter and exit the W&W at the Washington Station on July 9, 1929, the final day of Weinschenker was aware of the travels passenger service for the railroad. Coupled together in the photo are Baggage 12, Coach 13, and of Coach 6 since the W&W ceased passenger Coach 6. service in July of 1929. Ten months later it was sold to the Attapulgus Clay Company in maybe somebody will still restore it--still save it. That’s why it was Georgia and eventually taken out of service and used as a private let go to them.” residence. In 1985 it was found and relocated to the Greene CounUnfortunately, the best laid plans don’t always make it to fruity Historical Society with a goal to restore it and run it behind tion and the vision for Coach 6 in Connecticut was not realized. Second Number Four, the W& W locomotive on permanent loan “Last year, their board decided to give it away and posted it to the historical society by the Pennsylvania Railroad. was free for the taking. That’s when I stepped in. I emailed and a When the persons interested in pairing the Coach and loco- couple of hours later heard back from them,” he said. motive “went their separate ways,” the car just sat there until 1996 When they learned Weinschenker was from Waynesburg, when the Connecticut Antique Machinery Association acquired where Coach 6 originated, the decision was quite easy. it. “I spoke with a restoration expert before committing and he “They were looking for a small, narrow gauge passenger car said, ‘This is the one you need to get. There are enough original and they contacted the museum,” Weinschenker said. “They made pieces to restore it back to semi-new condition,” Weinschenker a donation and took it to Connecticut. The whole point was that said. “He said, ‘If it was me, I would take it.’”

Coach 6 may look a little worse for the wear but, “This is 1892 technology, all wood, and it has traveled up and down the coast four or five times,” Weinschenker said. When it was a private residence they stripped all of the hardware from it. So, basically it is only the wooden shell and the oak interior, he added. “But, it is in restorable condition. That is the main reason I agreed to bring it back to Waynesburg,” Weinschenker said. “The most important aspect is the frame. Is the frame straight? In this case it has just a little bit of sag and that can be fixed.” The cost to bring Coach 6 back to life will be in the ballpark of $100,000. He has started the grant writing process and hopes train lovers in the community will also contribute to the project. “We hope it will generate interest in railroading,” Weinschenker said. “There are all types of possibilities. I could see it used by railroad enthusiasts in the area and around the country as a base for their events.” If all goes according to plan, in a few years, visitors to the museum will enter one end of Coach 6, equipped as it was when it ran the rails of the W&W Railroad, and feel like they have stepped back in time. They will then move to the rear of the over 40 foot long coach where the museum’s holdings on the W&W will be displayed. For now, it will be left out until after the upcoming Greene County Historical Society Harvest Festival and then pushed into the engine Loaded and coming home house, next to Second Number Four. Coach 6 begins the journey from Connecticut to Waynesburg.

SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2015

• GreeneSaver

13


OVR Pathway to Employment for Learning or Physically Disabled

W

hen a student with a learning or physical disability begins to consider what is available to them in the way of higher education and/or employment after high school, the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) may be able to assist them in that process. Students who had an Individualized Educational Plan (IEP) during high school or those who believe they may have a learning disability are encouraged to contact OVR for an evaluation. Diagnostic testing will be completed to determine if services are appropriate. There is no cost for evaluation and vocational counseling services through OVR. However, based upon financial need, clients may be required to contribute to the cost of assistive technology services and devices. Once a person is deemed eligible for OVR assistance, an individualized plan for employment (IPE) will be developed through a face-to-face interview with an OVR counselor. The IPE outlines ones vocational objective, services available, and client responsibilities in the program. Medical services and equipment such as physical and occupational therapy, wheelchairs, and automobile hand controls may be made available to help clients pursue and achieve employment. Assistive technology may also be provided to help maximize employment or educational opportunities for independence and integration into society.

14

Other support services that may be provided to achieve and maintain employment, include: Job placement assistance, including: practice interviews, guidance in filling out job applications, and locating jobs. Counselors may also provide job leads. Room, board, and transportation costs during an evaluation for services or while completing a rehabilitative program. Occupational tools, licenses, or equipment. Home modifications, adaptive or special household equipment to help clients get ready and be on time for jobs. Automotive modifications including, special driving or lifting devices to enable clients to travel to and from their job. Personal care assistance to help with daily needs necessary to participate in a vocational rehabilitation program. Job site modifications that enable clients to get and keep a job. Independent living to become more self-sufficient in employment. Text telephone, signaling devices, hearing aids, and interpretive services may be provided to assist clients in communicating. Specialized services and training for persons who are blind or visually impaired. For more information about OVR services, contact the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation at 412-565-5240 for Greene and Washington counties.

GreeneScene

GreeneSaver •

SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2015


JEN FUND

W

hen the Moore family lost its matriarch, Jennifer, a 1991 Waynesburg Central High School graduate, at just 40-years of age, they made a commitment to honoring her memory each year by giving back to the community. One of the most prominent ways in which they do so is by giving gas cards away to cancer patients and their families to help them travel for treatment. Art, and his son’s, Samuel, 15, and David, 13, have found several ways to raise the money to pay for the gas cards through their non-profit Jen Fund organization. “The boys decided to start a lawn care service. They have seven customers, including the Buckingham Cemetery where Jen is buried. They had been cutting lawns for a while and just decided to turn it into a business since Samuel will turn 16 in December and be able to drive,” Art said. “They are calling it Moore Brothers Lawn Service and for every $1,000 they earn they are donating $25 to the Jen Fund organization.” Other ways in which money is contribFrom left, Samuel, Art and David Moore following a uted to the fund for the gas cards is through balloon release at Buckingham Cemetery in Washington direct donations by businesses and individuCounty. The Moores attached business cards to the balloons to raise awareness of The Jen Fund, started in the als, collections at the local Giant Eagle store, name of Art’s late wife and the boys’ mother who passed as well as the sales of t-shirts, hoodies, deaway in 2011 of a rare form of cancer. cals, and window clings. The cards are then distributed as close to Sept. 21, Jennifer’s birthday, as possible, to multiple cancer treat“No one is paid (by the Jen Fund non-profit). ment centers where patients have expressed a need. Among the centers being helped are UPMC We are all volunteers. I’d like to say 100 percent goes in Washington, the Darnell House in Washing- to the fund, but there are costs for the postal service ton, and the Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center (some of the gas cards require mailing) and paperin Morgantown, W.Va. Families are also helped at work,” he said. “Our biggest thing is we need to get the information out there, through ads, publicity, or other times during the year, Art said. A new goal set by Art and his sons is to create word-of-mouth. The more people know, the better a memorial scholarship at Bethlehem-Center High we are.” Art Moore said he is grateful to the Greenlee School, where Jennifer had been employed. “It will go to people (students) who help out in Funeral Home in Beallsville which has made clients aware of the opportunity available for friends the community, the same as she did,” Art said. He hopes to present the first scholarship to a and family members to make donations to The Jen graduating senior from the class of 2016 at but the Fund. For more information, visit The Jen Fund on details are still being worked out at present. The larger goal for the scholarship is to one day be able Facebook. Donations can be made to The Jen Fund, P.O. Box 64, Clarksville, Pa. 15322. to present it at other school districts, he said.

SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2015

• GreeneSaver

15


16

GreeneSaver •

SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2015


Helping is Instinctive for Local Girl

Allie Higgins, a seventh-grader at Margaret Bell Miller, presents monies she raised from a bake sale to Jessica Cole, administrative assistant of operations at the Corner Cupboard Food Bank.

A

llie Higgins doesn’t view her generosity as a big deal but we are sure if the people, and animals, she is helping could voice an opinion they would tell her it is. The 12-year old recently visited the Corner Cupboard Food Bank to present them with a wad of cash, totaling more than $230. It wasn’t her life’s savings. It was the result of Allie giving of her time and talents as a baker while on summer vacation at Big Bear Lake Campground in Morgantown. “I made four different kinds of brownies, nobake cookies, cupcakes and four different kinds of (baked) cookies,” Allie said. “I also made fruit punch and lemonade to sell with them.” She credited her mom, Cindy Higgins, and aunt, Debbie Higgins, for helping her with the baking but Debbie said her niece did the bulk of the work. Allie said she saw the sign for the food bank when she was passing by one day. She asked what they did there and wanted to help. This was not the first time Allie was moved to action.

“Last year I saw the sign in front of St. Ann’s Church for the soup kitchen,” she said. The young entrepreneur turned her baked goods into a $175 donation in that instance. When she isn’t holding bake sales for others, she is volunteering to help with cleanup after services at the Fairall and Oakview United Methodist churches, Debbie said. “It was a surprise to us. We didn’t know she did this,” said Jessica Cole, administrative assistant of operations at the food bank. “This means so much.” Cole told Allie that, through the purchasing power of the food bank, her donation will be a big help. Allie said she hopes other kids may be encouraged to help more. “I have a plan for what I’m going to do for next year. I am going to look into volunteering at the animal shelter and taking a couple of friends with me,” she said. We congratulate Allie and her family for its part in helping her help others.

GreeneScene by Toni Holoka

SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2015

• GreeneSaver

17


Caring for those with developmental disabilities… Caring for the community. To learn more, contact:

Greene Arc, Inc.

197 Dunn Station Road • Prosperity, PA 15329 • 724-627-5511 www.greenearc.org

18

GreeneSaver •

SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2015


Bowlby Bits Fall Story hours begin on Tuesday, Oct. 6. Pre-register your infant, toddler or preschooler, children 7-12, and young adults for ten weeks of story time fun at the Library. Call for specific schedule and to register. After Hours Fall Festival on Fri., Oct. 23, 4-8pm. Pumpkin bowling, bobbing for donuts, other games, crafts & snack foods for the whole family to enjoy together. Please call to preregister. Haunted Mansion Tours on Sat., Oct 24 6-8pm. Does the ghost of Mrs. Bowlby continue to wander the stacks and stairwells of Eva K. Bowlby Public Library? Find out on a guided tour through the four floors of the library, viewing different ghastly spectacles that only appear after dark. Tours are free, but NOT recommended for children under the age of 10. FREE American Red Cross CPR Certification training through the Greene County Memorial Hospital Foundation, Thur., Oct. 15, 5-9pm. Space is limited, please pre-register. National Friends of the Library Week is Oct. 18-24. The Bowlby Public Library invites all Greene County residents to stop by on Tuesday, October 20, from 4-6pm for live entertainment, door prizes & refreshments. It’s free. For info, or to register for any of the above call the library at 724-627-9776.

SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2015

• GreeneSaver

19


G ree n e Sce n e of the Pa st

W

by Tara Kinsell

Greene Scene of the Past Inspired by Reader’s Inquiry

hen Al Penska of Graysville was out and about on the western end of the county with his metal detector he came across a weathered looking coin. Al brought his find into the GreeneSaver and it prompted us to do a little investigating. By the markings on it we knew it came from the Greene County Centennial Celebration held in 1896. The coin he found had a hole in the top of it where once a ceremonial ribbon would have been attached. Coins with the ribbons attached were presented to dignitaries at the time to be worn at the festival, said Eben Williams of the Greene County Historical Society. Our selection for this month’s Greene Scene of the Past was inspired by Al’s find. Taken in August of 1896 at the intersection of High and Washington streets in Waynesburg, this photo, from the archives of the Greene County Historical Society, is of the grand marshals of the Centennial Celebration Parade on horseback. On close inspection, one of the coins with the ribbon can be made out on the jacket of one of these men. The arch they are photographed under was erected for the Centennial Celebration that commemorated the formation of Greene County from a portion of Washington County in 1796. The event also honored the early settlers of the area. We were so intrigued by the pomp and circumstance of the photo, coupled with Penska’s find, that we sought out the documented history of the county’s centennial event. We were amazed to learn that 200 people showed up at the Greene County Courthouse for a meeting held to choose the committee that would be responsible for planning the celebration. Imagine that many volunteers stepping forward for a single event in this day and age! From this group a committee of prominent citizens, ensuring each area of the county was equally represented, was selected. Eventually, the rest of the 200 plus would have plenty to do as committees were also formed to ensure that each of the individual aspects of the two-day celebration went off without a hitch. To pay for the Centennial Celebration, townships outside of the borough of Waynesburg were each responsible to contribute $100 each, whether from donations or pledge.

The entire county was a part of the event, right down to the school children who submitted art and essays for the celebration. A township choir was even assembled with a minimum of 50 vocalists from each township to be sent to sing a Centennial Hymn with lyrics by Nora Summersgill and music by Dr. J. M. Blose, director of the Waynesburg College School of Music. Quite obviously there was some serious effort put into the marking of the 100 years. The ladies of the county even got together to publish their own Women’s Centennial Paper. The cover of a special edition of the Waynesburg Independent newspaper was printed in green ink. A balloon ascension, parachute jump, fireworks, discounted rides on the Washington and Waynesburg Railroad, historical displays, and a bicycle race were among the many festivities planned. And, Waynesburg itself was decked out to match the jubilation of the residents with houses and businesses sporting flags and bunting. Although arches were placed at other street corners, the one depicted in our Greene Scene of the Past was the largest. The portraits on either side of the arch are of George Washington and William Penn. It was reported that when the grand event arrived more than 20,000 people crowded the streets of Waynesburg to share in the celebration.

Al Penska of Graysville shows off the Greene County Centennial Coin he unearthed.

Under the Arch Grand Marshals of the Centennial Parade, from left, Robert Wallace Munnell, John Flenniken Pauley, Sr., J.B. Rinehart, Jr., Dr. J. T. Ullom, Thomas Spencer Crago, John Martin Wiley, Hiram Kent, and Eleazer Luse Denny. If you have an interesting old photo from the area you’d like to share, just send it to: GreeneScene of the Past, 185 Wade Street, Waynesburg, PA 15370. Or email to: info@greenesaver.com with GreeneScene Past in subject line. The GreeneSaver can even scan your original in just a few minutes if you bring it to our office. We are particularly interested in photos of people and places in the Greene County area taken between 1950 and 1980, though we welcome previous dates, too.

20

GreeneSaver •

SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2015


Co ol at Sc h ool

I

by Tara Kinsell

ENGINEERS IN THE ELEMENTARY

magine, if you will, driving along a Greene County back road when a large buck runs into the path of your vehicle. You slam on the brakes and your car escapes the incident without a scratch. And, thanks to a fourth-grader at the Waynesburg Elementary School, so do you! The vehicle restraint system that holds you safely in your seat was her concept. Meanwhile, on the other side of the county, a tanker truck has overturned and spilled the contents it was carrying near a tributary of Ten Mile Creek. The design work of a fifth-grade student from Waynesburg Elementary comes into play to quickly and effectively clean it up. The spill never reaches the tributary. These are just two examples of what can happen when elementary students are given the opportunity to learn mathematics and science through a hands-on, problem-solving approach. In the Central Greene School District, students in fourth and fifth grade will be able to do just that with Project Lead the Way’s (PLTW) Launch program, new to the district this school year. “PLTW has a long history of successfully engaging students in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) subjects, encouraging them to continue their learning in middle school, high school and beyond,” said Annette Vietmeier, director of curriculum, instruction, technol-

SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2015

• GreeneSaver

ogy, and federal programs in the Central Greene School District. “We are excited to offer PLTW Launch to our students, giving them a chance to get excited about math, science, and STEM concepts and pursue these subjects as they continue their educational careers.” The module of the program that is the focus for fourth graders is called, Energy: Collisions. It will have the students exploring how mechanisms change energy by transferring direction, speed, type of movement and force. Think of Newton’s law regarding objects at rest remaining at rest unless acted upon by an unbalanced force. The physics that we learned in high school are now part of elementary curriculum. Getting back to the example of that near accident with the deer, as students solve the problems presented in this module, they will apply the knowledge and skills they gain related to energy transfer in collisions to develop a vehicle restraint system. So, there is a real possibility that a 10-year old may be behind the design of the safety equipment in your next car. As for that spill scenario, the Robotics and Automation module of PLTW will give fifth-grade students in the Central Greene School District a chance to explore how robotics are used in today’s world and the impact of its use on society and the environment. Students will learn about a variety of robotic

components as they build and test mobile robots that can be controlled remotely. Applying the knowledge they gain in mechanical design and computer programming from PLTW, they will solve a real-world problem related to an environment disaster cleanup. A grant through Chevron has made the PLTW programs available in the Central Greene School District, according to Vietmeier. “Through PLTW Launch, Waynesburg Central Elementary School’s students will become problem solvers,” Vietmeier said. “They’ll engage in design problems that encourage collaboration and use touch technology, robotics and everyday materials to explore topics such as energy, light and sound, motion and stability, and gravity.” This clearly fits the title of something that is “Cool at School.”

science h t a m

21


Dugan Scholarship Fund The family of Chris Dugan has started a memorial scholarship fund with a kickoff spaghetti dinner fundraiser to be held on Oct. 11 from noon to 7 pm in the social hall of the Jefferson Volunteer Fire Department. A Chinese auction and 50/50 drawing will also be held at

that time. The cost of dinner is $10 for adults and $5 for children under six. Take-out is available. Tickets can be purchased in advance but are not required. For more information, contact Stacy Stoneking at 724-883-2114, or Darlene Hvizda at 724-627-5243.

Grants Available The Community Foundation of Greene County (CFGC) will accept fall grant applications through 4 pm, Oct. 1 for project activities beginning after Nov. 30. Successful grant awards will be announced in late November or early December. The foundation expects to award three to five grants ranging between $500 and $2,000 per grant project. Eligible applicants include nonprofit, charitable, tax-exempt organizations (recognized under Section 501(c)(3) of the InConcord, N.C., and the Tamarack artisan com- ternal Revenue Code), as well as educational inmunity in Beckley, W.Va. The trip is open to the public and includes bus transportation, a dinner cruise, city and low country visits, and more. For more information about the trip, contact 724499-5254. For information about membership in the GCASR, contact Irene Jacobs at 724-627A town hall meeting, “Taking Back Our 9425. Community from Drugs and Alcohol,” will be

GCASR Welcomes New Members The Greene County Association of School Retirees (GCASR) held a breakfast meeting to welcome new retirees, Tammy Cox, Nancy Fox, Susan Christopher and Linda Stajnrajh, pictured from left, looking over the itinerary for the group’s 2016 trip. The trip is planned for Monticello in Charlottesville, Va., Charleston, S.C., Savannah, Ga., the Charlotte Motor Speedway in

Town Hall Meeting

Loving Families Sought Family Care for Children & Youth (FCCY) is looking for loving families to consider opening their hearts and homes to help children. Over 25,000 children in Pennsylvania are not living with their families. FCCY provides an array of progressive social services designed to provide these children with a caring, nurturing family atmosphere. FCCY places children in need with families

stitutions or schools, religious organizations, and government organizations, whose purposes and programs benefit Greene County residents. CFGC seeks to fund organizations and ideas that will have a significant and lasting impact on Greene County, its residents, infrastructure and future. Grant guidelines, application procedures and application forms are available on the Foundation website at www.cfgcpa.org. FMI, contact 724-627-2010 or email cfgcpa@gmail.com.

who can help them both physically and emotionally. FCCY case managers work with foster families and the children they care for as a team, helping both experience a healthy, productive relationship. Case managers will also provide support new foster families and coordinate the special training they need to become ideal foster parents. If you are interested in becoming a foster parent, please call 800-747-3807.

held at 7 pm on Oct. 8 in Courtroom 1 of the Greene County Courthouse. The event will include an expert panel with Gary Tennis, secretary of the Pennsylvania Department of Drug and Alcohol Programs, and

other invited guests addressing the impacts of drug and alcohol use on the state. Because of the topical nature of the meeting, the audience will be asked to refrain from political questions or remarks, and to follow rules distributed at the town hall meeting.

Nursing Career Day

Waynesburg University will host Nursing the nursing program, according to Dr. Nancy as a Career Day on Oct. 8 for high school stu- Mosser, chair and director of the Waynesburg dents interested in the field of nursing. The event University Department of Nursing. begins at 9:15 am in room 104 of the Center for Mosser, who is also a professor of nursing at Research and Economic Developement. Partici- the university said the day “is held as a recruitpants will spend the day exploring the university’s ment event,” that allows prospective students to nursing simulation lab with faculty and students observe faculty in the lab and provides an opfrom the nursing department. The simulation lab portunity to ask current nursing students general provides an effective environment for students questions about the program. For more information, or to register for the to learn and apply cognitive, psychomotor, and decision-making skills for clinical practice. Nursing as a Career Day, call 1-800-225-7393 or the topic of Civil Rights in America. It will be In the lab, perspective students will be given visit www.waynesburg.edu. For complete inforheld from 5-7 pm on Tuesdays from Sept. 29 to an opportunity to experience the same complex, mation about Waynesburg University’s DepartNov. 3. simulated, patient care situations as students of ment of Nursing, visit www.waynesburg.edu. Participants can earn up to 24 Continuing Education Hours with 10 more hours optional after the course. FMI, contact Sue Wise, associate director of TPS at Waynesburg, at swise@ waynesburg.edu or 724-852-3377. We’re sorry to report the GreeneScene Road Rally will not be held as originally planned this year. New plans are being considered for 2016 – stay tuned!

American Civil Rights Course For Secondary Teachers A free professional development class targeted toward secondary social studies teachers and librarians is being offered at Waynesburg University through Teaching with Primary Sources (TPS). TPS is funded by a grant from the Library of Congress. The course, entitled “Oral History and the Long Civil Rights Movement,” features methods and materials from the Library of Congress on

22

No GreeneScene Road Rally

GreeneSaver •

SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2015


SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2015

• GreeneSaver

23


24

GreeneSaver •

SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2015


SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2015

• GreeneSaver

25


Best Places to Work Award Finalist Waynesburg University is in the running for the Pittsburgh Business Times’ 2015 Best Places to Work Awards, based on the results of an employee engagement survey completed in June. “We are proud to be recognized by the Pittsburgh Business Times as ‘Best Places to Work’ finalist,” said Doug Lee, Waynesburg University President. “It’s a privilege to serve alongside the dedicated faculty and staff at the university. This recognition is a result of the enthusiasm and commitment each one brings forth.”

The university is one of ten finalists in the category of 150 employees and over. To be eligible for selection as a finalist, companies must reach a minimum level of employee participation, based upon total number of employees. They are ranked based upon the responses from employee completed surveys which are compiled and evaluated by the Pittsburgh Business Times. Finalists are chosen in each business size category, according to their overall engagement score, based on the results of the survey, and in essence, by the employees themselves.

Bowlby Library’s Pint-Sized Heroes The five top readers in the Eva K. Bowlby Public Library Summer Reading Program, which concluded last month, logged more than 5,400 minutes of combined reading time. They were part of a group of 85 children who read or listened to books during the “Every Hero Has a Story,” summer program. Each of the top five readers received a set of pencils, a notebook for school and a certificate signifying their individual achievement. The summer reading program also encouraged young readers to become “Pint-Sized Heroes,”

Children who participated in the Bowlby Library Summer Reading Program collected items each week for agencies represented by speakers who presented to the group each week during the program.

WU Volunteers at Game Lands Roughly 475 volunteers, including the incoming freshman class at Waynesburg University, Bonner Scholars, and freshman orientation leaders, along with university faculty and staff participated in a service project at the Pennsylvania State Game Lands last month. The volunteers focused on revitalizing several cemeteries located in the game lands. Dating back to the 1880s, these cemeteries were overgrown and in need of maintenance. In addition to clearing brush, repositioning fallen tombstones, setting posts to mark the cemetery areas and painting fences, the group also built and hung 150 blue bird

in their local community. Each week the library invited a speaker from local non-profit organizations to speak to the kids on how they could individually donate a needed item. Organizations represented this year, included: Ronald McDonald House Charities, Domestic Violence Services of Southwestern Pennsylvania, Toys for Tots, Corner Cupboard Food Bank, and the Bowlby Library Teen Advisory Group. Numerous donations were collected each week for the organizations.

boxes. The effort was sponsored by CONSOL Energy, the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation, Sherwin Williams and Wayne Lumber. “Service is in the DNA of Waynesburg University, and this was evident with the class of 2019!” said Kelley Hardie, assistant dean of Student Services at the university. “The new students volunteered alongside Wildlife Conservation Officers to perform environmental stewardship. The outcome was remarkable and all service tasks were completed. The officers said they were extremely proud of our students’ hard work and servant hearts.”

WCCC Dental Programs Reaccredited The Dental Hygiene Associates Degree and Dental Assisting Diploma programs at Westmoreland County Community College have been fully approved by the Commission on Dental Accreditation, a specialized accrediting agency, recognized by the U.S. Department of Education. The reaccreditation is the result of on-site reviews of both programs “without reporting requirements,” indicating that the programs achieved or exceeded the basic requirements for accreditation, according to the college. “This is wonderful news and further reflects

26

on the work and leadership of Angie Rinchuse, professor and program director for dental hygiene, and Mary Kay Huesdash, professor and program director for dental assisting,” said Dr. Kathleen Malloy, dean of Health Professions and Natural Sciences at WCCC. “I congratulate the faculty on their accomplishments,” said Dr. Kathy Bishop, vice-president of Academic Affairs and Student Services. “It validates all of their hard work, program quality, and dedication to the college and their students.”

From left, Jenna Martin, logging 2,549 minutes; Lauren Martin, logging 2,180 minutes; Darren Knight, logging 1,335 minutes; Paige Redman, logging 1,763 minutes; and Matthew Wassil, logging 900 minutes reading.

GreeneSaver •

SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2015


SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2015

• GreeneSaver

27


28

GreeneSaver •

SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2015


SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2015

• GreeneSaver

29


Spo r t Sh o rt s

by Tara Kinsell

World Champion at Just Nine Years Old

H

ow do you top being a world champion when you are only 9-years old? You set a goal for next year to win the triplecrown in your sport. That is what Ava Bertagnolli, a fourth-grader at Jefferson-Morgan Elementary will shoot for next. When she won sixth-place last year at the 2014 World Championship Horse Show in Louisville, Kentucky, mom, Jodi, asked her what her goals were. “I want to go back and win again,” she answered. And, win she did. On Aug. 24, Ava qualified in her class by winning second-place and the reserve world championship. Four days later, in front of a panel of three judges, she was named World Champion in saddle seat equitation eight and under. “Your heart and mind have to be in the right place. Once you understand your horse and they understand you it is pretty magical,” Jodi said, noting she sees that magic when Ava rides. She should know. Jodi has been riding since she was just a young girl. Back then, it took one visit to a friend’s stable where they placed her on a horse for a photo, she said. “I was done. I knew, right then and there, that I loved it. I worked for riding lessons,” she said. When she told her parents that she wanted to do it as more than just a hobby she heard the parental voice of reason. “They said if I wanted to do it to go to college and get a ‘real job’ to pay for it,” she said. Ava had a much earlier start, learning to ride when she was just 3-years old. She explained what it feels like when she is riding. “My horse, Sam, makes me feel amazing. My mind [when she is on him] is thinking about everything that I need to do for my body form, and Sam, to look our very best,” she said. “We have to be a team for each other. He makes me feel so pretty. He likes himself a lot, and can get fancy too.” Jodi, said there is something innate in the way Ava relates to her horse. “After she captured sixth last year I knew I needed to step away,” she said. “That was probably the hardest ting for me to do, to say I need to step back.” You see, Jodi is not only Ava’s mom, she is also her riding instructor. Two and a half years ago Jodi saw her long-time dream of having her own riding stables, Heritage Stables, become a reality on Goslin Road in Rices Landing. Husband, Rick, head coach of the California University softball team, has been completely supportive “but I still hope one of the girls wants to play softball for her dad,” Jodi said. Ava’s younger sister, Mia, 5, is the one most likely to don a ball glove, according to Jodi. “Mia is very talented, loves to ride and has fun but she doesn’t like to compete,” Jodi said, noting she is completely fine with it. She tells her girls “whatever your goals are, I am with you.” That is why, when Ava showed such a passion for equitation, Jodi turned to friend and fellow riding instructor, Shelley Fisher, of Sugar Knoll Farm

30

in Huber Heights, Ohio. “I saw her [Ava’s] potential but it’s really hard to coach your kids,” Jodi said. Last October, the Bertagnolli’s began making the four-hour trip to Sugar Knoll Farm once a month, staying a couple of days at a time for Fisher to work with Ava. Jodi and Fisher share video and pictures of Ava when they are not in the same location and are in complete agreement with what to do with Ava. It was Fisher who was at Ava’s side when she was inside the ring. “I was videoing for my mom and family back home,” Jodi said. “When she won I kind of just went crazy. You can hear me on the video. I was jumping up and down. I can be very loud.” Jodi asked Ava what she was thinking at that moment. Ava told her, “’In my mind I just kept saying 24, 24, 24 (her contestant number) and when they said my name my mouth dropped and I thought, oh my gosh, oh my gosh,’” Jodi said.

GreeneSaver •

SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2015


Mini Walk to End Alzheimer’s

I The King Coal Show wrapped its 2015 schedule of events on Aug. 29. Results of the various judged activities can be viewed at the King Coal Festival Facebook page. SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2015

• GreeneSaver

t was 16 years ago that author Ann Frantti wrote the children’s book, “Grandma’s Cobwebs,” but its impact is just as strong today. Local fourth-grade students were read the story, told through the eyes of a little girl witnessing her grandmother’s struggle with Alzheimer’s Disease, in the days leading up to the 8th Annual Mini Walk to End Alzheimer’s Disease in the Central Greene School District, held Sept. 17. It was the most successful walk to-date, said Nancy Riggle of the Southwestern PA Area Agency on the Aging and an Alzheimer’s Association volunteer. Over $3,000 was raised by the children, a new record. Ten students raised over $100 each: Lily Maute, Savannah Jo King, Travis Tedrow, Logan Crouse, Ayslynn Metzger, Kaley Rohanna, Ben Maxwell, Garrett King, Brianna Pettit, Kayla Strelick, and Ky Szewczyk It was Riggle and long-time friend, Sue Dugan, now a retired third-grade teacher in the district who collaborated around 10 years ago to come up with an idea for a project to compliment a social

studies lesson being taught by Dugan. The theme was public service. Riggle suggested the students create artwork to be presented to residents of Golden Living Center’s Alzheimer’s Memory Care Unit, where she worked at the time. Today, Riggle, now with the Southwestern PA Area Agency on the Aging and an Alzheimer’s Association volunteer, coordinates with Margaret McCombs, learning support teacher at the elementary, for the Alzheimer’s-related activities at Waynesburg Elementary. Continuing with art as part of the process to teach the kids about Alzheimer’s, the fourth-grade classes will create special seasonal artworks, based upon their knowledge of the disease. The art will be delivered to Golden Living Center where it will be displayed for residents to enjoy throughout the year. The Annual Greene County Walk to End Alzheimer’s at Wana B Park is scheduled for 9 am on Sept. 26. For more information, contact Allison Kaharick at 412-261-5040, or visit www.alz.org.

31


32

GreeneSaver •

SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2015

Sep Oct GreeneSaver 2015  

Gear up for spooky, local ghost stories in this issue of the GreeneSaver. Check out the Harvest Festival events, see the history of Sycamore...

Sep Oct GreeneSaver 2015  

Gear up for spooky, local ghost stories in this issue of the GreeneSaver. Check out the Harvest Festival events, see the history of Sycamore...

Advertisement