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Class Dismissed!

he Greene County Department of Recreation recently wrapped up its fourth introductory “Women’s Intro to Sporting Clays” class at Hunting Hills in Dilliner. Fourteen women signed up for the classes, which were free for women ages 15 and older. Classes covered the fundamentals of clay target shooting and were taught by Chuck Mallory and Randy Coss, certified National Sporting Clays Association Level 1 instructors. Students shot targets and learned about different types of guns, techniques of stance, trap positions, and clay speeds and sizes. The “Women’s Intro to Sporting Clays” classes were sponsored by the Greene County Commissioners, Hunting Hills, Friends of the National Rifle Association and the Waynesburg Sportsman Association. For more information, call the Department of Recreation at 724-852-5323.

GreeneScene

Pictured are 12 of the 14 class participants with coaches and instructors. From l. to r.: Coach Brian Swartz, Assistant Head Coach Randy Coss, Rachel Virgili, Coach Doug Kerr, Jennifer Wolfe, Joan Driscole, Head Coach Chuck Mallory, Alyssa Miller, Shanna Meyers, Gretchen Brandstetter, Coach Tom Pavel, Donna Neino, Coach Rex Buckhalter, Joyce Drew, Coach Eugene Latusek, Valerie Glister, Michelle Lee, Erica Lee, Jennifer Faddis, Parks and Recreation Manager Pam Blaker, Recreational Associate Nikki Smith and Recreation Director Jake Blaker. Not pictured are students Ashley Drew and Candace Kingan.

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Getting a New “Leash” On Life S

ometimes, life’s greatest gifts can be wrapped up in ugly, frightening packages. “In March of 2010, I was diagnosed with a brain tumor. I was given two years to live.” These chilling words from Greene County Sheriff, Brian Tennant, signify the beginning of a remarkable new chapter of his life. At the time, Brian was a police officer for Waynesburg Borough, but this came to an abrupt halt. He continues, “I had to go off work as a police officer, and started going through treatment. I moved my whole family down to M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, in Houston, Texas, and had radiation done.” Sadly, the outcome was not all that the Tennant family had hoped—the treatments had no significant impact on the tumor. “They basically said that was all they could do, so we started looking for alternative options.” Bags were packed and passports prepared for a desperate trip to China, in the hope that alternate therapies might do what traditional medicine could not. “Then we found out about this other place in Houston, the Burzynski Clinic,” Brian recalls. Known for its unique (and sometimes controversial) methods in treating cancer, the clinic called the Tennant clan back to where they’d just left. Treatment was grueling, in its own right, due in part to mandated steroid therapy; “I gained a bunch of weight. I was up over 400 pounds at one point. I was having trouble walking. My legs were really weak from all the treatment,” Brian shares. But then, something happened: “Things worked,” he states, simply. “The tumor shrunk down, and there was nothing showing up on anything, so, essentially, I was healed, which was miraculous, really.” Brian was anxious to get back to serving and protecting the community, but his still-recovering body was not yet ready for full active duty. Then he was inspired with a new idea: “I always loved dogs, I always had dogs, I was always interested in dogs,” he points out. “I always had an interest in being a K-9 Officer, so I went to the Chief of Police of Waynesburg Borough, who was Tim Hawfield at that point, and said, ‘Hey, here’s an idea—what do you think about me being a K-9 Officer?’” Brian was temporarily off duty, and the borough didn’t even have a K-9 officer at the time. The chief was, understandably, rather skeptical, but Brian sold the idea expertly. “He said, ‘You’re not even working right now!’ and I said, ‘I know, but I’m going to get myself ready physically, and I’m going to come back to work.” Brian saw an opportunity to take his recuperation time and use it for the roughly nine weeks of concentrated training required to learn how to work with a K-9 partner. Thanks to an anonymous donor, funds were generously provided to obtain and outfit a K-9 partner for Brian, whose next stop was Battle Ridge Canine, in Madison, WV, to visit owner, Mike Mays, and meet his soon-to-be partner, Dagen. “When I got him, he was about 18 months old,” Brian notes, adding, “They start the dogs immediately, as soon as they’re old enough to walk. They start testing their drives—their ‘hunt drive,’ their ‘prey drive,’ and determining whether or not they’re going to be good for law enforcement purposes.” Dagen, who is now 5 years old, had what it takes, so dog and human began a series of 8 hour days, 4 to 5 days a week, dedicated to teaching both how to perform as a team. “It’s a really good opportunity for the dog and the handler to train together, because you learn things, just like a dog learns things,” Brian says. Laughing, he adds, “The dog doesn’t need as much time to train as we do! You show the dog something a couple of times, and he gets it. It’s for the trainers to learn not to make mistakes, and what to look for—how to ‘read’ your dog and see what he’s thinking.” Dagen’s training included regimens in patrol and controlled aggression, narcotics detection, and article detection; Brian’s “training” included not only the work with Dagen, but, as part of Waynesburg Borough’s first K-9 team, he was charged with creating the policies for the Waynesburg K-9 Unit. When Brian’s run for Greene County Sheriff was successful, Dagen followed, but regular readers will know that Waynesburg Borough Police are not without a K-9 officer. Last month’s GreeneSaver profiled Officer Asa Winters, and K-9 Officer Izzy, currently working to keep the borough safe since Brian’s election as Sheriff. Not surprisingly, Brian echoes Asa’s thoughts about one of the most fundamental aspects of training, applying not just to police dogs: “The foundation of everything is obedience, for all dogs. You have to walk them on a leash, have them walk beside you, sit, lay down; you really have to have that foundation. You have to know your dog, you have to trust your dog, and your dog has to trust you before you can go into the bigger, more intensive things.” Brian stresses the value of exposure and repetition to encourage good dog behavior. “If you want your dog to sit and stay there, if he sits 10 times and you walk away and he follows you, you have to do it 11 times,” adding, “A lot goes into proper reinforcement and correction when they don’t do something, but generally just don’t give up on it.” A unique “group training” also provides opportunities for dogs and handlers to interact. “Once a week, the K-9s in the area train,” Brian says. “Sometimes we go to Masontown, where Mike Yeager has a K-9, sometimes we go to Cumberland Township, where Craig Miller has a K-9; sometimes we’re at Waynesburg where Asa and I are. We can help each other out, because we know a little more what to do and how to react.” With such extensive, ongoing training, surely Dagen is completely on-task, all of the time, correct? Well, almost… “He gets along really well with cats, generally; however, if something runs, he wants to chase it,” Brian points out in a tone of voice that indicates that a good story is about to be told. “One night, when I was still working for Waynesburg Borough, I get called for a burglary at the Bowlby Library. I go, and it’s, like, 4 in the morning, and that place can have a touch of creepiness in the daylight, so now you’re going through with flashlights. I have Dagen, I was backing up another officer—actually, the officer I was backing up? Asa Winters!” He continues, “We go into this building, and we’re going through and clearing it, and I’m giving the dog commands, and it’s a pretty tense situation. We come around a corner, and this cat jumps down right in front of Dagen, and takes off running! I jumped about 10 feet in the air, Dagen jumped about 10 feet in the air, and then started into a dead sprint to get this cat! Asa—I think we had to peel him off the ceiling…” To all of the brave police officers who are out there every day risking their lives and keeping us safe, whether human or K-9, you have our undying thanks! And, for some of you, a scratch behind the ears.

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A

cross Greene County, public school teachers have been busy getting lesson plans ready and keeping their classrooms prepared for students. Over the course of the school year, many of those teachers (and schools) will try to find the funds to purchase additional supplies and learning materials that will enhance the educational experience of their students. Now Greene County teachers and schools have a new opportunity to apply for grants to help with small education projects. In partnership with CONSOL Energy, Inc., the Community Foundation of Greene County (CFGC) announces a new endowed fund - the CONSOL Energy Excellence in Education Fund. The CONSOL Energy Excellence in Education Fund will provide small grants of $250 to $500 to teachers in Greene County public schools. The grants may be used to purchase supplies or equipment for special classroom activities that will directly enhance student learning and performance but may not be funded as part of the regular school or classroom budget. “CONSOL Energy is proud to be able to help provide teachers with the funds necessary to help advance education in local communities. The grants provided will support and pilot educators’ innovative ideas that will ultimately enrich curriculum, including project-based learning initiatives and technology investments not covered by the school budget,” said Tommy Johnson, Vice President, Government and Public Relations for CONSOL Energy. According to a recent survey by the National School Supply and Equipment Association public school teachers spent, on average, almost $500 out of pocket on their students last year, a 25 percent increase from 2010. “With shrinking budgets, many schools have had to cut back on certain expenses in recent years,” commented West Greene School District Superintendent Thelma Szarell. “But many teachers and administrators are continuing to look for ways to keep the learning experience fresh and exciting for our students. The CONSOL Energy Excellence in Education Fund will provide just that opportunity for a few teachers each year.” “We are so pleased to work with CONSOL to establish this new fund,” said Bettie Stammerjohn, CFGC executive director. “Because CONSOL Energy chose to endow the fund, this means that funding for the grants will continue to grow and be available year after year. This is one of the best ways to give back to a community and help ensure that future teachers and students will benefit from new educational activities.” Guidelines for the CONSOL Energy Excellence in Education grants are available through the CFGC website (http://cfgcpa.org/guidelines.html). Teachers and school principals may also request a copy of the guidelines and application procedures by phone (724-627-2010) or email (cfgcpa@gmail.com). Applications for The CONSOL Energy Excellence in Education will be accepted throughout the year.

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Worth a Thousand Words? G

By Regis Whetzel

reensboro came alive during Art Blast on the Mon, which just celebrated its ninth consecutive year this past Labor Day Weekend. One of the highlights of the event was “Everyone’s Art Show,” and “Every Kid’s Art Show,” held at the Mon View Roller Rink and Community Center. Sponsored this year by Noble Energy, this year’s show featured some of the brightest artistic talent from the area, and also provided the Art Blast with a chance to show their appreciation to area schools by donating $100 each to Jefferson-Morgan Elementary, Jefferson-Morgan High School, Mapletown Jr./Sr. High School, Carmichaels High School, Open Door Christian Academy, Greene ARC, and the LeMoyne Community Center, to thank them for their participation. Local schools provided over 100 pieces of art to be shown at the exhibit. 46 pieces were submitted for judging in the competitions, “Everyone’s Art Show” for adults, and “Every Kid’s Art Show” for school-age children. Taking first prize in “Everyone’s Art Show” was Direct Results very own graphic design specialist, Molly Usher! Congratulations to Molly, and all other winners (listed below). Art Blast on the Mon extends a special thanks to Curt and Lisa Miller, and the County of Greene, for the use of their facilities for the Art Blast and accompanying art show; and also to the Art Blast committee members and volunteers that made the event a great success. Basket Competition winners were: Home—Nancy Britner; Kitchen—Sharon Smith; Ladies—JoBeth McKee; Auto—Yvette Shelott; Sport—Casey Bryan; Lady Luck—Millicent Pierce; Farmer’s Market—Mary Spellman; Batik Quilt—MaryAnn Hunnell; “Everyone’s Art Show” awards: 1st Prize—Molly Usher 2nd Prize—Jennifer Adamson 3rd Prize—Maggy Aston “Every Kid’s Art Show” awards: Elementary—Lauren Fox Middle School—Jade Policz High School—Mary Richards Aston

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Get Fit This Fall!

eginning later this month, the Greene County Department of Recreation will kick off the fall season with four sessions of three fitness classes. All classes begin the week of Sept. 29 and include evening sessions of “Gentle” hatha yoga, Zumba and “Body Blast!” aerobics. Individual classes can be attended at a cost of $8 per class, but pre-registration discounts are available. Three of the classes will be held in the 4-H Building at the Greene County Fairgrounds in Waynesburg, with one session of yoga planned for Mon View Roller Rink and Community Center in Greensboro. Attendees should wear sweat-absorbing clothes and good support shoes and bring water and towels. Beginning Sept. 30, hatha yoga will be held from 6 to 7:30 p.m. every Tuesday through Nov. 18. The pre-registration discount is $5 per class, for a total of $40, and the deadline is Sept. 29. Certified yoga instructor Virginia Wainwright will lead the classes. Hatha yoga is a more gentle style of yoga exercise that is great for beginners and senior citizens. It improves balance and overall health, while increasing flexibility and circulation. Attendees should also bring yoga mats, and shoes will not be worn during the class. Instructor Melissa Frameli will lead Zumba classes from 5 to 6 p.m. every Wednesday from Oct. 1 through Nov. 5. The pre-registration discount is $5 per class, for a total of $30, and the deadline is Tuesday, Sept. 30. The fitness program Zumba combines Latin and international music with dynamic, yet simple exercise moves. Benefits of Zumba include efficient calorie-burning, muscle toning and cardiovascular improvement. Also every Wednesday from Oct. 1 through Nov. 5, instructor Shastina Humble will lead “Body Blast!” aerobics classes from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. The pre-registration discount is $5 per class, for a total of $30, and the deadline is Tuesday, Sept. 30. The aerobics classes are designed for both high- and low-intensity workouts. Aerobic exercise conditions the heart and lungs; other benefits include increased energy and stamina, toned muscles, decreased tension and improved mood. The classes will combine fun cardio routines with specific and tailored muscle conditioning. Finally, instructor Wainwright will lead one more session of hatha yoga beginning Thursday, Oct. 2, at Mon View Roller Rink. Classes will be held from 6 to 7:30 p.m. every Thursday through Nov. 20, with the exception of the Oct. 23 class, which will meet Wednesday, Oct. 22. The pre-registration discount is $5 per class, for a total of $40, and the deadline is Monday, Sept. 29. For more information, or to pre-register for any of the classes, call the Department of Recreation at 724-852-5323, or visit www.co.greene.pa.us.

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GreeneScene of the Past

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Throckmorton’s Grove/Golden Oaks Park

n enthusiastic newspaper article from 1927 describes (what was then) the ongoing process: “The work of transforming the Throckmorton Grove, west of Rogersville, into an amusement park is progressing rapidly,” it says, noting that the new owners “plan to make it one of the most attractive amusement and recreation parks in this section.” The list of amenities is impressive. “A fine athletic field has been completed, and work on the grandstand and bleachers was started Monday,” “A large dancing platform has been erected, and square dances are held on Wednesday evenings,” “A wide veranda and kitchen will be added to the dancing pavilion, and meals will be served…” Add to that plans for a well-equipped playground, a “large cement pool,” and a small zoo, and the mind creates pictures of a playful paradise where almost any outdoor recreation of the day could be enjoyed. Among those who remember trips to what came to be known as Golden Oaks Park, one thing agreed upon is that a variety of well known musical acts regularly performed there. According to Stanford “Zip” Zimmerman, father of Greene County Commissioner, Blair Zimmerman, “Lots of families would go up there, Sundays, most generally. They always had some ‘name’ person up there. Back then, they called them ‘cowboys’ or ‘hillbillies,’ but today they call them ‘western.’” Zip’s memories of the performers at Golden Oaks features stars from the hugely popular WWVA Jamboree radio show, such as Loye Donald Pack, known to fans as “Coyboy Loye”; and “cowboy movie” actor, Chuck Fisher. Another former fan of Golden Oaks, and friend of “Zip” Zimmerman, Peg Wilson of Waynesburg, also has fond memories of her times there. Recalling some of the performers she enjoyed, her list includes, “Hawkshaw Hawkins, and Big Slim, the ‘Lone Cowboy’; Honey and Sunny, the Davis Twins…” She remembered seeing a young Minnie Pearl, who would later become a legend at the Grand Ole Opry, and through her regular appearances on the popular television show, Hee Haw. “My uncle used to gather a bunch of us, and we’d pack a picnic lunch in a basket, and take a gallon of water or more for drinking,” she said, “and we’d have our picnic lunch there and have a good time!” Before the days of Golden Oaks, though, the plot of land where it would be was still quite the active spot for townsfolk to gather, picnic and socialize, as can be seen from this classic picture, dated October, 1906. The GreeneSaver has to confess—we would love to find some pictures of the place after it became Golden Oaks park, but the simple truth is that we’re finding it rather difficult to locate any! So the call goes out to you, our wonderful readers—if anyone has any pictures from Golden Oaks park, please share them with us! Maribeth Coote, of Holbrook, submitted this picture which was given to her by Terry Grimes. Maribeth actually owns the land where Throckmorton Grove/Golden Oaks park used to be, tucked away behind her home near the intersection of Rts. 18 and 21. Thanks to Maribeth for this amazing slice of nostalgia! If you have an interesting old photo from the area you’d like to share, just send it to: GreeneScene of the Past, 185 Wade Street, Waynesburg, PA 15370. Or email to: info@greenesaver.com with GreeneScene Past in subject line. The GreeneSaver can even scan your original in just a few minutes if you bring it to our office. We are particularly interested in photos of people and places in the Greene County area taken between 1950 and 1980, though we welcome previous dates, too.

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Who Will Be the Nominees..? The Waynesburg Area Chamber of Commerce is now accepting nominee applications for its Distinguished Service Award. The Chamber announced today that the honor would be bestowed on an individual for outstanding service to the Waynesburg community. In addition, 2014 will mark the eleventh Organizational Distinguished Service Award which will be presented to a civic organization or business which has also shown a lasting commitment to the Waynesburg area. These awards will be presented at the Annual Waynesburg Chamber of Commerce Membership Meeting and Banquet, which is scheduled for November 22nd at the Waynesburg University’s Benedum Dining Hall. The winner of these prestigious awards will be selected from nominations received by the Chamber. Nominees are judged on contributions to community welfare and betterment; participation in community activities and civic enterprises; lasting contributions to community welfare; leadership abilities; In August, the James L. Farrell American Legion Post 330 of Waynesburg, PA had the honor of award- success in their individual vocations; personal progress; and cooperation with other individuals and organizations. The awards will be presented for direct, outstanding service to the community and has no ing four student scholarships of $2000.00 each to: Robi Arbogast, of Waynesburg Central High School who is attending Waynesburg University; Mary association to the Chamber of Commerce involvement. Anyone can nominate an individual, organization or business for the awards by submitting a comBeth Wood, of Waynesburg Central High School who is attending Waynesburg University; Tyler Wagner, of Manheim Township High School, a Junior at Penn State; and Savanna Christy, of Waynesburg Central pleted nominee application no later than Friday, September 26th by 4:00pm.  Nomination applications are available by calling the Chamber office at 724-627-5926 or a printable High School who is attending Westmoreland County Community College. From left to right: Cmdr. George Barnhart, Adjutant Roy Arbogast, Robi Arbogast, Mary Beth Wood, version is available on the Chamber’s website at www.waynesburgchamber.com. Chaplain Arleigh Wood, Jr., and Scholarship Committee member, Tom Boyd. Not pictured: Tyler Wagner and Savanna Christy. Photograph by Michele Deems, James L. Farrell American Legion Post 330 Historian

Congrats to Scholarship Recipients!

Perfect Game!

Matt Nelson (L) was presented with a plaque for Athletic Achievement from Washington-Greene Adult Baseball League Vice President, John Greenlee. The award is in recognition of Matt’s perfect game, pitched on June 1st, in which Matt recorded 11 strike outs! Way to go, Matt! If any talent scouts for the Pirates are reading this, you might want to pay Matt a visit…

Not Just Pretty—Pretty Tasty, Too! Members of the Town and Country Garden Club held their August meeting at the Lardin House Inn located in Masontown. The members toured the flower, herb, and vegetable gardens on the premises. Chef and owner, Bill Aupperle (center), points out to members, Carol Harrison (left), and Rachel Miller (right) different shrubbery on the property. The walking tour featured the flower garden of edible flowers used for garnishing various entrees and desserts the Chef prepares. Chef Aupperle is the owner of the Lardin House and specializes in the preparation of various cuisines. His weekly radio program is on WMBS 590 AM Wednesdays at 10:20 am.

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Challenge Program Kicks Off in Greene County The Challenge Program, Inc., a regional non-profit organization that motivates high school students and introduces them to careers in their communities, will visit schools in Greene County this fall to introduce students to the program through an Orientation Assembly. The program contributes to regional economic and workforce development by partnering businesses with high schools to help students understand the relevancy between high school education and future workforce success. This year’s Orientation Assembly will involve having student volunteers participate in a mock interview challenge to demonstrate how developing the right work habits and behaviors will set them apart from other jobseekers. Each interview question will be directly linked with one of The Challenge Program, Inc.’s five award categories—Attendance, STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math), Community Service, Academic Improvement, and Academic Excellence. All students in the sophomore, junior, and senior classes will be eligible to compete for financial incentives for their performances in these five award categories throughout the school year. “When companies are hiring, they are looking for employees who exhibit the qualities and characteristics that The Challenge Program, Inc. promotes,” said Barbara Grandinetti, Executive Director for The Challenge Program, Inc. “The goal of this year’s Orientation is to help students understand that developing good work habits in high school will translate to success beyond the classroom.” For more information on participating in or becoming a business partner to The Challenge Program, Inc., please call 814-533-7401 x 100. To find out when The Challenge Program, Inc. is visiting participating high schools, view the events calendar at http://www.tcpinc.org/about/Events.

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JEN Fund

ifficult though it may be for those left behind at the time, and even long after the time, there are many who say that the best way to keep alive the memory of a loved one no longer with us is to do something good in that person’s name. When Art Moore, of Clarksville, and his sons, Sam and Dave, lost their beloved wife and mother, Jen, to a rare form of cancer, they channeled some of their grief into a loving way to be of service to others who may be experiencing something similar to their situation. Thus began the “JEN Fund,” which helps ease transportation burdens by providing gas gift cards to families to help lessen the need to spend large sums of their own money while traveling to and from various cancer treatment centers where a loved one may be receiving treatment. A special commemoration is held every September 21st, which was Jen’s birthday, and has now been turned into “JEN Day,” a day when many of the collected gas cards are distributed at area hospitals and cancer centers. Standing for “Joyful, Exciting New day,” JEN Day represents a concentrated day of service for the Moore family, though cards are distributed throughout the year, and other events help to raise awareness of the mission of JEN Day. To learn more about Jen, and the Moore family’s efforts through the JEN Fund, visit their Facebook page at www.facebook.com/ jenfund. Donations can be sent to The JEN Fund, P.O. Box 61, Clarksville, PA 15322. Jen Moore, beloved wife and mother.

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Big Service

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in a

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hough they may not always get as much attention as doctors, the fact is that pharmacists can contribute to a person’s health and well-being just as significantly. Trust matters, and one of the biggest factors in building trust is having a long, positive track record. Philip Michael, owner of the new Mt. Morris Pharmacy, located in the bottom floor of the Cornerstone Care building on Locust Street in Mt. Morris, has that covered. “I’ve been a pharmacist since 1992. My father and uncle were both pharmacists; my sister is a pharmacist—we have a big pharmacy background!” Along with pharmacist, Mark Rinhard, and pharmacy technician, Ramona Mills, Philip is enthusiastic to become woven into the fabric of Mt. Morris. “One thing we like a lot about Mt. Morris is that it’s the type of community where we could give back to the community, in more ways than one,” he notes. “With the personal service, customer service and patient services that we offer, we feel that we can be the healthcare stop, not only for the clinic upstairs, but to continue the patient education downstairs in the pharmacy, helping patients on to better health.” This includes “Medication Therapy Management,” which, says Philip, “is a program that allows the pharmacist to follow up with the patient once per quarter, and have a special meeting with patients that are on several medications. We go through the medications, make sure they’re taking them correctly, make sure they’re getting refills, and look closely at the medications they’re on.” This service includes monitoring a person’s weight, blood pressure and blood sugar. Philip and Mark are also “Diabetic Certified Pharmacists,” which, Philip notes, means that they are qualified to, “counsel patients about diabetes a little bit more and better than a run-of-the-mill ‘chain’ pharmacist.” Blood sugar and blood pressure checks are offered free of charge, every day. In addition to being a full service pharmacy, the store also provides an extensive “Dollar Days” section, cologne gift sets, a complete line of over-the-counter pharmacy items, and a constantly expanding inventory of new products of all types. Though fully up and running now, the team is looking forward to celebrating an “official” grand opening within the next few months. “We’re going to involve Cornerstone Care, along with many other community groups in Mt. Morris, such as church groups, civic groups, and whoever we can to give back to the community, and become an integral part of the community,” Philip says. “We want to be there for a long time, and be a big, thriving part of the Mt. Morris community.”

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Clipper

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1080 East High Street Waynesburg, PA 15370

“Keep On Clipping!”

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(724) 627-5766 www.CSTirePros.com

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Oak View United Methodist Church

t’s nice to be recognized by someone you’ve not seen for quite a long time; unless, perhaps, the person recognizing you had contemplated shooting you dead several years before. In 1987, Pastor David Stains was performing mission work as a “peace agent” in Nicaragua, then in the midst of a bloody war between the Contras and Sandinistas. Some 20 years later, his calling took him back to that country, where, he recalls, “My guide—I was talking about being there during the war, and he suddenly turns to me; he said, ‘I recognize you! I had you in my rifle sights! We were watching you walking in this field, and we were radioing in, asking, “This appears to be an American; should we shoot him?” and the commanding officer said, “Well, we have no orders to shoot him, so let him go…”’ That was just one of those interesting moments, you know..?” Life is calmer now for Pastor Stains, who has been ministering to the needs of the congregation of Oak View United Methodist Church in Waynesburg for over two years, and has a total of 40 years of pastoral experience. Oak View emerged in 1981, the product of a merger between the former Coal Lick and Morrisville churches. This October, Oak View will commemorate its 33rd anniversary in service to the community, and extending outward through various missions programs. Oak View offers a wide variety of ministerial services, including teaming up with local Boy Scouts to “retire worn out Bibles and flags to the flames,” as Pastor Stains says; encouraging members to include caring for their physical selves as part of their spiritual practice through an exercise program for which they’ve often received the “Golden Sneaker” award, presented by the council of United Methodist Churches; and being an original “hub” for the “Operation Christmas Child” initiative, which provides gift-wrapped shoe boxes containing age-appropriate gifts for children all over the world. Another great blessing, one which extends far back into the “Coal Lick” origins of the church, is that 2014 marked the 50th year of Vacation Bible School (VBS), which began in 1964 under the guidance and direction of Mrs. Dena Shultz. Leading the program runs in the family; Dena became the “Assistant Director” in 1995, turning over the reins as Director to her daughter, Tracy, who maintains the position. “I just think it was God directing me, and I didn’t even realize it,” Dena says of the start of her VBS work. “I’m a retired school teacher, moved here after teaching in Chartiers-Houston for five years; I just started Bible school in 1964, which is when my first daughter was born, and we just went on from there.” Supporting the church’s missions work is an important aspect of Oak View’s VBS, and Dena’s enthusiasm shines through, even after half a century of involvement. “This year, for the first time, a couple of young men said if we could raise $1000 by Friday in the offering, they would shave their heads!” The goal was reached and far exceeded, with the VBS offerings raising over $1900, which Pastor Stains personally delivered to a food station for children in Paraguay during a recent missions trip. The pastor and congregation are aware of the importance of fulfilling needs close to home, as well as in faraway places. Pastor Stains says, “Every year we host a team from Habitat for Humanity, and so we help to bring some advancement to the larger community with that service. Any church that is worth being called a church has a goal of bringing people to a knowledge of God through Jesus Christ, and cultivating active discipleship.” Oak View United Methodist Church is located at 160 Rolling Meadows Road, in Waynesburg. Sunday School is held at 9:15am, and services begin at 10:30am. For more information about Oak View, visit their Facebook page at www.facebook.com/oakviewumc, or call 724-637-6398.

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One More Fair Memory…

The Reason “Message Board” Was Invented!

Local historian Gordon Grimes posts that he is seeking a few small family cemeteries in the area, Our thanks go to Coleen Cumer of Jefferson for sending us this striking photo of her son, Nathaniel, and his horse, Dakota, paying their respects during the playing of the National Anthem at the as well as permission to take photos, there, since they’re on private land. Glad to help, Gordon! He says, “The three cemeteries are: Headlee Cemetery 1--It is supposed to be half a mile northGreene County fair. This picture came in just after we’d gone to print, so we couldn’t get it into last west of the Shannon Run Church on Ray Fox Farm. A half mile from the church is Fox Run, but month’s “Fair Memories” section, but it was so beautiful that we had to run it this month! I didn’t find any cemeteries up it. Headlee Cemetery 2—about 1 mile northwest of Shannon Run Church on Jno. Lemley Farm. I found a cemetery on Vandruff Road which is about 1 mile, but no one answered the door at the house across the road. Issac Headlee Cemetery—I found this cemetery on Hacklebender Road, but wasn’t able to find someone to get permission to photograph.” If you can help Gordon, please contact him at 724-833-9045, or by email at greenecountyhistorian@gmail.com.

Ask And You Shall Receive, Part Two… When we used a photo of a spooky “zombie cowboy” figure as our last GreeneScene Contest, we were left in the dark regarding details, but the light has shined on our confusion, thanks to the owner of this display, Cynthia Montgomery of Waynesburg. Cynthia relates the tale of how she often enjoys going to yard sales on Saturday mornings, but, she says, “One Saturday I was busy, and my husband is not a big ‘yard sale person,’ but I said, ‘There’s a swing set at one of these yard sales that I wanted to look at; can you run down and check it out?’ He agreed he would go, and was gone for quite some time. When he came back, I said, ‘How was the swing set?’ and he said, ‘It wasn’t what we were looking for, but I did buy something…’ I said, ‘Yeah? What did you buy?’ and he said, ‘A man! He’s out on the porch!’” And the rest is history. Cynthia’s husband, Ronald, got a great deal on the talking figure, paying only $20, and supplying the cowboy hat. In addition to the attention-grabbing figure on display, Cynthia also got herself some powerful ammunition for the future! Remembering her first encounter, she says, “I stood there kind of in awe for a while, and I finally said to my husband, ‘You can never, ever say anything about anything I buy at a yard sale!”

Ask And You Shall Receive… Last month’s GreeneScene of the Past featured numerous folks at the Greene County Airport, gathered around a biplane piloted by famed aviatrix, Betty Skelton. We asked readers for help identifying people in the photo, and we received it! Kristen Wells of Aleppo wrote, “The man kneeling in the center of the front row (4th from the right) wearing a plaid shirt and glasses is my grandmother’s brother, Bill Bissett,” and we received further confirmation in a phone call from former Waynesburg mayor, Roy Huffman, who noted that he had several opportunities to fly with Bill, adding, “He was one awesome pilot! He could fly with more precision than the auto-pilot!” Thanks to Kristin and Roy for sharing this information, and, of course, if anyone else can help us identify folks in that great photo, please let us know!

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Honoring a Teammate The Devil Rays and Marauders of the Washington-Greene Adult Baseball League’s (WGABL) “+35 Division” observed a moment of silence in honor of Richard Mackey, a 5 year veteran of the league who played for the Devil Rays for 4 years, and had been most recently playing with the Bandits, another WGABL team. Richard passed away recently, a few days after experiencing distress during a Bandits game. Honoring Richard are Anthony Brnusak, President of the WGABL, behind home plate, flanked by umpires Josh Gray and J.J. George. The Devil Rays, on the right, are (L-R) John Greenlee, coach; manager Bob Presock; Jim Price; Mike Bonus; Jeff Kurcaba; Dave Baney; Jack Smarslak; Pete Berger; Jim Balis, and Andy Greene. Marauders, on the left, are (R-L) Mike Collins, coach/manager; Sam Kildare; Devin Schifano; Rick Forrester; John Peroni; Mike Birchok; Rich Downer; Gage Downer; Paul Rozak; Dale Yost; Mike Sterling, and Fred Britvich.

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Revitalizing Ryerson

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GreeneScene by Leigh Ann McCulty

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aynesburg University’s incoming freshman class participated in a service project at Ryerson Station State Park Saturday, Aug. 23, with the goal of raising the level of recreational experiences for people visiting Ryerson. Volunteers served at various locations in the park working on projects such as removing invasive plant species, staining benches and guardrails at the campground, and removing litter along roads in the park. CONSOL Energy sponsored the event, providing the necessary tools as well as long sleeved tshirts for volunteers. Additional support came from Sherwin-Williams and the Salvation Army who also provided tools and materials. The nearly 500 volunteers included guidance and leadership provided by upperclassmen, Bonner Scholars and orientation leaders as well as University faculty and staff who served alongside the freshman class. Before heading to the park, CONSOL representatives and the president of the Waynesburg University Student Senate, Joshuah Dains of Clarksville, gave motivational talks on the importance of community engagement to the student audience. Decked with the words, “Coming together to make a change,” the t-shirts donated by CONSOL illustrated the combined efforts of CONSOL, Waynesburg University and Ryerson Station State Park. The t-shirts were designed by Michelle Dunseath, a Waynesburg University digital design student from Donora, Pa. Representatives from both CONSOL and Waynesburg are hopeful that this will be the first of many collaborative projects at Ryerson. “We are proud to partner with two very important community organizations in Waynesburg for what we hope will become an annual event,” said Jessica Kearns, external relations specialist at CONSOL. “As a natural resource company, we recognize the importance of environmental management, and we practice responsible use of the land, water and air in our operational areas. This project provided us the opportunity to work together with local students to encourage civic engagement and community development.” The day ended with Park Ranger Alan Johnson thanking the students for doing a year’s worth of work in one day. In alignment with the University’s mission of connecting faith, learning and serving, also often referred to as connecting the heart, head and hands, the first two days of Freshmen Orientation Weekend were devoted to faith and learning, with the third focusing on service through the project at Ryerson. Founded in 1849 by the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, Waynesburg University is located on a traditional campus in the hills of southwestern Pennsylvania, with three adult centers located in the Pittsburgh region. The University is a member of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU) and is one of only 23 Bonner Scholar schools in the country, offering local, regional and international opportunities to touch the lives of others through service.

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50’s Fest & Car Cruise A

lthough the start was rainy and cool, it became a beautiful day for the 13th Annual 50s Fest & Car Cruise presented, as always, on the 2nd Saturday of September in downtown Waynesburg. Close to 100 vehicles were registered and hundreds of spectators turned out for the event, which is coordinated by Waynesburg Prosperous & Beautiful, Inc. Each year the committee honors the driver of the vehicle that traveled the most miles to get to the cruise. That distinction this year went to Pat Masat, who came 628 miles from Parkton, North Carolina with his family in their 1963 Ford Galaxie. Other long distance travelers included Dave Matthews in his 1938 Ford Coupe “Cherry Bomb” from Stevens, PA (260 miles), Richard Sterbutzel with his Nash Metropolitan from Gettysburg, PA (225 miles), Chet Buffington of Galloway, Ohio in his ’83 Camaro (200 miles) and Marshall Ingraham in his 1979 Lincoln Continental from Bedford Eights, Ohio (160 miles). “It’s always a great day in downtown Waynesburg during 50s Fest,” said Shelly Brown, Chairperson of WP&B’s Promotions Committee. “We have several new shops open in downtown which really add to the appeal…with Doug Wilson’s Greene County Gold Show broadcast from the courthouse steps, and parking right on the main drag like we do – it’s just a very unique event for classic car enthusiasts. Our bikers like it, too. It’s just a great day in downtown!” Shelly also noted that a limited number of the 2013 collectible t-shirts are remaining and available for purchase. If you missed getting yours, call her at 724-627-2040.

Caption: Pat Masat and daughter Isabella with the 1963 Ford Galaxie they drove from Parkton, NC to the 13th Annual 50s Fest & Car Cruise in downtown Waynesburg.

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Waynesburg University’s Stover Scholars

aynesburg University students known as “Stover Scholars” are experiencing a dynamic and effective method of discovery and education in America’s constitution, its judicial system, politics and leadership. The Stover Scholars program, unique to WU, is capturing great reviews from participants. “When I was in high school, I was kind of like the only person who was interested in government and politics,” says Waynesburg University sophomore, Ryan Schwertfeger. “I didn’t really have a lot of people to talk to or express my views with, so coming here, having a program that focuses on constitutional and moral leadership, and having discussions with people who have the same interests as I do—even if they have different opinions—I just love being a part of the conversation.” Founded in 2007 by Waynesburg University alumnus, Dr. W. Robert Stover, the stated mission of the program is to bring “Stover Constitutional Fellows and other illustrious guest speakers to campus, and offer a rich array of experiences to a select group of students designated as Stover Scholars. These experiences include special seminars, visits with notable government officials, and internships in the fields of government, law, and public policy.” The real-life application of these principles is more interesting and exciting that the description implies. Plays and re-enactments are a regular occurrence, benefitting not only the Stover Scholars, but students from many schools in the area who are invited in to watch the presentations. “Most everyone here has or will play a Justice of the Supreme Court in our annual Constitution Day play. We’ve filled up the auditorium with high schools and elementary schools from all over the region,” says the program’s leader, Dr. Lawrence M. Stratton, a respected educator who brings significant experience to the table. Dr. Stratton has taught law and ethics courses at Georgetown University, the University of Pennsylvania, and other universities; has written articles and co-authored two books on constitutional law and ethics; holds degrees from Princeton Theological Seminary, Georgetown University Law Center, and the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School; and is also an ordained Presbyterian minister. The list of people that Stover Scholars have met, either through campus visits or field trips, reads like a who’s who of Washington, D.C. movers and shakers. “We’ve visited Governor Corbett in Harrisburg, Governor Kasich in Ohio; former New Jersey Governor, Christy Whitman came here, and we’ve visited Supreme Court Justices Alito, Sotomayor, O’Conner and Scalia, and we will be visiting Justice Kennedy in November,” says Dr. Stratton. Differing opinions are a vital part of the fabric of politics; students appreciate having a “safe haven” within the Stover program, which gives them a chance to express fearlessly. “I think what’s really important is that we are all students, and we are all here to learn,” notes junior, Matt Kenney. “The Stover program gives us amazing opportunities to learn. We have Dr. Stratton, who’s invaluable; but then we also have the opportunity to learn from each other. Are we sometimes divided on issues? Yes, but it doesn’t mean that we’re all set in our ways. It doesn’t mean that we don’t shift and we all don’t try and learn from each other, because that definitely happens.” The influences of the program seem to stick with students long after graduation; proof is found in Missy Sargent, Pictured, from front moving around the table counter-clockwise: Dr. Lawrence Stratton, Director of who was in the first class of Stover Scholars starting in 2007. Missy was graduated in 2011, and then went on to bethe Stover Center for Constitutional Studies and Moral Leadership and Assistant Professor of Ethics come Dr. Stratton’s assistant, helping coordinate programs, adjust student schedules, and, as she puts it, “Brainstormand Law; R.J. Leon, Freshman; Vincent Morrow, Freshman; Andrew Stanko, Sophomore; Emily Bish, ing new ideas for what we’d like to see in the future.” Having been with the program since its inception gives Missy a Freshman; Joanna Scott, Freshman; Kiana Levi, Freshman; Paige Carter, Sophomore; Nick Cordova, unique overview on its growth over time. “It’s been exciting to see the changes in the last couple of years,” she notes Freshman; Matt Kenney, Junior; John Wicker, Sophomore; Missy Sargent, Assistant to the Director of the enthusiastically, “and really see how far the program has grown, and what a bright future it has, for sure.” Stover Center for Constitutional Studies and Moral Leadership; Ryan Schwertfeger, Sophomore.

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The Real “MBM”

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any Greene county residents will be familiar with the name, “Margaret Bell Miller,” because of the middle school located in Waynesburg. First opened in 1928, the building on East Lincoln Street was originally a high school. When a new high school was erected and opened in 1969, the old building was renovated and transformed into the Margaret Bell Miller Middle School, often referred to as, simply, “MBM.” A brief snippet on the school’s Internet site says that, “Mrs. Mill-

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er was an intelligent, hard-working person who began her career as a teacher. Later in life, Mrs. Miller became a principal at Waynesburg College. In 1855, she went on to marry Alfred B. Miller, who was the president of Waynesburg College…” but this description, though offering some basic information, leaves many gaps and questions remaining to be explored. Margaret Bell Miller was born Margaret Kerr Bell on October 2, 1836, in Washington, PA. A brief yet comprehensive account of her life story was published in 1896, in the Women’s Centennial Paper, published in August of that year to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the founding of Greene County, and highlighting the achievements of a variety of women who helped shape the region through those early years. Attributed to Mrs. Martha Bayard Howard, the full page article begins by noting how “Miss Bell,” in 1850, was the principal-elect of, “our school for young ladies, which was expected to grow into a female seminary. This seminary was to be connected with Waynesburg College, which had received its charter the preceding March, but had yet neither buildings nor faculty.” According to the old newspaper account, “We have but slight knowledge of the early years of her life.” What is known is that, “She was graduated with honor from Washington Female Seminary,” where she was described as, “A diligent, bright-eyed school girl, whose sprightliness and accuracy won the admiring notice of sage committees of examination.” Plans moved forward; Margaret became a successful teacher, who “at once won the hearts of her pupils and the favor of the projectors of the new institution”; work progressed, also, on the budding Waynesburg College, which, the Women’s Centennial Paper article notes, “… was ready to occupy, November, 1851. In September, 1852, three young ladies were graduated from the Female Department, and in 1853, the same department sent forth four graduates.” Crediting “Miss Bell,” the author goes on to say, “Not a little of this growing prosperity of the school was due to the efficiency and popularity of the principal of the Female Department,” the part of the new Waynesburg College that was led by Margaret Bell. In March, 1855, she married Alfred Brashear Miller, who, at that time, was a professor of mathematics at the college. They were a formidable duo of educators, in addition to sharing a happy life together. Waxing poetic, a friend of the couple once described them as “the Brownings among teachers, whose life till death did them part was a shining example of the beauty of loyalty.” It may come as a surprise, especially for a religiously-oriented college in the 1850s, to learn that men and women learned in coeducational classes, in most cases. The “Female Department” eventually faded away naturally as Waynesburg College became fully integrated, in terms of gender. Alfred Miller was elected President of the college in 1859, and Margaret’s sense of duty (and love for her husband) only deepened. A passage from McDonnold’s History of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church de-

scribes her character and demeanor in continual service to the college: “Mrs. Miller was her husband’s faithful co-worker… Through twenty-four years her time and strength were given with the utmost unselfishness and enthusiasm to this work. She really sacrificed her life to build up this institution. Without her brave and self-denying work and influence the enterprise would probably have failed.” Revealing the depth of Margaret’s passion, Martha Howard, the writer of the Women’s Centennial Paper tribute, once heard her say, “I would rather lose my right hand than to give up teaching.” Her impact upon the formation and growth of Waynesburg College was matched by the influence and inspiration that blessed the students in her care. One of them, Estelle Biddle Clark, wrote, “Mrs. Miller possessed eminently ‘the genius to be loved.’ No one ever approached her but felt at once the charm of her manner.” Throughout her life, Margaret Bell Miller devoted herself entirely to the growth and preservation of Waynesburg College, and the encouragement of education, overall. Her unending work, which included not only maintaining a home that was “constantly open for the entertainment of friends of the college,” and teaching classes an average of six hours a day, but also the day-to-day activities of a wife and mother of seven children, took its toll. Recalling her last days, the Centennial Paper article notes, “At the opening of the school in the fall of 1873, she entered upon the work with her accustomed enthusiasm. She bravely kept up her labors through the winter until one evening in February, while sitting in the home circle, the call came to her which meant the speedy end of all earthly work. In a moment she was made helpless and speechless by a stroke of paralysis. She lingered two months, tenderly watched over by loving friends; then, Monday evening at 9 o’clock, April 27, 1874, she entered into rest.” The legacy of Margaret Bell Miller lives on 140 years after her death, and not just by way of the school building that bears her name. Her legacy continues wherever a teacher is excited to plant seeds of knowledge, and in every student for whom those seeds take root and grow. GreeneSaver •

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Major sponsor Hartman & Hartman Constructors will have two trucks at the Touch A Truck event on Sept. 27 at the First Baptist Church in downtown Waynesburg. Pictured (L-R): Ed Koneski, Hartman & Hartman Constructors, Inc.; Dawn Mankey, Event Coordinator; Shelly Brown of Direct Results, Pam Blaker of Direct Results and Matt Campbell, Hartman & Hartman Constructor, Inc.

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irect Results is pleased to support the Touch-A-Truck event, presented each year by First Baptist Church of Waynesburg. The family fun event is on Sep. 27 this year, in the parking lot of the church at 303 West Street in downtown Waynesburg, from 11am – 2pm. With more vehicles and activities offered each year, the event has grown since it began 4 years ago. “We had 150 children the first year, and 400 last year. We expect a greater crowd yet this year,” said Dawn Mankey, coordinator of the event for the First Baptist Church. The concept of the event is simple – give kids a chance to see & touch - and most importantly - to learn about these many and massive vehicles with which they would not ordinarily have such a “close-up” experience. In learning about the vehicles, they learn about the industries in which they work and how they affect our lives and communities. Dawn describes the event as one that definitely inspires children to develop a vision for a future career, which is one reason it is an appealing event to major sponsor Hartman & Hartman Constructors. “We like to support events that help kids in any way, ” said Ed Koneski, President/CEO of Hartman & Hartman Constructors, Inc., who will have two trucks at the event, the Kenworth Tractor pictured here and also a Kenworth roll back, which, weather permitting, will be hauling a 1968 Camaro race car. Other vehicles which will be present at Touch-A-Truck this year include various emergency vehicles, fire trucks, Waynesburg University’s media van, a utility company cherry picker, construction vehicles, and Rice Energy’s new family fun ice cream truck. In addition to the vehicle displays, the event offers a Chinese auction with toys and family baskets. There will also be a free photo booth, free food and beverages, and every child under 12 will receive a free t-shirt while supplies last. “We have a great collection of local and regional businesses, organizations and individuals who are supporting this event and making it possible to offer everything at no cost to local families. it should be a super day and great learning experience for every age.” Dawn said. “As an added bonus, every family that attends Touch-A-Truck is invited back the following morning for a Sunday School Pancake Breakfast at the church,” she added.

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GreeneScene

WRAP IT UP AND SHOW IT OFF!

WE CAN WRAP ! ANYTHING st. Almo

nt We Pri All The ! shir ts T l o o C

VISIT OUR WEBSITE AND VIRTUAL EXPERIENCE AT WWW.DIRECTRESULTS.US

Tour Our Facility! Watch the Experts at Work! Starring Local People! See What We Can Do!

185 WADE STREET WAYNESBURG, PA 15370 • 724.627.4070 September / October 2014

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2014 GreeneScene Road Rally Saturday October 4 is the date for the 2014 GreeneScene Road Rally!

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his family friendly event is held every October in memory of BJ Quallich to benefit local charitable causes in Greene County. This year we’re once again raising funds for the Greene County Historical Society & Museum, and if you participate, you’re in store for a great ride, plus a chance at our $300 1st place cash prize. This year’s routes, designed by Bob & Mary Ann Dispenza, include some of Greene County’s greatest scenery and stunning views. The course questions are challenging and fun, too. And back by popular demand, the Texas barbecue style dinner sponsored (and prepared by) Bill Martin of Principle Energy Services will follow the rally. Hundreds of dollars in Chinese auction and door prizes will also be awarded along with the winners’ cash and prize packages. Whether you’ve been doing it for years, or this is your first time, you will have a blast at the GreeneScene Road Rally. Check-in begins at 2pm at the Greene County Fairgrounds, and the rally will begin no later than 3pm. If you’re not quite sure what the GreeneScene Road Rally is, you’ll find complete details, along with the answers to Frequently Asked Questions and more on our website at GreeneSaver.com. Under Events, choose Special Events and GreeneScene Road Rally. Here’s a brief explanation: It all starts with the strategic plotting of a course in advance. The “Course Master” chooses a scenic route with several interesting sites along the way, and then prescribes exact driving directions complete with progressive tripometer readings for participants to follow. It will be the most fun road trip you’ll take on the scenic byways of Greene County. It’s not a race, and it doesn’t require a fancy car. You will need at least one passenger or “navigator” to read the directions and keep you on course with clues relating to signs and sites you’ll see along the way. Extra eyes are always good – bring the kids – they love the Road Rally! The road rally course is timed in advance with several trial runs at safe and legal speed limits, then averaged to determine the “target time” it should take to drive the course. Scores are based on how close you come to the target time, along with bonus points for finding the answers to site-specific questions from clues provided. First prize is $300. Second and third place get prizes packages valued at over $100, and EVERY participant gets their own “Goody Bag” loaded with neat little doodads donated by local businesses. The course will end at the PA National Guard Readiness Center at EverGreene Technology Park in Waynesburg, where the food and prizes are passed out without delay. Everything’s included in your registration fee, which is $30, plus $10 per passenger. You’ll find a pre-registration form in this issue of the GreeneSaver, or you can download one at www.greenesaver.com.

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New and exciting career opportunities await you as a Professional Truck Driver! This is your life. This is your dream. OWN IT.

Natural Gas Vehicle Grant Programs

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he Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) is eager to encourage the conversion of fleet vehicles maintained by a variety of organizations to alternative fuels, which not only serves to reduce dependence on traditional gasoline or diesel fuels, but also helps to lessen toxic vehicle emissions. To this end, the DEP has two current vehicle grant programs. As outlined in information provided by the DEP’s Community Relations Coordinator, Lynda Rebarchak, the first of these is the alternative Fuels Incentive grant (AFIG) program, wherein $4 million was awarded to 33 local governments, non-profit organizations and companies making the switch to compressed natural gas (CNG), propane or electric power for medium to light weight fleet vehicles. The awarded AFIG grants will help pay for the conversion or purchase of 274 natural gas vehicles, 261 propane vehicles, and 23 plug-in hybrid or electric vehicles. An estimated 24 new fueling stations and 35 existing stations will be supported by these vehicles. Through the AFIG program, the DEP has awarded $8 million to 66 grantees since 2013. AFIG grants are an annual solicitation, providing financial incentive for a variety of transportation projects with the result of reducing air emissions in Pennsylvania. This year, AFIG grants focused on the conversion or purchase of natural gas vehicles weighing less than 26,000 pounds, as well as the conversion or purchase of electric, propane or other alternative fuel vehicles of any size. The Alternative Fuels Incentive Grant program was established in 1992 under Act 166. The program helps to create new markets for alternative fuels in Pennsylvania which enhances energy security. An investment is being made not only in alternative fuels, but the deployment of alternative fuel vehicles, fleets and technologies. AFIG projects promote and build markets for advanced, renewable and alternative energy transportation technologies. The intent is to provide a stimulus for opportunities that better manage Pennsylvania’s fuel resources in a way that also improves the environment, supports economic development and enhances the quality of life. The second is the Act 13 Natural Gas Vehicle grant program, which opened its third round on Aug. 30, offering an estimated $6 million to help pay for the incremental purchase and conversion costs of heavyduty natural gas fleet vehicles. Act 13 called for more than $20 million in grant funds to be made available for a three-year program. Since 2013, $14 million has been awarded to 44 organizations and companies making the switch to compressed natural gas, liquefied natural gas and bi-fuel vehicles weighing 14,000 pounds or more. Those eligible to apply include non-profit organizations, local transportation organizations, state owned or state related universities, commonwealth or municipal authorities, for-profit companies and the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission.    Grant applications are due by 4 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 14 and will be awarded this winter. To view an updated “guidance document” regarding the program, or access an online application, visit www.dep.state. pa.us, and click on the “Natural Gas Vehicle Grant Program” link.

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September/October 2014 - GreeneSaver  

Your favorite source for good news in Greene County is back with another packed issue! Read about Sheriff Brian Tennant and his K-9 partner,...

September/October 2014 - GreeneSaver  

Your favorite source for good news in Greene County is back with another packed issue! Read about Sheriff Brian Tennant and his K-9 partner,...

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