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COMMUNITY MAGAZINE

OCTOBER / NOVEMBER

2016 • GreeneScene Magazine

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GreeneScene Magazine •

OCTOBER / NOVEMBER

2016


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TOLL FREE 1-866-333-5462 or 724-627-4600 CENTRAL PLAZA • SUITE 104 • WAYNESBURG

OCTOBER / NOVEMBER

2016 • GreeneScene Magazine

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McNEELY MILITARY MEN

Sons of Harry and Nellie McNeely • Greene County, Pennsylvania SCOTT Marine

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ALLEN Marine

GEORGE Navy

arry and Nellie McNeely of Jefferson, PA had a total of eleven children, among them eight boys. And every single one of those eight boys served in the U.S. Military. Sisters Velma (McNeely) Roberts and Lois McNeely, who are the daughters of Frank McNeely (one of the eight), have worked to gather a picture of each their uncles, and Velma is putting together a memory book to share with family. During this process, they decided to make the annual GreeneScene Tribute to Veterans a part of their efforts to honor and show

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FRANK Army

WILLIAM Marine

HALLIE Marine

ARLEIGH Army

DOUGLAS Army

their love and appreciation to their father and uncles: Scott McNeely; Allen “Dynamite” McNeely; George McNeely (deceased); Frank McNeely (Lois & Velma’s father); William “Bill” McNeely; Hallie “Hal” McNeely (deceased); Arleigh McNeely (deceased) and Douglas McNeely. GreeneScene Community Magazine joins Velma and Lois in paying respects to this incredible McNeely Family of brothers who all served our country and fought for the freedoms that we cherish. Thank you to each and every one of you.

GreeneScene Magazine •

OCTOBER / NOVEMBER

2016


RODMAN STEWART

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uff Creek native Rodman Stewart is pictured here sitting on top of the aircraft in this cover photo taken by a Dutch Magazine covering the missions of individuals stationed at Camp New Amsterdam in the Netherlands during Desert Storm in 1991. Tech Sgt. Stewart was an aircraft mechanic serving the plane used in missions launched from Incirlink AFB in Turkey. GreeneScene Magazine joins his family in paying tribute to TSGT Rodman Stewart. Your service and dedication to ensure our freedom will never be forgotten! Thank You!

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GreeneScene Magazine •

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I Love this P l a ce

he village of Rogersville in Greene County, Pa is home to just over 220 people who live in the “town proper” but if you include the suburbs (yes you can smile at this point), that number goes up a bit. Just remember, like you’ve always heard - good things come in small packages.

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In 1807 early settler and Civil War veteran John Rodgers founded the town in the western part of Greene County. Over the years others came, churches and schools were established and businesses opened their doors. The community began to draw the attention of its larger neighbor to the north, as in the fall of 1886, I.H. Knox of The

ROGERSVILLE, PA

By Katherine Rockwell

Waynesburg Republican said Rogersville was “[a] quiet country village struck with the fever of improvement.” Indeed, Rogersville saw some industrial and recreational developments over the years, and as technology and industry began to boom, largely a result of the growth of the steel industry all around Pittsburgh, its influence spread throughout Western Pa, including to Rogersville and its people. During the 1870s, Watson Brothers Carriage Works opened shop in Rogersville servicing the transportation needs of people from far & wide during the height of horse-and-buggy travel. The Waynesburg, Graysville and Jacksonville Telephone Company was established during a meeting in Rogersville in 1889, and Jesse Ullom of Rogersville was elected President. After the turn of the century, in 1917, Rogersville boasted its own baseball team which competed with teams in Waynesburg and as far away as Pittsburgh. Later, nearby Golden Oaks Park (also known as Throckmorton’s Grove) became a popular venue for a variety of sporting events and live entertainment, including national recording artists of the period. Although the days of industry, outdoor concerts and horse pulls have passed, Rogersville remains an active community. In the heart of Center Township, where the volunteer fire company hosts regular square dances and activities, one can still find lively entertainment. Commerce and conveniences have returned also. Rogersville residents, indeed most of the folks in Western Greene County, count on the Rogersville office of Cornerstone Care for health care, and the Pioneer Branch of Community Bank does a brisk business. Locals and visitors enjoy Gloria’s Ceramics and Greene Gifts. The carriage works may be gone, but Walter’s Take-Down Tire Shop handles today’s automotive services. Kesterson-Rush Funeral Home, which is actually the longest surviving business in Rogersville, has a rich history (see side bar) and Pioneer Grocery (formerly Rush Grocery & Video) is definitely the community hub where locals and motorists on busy West Roy Furman Highway (PA Rt. 21) can find just about anything one may need, plus great food and hand-dipped ice cream. Yum. “A Norman Rockwell town,” is the phrase Gene Rush, who opened the original Rush Grocery and Video store, uses to describe Rogersville. “Everyone takes care of everyone in this town. It’s friendly, clean and convenient for both those living here and those who are just travelling through.” According to Gene, Rogersville has always been a welcoming place for people to gather and rest on their travels. “In 1909 the town was considered a ‘one horse town’ and had three hotels and two bars.” However, as more people moved to the cities the town lost some of its businesses and left those behind inconve-

nienced. “There wasn’t anything here. You had to go all the way to Waynesburg for a loaf of bread. That’s why in 1993, when the property became available, I bought it and opened the grocery store you see today. The building had previously been Buck Shumaker’s Sporting Goods Shop.” Patty Rohanna, owner of Gloria’s Ceramics and Greene Gifts, grew up in the area and is a graduate of West Greene High School. “The area has always been friendly. I moved back when I had kids of my own, and started to help my mom run the shop. [Moving back] felt like coming home. I knew familiar faces and Rogersville is a comfortable and safe area…it’s a very positive place, if it wasn’t for the support of the community, I certainly wouldn’t be seeing the success I see today,” Patty insists. The shop is named after Patty’s mother, Gloria, who founded the business. Patty has been working with ceramics for the last forty years and now teaches others interested in in creating custom crafts. While her shop specializes in ceramics, she also offers stained glass, furniture, candles and quilts. Larry and Ella Mitchell have lived in Rogersville for close to 50 years. Larry says the Mitchell family traces its roots in this country to pre-pilgrim days, and it was his great grandfather Mitchell, a civil war veteran who, after being wounded in the war, came home to Jackson Twp, but began to accumulate property in Center Twp. and that’s how his family came to have roots in Rogersville. Larry served in the U.S. Navy from 1956-1960, including 26 moths in Japan. When he returned from service he married and settled in Rogersville. “When we first moved here, there were fields of corn and hay right behind us, but now there are homes. It’s just a nice place to live, always has been. So many small towns have just died off these days. In Rogersville, it seems as soon as one generation has passed on there’s a new one coming along or young people moving in, so we stay alive,” Larry says. Though retired now, Larry was instrumental in forming the Center Twp Volunteer Fire Company in 1962 and was a charter member. “It’s actually one of the youngest volunteer fire companies around, but it’s a healthy one. We have a nice facility and hard-working volunteers,” he says. As Veterans Day is approaching, the Rogersville United Methodist Church is extending an invitation to all to join them for a Special Veterans Recognition service on Sunday, Nov. 6 at 11am. On Dec 10th, the town will host “A Community Christmas” beginning with a parade at 4pm, and tree lighting at 5. Santa & Mrs. Claus will be there and plenty of refreshments. Consider a visit that day. Though the town itself is small, the atmosphere is large, the people are friendly and it’s clear that Rogersville’s residents have a real sense of community. No wonder they find it so easy to say “I Love This Place.”

GreeneScene Magazine •

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Rogersville’s Funeral Home

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e s t e r s o n - Ru s h Funeral Home LLC sets prominently on the right as you come through the curve of West Roy Furman Highway entering Rogersville from the north. The property was originally owned by C.F. Wood and wife who sold furniture and performed undertaking there. Records reveal they sold the business to Ralph Scott and James F. Adamson The original buildings that housed the funeral home are to the left of the Clover on March 7, 1925. Mr. Scott Farm Store in this picture. The two white houses on the left, with the car parked in was a licensed undertaker front, were joined together. The current day apartment building next door to the funeral home replace the Clover Farm store. and Mr. Adamson was not, but he held ½ interest in the business. After Mr. Scott’s death in 1945, his widow and Tony grew up in Hundred, WV, graduating Adamson continued to operate the funeral home from Hundred High School; Phylicia is a native of until 1948, when Adamson sold his interest to Mrs. Johnstown, PA. The two met while attending PittsScott, who had a “widow’s license” making her the burgh Institute of Mortuary Science, and were marsole owner. It operated as Scott Funeral Services un- ried in October 2011. Both are licensed funeral ditil February 9, 1956, when she sold to Mr. & Mrs. rectors and have resided in the Pittsburg area for the Robert Lantz – a name still familiar to area resi- last ten years gaining experience working in funeral dents. The Robert L. Lantz Funeral Home served homes and owning a mortuary transfer service. the area for nearly 30 years until Mr. Lantz retired Tony’s son Christopher is a freshman at Penn State, May 1, 1985, when Mr. Carl E. (Gene) Rush pur- and together Tony and Phylicia have an adorable chased the business and property, and began opera- daughter Presley who is 9 months old. tions as Rush Funeral Home, Inc. “As Kesterson-Rush Funeral Home, we plan to Gene Rush is a native of Greene County, born keep the long legacy of this business alive, putting in Waynesburg, and a Vietnam veteran , who served one goal above all else: helping community memin the U.S. Air Force 1968-172. After his discharge in bers and their families through the hardest times of 1972, Gene attended Robert Morris College and was their lives by offering support and guidance,” said employed by the Ferrell Funeral Home in Claysville Tony. during and after his graduation from Pittsburgh In“We are taking our ideas and experiences in stitute of Mortuary Science. He worked there until the funeral industry and starting a new journey. It 1982, and three years later purchased the funeral was time for us to go out on our own,” Phylicia said, home in Rogersville from the Lantz’s. “and we want to be involved and continue to supFrom the beginning Gene and Judy Rush were port the community.” destined to be mainstays in Rogersville. In 1993 The Kestersons are members of The Waynesthey built Rush Grocery and Video, which gave the burg Area Chamber of Commerce, Rogersville town the general store and restaurant it so desper- United Methodist Church, the West Greene Lions ately needed. Judy managed the store while also Club, Waynesburg Moose and The American Leserving as secretary for the funeral home. Gene is an gion. active member of the West Greene Lions Club and “We have met so many wonderful people in the both are members of Rogersville United Methodist last six months. It is truly remarkable the warmth Church. They are parents to four adult children, 10 and welcoming we have received from Greene grandchildren, and 2 great grandchildren. County,” Tony adds. This year, Gene & Judy Rush made the decision to retire. The store, now dubbed Pioneer Grocery, has been sold to son Ken Carlisle, and the funeral home sold to Tony and Phylicia Kesterson. That doesn’t mean they’re going anywhere, it just means a shift in priorities. “People get the impression that if you retire, you’re gone. Not true,” says Gene, “We still live here and we’ve got grand & great grandchildren we want to spending more time with – that’s the real reason.” “It’s been a good run,” he adds, “We’ve had a good life and the community has been such a big support. If you don’t have community you don’t have anything. It’s time to let the younger ones take over.” The “younger ones” would be Tony and Phylicia Kesterson, a husband and wife funeral director Phylicia & Tony Kesterson, husband and wife funeral directors who now operate Kesterson-Rush Funeral team, who purchased the funeral home on April 6, Home in Rogersville. 2016.

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Rogersville Christian Church A Place of Grace

ounded in 1890, the original Rogersville Christian Church was in a wood frame building located on the property where Pioneer Grocery is now. A. Campbell Jobes was the first pastor. Under his ministry and those who followed the church grew from the 28 charter members (family names included Adamson, Scott, Grove, Church, Tustin, Thompson, Frye, Sharp, Miller, Gillogly, and Knight). It grew enough that in 1923, while D.R. Piper was the pastor, it was decided to build a new church “a large and modern house of worship, suitable for the church’s future needs.” The final service held at the old building was April 29th, 1923, preached by A. Campbell Jobes at the age of 85. Construction began on the new building, which would be located on the opposite side and down the street in a curve on the highway, where it is today. The lot where the new church would be built was larger, across and down the street above the curve in the road. It was purchased from Charles H. Church for $2,200, and records show the cost of construction to be $32,000. The present church was dedicated Sep 14, 1924, Reverend Piper at the pulpit. The Rogersville Christian Church was a part of a charge that once included Wind Ridge, Holbrook and Willow Grove. Long-time member, Ick Hamilton, says “The first minister I remember was Rev. Thompson, who came in 1951. He and his wife had Thompson’s Christian Book Store on Morris Street in Waynesburg. Rev. Thompson contracted polio and was bedridden the later years of his life. I remember when I worked for Lantz funeral home, we used to take Rev. Thompson and his wife up to a house at Waynesburg Lakes near Ruff Creek – which was their weekend getaway. All the local funeral homes took turns taking them up there.” In the early 2000s, the congregation of the church began to dwindle and was no longer able to support a full time minister. Kevin Montgomery was the last contracted minister, followed by only visiting pastors or traveling speakers. As time went by, just a few families remained, and continued to meet for bible studies and keep the building safe and maintained. Until four years ago, when they had an opportunity to swing the doors open wide

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and offer this wonderful house of God to a new congregation. Pastor Jim Jarvis, a West Greene graduate, tells the story of a vision he once had, that he would one day pastor a church on a curve in the road. Several years ago, he happened to visit the Rogersville Christian Church, and asked to go upstairs. When he saw the view from the windows, he knew right then that this was the church of his vision. Four years ago it came to fruition when he and his congregation were welcomed into the Rogersville Christian Church building. Called The Place of Grace, this church family’s non-denominational doctrine is based on the Word of God. While offering plates are present for those who choose to contribute, the plates are not passed for collection in the traditional way. There is a praise team and Pastor Jarvis has been known to occasionally play old time hymns on his guitar. In the past 4 years, several improvements have been made to the building. Because his wife is in a wheelchair, the first thing Pastor Jarvis did was convert a small, unused classroom on the main level to a handicapped bathroom. A handicapped ramp was installed to enable easy access to the lower level. Sidewalks, air conditioning, a new electrical system and a complete sound system have been added. The congregation is on the rise. Today the church attracts adults of all ages and families with children from various faith backgrounds, still small, but growing. Sunday School begins at 10am and worship service at 10:45. The 4th Sunday of each month there is a covered dish dinner following. All are welcome!

GreeneScene Magazine •

OCTOBER / NOVEMBER

2016


G re e n e Sce ne of the Pa st by Shelly Brown

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e’re not sure when this photo was taken, but we do know where it was. “That’s where the old gristmill was, on Ten Mile Creek right about where my house sets today,” said Gene Rush of Rogersville, who shared the photo with us. “Bob Lantz told me that two of the boys were Adamsons, don’t know which two, and the other boy he didn’t know. I have a piece of the old millstone that was used to grind the grain in my yard right under the flagpole.” Gene’s home is behind the funeral home, next to where the Center Township munici-

pal building is, located on the banks of Ten Mile. If you look very closely, between the forks of the tree, you can see a portion of the water wheel above the rock wall, and you can also see some other children playing in the water below. Gene says the picture was actually an old postcard originally acquired by Ms. Ullom. “I got it from the late Jerry Moore, and had it enlarged for framing to hang at the funeral home.” It’s a great GreeneScene of the past, fitting with our spotlight on Rogersville where, according to its residents, it has always been a good place to raise kids. Thanks for sharing, Gene.

If you have an interesting old photo from the area you’d like to share, just send it to: GreeneScene of the Past, 185 Wade Street, Waynesburg, PA 15370. Or email to: info@greenesaver.com with GreeneScene Past in subject line. The GreeneSaver can even scan your original in just a few minutes if you bring it to our office. We are particularly interested in photos of people and places in the Greene County area taken between 1950 and 1980, though we welcome previous dates, too.

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OPERATION EASTERN EXIT

hile the eyes of the world focused, seemingly mesmerized, on Operation Desert Shield and the Persian Gulf, a handful of Marines staged a daring and flawless night rescue of more than 250 American citizens and foreign nationals January 4 and 5, 1991 on the horn of Africa in Mogadishu, Somalia. On 1 January 1991, the US Ambassador to Somalia requested military assistance to evacuate the U.S Embassy. Americans and other foreign nationals had sought shelter in the Embassy compound that day as the reign of Somali dictator Siad Barre disintegrated into a confused battle for control of Mogadishu. Operation Eastern Exit involved the evacuation of 281 noncombatants from the U.S. Embassy in Mogadishu, Somalia. Despite the priorities of the Gulf War, a contingency Marine Air Ground Task Force (MAGTF) was formed from 4th Marine Expeditionary Brigade elements aboard two amphibious assault ships. The primary forces involved in this ten-day operation were Navy and Marine forces diverted from Operation Desert Shield. The special purpose MAGTF consisted of a reinforced helicopter squadron, a combat service support detachment, and less than one battalion of infantry. By 4 January 1991, as the situation in Mogadishu continued to deteriorate, it became apparent that the Embassy’s only hope lay with the two ships still steaming south at flank speed. The USS Guam and USS Trenton steamed at full speed toward Mogadishu, and upon arriving near the coast at 0043 on 6 January, initiated the evacuation of the embassy. This consisted of four waves of five CH-46E helicopters each. Flying in the face of active surface to air missiles, anti-aircraft artillery sites, artillery and small arms fire, the entire CH-46 evolution was conducted using night vision goggles during the hours of darkness with the embassy compound darkened. As the last wave of CH-46s lifted off with the security force,

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armed looters could be seen scaling the walls of the embassy compound. The evacuation was declared complete at 0343 on 6 January when the last CH-46 wave returned to the USS Guam. On 11 January, the USS Guam and USS Trenton offloaded the evacuees in Muscat, including an infant born aboard ship, bringing the operation to a successful conclusion. At the time, Mike Belding was a U.S. Marine Captain serving with Marine Medium Helicopter Squadron 365 and assigned to the special purpose MAGTF. He participated in Operation Eastern Exit piloting a CH46E helicopter, and extracted Ambassador Bishop on his aircraft during the last flight out of the U.S. Embassy compound. For courageous leadership and heroic achievement in aerial flight, Captain Belding was awarded the Air Medal with Combat Distinguishing Device. Helicopter crew and Squadron Commander. Eastern Exit received relatively little atL-R: Lt. Col. Saikowski, Capt. Leberman, SSg.t Roscicki, Honorable James Bishop, tention as it was conducted on the eve of the Sgt.Valazquez, Capt. Belding war with Iraq. In other circumstances, the execution of such a short-notice and highGreeneScene Community Magazine thanks Mike for sharing risk operation might have garnered front page headlines around the world. Noteworthy items included the evacuation of 281 people from this exciting story, and even more Captain Belding, we thank you and over 30 nations, including 12 heads of diplomatic missions and 39 your comrades for your bravery and dedication to the life-saving mission of that night, and for your service in defending and extending Soviet citizens from amidst a bloody civil war. Mike Belding continued serving in the Marine Corps and retired the basic liberties and human rights that we in America hold dear, to the rest of the world. in 2012. He now lives with family on his farm in Greene County.

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Greene County’s Transportation

Joseph Lilley, a driver for 25 years, stands next to his bus. Greene County Transportation System assists Greene County individuals to and from destinations, in and out of Greene County.

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obin McGill’s face lights up as she talks about why she likes riding the “bus.” She smiles as she mentions her favorite bus drivers and the things she enjoys most about being a rider of the white vans commonly seen around Greene County. Becoming friends with other riders, knowing that she is in a safe vehicle and getting to where she can socialize with others, are some of the reason why she likes Greene County’s transportation. McGill is one of many riders aboard the Greene County Transportation Services which is a program, which is designed to transport eligible riders to destinations in and outside of Greene County. Transportation services are available to individuals who have Medical Assistance, who are between the ages of 18-64 with a disability, and who are 65 and older. There are different programs that may qualify the individuals to ride at a reduced rate or for free. There is also a mileage reimbursement program for individuals who have Medical Assistance. Transportation assistance is helpful for individuals and their family members. Pauline Lint, who frequently uses the Greene County Transportation System, has been a rider for eight years, and rides the vans to get to different places around the county. “If I didn’t have the transportation to the Senior Citizen Centers, I would have no socialization,” said Lint. Lint’s daughter, Lynne, feels fortunate to know her mother is in good hands when riding one of the vans because the drivers take care of their riders and maintain their safety. Transportation drivers pick up passengers

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at their door and will provide reasonable assistance when passengers are boarding and leaving the vehicle. Drivers are not permitted in the individual’s residence. The vehicles are wheelchair accessible. Carol Keller, a four-year rider of the transportation program believes that the bus drivers are nice, and willing to assist the riders whenever needed. Though Keller says all the bus drivers are pleasant, Paul Kraich, who has been driving for more than 25 years, stands out to her. “Paul is wonderful,” said Keller. “We talk and he is nice and is willing to help me off the bus.” Each of the riders use the Greene County Transportation System program for different reasons. Some depend on the program to get to and from doctor’s appointments, others to go to places to socialize with friends. Some even take the van to travel outside of the county for medical appointments in Washington, Pittsburgh or Morgantown. Something, McGill, Lint and Keller all agree on is that anyone who is qualified and interested in becoming a rider of Greene County Transportation should take advantage of the program. The transportation service is provided by the Greene County Board of Commissioners, the Pennsylvania Department of Aging, the Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare and the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation’s Shared-Ride Program. For more information about the Greene County Transportation services, or to apply for the program, call 724-627-6778.

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HATHAWAY AND ROLLINS

gt. Major James Hathaway, native of Rices Landing, spent 26 years in the United States Army in service to our country and in defense of life, liberty and justice for the human race. A 1952 graduate of Jefferson High School, Jim entered the Army in February 1954 and was honorably discharged in December 1980. His time of service spanned many of the most challenging and tragic moments of our military history, and today he is enjoying a well-deserved retirement in Lake City, Florida. His wife and self-described “forever friend” Mary writes, “Jim is always laughing and keeps us smiling. He has the personality to get along with everyone. He is a Great American, now retired and enjoying life.” Mary shared this photo of Jim taken before his retirement, and also submitted the names of the six more men for our honor roll – the Rollins brothers: “We call them the ‘Pitt Gas Boys’, they are all sons of William and Beula, and all six served in the military. William Rollins served in eight major battles in France, Germany, Italy & Holland from Sept. 1942-March 1945. Carl Rollins was in 7 battles in Germany, France and Italy, July 1942-May 1945 and was also a POW. Fred Rollins, who served Jun 1945-Jul 1952 spent 2 years in Korea and 5 years in Japan. Charles Rollins served Jul 1950-Jul 1952 including time at the Panama Canal. Jack Rollins served Feb 1953-Feb 1955 in Germany. Paul Rollins served Jul 1961-Jun 1964, 3 years in Germany.”

GreeneScene Community Magazine is pleased to join Mary Hathaway in paying tribute to both her husband Sgt. Major James Hathaway and the Rollins brothers. If it weren’t for the valiant efforts and sacrifices of these men and all our veterans through the years, we would not enjoy the liberties and hard won rights that we do enjoy in this country. May we always remember that, and value it. Thank you.

GreeneScene Magazine •

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LIEUTENANT HELEN SCHMIDTKE (AKA JEAN GUSIC)

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Helen Schmidtke in her Army dress uniform when she first enlisted, the picture was taken on her 21st birthday as a present for her dad, who really wasn’t too thrilled about her enlistment.

Helen , best friend Edie Sturgis and two other nurses awaiting the transport home at the end of their tour of duty.

etired World War II Army nurse Helen Gusic of Waynesburg remembers the day she and a dozen other nurses flew home to San Francisco in a cargo plane piloted by men as happy to be heading stateside as they were. “We flew under the Golden Gate Bridge,” she admitted with a grin, then quickly added “Maybe you shouldn’t mention that. I think it was illegal!” Don’t worry, Helen. At age 92, no one is going to come looking for you! The ‘war to end all wars’ was winding down when young Helen Schmidtke, born in 1923 in Trotter, near Connellsville, graduated from West Penn Hospital Nursing School in Pittsburgh “December 21, 1944, second in my class” and enlisted in the Army. Those graduating the year before had gone to wartime duty in the “European Theater”. Inspired by their example, Helen and some of her nursing school buddies enlisted while the war was on, but would serve as nurses after V-J Day when Japan formally surrendered on September 2, 1945. Sitting in the living room of her apartment on Bonar Avenue today, Helen was dressed once more in her olive drab woolen dress uniform, beaming and full of stories to tell of her adventures in the “Asiatic Theater”. “And you can still get in it!” marveled next-door neighbor Margie Lemley, a spry woman of 90 years. The coffee table was covered with snapshots taken with the Brownie camera that went to boot camp in Camp Lee, Virginia then to San Francisco, then off to Los Angeles when Helen shipped out to the Philippines on an old freighter converted to hospital ship. “We were in bunks three tiers high,” Helen looked at one fuzzy shot of her and best friend Edie Sturgis looking over the railing and laughed. “It wasn’t exactly a cruise!” When they arrived for duty, the harbor in Manila was still partly closed because of mines, and swarms of malaria-infested mosquitos made bed nets mandatory. “We watched movies outdoors and wore our sleeves buttoned down and netting over our heads and tucked into our collars. It wasn’t very fashionable and it was hot!” Nurses were there to treat the wounded and ready them for the hospital ship home, plus care for those infected with malaria, hepatitis and contagious diseases like tuberculosis. By the time Helen’s team got to the Philippines, atomic bombs had fallen on Hiroshima and Nagasaki Japan on August 6 and 9. The young Army nurses spent the next four months working first in a field hospital and then at the Quezon Institute that had been made into a hospital. Medicine leading up to and during the war years was pret-

By Colleen Nelson

ty primitive by today’s standards, Helen noted. “They would sprinkle sulfa powder on the wounds - that’s what we had to work with. Penicillin was a controlled substance and we had to sign for it. There was no vaccine for polio and I remember the iron lung.” When new orders came through in December, “we all thought we were going home.” But instead, the nurses were sent to Osaka, Japan to be part of the American Occupation. Helen’s nine months in occupied Japan are captured in snapshots of a Buddha so large “the thumb was as big as me!” and temples and street scenes of places that had survived Allied bombings. There is a photograph of three Japanese nurses Helen worked with who spoke English and acted as translators. She remembers being amazed that amidst the almost total destruction of Osaka the hospital had survived because “the Japanese had painted white crosses on the roof.” Since all nurses were lieutenants – “we had to have rank because our orderlies and aides were enlisted men and they had to take orders from us!” - there were parties at the officers club and pilots with their own bars on their sleeves to date. Flying over the radioactive wasteland of Nagasaki, Helen saw the devastation first hand from the jump seat behind P-51 pilot Joe Smith. “We went tromping around in Hiroshima once too. Well, we didn’t know that much about radiation back then. I guess I was lucky because here I am!” Helen headed home on September 2, spent a few days in Yokohama, caught a corner of a typhoon on the way to Tokyo, then on to Honolulu, Hawaii. She flew from there to San Francisco in a C-54, retrofitted with bucket seats, swooped under the Golden Gate Bridge, took a Pullman train to Ft. Dix New Jersey and mustered out at the end of September 1946. Now, 70 years later, this amazing nonagenarian is still on her own tour of active duty, volunteering to sort donations on Tuesday and Fridays at the new location of Cherry Door Hospital Auxiliary thrift shop on West High Street in downtown Waynesburg. These donations turn into scholarships for students in any medical field willing to work in Greene County. Stop by and say hello – there are still plenty of stories to tell. If you know Helen Gusic by her nickname “Jean” that’s a story in itself! But if you want to know what ever happened to the Samurai sword young Helen Schmidtke was bringing home on that Pullman train she will only tell you this: “Someone stole it when we got to Chicago!”

Helen and friend Edie Sturgis in back, in front Helen Field and Dottie Fleming, all four nurses, posing for the picture in Osaka, Japan.

Editor’s Note: GreeneScene Community Magazine pays tribute to Helen “Jean” Gusic, her fellow nurses and all our precious veterans for their service. We are in debt to you, for helping to preserve the liberties we hold dear here and abroad. Thank you.

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Helen “Jean” Gusic at home in Waynesburg today where, at the age of 92, she can still fit into her service uniform.

GreeneScene Magazine •

OCTOBER / NOVEMBER

2016


Welcome to Gateway Senior Housing

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aynesburg Prosperous & Beautiful (WP&B), the Greene County Housing Team (GCHT), and PIRHL Developers, LLC (PIRHL) recently hosted a public ribbon cutting ceremony for Gateway Senior Housing, which was placed into service in Waynesburg Borough in June 2016. The ceremony celebrated the completion of a 52-unit apartment building for independent seniors 62 and older, built at the borough’s eastern downtown gateway. The building of- (L-R) Jason Temple - Resident Manager – NDC RE Management, Inc., fers zero-step access off of East Street Blair Zimmerman – Chair GC Commissioners, Steven Napolitano – Sr. or at the main entryway through the VP Boston Financial Investment Management, Laura Rye – Community Investment Relationship Manager, FHLB Pittsburgh, Dave Coder - Comparking lot, off Nazer Street. missioner, Sara George – First Resident, Holly Glauser – PHFA Director of Gateway Senior Housing is a Development, Karen Bennett - Greene County Human Services Adminis$10.1 million collaborative effort by trator, Patrick G. O’Brien – Sr. Executive VP & COO – Community Bank, WP&B, GCHT, and PIRHL. The build- David Burg, Principal – Pirhl, Jeanine Henry – Chairwoman, Waynesburg ing contains 31 one-bedroom, one- Prosperous & Beautiful , Larry Marshall – Borough Council President & WP&B Executive Director. Photo by JoAnne Marshall bath apartments, and 21 two-bedroom, one-bath apartments. Six apartments are fully handicapped accessible and all are adapt- Borough, Greene County, our state representaable. Each unit includes Energy Star-rated appli- tives, Waynesburg Prosperous & Beautiful, our ances and windows, central A/C, storage closet, local financial institutions, and Pirhl succeeded in and pantry. The building itself is certified to meet obtaining the financing for the project in a highly PHFA’s criteria for energy efficiency and conserva- competitive arena for such funds. Together, fundtion, operational savings and sustainable building ing for Gateway Senior Housing came from Greene practices. Amenities also include a large communi- County, the Borough of Waynesburg, Community ty room with outdoor patio, a wellness center, com- Bank, the Pennsylvania Housing Finance Agency, puter room, and community laundry rooms. These Boston Financial, and through First Federal S&L of spaces will support enhanced living and supportive Greene County and the Federal Home Loan Bank of Pittsburgh. services for senior residents. Perhaps the greatest sign of the project’s sucThe 1.67-acre development site for Gateway Senior Housing was created from four separate cess were the many smiling faces of the residents parcels. The location abuts the borough’s downtown now living at Gateway, and the words of resident area and provides walkability to several points of Sarah George who thanked those responsible for the building, its décor and facilities, and praised the interest for the residents. The recurring theme during the ceremony management staff as she related stories of the fun from all speakers - from the funding sources, to and rich social life the residents enjoy. The development is being managed by NDC developer to public officials was the impressive and unique ability of the various stake holders involved Real Estate Management, with enhanced supportto work to- ive services coordinated by the Greene County gether for Department of Human Services. Service partners the benefit include Southwest Area Agency on Aging, Washof the com- ington Health Systems-Greene, Community Action munity and Senior Services, Greene County Transportation, its citizens. and others. For information on remaining availWaynesburg ability, call 724-833-9217.

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2016 • GreeneScene Magazine

INTERNATIONAL COMPETITION

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ridgeville resident and Westmoreland College alumnus, Shawn Culp, Culinary Arts class of 1999, has been named coach of the American Culinary Federation (ACF) Culinary Youth Team which is competing in an international culinary competition in Erfurt, Germany, October 22 through 25. Chef Culp will coach a six-member team of chefs from across the United States who will compete in the Internationale Kochkunst Ausstellung (IKA), commonly referred to as the “culinary Olympics.” IKA is the largest international professional competition for chefs, cooks and pastry chefs. More than 2,000 chefs representing over 50 nations are expected to participate.

Preparation begins four years in advance. Chefs from across the nation compete in rigorous tryouts to earn a coveted spot on one of the U.S. teams. In 2010, Culp earned a spot on the American Culinary Federation Regional Team and competed in national and international competitions. That same year, he was inducted into the Westmoreland College Culinary Arts Hall of Fame.  Currently, Culp is the culinary department chair at The Art Institute of Pittsburgh. Photo provided by WCCC Culinary Arts Hall of Fame.

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GreeneScene

PICTURE PUZZLE WINNER WINNER OF 4 TICKETS TO THE 45TH ANNUAL HARVEST FESTIVAL AND A $25 GIFT CARD FOR THE GIFT SHOP

Vickie Steinmiller Rices Landing

Answer: Jack-o-lantern 16

GreeneScene Magazine •

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2016


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Touch-A-Truck Draws Record Crowd

t is quite amazing when one event can draw close to 2,000 people in Greene County - and that is exactly what the 6th annual Touch-a-Truck did on Sept. 24 at the First Baptist Church in Waynesburg. Well over 800 children registered at this year’s Touch-A-Truck, and just to give you an idea of the scope of this event, picture this: 2,100 hot dogs. That’s the number lead organizer Dawn Mankey reports they cooked for the day. Add to that 150 dozen homemade cookies (a team of volunteers from Central Greene Education Association and members of the First Baptist Church did A LOT of baking), 2,000 bags of chips and 64 cases of bottled water. “Everyone who attends gets lunch,” Dawn says. But the truth is, free food is really not the actual BIG deal at Touch-A-Truck. Beyond the food, free t-shirts, face painting, prizes and games…the significance of Touch-A-Truck is really recognizable in how lives are touched. Just listen to this story Dawn shared: “Last year, a young man who had brought his little brother to the event told me he had first come to TouchA-Truck when he was 12 years old. At that time, he said, he became so inspired by the experience that he began to seriously think of what he wanted to be when he grew up. And he kept that dream. He was proud to share with me that he had just been accepted into a special training program with West Penn Power, and tracked the career opportunity to his visit to our first Touch-A-Truck.” What exactly is this event that has such a draw and impact on kids? Just like the name says, it’s a parking lot filled with big trucks, equipment and vehicles of such variety and intrigue that each kid can’t resist looking, listening and touching. Yes, climb aboard, sit in the operator’s seat, honk a horn, flick the lights…and most of all ask questions. Kids are great at that; and the generous and patient people who make their livings with these vehicles are right there to answer showing, sharing and teaching. There are dump trucks, bucket trucks, cranes, fire trucks, emergency vehicles, excavators and construction vehicles, fork lifts, buses, box trucks and flatbeds, 18 wheelers, police cars, race cars and more. The mood is festive and fun. “Community Action Southwest passed out snow cones and wherever there was a hook on a truck, we hung a piñata,” Dawn says with a grin. And the learning never stops. Waynesburg/Franklin Twp. VFC’s Fire House training vehicle took continuous groups through the demo and training on what to do in case of fire. Cornerstone Care’s impressive Mobile Dental Unit helped them learn about oral hygiene – and passed out free toothbrushes to boot. Med Express was there to distribute first aid kits. The cooperation and efforts of so many businesses, organizations and individuals for this event is downright incredible. “I cannot begin to describe how lucky we are to live in a community where so many people from all walks care enough to support an event like this with both money and labor,” Dawn says. Major event sponsors Hartman and Hartman Constructors, Hapchuck Inc., 18 Karat, Washington Financial Bank, Wells Fargo and Maxim Crane underwrote many of the expenses and brought several big and exciting vehicles to the event. “We typically have a budget close to $10,000, which in most years past was covered by a few large corporate sponsors. This year, when some of that money had gone away, many of our local, smaller contractors, businesses and stores stepped forward to make up the short-

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fall,” Dawn adds. Several organizations and individuals also pitch in to help on the day of the event. Dawn shares one example in a group of young and energetic Waynesburg University students who showed up on the scene. “Do you know how much work it is to unload 64 cases of water? All that food, the supplies…when I looked up and saw that sea of college students walking down the hill, I thought, ‘wonder what they’re doing?’ Turns out our youth minister had mentioned it to them and they were coming to help. I was never so happy to have so many hands carrying and loading and moving, happy faces working all day, they had as much fun as the kids did!” One tradition has become a highlight of the event, when the random drawing is held from all the kids’ registration slips to award a grand prize to one child age 6 or under and another prize for the lucky winner 7-12 years old. Fox Ford donated a Steelers themed Miniature Ford F150, battery operated “Power Ride” for the younger winner, Heavenly Headley of Holbrook. Isaiah Yoder from West Waynesburg was the older winner of a Hover Board. Although Dawn Mankey gave credit to all, we have surely left some contributors and supporters un-named above…there are too many. But you know who you are, and please also know you are appreciated. When we hear so much about unrest in our world, it’s good to know, as Dawn said it “Our community unit here in Greene County is pretty strong – this is a good example of that. When we recognize the importance of our kids’ futures, our community comes together.”

2016 • GreeneScene Magazine

Waynesburg University student volunteers pose with Sponsors Maxim Crane and Hartman & Hartman Constructors at Touch-A-Truck event.

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VERNON BAKER

This photo of Corporal First Class Vernon Baker was taken in 1958 at Baumholder, Germany. Corporal Baker served in the Army 2nd Armored Division Hell on Wheels. Today Vernon lives in Mt. Morris, PA and we are pleased to include him in this year’s Tribute to Veterans. GreeneScene Community Magazine joins Vernon’s daughter Cindy Mayle and family in saluting Corporal First Class Vernon Baker, and thanking him and all our precious veterans for their service to our country, as we defend human rights throughout this world.

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GreeneScene Magazine •

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2016


DONALD KELLER

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By Linda Moon

pon graduation from Waynesburg High School in 1968, Donald Keller made the decision to enlist in the army. He actually enlisted in April while he was still in high school and left for basic training June 20, 1968. After basic training, Donald trained as a Radio Telephone Operator (RTO) at Fort Polk, LA, earning the rank of E-4 and was then deployed to Vietnam, where he became a E-5 Squadron leader in RTO. While in Vietnam Donald was wounded twice, and was awarded two Purple Hearts. He received many other commendations and medals including an Air Medal and Bronze Star; however Donald says the one that really means the most to him is the Soldiers Medal which is given for heroism. While his battalion was crossing a river, a fellow radio telephone operator slipped and fell into the river. Without hesitation, Private Keller yanked off his own equipment and jumped into the river thereby saving his comrade’s life. After his honorable discharge in December 1969, Donald returned to begin life with his high school sweetheart, Karen, who had become his wife just two months earlier in October 1969. Together they raised four chilVietnam veteran Donald Keller displays his medals and dren, and today are the happy grandparents of commendations. five. Along with a few beloved pets, the Keller he feels personally committed, and proud. It’s an onFamily is complete. Although it’s been a long time since Donald was in active duty, his patriotism going task…a small thing really…but quite meanand service to our country and community has ingful. In his wallet, Donald always carries several been a life-long commitment. Donald is an active small plastic bags which each hold inside one star member of the Waynesburg VFW Post, American from an actual American flag. He hands these stars Legion, the DAV and the Military Order Purple to other veterans or people that have shown him or his wife an extra special kindness. There is a small Heart organization. When asked how his military service and printed paper that accompanies each star with time in the Army influenced his life, Donald says, these words: “I am part of our American flag that “It taught me to be a hard worker.” That certainly has flown over the USA. I can no longer fly. The proved out in his civilian life. After his discharge sun and winds caused me to become tattered and Donald worked at several jobs before he found torn. Please carry me as a reminder that YOU ARE his life’s work as a mechanic at Cumberland Mine, NOT FORGOTTEN.” where he worked for the next 33 years, and never had an unexcused absence. Donald retired from the mine in January, 2011, though he really hasn’t slowed down much. He may not get a paycheck for his labors today, but he keeps busy as a volunteer with the various organizations and community projects he supports. Donald has one job to which

Donald and Karen Keller.

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One of the stars that Donald Keller has saved from a retired flag that flew somewhere in this country. Donald retrieves these stars from flags that have become too tattered or torn to fly before they are officially retired and burned. He then passes them along, mostly to veterans and others who need to hear the words, “You are not forgotten.” Anyone who has a flag that needs to be retired can drop it off to Donald and he will retrieve the stars and properly retire the flag. Donald lives at 549 North Porter Street in Waynesburg.

2016 • GreeneScene Magazine

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Halloween Skate & Dance Mon View Roller Rink in Greensboro will kick off the 2016-17 season with a “Skate & Dance,” scheduled for 7-11pm, Friday, Oct. 28. Admission is $8 per person. The skate is 7-9 and the dance 9-11. The first 100 guests dressed in costumes will receive an insulated lunch bag. The event is sponsored by the Greene County Commissioners and I-79 Honda Mazda. This season,

there will be a Skate & Dance every Friday night from 7-11pm; and open skate on Saturday nights 7-10pm. Admission is $8 on Friday and $5 on Saturday (times and prices may change). Mon View is also available to rent for private parties at a rate of $120 for two hours. FMI: Call the rink at 724-943-3440, or the Department of Recreation at 724-852-5323.

District X Garden Clubs

South Hills Country Club was the setting for the 16th annual meeting for District X of the Garden Club Federation of Pennsylvania. Our local Town & Country Garden Club is one of the 11 clubs that comprise District 10. Kay Bair, President, also serves as the District X Awards Chairman, who presented Twenty-four Daffodil Awards and 48 Laurel Awards to members of the 11 clubs. New district officers for 2016-2018 were installed by GCFP President, Sharon Brown: Vina McLeod Rudolph, District Director; Kay Bair, Assistant Director, Linda Coleman, Secretary; and Janice Yeaton, Treasurer. Attendees were also treated to “The Italian Garden Project” a program by Mary Menniti celebrating the joy

and wisdom inherent in the traditional Italian American vegetable garden, preserving this heritage and demonstrating its relevance for reconnecting to our food, our families and the earth. The project, which began as a part-time hobby, has ballooned into tours, classes and documentation in the Archives of American Gardens for the Smithsonian Institute. Club Presidents recognized were: (l) to (r) Sandra Grilli, Martha Washington GC; Sally Calabrese, Green Gardeners; Michael Sarraino, Garden Club of Munhall; Angie Raitano, Valley Garden Club; Jan Nevling, Pleasant Hills GC; Diane Palmer, Giant Oaks GC; JoAnn Celaschi, Charleroi GC; Kay Bair, Town & Country GC.

New Tax Benefits The Community Foundation of Greene County (CFGC) will host a seminar about a new option for IRA owners that can help reduce their income tax while allowing them to give to their favorite charities. An overview of the new tax benefits and options for IRA owners and beneficiaries who are 70-1/2 and required to take an RMD (Required Minimum Distribution) through the Qualified Charitable Distribution, will be presented by Tom Milinovich, CPA, CFP, of Milinovich & Co., Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor. According to Milinovich, persons who reach the age

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of 70-1/2 are required to take a minimum distribution from their IRA. But not everyone needs that money. The new rule allows them to make a charitable gift to one or more of their favorite charities directly from their IRA using some or all of their Required Minimum Distribution. The free seminar, which is open to the public, will be held on Wednesday, November 9th at 6:30 p.m. in the CFGC Foundation Room at 106 East High Street, Waynesburg. Space is limited and registration is required. To register for the seminar, call 724-627-2010; e-mail cfgcpa@gmail.com. or visit our website CFGCPA.ORG and click on the IRA Seminar Link.

She Loves Animals Miss Rain Day Bryn Patton loves animals, “I feel it is important to give back, I love all animals and want to see them given the opportunity to be happy and healthy.” It is because of this love she has chosen the Humane Society of Greene County for her individual service project and is organizing a pet supply drive to benefit the HS. Direct Results, Home of GreeneScene Community Magazine, is pleased to be one of the drop-off locations for Bryn’s drive. Items will be collected from now through Dec. 9, 2016. Please stop and drop any contributions from the list below at Direct Results, 185 Wade St. (next to Auto Zone) Waynesburg, M-F, 8:30am5pm. ITEMS NEEDED: Dog Food (cans or bags). Food is a priority and the most needed item. Other supplies needed are: newspapers, rugs, blankets, towels and sheets for bedding; nylon leashes, combs/brushes, cat and dog carriers (all types), clay litter; and toys such as chew toys, ping pong balls and fabric cat toys. Monetary donations are always helpful for veterinary expenses, vaccinations, worming medicine, etc. For more info or other drop-off locations, contact Miss Rain Day Bryn Patton at 724-833.2987 or Rain Day Scholarship, Inc., Jeanine Henry, at 724747-4506.

When Bryn came to make drop-off arrangements with Direct Results, we snapped her picture with our unofficial mascot, Lilly, the English Bulldog who likes to hang out at our place.

Fox Ford Raises Funds

Melody Longstreth, Waynesburg Area Chamber of Commerce, Lindsay Gilbert, 2016 Chamber Scholarship recipient and Mark Fox of Fox Ford.

The 2016 GreeneScene Road Rally, presented exclusively by Fox Ford of Waynesburg earlier this month raised $1,450 for the Waynesburg Area Chamber of Commerce Scholarship fund. “We had a great event, I think everyone had fun, and it’s always rewarding to help a worthy cause such as the Chamber’s Scholarship fund,” said Mark Fox. Melody Longstreth, Director, expressed her appreciation, “The Chamber is grateful that our Scholarship Fund was selected by Fox Ford as the recipient of the road rally proceeds. We hope that this will allow us to expand our scholarship offer-

ing in 2017 to increase the amount of our award or to possibly fund a second scholarship.” The road rally winners also received cash prizes provided by Fox Ford. First place and $300 went to Eric Wilson Team - $300; 2nd Place and $150 was captured by Murray Hoy Team, and the 3rd place award $100 went to the Eric Popp Team. Twenty three cars and sixty people were registered for the event which concluded with a dinner and awards ceremony at the Fox Ford Showroom. Save the date for next year and plan to run the 2017 GreeneScene Road Rally on the first Saturday of October.

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2016


JOSEPH ZETTI

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ike many who served in WWII, 1942 Hefferson High School graduate Joseph J. Zetti, from Clarksville, PA, was a young man in a very scary place when he acted with valor to save his fellow soldiers. Private Zetti was serving in the army medical corps in Italy when he performed his duties in such a way that he would later be awarded a Bronze Star. The official citation that accompanied the award describes the scene: “For gallantry in Italy, Private Zetti, while under machine gun, artillery and rifle fire, proceeded into an open field where concealment and cover were scant, to aid the wounded. Reaching them, he littered the wounded men to a place of comparative safety where medical treatment could be given them.” Private Zetti was reported missing on January 22, 1944 and later reported a prisoner of war of the German government on April 15 that year. Joseph Zetti knew the atrocities of war, yet he was, and is, a survivor. Today Joseph is 93 years old, living in Akron, Ohio. The information we’ve included here was submitted by his sister, Donna Elliot, of Rices Landing. GreeneScene Community Magazine is proud to join Donna in honoring her brother, and thanking him for his service. Private Joseph J. Zetti, we salute you, and all our precious veterans for your sacrifices and your service. We appreciate you.

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CAPTAIN JOHN B. MARTIN

r. John B. Martin, Sr., long time resident of Fredericktown, was also known during his lifetime as Captain John B. Martin Sr. A veteran of World War II, Captain Martin was captured by enemy forces during the infamous Battle of the Bulge, where he was serving as a combat medic in the 106 Division US Army. He was held prisoner at a German POW camp from 1944 to 1945. Captain Martin was distinguished with recognition and the awarding of the Purple Heart. After returning home from war, John B. Martin Sr. practiced medicine for 52 years and was a practicing physician at Centerville Clinic for 35 years. He was also on staff at the hospitals in Brownsville

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and Waynesburg, a school doctor with Beth Center School District, and physician for Republic Steel Corporation. He was a graduate of Harvard and the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. Dr. Martin, who passed away in 2003, was also a Shriner and a lifetime member of the Mason BPOE, American Legion, AMVETS Post No. 103 of Hopwood, the VFW, and member and Race Physician for the Steel City Sports Car Club. GreeneScene Community Magazine joins his wife, Mrs. Pearl Martin, in paying tribute to Captain John B. Martin, and remembering him for his courageous service and bravery. Thank you, Captain Martin, you served your country and your community throughout your lifetime, and many were privileged to know you.

2016 • GreeneScene Magazine

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Spo r t Sh o rt s

By Jason Tennant

MAPLETOWN’S RUSH JOINS EXCLUSIVE CLUB

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n Friday night, October 7th, during a 26-20 overtime win over JeffersonMorgan, Mapletown’s Dylan Rush made history when he scored a touchdown on a 20-yard run. That’s something Rush has done countless times during his high school career. What made that particular run so special was that it put Rush over the 4,000-yard career mark. Rush was humble following the game, “All of it is because of the (offensive) line I’ve had the past three years…Just the entire team. It’s just amazing to be with them and achieve that.” All eyes were on Rush that night as he joined a very exclusive club. He became the 69th player in WPIAL history to reach 4,000 yards, but he is only the fifth from Greene County to reach that mark. Rush joins Derek Bochna (Mapletown Class of ’90), Rodney Wilson (West Greene Class of ’94), Rocky Doman (Carmichaels Class of ’00), and Lanfer Simpson (Waynesburg Class of ’01). Just days after Rush joined the club, an impromptu reunion of sorts was held in order to get a group photo. Sadly, the photo could only include 4 of the club’s members. Tragically, Doman was killed in a 2007 gas well drilling accident at the age of 26. It was neat to see a group of some of the most recognizable names in Greene County sports history get together and tell some old football stories while welcoming a new member, still a junior in high school, into fold. For Mapletown, one of the smallest schools in the state, Rush is the second Maple to reach the 4,000-yard mark, joining Bochna. “It’s just amazing to be mentioned with him (Bochna) and all the other great athletes that achieved that goal,” said Rush. Bochna was certainly a great athlete. After compiling a total of 4,793 yards, a WPIAL record at the time, the three-sport athlete at Mapletown went on to big things at Penn State University, where he was a 4-year letterman in both football and baseball. He still ranks near the top of the all-time list for interceptions at Penn State with 12 during his career and was named to the Penn State All-Decade Team for the 1990’s. “I had a good group of people around me and great teammates,” said Bochna. “My name’s attached to it, but what I remember are the crowds we had at Mapletown, the support of the community. It was an exciting time in Mapletown to play football.”

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These days Bochna is a teacher in the McGuffey School District where he spent 10 years as head football coach. Now an assistant coach at Washington High School, Bochna resides with his wife and 2 children in Waynesburg. West Greene’s Rodney Wilson took the numbers to a new level, not only in Greene County, but in the entire WPIAL. Wilson was the first player in the WPIAL to ever rush for over 5,000 yards and he wasn’t done there. He eclipsed 6,000 yards too, setting the WPIAL record at 6,304. That record fell in 1997, but Wilson still sits in fourth place on the all-time list. “Derek (Bochna) was certainly a flagship for me in many ways. We were close enough in age that I followed him and understood what he was doing,” said Wilson. “I don’t know that 4,000 was ever a goal in my mind until it actually was achieved and after that you set your sights on some things higher.” Wilson, who was also an outstanding wrestler at West Greene, played on the only West Greene football team to play for a WPIAL title, falling short in the 1993 Championship Game at Three Rivers Stadium in Pittsburgh. He went on to become a

defensive standout at Slippery Rock University and then spent several years in Texas before moving back to the area where he resides with his wife, whom he met in Texas, and their 3 children. He is Director of Business Development for CONSOL Energy. Doman’s Carmichaels teams reached the playoffs his junior and senior seasons. He was named the MVP of the Tri-County South Conference in 1999, the same year his high school career ended with a total of 4,145 yards. Doman went on to play college football at Waynesburg and there is now a Memorial Scholarship in his name awarded each year to a Greene County standout high school senior athlete who is a good team player with a humble spirit. Simpson, who starred on Waynesburg Central’s 1999 WPIAL Championship team was looking to make it back-to-back titles when he entered his final high school game, the 2000 WPIAL Championship Game at Three Rivers Staduim. “I knew that I was getting close as the season progressed (to reaching 4,000),” said Simpson. “When you’re in that championship moment, you’re not thinking about personal statistics. You’re worried about the

score on the scoreboard.” His team fell short that year to Aliquippa, but Simpson was able to reach the 4,000 yard milestone, finishing with 4,010 yards. Starring in not only football, but track and wrestling as well at Waynesburg, Simpson went on to play football and wrestle at West Virginia University. He is now an Assistant Superintendent of Production at EQT and serves as Pastor at the Mapletown United Methodist Church. Also a cofounder of and broadcaster with GreeneSports.net, Lanfer resides in Waynesburg with his wife and son. As for Rush, there’s still a lot of high school football to be played this season and the next. With that in mind, the all-time Greene County record is certainly within reach. “Of course I’ll try for it, but that’s nothing that I really care about,” said Rush. “As long as we win the games, it doesn’t matter to me.” Wilson, who holds that County record, took the ‘records are meant to be broken’ approach as he told Rush, “Get as many yards as you can!”

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2016


LEARNING BY DOING – WCES Veterans Appreciation Program

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or the previous five years, and again this year, the students from kindergarten through fifth grade at Waynesburg Central Elementary will begin to comprehend something that many children their age may not understand. And with this knowledge, they will also learn how to express a very real and sincere appreciation for certain citizens in their communities – our veterans. “Both my parents were in the military, my dad is still active duty at Fort Campbell, KY,” says Nichole Trollman, WCES teacher and one of the coordinators of what has grown into one of the largest veteran observances in Greene County. “There are many teachers and staff here who have military ties both active and retired, we are very conscious of the importance of our children not just going through empty motions, but truly understanding what a veteran is, and why it’s important that we recognize and thank them,” Nichole explains. The Veterans Day Program is very much a pre-

sentation from the children themselves, directly to the veterans in our community, who are invited to attend this year at the Waynesburg Central High School auditorium on November 8, beginning at 9am. “It is an elementary school activity, but we outgrew our space a few years ago and moved to the high school auditorium,” explains Nichole. The children will dress up in reds, whites and blues that day, they will sing patriotic songs to the vets in attendance, and they will deliver individual thank you cards they have personally made to each veteran there (and send more overseas to deployed active personnel). Several students will present a flag folding demonstration - offering an explanation of each step in the process and what significance it has. The students will recognize the veterans from each branch of the services present in the audience. Then for a bit, the roles change, and a keynote speaker – always one of our local veterans – addresses both the audience and the children, once again helping them understand just who these courageous men and women are – and what they have done for our country and our world. A special highlight of this year’s program will be a video tribute produced by the WCES News Crew. Prior to the event, video clips of live interviews with students about their thoughts and impressions of veterans, the veterans day celebration and their personal messages to veterans will be recorded and edited together to create a mini movie tribute which will be shown during the program

that day. While the special Veterans Day Program on Nov 9th is a focal point, the efforts and actions of WCES students to appreciate and support our veterans stretches beyond a single day. “We partner and work closely with the Veteran’s Affairs office,” Nichole says, “In the past we have collected donations for deployed soldiers; this year our collection will be for veterans living in our area who are in need, things like non-perishable foods, personal hygiene items, household products, etc. The entire student body is invited to bring donations of such items to school; we have collection boxes in the hallways for about 2-3 weeks. The Veterans Affairs office will then distribute for us,” she explains. Anyone, whether you are attending the program on Nov. 8 or not, can contribute to

the WCES collection effort by dropping your donations off at the Veteran Affairs Office at 22 W. High Street in downtown Waynesburg. Be sure to let them know you are helping the WCES students help our local veterans in need. Just one month later, the students will have another card campaign, collecting and sending Christmas cards to soldiers stationed in Bagram, Afghanistan right now. According to Nichole, the soldiers are going to return the favor by sending the WCES students an American Flag they have been flying over their installation in Afghanistan. It’s a great effort, and a testament to the wisdom and dedication of the teachers and staff at WCES to help young students understand how important it is to say to our veterans “Thank You”, and truly mean it.

Photos of the 2015 Veterans Day Program by Waynesburg Central Elementary students, compliments of Kelly Sherrick

FIRST SERGEANT CHALLEN MATTHEWS

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native of Waynesburg, and member of the last class to graduate from Waynesburg High School when it was downtown (where Margaret Bell Miller is now), Challen Matthews spent many years a long, long way from home. During his 35 year career in the United States Air Force, First Sergeant Challen worked in security police – responsible for the security of weapons and arsenals, among other duties. “He was in Greenland, he was in Germany, he was in Iran, and he was in Grand Forks North Dakota, where I met him,” said his wife Sandy, who conspired with their daughter Melody to submit these pictures and tribute to us without Challen’s knowledge. “We are so proud of him, he dedicated his life to the Air Force, and to the service of our country,” Sandy said, and we agree. Without going into a lengthy history, we will tell you that Challen Matthews is a heavily decorated veteran, who served a lengthy career in sometimes very dangerous circumstances and like many of his fellow veterans, remains today both a proud American and a servant in his community. Challen is now retired and back in Waynesburg where he and Sandy are celebrating the recent birth of their third grandchild, Mason Challen Matthews. Mason was born on Sep 28th to Challen’s son Shawn and wife

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2016 • GreeneScene Magazine

Melissa, who live near Washington D.C. Their daughter Melody and husband Matt have two little boys, Braden Eric Eller and Cooper Cash Eller, and live at South Point. GreeneScene Community Magazine joins the family of Challen Matthews in paying tribute to a man who offered his service to our

country in the defense of human rights and the freedoms we value around the world. Thank you “First Shirt” Matthews.

This 1989 photo shows Staff Sgt. Challen Matthews while home on leave with his mother Dorothy Matthews and at the time 14 year old son Shawn.

Here we see First Sgt. Matthews in dress uniform and Sandy aboard the Gateway Clipper.

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SERGEANT JASON RAY

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E-4 Specialist Jason Ray right after he returned from Iraq in 2006

ason Ray graduated from Waynesburg High School in 2000 and, like many kids at that age, he had no clue what he should or would do with the rest of his life. “At that time, all I ever thought about was how much fun I could have,” Jason admits. To his credit, he did get a job - even if it was working at the local bowling alley – and he enrolled in school at Waynesburg College. Jason may not have had a strong sense of direction in the beginning, but that changed once he began to pay attention to the seemingly constant media coverage of the war in Afghanistan and the terrorism becoming rampant at the time. Focus would become no problem for Jason; in time, he came to know exactly what he wanted to do. “I just kept hearing about it, and getting this growing feeling that I needed to be there, that it was important for me to be a part of this fight… that I had an obligation and desire to defend our country and its people,” Jason recalls. That’s exactly what he did. On Sep. 12, 2004, Jason enlisted in the United States Army and headed to basic training at Fort Sill, Oklahoma. Following completion of basic training, Jason was stationed at Ft. Bragg, NC which remained his home base for his entire time in the army. Twice he was deployed overseas. The first

time came quickly when he was sent to Iraq in 2005, where he provided convoy security, escorting mobile elements all across Iraq and was tasked out as a quick reactionary force. In 2007, Jason was again deployed, this time to Afganistan where he remained for 15 months. “My time overseas was something that I’ll never forget for the rest of my life,” he says of his experience, “There were definitely a lot of things that I got to see and do while over there that I will hold with me for the rest of my life. I served with some of the greatest men that I will ever know; that I still consider friends to this day. But it wasn’t all good. I lost friends and have seen our heroes sent home…” Jason was honorably discharged from active duty in June 2009. He has a very clear and poignant memory of the night he arrived home. “I remember pulling into the driveway at home just as the Penguins beat the Detroit Redwings for the Stanley Cup.” Like so many of our veterans, Jason has experienced the ravages of war, yet he reflects on his military service with a very positive and gracious attitude. “Being in the service made me grow up and realize there is something more important out there, something bigger than me,” he explained. It doesn’t take long being in Jason’s

Editor’s Note: GreeneScene Community Magazine salutes Sergeant Jason Ray, and we thank him for his willingness to serve, to risk his own life to help preserve the quality of life and human rights we all deserve. We appreciate you.

By Linda Moon

presence before one also recognizes a man with a very real sense of pride in his country, and a confidence in himself that was missing from the youth who didn’t know what to do with his life. Jason says it was also his military experience that taught him the simple but enduring lesson that hard work pays off. “Not only for yourself, but for your family, children, and community,” he emphasizes. Today Jason lives in Carmichaels with his wife Natalie and their two children, Abby, who is 8, and Owen, who is 5. He is employed at Cumberland Mine.

Jason Ray at home today in Carmichaels.

BOWLBY BITS Initial Outfitters fundraiser – Nov. 3, 3-7pm, featuring the Fall/Winter 2016 collection of handcrafted & personalized jewelry, bags, scarves & more. Creative Crafting for Adults – Arm knitted scarf, with two classes – Thu., Nov 3 at 5pm, or Sat. Nov 12 at 10am. Cost $10, please pre-register. FREE S.A.T. Prep classes - Nov. 5, 12 & 19, 10am-2pm. Pre-registration required. FREE American Red Cross CPR training - Nov. 7, 5-8pm. Pre-registration required. Author Talk featuring Margo Orlando Littell, of Connelsville, Pa, which is the setting for her recently published work, Each Vagabond by Name. Wed., Nov. 9, 6-8pm. Essential Oils - Nov. 15, 5-7pm. Learn about essential oils and their health benefits in perfume. Attendees will make two different roller balls. Cost $12. Please pre-register. International Games Day - Nov. 18, 4-8pm. Game playing and 8th Annual TurGreeneScene by key Bowling Contest. Pre-register your famTammie Dunlap ily. Special Story Time - Nov. 19, 11am1pm. Dr. Seuss-themed stories, fun, crafts, and raffle prizes for ages 3-8 years. Light lunch included. Please pre-register. Family Movie Night - Thursday, Nov. 23, 6pm, previewing “Nine Lives” Pre-registration requested. Bowlby Library Book Club – Nov. 14, 6pm, discussion on “Capital Dames,” by Cokie Roberts. Color Outside the Lines - adult coloring group meets every Wed., 11am-1pm or 6-8pm. The Bowlby Public Library will be closed for Thanksgiving Nov. 24 & 25. For more info or to register for above events come to Eva K Bowlby Public Library at 311 N. West St., Waynesburg, Pa or call 724-627-9776

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GreeneScene Magazine •

OCTOBER / NOVEMBER

2016


THOMAS THARP

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e are privileged to salute Thomas R. Tharp Sr., Specialist 5 RA United States Army, Dec 1965 to Sept. 1968. Among many other honors, Specialist Tharp was awarded The Army Commendation Medal for meritorious service in Vietnam Sept. 1967-Sept. 1968. He served with the First Air Calvary, Second Battalion, Seventh Calvary HHC.

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Thomas belonged to the Class of 1965 at West Greene High School, and now resides in Waynesburg. Thank you, Specialist Thomas R. Tharp Sr., you are a valiant man who has helped defend the way of life we enjoy in America for all humanity – the privileges and liberties that do not come cheap, but require the dedication and service of heroes like you. We appreciate you, every day.

2016 • GreeneScene Magazine

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All the Way to State!

WU Top Nursing School Waynesburg ranked among the top 1.5 percent of the more than 3,200 schools that were considered nationwide in the inaugural ranking by Nursing Schools Almanac.. Ten percent of those schools made the final list, with Waynesburg being ranked No. 49 in the nation. “This ranking is a reflection of the dedication and commitment to excellence displayed by the faculty, students and graduates of the Waynesburg University Department of Nursing,” said Dr. Nancy Mosser, chair and director of the Department of Nursing and professor of nursing. “It is quite an honor to be ranked among the top 1.5 percent of schools nationwide.” The ranking primarily examined schools on their academic prestige and perceived value, the breadth and depth of nursing programs offered and overall student success, particularly on the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX). Waynesburg was also recognized as No. 27 among private nursing schools and No. 12 overall in the

Madison Kovach, the 14 year old daughter of Renee and Jeffrey Kovach of Jefferson, recently competed in the District 4-H Horse Show held at the Westmoreland County Fairgrounds. Madison earned a 4th place finish in Western Beginner Walk Trot with her horse, Cheyanne’s Little Hot One.  This qualifies Madison and Cheyanne to compete in the State 4-H Horse Show held at the Farm Show Complex in Harrisburg on October 28-30, 2016.  Madison is a member of the Greene County 4-H Horse and Pony Club and a freshman at Jefferson Morgan High School. Congrats and good luck Madison!

Town Hall Meeting

Mid-Atlantic region, which includes Delaware, the District of Columbia, Maryland, New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania. For more information Waynesburg University’s undergraduate and graduate nursing programs, visit www.waynesburg.edu.

Victory 5K

Runners and walkers begin The Victory 5K 2016.

The inaugural Victory 5K Race held in Waynesburg this summer was by all accounts a success. The run was a collaborative effort of Bethlehem Baptist Church in Ruff Creek, and Waynesburg First Church of the Nazarene. According to co-director Larry Calvert, receipts from 97 race registrants combined with other fund raising activities associated with the event produced a total of $3,720.51 in charitable funds. The two designated recipients for 2016, Corner Cupboard Food Bank and Alexa Grace Pester Memorial Scholarship,

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each received $1,710, and $300.51 remains in the event fund for 2017. The food bank also received items from a food drive and left over event produce. Domestic Violence Services of SWPA received all left over event t-shirts to be used at its emergency shelters. “Thank you to all our sponsors, particpants and volunteers for making The Victory 5K 2016 a wonderful success! Please “LIKE” The Victory 5K Facebook page for updates on the 2017 event,” Larry encourages.

“We open this informal gathering with three taps of the gavel. The first tap is for those who’ve lost... This one tap is for those who have struggled with addiction and lost. The second tap is for those who are struggling presently, who are here and not here, and need our connections now more than ever. And the third tap is for our future together preventing another life of addiction and despair.” The room was silent as Judge Toothman opened the second town hall meeting to discuss the issues of heroin and other drugs in Greene County. Over 200 community members gathered in the main courtroom of the Greene County Courthouse on October 6th to hear from several speakers about the problems of drug use and addiction in our county and those nearby. Several of the scheduled speakers were those who gave testimony of their own experiences with addiction or a loved one’s own struggle. Also present were representatives from the Pennsylvania Attorney General’s office and the Fayette County Police Department who spoke of ways in which this issue is currently being addressed and gave suggestions for preventing addition. All were impressed at the turnout for the meeting, noting how excellent

it was to see so many come together for one common cause. Since the last town hall meeting in October of 2015 the addiction problems in Greene County have been met by the efforts of the Coalition for a Brighter Greene, which was formed as a result of that first meeting. Community events were sponsored by the coalition and Steps Inside over the past year to raise awareness and spread information about prevention and recovery throughout the community, the Bird Sisters Oxford house opened its doors on January 1st 2016 to provide recovery housing for women, 1,400 people walked in the March for Greene awareness walk from the Greene County Airport to the Greene County Fairgrounds, and funding was raised for area schools to begin providing the Botvin Life-Skills program to students starting with the 2016-2017 school year. The town hall meeting ended with high hopes for the year moving forward and the continued efforts of all those who attended. Anyone who would like to receive more information is encouraged to contact Steps Inside Inc. at www.greene-findout.org or visit the public Coalition for a Brighter Greene Facebook page.

GreeneScene Magazine •

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2016


OCTOBER / NOVEMBER

2016 • GreeneScene Magazine

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Co o l at Sc h o o l SMOOTH HEAD SOLIDARITY

n April of this year, 4th grader Braedyn Wasko, was hit by a ball two days in a row at his baseball practice. According to Braedyn’s mom, he was hit in the same spot on his lower right leg both times. He developed a bump on his leg, which he and his family assumed was from the ball. In May, Braedyn’s primary doctor sent him to an Orthopaedic specialist since the lump was not going away. He was told that if the bump did not go away by July, more tests would be run. The first week of July, Braedyn had an MRI and a bone scan and was then referred to Dr. McGough, an Orthopaedic surgeon in Pittsburgh. On August 12, three days prior to Braedyn’s 10th birthday, he was diagnosed with Ewing’s Sarcoma. Ewing’s Sarcoma is a rare form of bone cancer. Braedyn spent his 10th birthday in the hospital having tests run to make sure that the cancer had not spread. The cancer is localized to only the tumor, and Braedyn began chemotherapy treatments on August 22 which will continue for the next nine months. He will also have surgery to remove the tumor. Braedyn, a student at Carmichaels Elementary School, was very worried about losing his hair because of the chemotherapy – like any 10 year old boy might be. The Carmichaels High School Varsity Football Team, however, was not going to let him go through it alone. On September 30, during a pre-game pep-rally at CAHS, all forty-one

members of the football team, four coaches, Carmichaels Area Elementary School Principal, and CASD Superintendent all shaved their heads in support of Braedyn and included a fund raiser for him at the event. Braedyn’s mother, Carla Wasko-Hughes, said “The pep rally/fundraiser was truly amazing! We didn’t expect it to be so big. Braedyn had a fantastic time, he got to be a kid again, at least for a day! He is going through something that no child should have to endure…what those boys did for him is amazing.” “I always say that nobody should fight alone,

and Braedyn knows now he is not alone in this fight. He has a whole community behind him,” she added. Braedyn’s principal at CAES is Mr. Fred Morecraft. Braedyn actually had the privilege of shaving Mr. Morecraft’s head on the day of the event. “How many kids can say they shaved their principal’s head?” asked Morecraft, “It was a total team effort from the coaches, to the players, to teachers and administrators, and the students. I think we have all shown that we are here for Braedyn and his family with an outpouring of love from our little school district.”

By Tyler L. Whipkey

Mr. Morecraft wants everyone to know that the Head Varsity Football Coach Ryan Krull was the driving force behind the event. “Coach Krull did most of the organizing, we helped to get things moving, calling news stations, and informing the children about Braedyn and his fight.” Mr. Morecraft added, “A bigger lesson was learned that day, one more important than all the books can teach, and that is the lesson of empathy toward others. You could see Braedyn’s energy and faith restored, know that he had all of these students backing and supporting him! I am so proud of this district.”

Halloween Schedule for Greene County OCTOBER 27 • Waynesburg Borough, trick or treat from 4 to 6 pm • Waynesburg Lion’s Club Halloween Parade at High and Morgan Streets, 6:30 pm • Franklin Township, trick or treat from 4 to 6 pm OCTOBER 28 • Greene County Historical Society Flashlight Fright Night from 7 to 11 pm, $5 OCTOBER 29 • Garards Fort, trick or treat from 4 to 6 pm • Gray Township, trick or treat from 6 to 8 pm • Greene County Historical Society Flashlight Fright Night from 7 to 11 pm, $5 • Perry Township, trick or treat from 5 to 7 pm OCTOBER 30 • Carmichaels Borough, trick or treat from 4 to 6 pm • Cumberland Township, trick or treat from 4 to 6 pm • Rices Landing Halloween Parade at 1 pm from the Hewitt Church parking lot • Rices Landing Borough, trick or treat from 2 to 4 pm OCTOBER 31 • Aleppo Township, trick or treat from 6 to 8 pm • Center Township, trick or treat from 6 to 7 pm • Dunkard Township, trick or treat from 4 to 6 pm • Franklin Township, trick or treat from 4 to 6 pm • Freeport Township, trick or treat from 6 to 8 pm • Gilmore Township, trick or treat from 6 to 8 pm • Jackson Township, trick or treat from 5 to 7 pm • Jefferson Township, trick or treat from 6 to 8 pm • Monongahela Township, trick or treat from 6 to 8 pm • Morgan Township, trick or treat from 5 to 7 pm • Morris Township, trick or treat from 5 to 6 pm • Richhill Township, trick or treat from 6 to 7 pm • Springhill Township, trick or treat from 6 to 8 pm • Wayne Township, trick or treat from 6 to 8 pm • Waynesburg Chamber Spooktacular Costume Contest from 8:30 to 9:30 am on courthouse steps

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GreeneScene Magazine •

OCTOBER / NOVEMBER

2016


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EVANS BROTHERS

n this special issue of GreeneScene, we have several sets of brothers who have all served in our military. Pictured here are three brothers, Harold Victor Evans, Charles William Evans and Thomas F. Evans. Although Thomas is now deceased, Harold and Charles both still live in Greene County today, Charles “Bill” here in Waynesburg and Harold near Dry Tavern. “We all grew up in Wayne Twp, and went to school at the Knicely School on the ridge there between Kuhntown and Spraggs,” said Charles, who shared the picture with us. “Harold was drafted by the Army in 1944 and spent 20+ years in the service, it was a career for him. Both Thomas and I were pretty young when we joined; Thomas was in the US Army Air Force 1946-1950. Back then they didn’t have a separate Air Force, it was the Army Air Force. I joined in 1947 - I was just 17, but I signed my parent’s names and they let me in.” Charles served through 1951, including two years in Korea. After coming home from the service, Charles spent many years as a working member of the Carpenters Union out of Pittsburgh. He retired in 1985. GreeneScene Community Magazine thanks Charles for sharing this photo of the three Evans boys, the only sons of Margaret (Taylor) and Thomas Floyd Evans. And more importantly, we thank Charles, his brothers, and all our precious veterans for risking their very lives as they fought for our country and our way of life - for helping to preserve our freedoms and to gain new liberties and human rights for people across the continents. We salute you, and we appreciate you.

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2016 • GreeneScene Magazine

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SSG ALBIE RINEHART

NCOs from Company C 2/110 at the local armory in the early 1980s. L-R: Albie Rinehart, Larry Crayne, Don Bedillion, Fist Sergeant Louie Truntich, Pete Caprini, Buzz Walters, Cal Linderman

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taff Sergeant (retired) “Albie” Rinehart was a 20+ year soldier with the Pennsylvania Army National Guard, serving with Company A 1/110 Infantry, 724th Military Police Company, and Company C 2/110 Infantry. Albie served as a noncommissioned officer in both the infantry and military police units, along with being a recruiter, training NCO, instructor, evaluator and supply sergeant. He was appointed to the Local Armory Board in in 1978, and continues to serve on that board today. Never deployed to foreign lands for his service, Albie Rinehart’s skills and strengths have

been well applied in his service to community, state and country. His contributions include working with the Armory Board through the construction and opening of the new Pennsylvania National Guard Readiness Center at EverGreene Technology Park and the closing of the Captain Robert C. Wiley Armory in downtown Waynesburg and transition to Waynesburg University. Although now retired from the Guard, Albie continues to serve on the Armory Board, and continues to volunteer for a variety of projects and activities involving the Guard. “I have always valued and felt blessed by

the opportunity to serve with those soldiers who make up our National Guard, from Korean and Vietnam veterans to those in Iraq, Afghanistan and anywhere else they have been called to go. Whether war, or rescue, or emergency aid during natural disasters, the men and women of our National Guard respond,” Albie says. Perhaps it was his experience as a recruiter, instructor and trainer NCO that first developed in Albie Rinehart the desire to mentor others, and inspire personal growth and achievement. However it started, it has never really stopped. Many people, now successful adults, will always think of Albie as Mr. Rinehart, elementary school teacher in the West Greene School District. Teaching is another passion of Albie’s, and one of his greatest delights is following his former students’ lives and achievements. Anyone who knows Albie Rinehart knows that he has one more passion in life, in addition to his dedication to the military and teaching, for Albie there is - running. Albie was, is and will always be a runner. Of course, not only is he personally a runner, Albie can’t help himself - he influences others to run. Over the years he has been instrumental in the organization and staging of several local fundraising runs & walks in our region. He helped initiate the “Heroes Run” which for many years combined all three of Albie’s passions: a tribute to two fallen soldiers and running to raise money for educational scholarships. While he was still enlisted, SSG Rinehart was the recipient of military awards at both National and state levels. US Military awards include the ARMY Commendation for Meritorious Service, ARMY Achievement for Meritorious Service, Humanitarian Service, and Army Reserve Components Achievement with 4 oak leaf cluster. State awards included the Pennsylvania Commenda-

tion for Meritorious Service for Outstanding Service to the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania Service with 3 silver stars, and Pennsylvania 20 year service medal. Today, as a life member of American Legion James Ferrell Post 330 in Waynesburg, Albie continues to work with veterans in service. This summer at the PA American Legion State Convention in Harrisburg, Albie was presented with the “Eddie Hoak” award, AKA “It’s a Good Thing You Do” award. This particular award is inscribed with these words: “For recognition of outstanding service and contributions to the community, state and nation. We salute you for your commitment to keep your post a vital asset to your community and our American Legion.” Albie is quick to express his sense of what this award represents. “I had the privilege of accepting this award for our Post – James Ferrell Post 330 – where our members work together for our community and veterans. It’s not ‘my’ award – it’s OUR award,” he says with emphasis. That is typical Albie. If you know him very well, you know that Albie Rinehart starts out every morning with the same goal. He gets up and asks himself these questions, “Who can I inspire today, who can I help feel good about himself or herself…on whose face can I put a smile?” GreeneScene Community Magazine salutes Albie Rinehart, for his military service, for his lifelong dedication to defending and ensuring our liberties, and for his indestructible enthusiasm for lifting the lives of others.

WAYNESBURG STUDENTS COVER WHITE HOUSE CEREMONY

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enior communication majors Kyle Dawson and Tyler Wolfe accompanied Bill Molzon, assistant professor of communication and director of TV operations, to the White House Oct. 5 and 6 to attend and report on the Pittsburgh Penguins’ Stanley Cup Championship ceremony with President Barack Obama. Dawson and Wolfe, who are both involved in TV productions at the University, recorded the event and produced video footage reporting on the ceremony. Many other Washington and Pittsburgh media outlets were also in attendance to document Obama’s congratulatory speech offered to the Penguins following their Stanley Cup win this summer. Molzon said his goal in taking students to the event was “to create a learning experience for the students that can’t be duplicated in the classroom.” The students agreed that the trip was invaluable for learning about TV production and covering major events. It was the fifth time that Molzon took Waynesburg students to Washington for such an event. The first time was in 1991 after the Penguins won their first Stanley Cup. Molzon coordinated this year’s trip with the

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on each of the trips, including this one. “I call him our D.C. field producer because he knows the city like the back [of his hand],” said Molzon. “He gave [Dawson] and [Wolfe] a personal D.C. tour.” The group arrived at the White House early Thursday, Oct. 6 to set up equipment in the White House East Room. “It’s not every day that you get to be in a room in the White Tyler Wolfe and Kyle Dawson recording Pittsburgh Penguins coach Mike Sullivan House, which not at the White House West Wing entrance. Photo by Bill Ingalls many people have the White House Press Office and Waynesburg alum- privilege to be in, let alone with all kinds of bignus Bill Ingalls, a project manager and senior pho- time media members, all of the Penguins’ team and tographer for NASA. Ingalls lives in the Washing- families, on top of dignified and notable governton area and has hosted Molzon and his students ment officials and, to top that all off, the President

of the United States,” said Dawson. Wolfe, who served as the TV camera operator during the ceremony, said he enjoyed learning from the media professionals in attendance. “We got to network with a bunch of professional photographers from the networks that have been doing this for decades,” said Wolfe, “as well as see part of the daily briefing that is given to the press.” Molzon emphasized that networking is an important part of covering the White House ceremony. Meeting people who work in bigger media markets can open opportunities. For instance, one media member informed Molzon of a possible TV journalism internship that may be available at the White House in the future. “We were the only student or college media members in attendance at the event,” said Dawson. “I think that says something about the department here and the opportunities we receive. This was a once-in-a-lifetime chance.” For more information about Waynesburg University’s Department of Communication, visit www.waynesburg.edu/undergraduate/undergraduate-majors/communication.

GreeneScene Magazine •

OCTOBER / NOVEMBER

2016


EARL J. RICE & J. ROBERT RICE

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Earl J. Rice

his picture of Earl J. Rice was taken at an Army Camp in 1918, somewhere near Chillicothe, Ohio. It shows Earl, a Greene County native, setting on the fender of a WWI truck. “Earl was my first cousin,” explains J. Robert Rice, who brought the picture to us. Earl was born in Gilmore Township, the son of Charlie Rice, and served in the US Army during WWI. According to Mr. J. Robert Rice, Earl’s brother Frank also served and was shipped to Germany, while Earl remained stateside during his time in the service. When Earl was discharged, he came

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home, however his parents had relocated to Ohio, so Earl spent some time living at his grandmother’s house, and also at his Uncle John’s house (that would be Mr. J. Robert Rice’s father – so we see how the cousins spent some time in the same household). Before long, Earl went to live in Ohio also, settling near St. Clairsville, and he and brother Frank started Rice Brothers Contractors, a company that built roads, mostly in West Virginia. One particular project stands out in Mr. Rice’s memory. “They were continuing the road in the panhandle of WV, right where PA Rt. 21 ends, west of Wind Ridge, I think the area was called Poplar Springs,” he recalls. And here’s the story that followed: “They were widening the path and ran into a rock ledge. So they drilled and primed it and filled it with dynamite to clear the rock. It was my cousin Earl’s job to climb up on the rock and put in the dynamite, but didn’t have a chance to get down before the other fellow set off the charge and it blew him up into the air with the rock. He flew up there… then he came back down. He was stunned but he

2016 • GreeneScene Magazine

wasn’t hurt…at least not bad enough to keep him from grabbing a pick handle and going after the fellow that set off the charge. They stopped him before he could return any favors.” Mr. J. Robert Rice is also pictured here (right), during his own time in military service. This photo was taken on May 21, 1951, of a young Sgt. John Robert Rice standing in front of the Capitol building in Washington D.C. J. Robert was in the 28th Division National Guard of Pennsylvania when it was mobilized and deployed to Europe as part of a NATO Command defending Western Europe from Soviet Attack during the Korean War. “President Harry Truman is the one who gave the command to go into Federal Service… you’ve heard of ‘Give ‘em Hell Harry’?” said Mr. Rice, with a barely noticeable grin. J. Robert had just been graduated from infantry school at Fort Benning and was on a ten-day furlough when he came home to Gilmore Township and married his love Elizabeth Dye at the Pleasant Hill Church. They spent their honeymoon in Washington D.C. Perhaps it was Elizabeth who took the photo, we didn’t ask. Mr. J. Robert Rice didn’t really want us to put this picture in our issue this month, he just wanted to show us how the cars in the background are parked right up by the building – something you’d never see today. But we insisted. Because we want to pay tribute to John Robert Rice, his cousins Earl Rice and Frank Rice, and all the priceless men and women who have

served in our military. No matter when, no matter where…they have all given something of themselves that cannot be forgotten or diminished. We Thank You.

J. Robert Rice

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GreeneScene Magazine •

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2016

Oct Nov GreeneScene 2016  

The Salute to Veterans Issue is here! Read about local vets and their families. How much do you know about our local veteran monuments? You...

Oct Nov GreeneScene 2016  

The Salute to Veterans Issue is here! Read about local vets and their families. How much do you know about our local veteran monuments? You...

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