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OCTOBER / NOVEMBER 2015

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STEELERS TICKETS WINNER

Braxton Jones of Waynesburg, PA

Congratulations to Braxton Jones of Waynesburg, winner of two tickets to see the Steelers play the Arizona Cardinals at Heinz field! The ticket giveaway was sponsored by Giant Eagle in Waynesburg & Rices Landing. Braxton is pictured here showing off his win with Waynesburg Giant Eagle Manager John Stefanizzi.

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CORRECTION

he beautiful photo of the covered bridge on last month’s issue of the GreeneSaver was taken and submitted to us by Bridget Vernon. We regret our mistake in not properly crediting Bridget Vernon. The name Kim Novak was unintentionally printed where

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credit is given to the photographer of our front cover photo, as Kim’s photo had appeared on the front cover of the previous month. Our sincere apologies to both parties. Thank you to Bridget for submitting the photo and sharing your talent and the beauty of our rural area.

Halloween Schedule for Greene County OCTOBER 25 • Rices Landing Halloween Parade at 1 pm from the Hewitt Church parking lot • Rices Landing Borough, trick or treat from 2 to 4 pm OCTOBER 29 • Dunkard Township, Halloween parade at 4:30 pm at Bobtown/Dunkard VFD • Franklin Township, trick or treat from 4:30 to 6 pm • Waynesburg Borough, trick or treat from 4 to 6 pm • Waynesburg Lion’s Club Halloween Parade at High and Morgan Streets, 6:30 pm OCTOBER 30 • Greene County Historical Society Flashlight Fright Night from 7 to 11 pm, $10 OCTOBER 31 • Aleppo Township, trick or treat from 6 to 8 pm • Carmichaels Borough, trick or treat from 2 to 4 pm • Center Township, trick or treat from 6 to 7 pm • Clarksville Borough, trick or treat from 6 to 8 pm • Cumberland Township, trick or treat from 2 to 4 pm • Freeport Township, trick or treat from 6 to 8 pm • Gilmore Township, trick or treat from 6 to 8 pm • Gray Township, trick or treat 6 to 8 pm • Greene County Historical Society Flashlight Fright Night from 7 to 11 pm, $10 • Greene Township, trick or treat from 6 to 8 pm • Jackson Township, trick or treat from 7 to 9 pm • Jefferson Borough, trick or treat from 5 to 7 pm • Jefferson Township, trick or treat from 6 to 8 pm • Monongahela Township, trick or treat from 6 to 8 pm • Morgan Township, trick or treat from 6 to 8 pm • Morris Township, trick or treat from 6 to 7 pm • Perry Township, trick or treat from 5 to 7 pm • Richhill Township, trick or treat from 6 to 7 pm • Springhill Township, trick or treat from 6 to 8 pm • Wayne Township, trick or treat from 6 to 8 pm • Waynesburg Chamber Spooktacular Costume Contest from 8 to 9 am on courthouse steps GreeneSaver •

OCTOBER / NOVEMBER 2015


OCTOBER / NOVEMBER 2015

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Annual Touch-A-Truck Event Draws Record Crowd

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Amy Giovannone & Ed Koneski from Hartman & Hartman Constructors enjoyed hosting neighborhood kids at the Touch A Truck Event at First Baptist Church last month.

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CHARLES STROPE & JOHN W. STROPE

By Tara Kinsell

t was the Vietnam War that started the miliStrope moved back to Greene County where tary lineage of the Strope family from Greene he met his wife of 49 years, Annette, through his County. Charles Strope of West Waynesburg brother. They have a son and a daughter, and still was working the family farm when the war live in west Waynesburg today. first broke out. Strope was one of five boys. Four of them “We had a farm on White’s served in the military, including Ridge. I went to the Army reCharles. Floren Thomas “Tom” cruiter and joined up for three Strope was stationed in Germany years. I knew if I got drafted I during Vietnam as a member of was going to Vietnam and then the Army. He currently lives in they sent me anyway,” Strope California, Pa. said, reflecting on his experiencBrothers, James, who es. “We were deployed from Fort served in the National Guard, Mead in Maryland to Oakland, and Richard, who served in the California where we got on a Air Force are both deceased. boat, the USS Gordon. It took 21 “Pretty much all of my days to get there (Vietnam). We cousins and my dad’s sister’s boy, had our guns but they wouldn’t Thomas King of Kirby, served. issue us ammo on the boat.” He was in the Korean War,” Strope said it was for fear of what Charles said. might happen when soldiers reFirst cousin, John W. alized the destination of the boat Strope, who owns and operates was Vietnam. Strope’s Aircraft Maintenance Strope achieved the rank of at the Greene County Airport, Army Specialist E-4 while workwas in the Air Force from 1965 ing as a combat engineer. At the to 1969. end of his time in country, the “I was an air freight specialCharles Strope Army offered him $5,000 to reist, a materials handler. I didn’t enlist. work on planes. I loaded and un“I said, ‘No way.’ It was one loaded them,” John said, with his of the worst wars I think we ever characteristic chuckle. “I served fought,” he said. “It wasn’t worth 22 months in Okinawa during losing my life for ($5,000).” Vietnam. Charlie’s dad and my In his pocket he carried a dad were brothers.” Kodak 110 camera while he was After the military, John overseas, shooting 13 rolls of Strope went on to study aircraft film. His family had sold the farm maintenance and repair. He has while he was away and moved to been instrumental in the group, Chicago. He flew there after his Support Our Aviation Resources enlistment was up. While he was (S.O.A.R.) that brings Aviation working, his father had the film Day and air shows to Waynesdeveloped for him. burg each year. “The developer said they The GreeneSaver Salutes lost the pictures. I think they saw all the Strope Men and extended what they were and knew somefamily who have served this naone would pay for war pictures tion and fought for the liberties so they sold them,” he said. “I still and ways of life that we value. John W. Strope have the receipt.” Thank you.

t is quite amazing when one event can draw between 1,600 and 1,800 people in Greene County - and that is exactly what the 4th annual Touch-a-Truck event did on Sept. 26 at the First Baptist Church in Waynesburg. “We had 750 registered children at Touch a Truck. I cooked 1,300 hot dogs and we only had 50 left. The 600 bibles were gone by 12:30 pm,” said Tim Mankey, who, along with his wife Dawn, are among the key organizers of the event where children are invited to literally touch a truck. “They (the professionals) let them sit up in their police cars, ambulances, utility company trucks and honk the horns and ask questions. It is an all-around good time,” Tim adds. Tim said there were 700 t-shirts distributed at the event and more children were still arriving when the last one was handed out. He credited great sponsors for making all of it possible each year. “Everybody deserves such applause. This is our church’s biggest community give-back with 100 percent of the donations going to the event,” Tim said. As part of registration when the children arrive, they are given three tickets to place into a Chinese auction for a chance to win one of 20 to 30 different gift baskets valued between $50-$120. Each child also receives a ticket to place into the drawing for a grand prize, based upon their age.

“Fox Ford sponsors the grand prize for kids who are six and under, a big ‘ride-on’ toy. The grand prize for kids six to 12 is a $100 Toys “R” Us gift certificate,” Tim said. “Each child also receives a ticket to have a picture taken in one of two photo booths. We wanted to make sure even so low income families could have a picture of their family.” A major event sponsor, Hartman and Hartman Constructors, underwrote many of the expenses and brought several big and exciting trucks to the event. Ice cream was provided by Rice Energy in the Rice Cream Truck. The members of the congregation at First Baptist baked cookies for the children. “Everyone that attended got the hot dog, chips, cookies and a bottle of water,” Tim said. “It is amazing when you consider that onethird of the population of Waynesburg was at this event. I don’t want to leave anyone out. Without all of our sponsors this wouldn’t have been possible.”

GreeneSaver •

OCTOBER / NOVEMBER 2015


ANDREW RAMEAS

By Tara Kinsell

Fallen Officer and Army Reserve Veteran Honored

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t will be five years in December since word reached Greene County of the death of police officer and Army reservist, Staff Sgt. Andrew Rameas, a 1996 Waynesburg Central High School graduate. Andrew, who served with the 363rd Military Police Combat Support Group in Iraq, was providing a police funeral escort by motorcycle with the Harker Heights, Texas Police Department when he was struck by an SUV. On Oct. 6, the Harker Heights Police Department, dedicated a monument to its officers with special recognition given to its fallen officers: Andrew and Officer Carl Levin. Andrew’s parents, Pete and Deanie Rameas were in Harker Heights for the dedication. “We were quite surprised. We had wanted to do something for the police department. They stayed with Andrew the entire time,” Pete said. Officers in Waynesburg waited on their end to receive their fallen brother, as well, he added. “This was Christmas Eve. We were quite taken aback by their sacrifice.” Pete said the inscription and the look of the monument are “absolutely beautiful.” The wording included with the statue of an officer reaching out to a small child reads,

OCTOBER / NOVEMBER 2015

• GreeneSaver

Deanie and Pete Rameas, standing next to the Harker Heights Police Department’s monument for its officers.

“In honor of those who serve, and in remembrance of those who have sacrificed.” A separate stone includes, “The following Harker Heights Police Officers have served mankind with distinction and given all in the performance of their duty. Their sacrifice will never be forgotten.” Andrew and officer Carl Levin’s names are listed beneath this inscription. We join the Rameas family and the Harker Heights Police Department in remembering and honoring Staff Sgt. Andrew Rameas.

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GreeneSaver •

OCTOBER / NOVEMBER 2015


LISA AND MITCHELL MURDOCK

By Tara Kinsell

A Chip off the Block

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Lisa and Mitchell Murdock

hen 16-year old Mitchell Murdock, a sophomore at West Greene High School, was growing up at his mother’s knee at the 2nd Brigade, Combat Team, 28th Infantry Division Army National Guard post in Washington, Pa., it left a lasting impact. Mom, Lisa Murdock, served active duty for 20 years, enlisting in the Army when she was just a year older than Mitchell is today. “I’m kind of following in her footsteps in a way,” Mitchell said, although he noted that he isn’t sure if it will lead to the military or a career in law enforcement. Either way, Mitchell is learning the discipline and good decision making skills for whichever path he selects as a member of the Civil Air Patrol (CAP) Unit #601. This unit operates out of the Washington County Armory, where Lisa once served and

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• GreeneSaver

worked full-time. “From the day he was born he was in a swing in my office there and then in a walker. Later on he was riding scooters threw the halls. He grew up in that armory,” Lisa said. In the CAP, Mitchell is around some of the same officers that were in his mother’s chain of command. “They knew Mitchell from before he was born,” Lisa added. When her son was sent to a two week-encampment at Fort Indiantown Gap, where at 17 she began her military career, Lisa said it was “very weird,” for her. But, she is very proud of Mitchell for opting to do something that a lot of young people would not do. Among the training that he and fellow cadets are receiving is emergency services, search and rescue, and drug demand and reduction (DDR). The DDR aspect of CAP is a program that helps cadets ‘achieve excellence in life by making good choices and remaining free of drugs and alcohol,’ according to the unit’s website. This is especially important if one hopes to enter the field of aviation, Mitchell said. The CAP is considered an auxiliary of the Air Force. So far, Mitchell has spent more than a dozen hours in the air on what are known as O-Rides, short for orientation rides. He has learned from them that he “Does not care for flying in small aircraft,” he said with a laugh. When asked what a typical day is like at one of the two-week encampments, Mitchell said cadets are up at 6:30 am, which he doesn’t deem to be too early. They stand at attention at the foot of their bunks for 20 minutes to start the day. Next is PT, breakfast, classes in marching and drill ceremony, lunch and then more drill, he said. After dinner, they head to the parade field to practice what they have learned in class. “We do an obstacle course as part of PT that teaches us leader-

ship and working together,” Mitchell said. “I joined in May 2014. We go every Wednesday and get home around 9:30 or 10 pm.” Lisa said Mitchell will miss twice this month because he has to be rested for track and field meets the following morning. “They (CAP) believe that school work and school activities come first,” Lisa said. Mitchell runs the 800 meter, 4X8 Relay, and one mile for West Greene High School. A student in the Upward Bound (U.B.) Program, for college bound students, Mitchell still has a lot of choices ahead of him but his military beginnings will combine with what he learns in U.B. to have him prepared. Sergeant First Class Lisa Murdock retired from the military in 2010. She was deployed for one-year during the Iraq War from Camp Shelby in Hattiesburg, Mississippi. We salute SFC Murdock for the sacrifices she made for our country, as well as Mitchell for dedicating himself to service at such a young age.

Mitchell Murdock and his fellow cadets from Civil Air Patrol Unit #601 in Washington stand at attention.

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Halloween Skate/Dance to Open Season The Mon View Roller Rink will open its fall skating season with the eighth annual Halloween Skate and Dance on Oct. 30 from 7 to 11 pm. Admission for all ages is $8 per person. The skate will be held from 7 to 9 pm, followed by the dance from 9 to 11 pm. Children are encouraged to dress in Halloween costumes. Special Halloween treats will be distributed thanks to sponsors CONSOL Energy, Noble Energy and the Greene County Commissioners. The 2015-16 skate season at Mon View will continue with a skate/dance every Friday after Oct. 30 from 7 to 11 pm. Open skating will be held from 7 to 10 pm on Saturdays. Admission for all attendees will be $8 on Friday nights and $5 on Saturday nights. Times and prices are subject

to change. Due to holidays and routine maintenance, the roller rink will be closed Nov. 27-28, and Dec. 18 through Jan. 23. It will reopen at 7 pm on Jan. 29 for the first 2016 skate/dance. It will then continue to be open on Fridays and Saturdays with the exception of March 25-26, and will close for the season on April 9. Mon View is available to rent for private parties at a rate of $120 for two hours. The price covers admission and skate rental for 20 people. A fee of $3 per additional person will be charged. Skate lessons are also available, by appointment. For more information, call 724-943-3440 or 724852-5323.

Nonprofit Training Courses Being Offered The Community Foundation of Greene County (CFGC) will partner with the Bayer Center for Nonprofit Management to offer two days of nonprofit training for staff members of interested organizations. Two sessions will be held on Oct. 27 and one on Nov. 17. The fee for either class, which includes lunch, is $125 for each day. A $10 discount will be applied for payments received online at the time of registration. A 20 percent discount will be given to any organization that sends three or more staff members to the same class, or one individual to all three sessions. Session topics will include effective planning and

execution of presentations, how to create presentation visuals that resonate with an audience, proper social media planning and strategy for organizations, and management and plans, as opposed to presenting the “How-Tos” of social media. A limited number of scholarships of up to 50 percent off the session costs are available as well. To register for classes, visit rmu.edu/bcnmregistration, or call 412-397-6000. Registration deadlines are one week before the start of each session. All sessions will be held in the CFGC Conference Room, located at 106 E. High Street in Waynesburg.

Toys for Tots The Greene County Leathernecks will once again host Toys for Tots with distribution sites in Waynesburg, Carmichaels, and Clarksville on the Saturday before Christmas. Donations of new toys will start being accepted at the end of October through collection boxes at all area Community Bank branches, the Rices Landing and Waynesburg Giant Eagle stores, Dollar General in Waynesburg, Big Lots in Waynesburg, Rush Gro-

Raffle Throw Winner The winner of the Lippincott Alpaca’s Open House “Knitting Herd’s” raffle throw is Lori Moore of Washington.

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Restoring Crouse School House Collection canisters for the Crouse School House renovation project are located at various businesses throughout Greene County. Several personal donations have already been made for the restoration of the former one-room schoolhouse, including one made by retired judge Terry Grimes, pictured here with Buzz Walters, who is spearheading the efforts. Much of the roof has already been replaced. “We just have to get the bell tower done first, then we can finish that section of the roof,” Buzz explained. The interior of the school house is also undergoing complete renovation and restoration. Buzz said all monetary contributors of $20 or more whose names are known will be

recognized at the completion ceremony. Those who would like to make a donation can look for the canisters or send a check payable to Greene County Historical Society, c/o Buzz Walters, Box 376, Rogersville, Pa. 15359. Be sure to write Crouse Schoolhouse on the memo line. For more information, call 724-499-5332.

Holiday Centerpieces Topic of Meeting The Town and Country Garden Club received a presentation on holiday centerpieces by Norma Kline at its last meeting. Norma utilized various containers including a homemade basket, fish bowl, wooden wagon made by her 80year old father, and a child’s wicker suitcase. She incorporated fresh and dried flowers and added touches such as candy canes, cinnamon sticks, ribbons and oranges, adding scents to the arrangements. Members participated in the program as Kline gave step-by-step instructions to create two different bows. They were also given an opportunity to create ribbon roses for package decorations. Norma holds a bachelor of science degree in home economics from W.V.U. with 5 years

cery in Rogersville, and various other locations. The annual Waynesburg Moose Dinner/Dance to support the Toys for Tots campaign will be held Nov. 7 with dinner at 6 pm. A Chinese Auction Greene County native, Gary VanSyoc, who will be held at 8 pm, followed by the dance with music provided by DJ Dave Plavi at 8:30 pm. To was a member of the Plastic Ono Elephant’s make reservations for the dinner/dance, call the Memory Band with John Lennon and Yoko Ono was part of a special concert held Aug. 31 at the Moose at 724-627-8028. Royal Court Theater in England for International Beatle Week.

teaching Fairfax, Virginia and 25 years in the Jefferson-Morgan School District. She has received recognition by the America Home Economics Association in its recruiting slide program.

VanSyoc Plays at Beatle Week Party VanSyoc was selected by Mark Hudson, who produced and wrote songs for Ringo Starr, to play for the concert along with members of Badfinger, Wings, Nube9 and the Bayonets. VanSyoc was featured on the vocals for “It Don’t Come Easy,” and “New York City.”

Scholarships Available The Community Foundation of Greene County is accepting Stealth Scholarship applications for non-traditional students 22 and older, who plan to enroll in college or technical school.

Students who are not currently enrolled, but plan to enroll for the winter or spring terms, should submit their application by Oct. 23. FMI, call 724-627-2010.

Holiday Craft Blast Vendors are being sought for the Holiday Craft Blast at the Greene County Fair grounds on Dec 13th. FMI, visit natgreen.org or email shine201027@yahoo.com

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OCTOBER / NOVEMBER 2015


ARMY SGT.

WILLIAM P. CAIN

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h e n Army S g t . Wi l liam P. Cain, retired, first enlisted in the military, it was to the surprise of his then fiance, now wife of 33 years, Ronda. “We were supposed to get married on Nov. 7,” Ronda said. Bill was going to work at Glassworks in New Jersey but the company began layoffs. Instead, he got a job with Hecks Dept. Store in Waynesburg, Ronda said. “When it closed down we were about to get married and he had no job. He was going out every day placing applications and one day he came home and said, ‘I joined the Army today.’ He left on April 12 for basic training. We were married in January (three months before),” Ronda said. Sgt. Cain retired from the Army after serving

OCTOBER / NOVEMBER 2015

• GreeneSaver

Bowlby Bits FREE S.A.T. Prep Classes - Classes on Saturdays, Nov. 7, 14 & 21, 10am – 2pm. Pre-registration is required.

By Tara Kinsell

from 1987 to 1995 as a small engine mechanic and quartermaster in chemical equipment and supplies. He finished his military service as a member of the reserves. Ronda said her husband received multiple awards from the military, including: the Army Commendation Medal, Sharp Shooter Marksmanship Badge for grenade and the M16 rifle. “He served in Desert Shield and Desert Storm. While he was serving in Desert Storm we had a son, Joshua William David Cain. Bill didn’t get to hold him until he was three months old,” Ronda said. “We left our Christmas tree up for seven months waiting on him to come home. We had Christmas in July that year.” The Cain’s daughter, Alicia R. Cain, was born at Fort Hood, Texas in the Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center where an average of eight babies, per day, are delivered. Sgt. Cain’s family would like to extend their gratitude for his service and for all that he does for them every day and an extra thank you to all of the soldiers this Veterans’ Day, Ronda said. We, at the GreeneSaver, join the Cain family in giving thanks to William and his fellow soldiers today and every day.

Silpada Designs Jewelry Fundraiser - Sponsored by The Friends of the Bowlby Library. Sat., Nov. 7, 10:30am - 1:30pm. Fabulous collection of handcrafted Sterling Silver Jewelry, come shop. International Games Day - On Friday, Nov. 13, 4-8pm. Old fashioned game playing for every member of the family & our Annual Turkey Bowling Contest. Please pre-register. Book Club - Monday, Nov. 9 at 6pm. The book discussion will be on the second half of the book 2030 by Albert Brooks. New members encouraged to attend. No need to register T.O.P.S. - Taking Off Pounds Sensibly is a weight management support group that meets every Sat. at the Bowlby Public Library 9:3011:30am. New members welcome! The Bowlby Public Library will be closed Nov. 11 (Veteran’s Day), Nov. 26 & 27 (Thanksgiving). For more info or to pre-register for any events, please call 724-627-9776

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Family Group at the Ready for Military Families

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ife on a military base comes with a built in support system. The children grow up together and the spouses have opportunities to socialize and build friendships. But, sometimes this isn’t the case for spouses of those who join a reserve unit or the National Guard, such as Waynesburg’s Company B, 1st Battalion, 110th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Brigade Combat Team. Erin Blanchard, president of the Family Readiness Group (FRG) for Company B, learned firsthand how important FRG’s are when her husband, Kevin, was deployed with Delta Company in Pittsburgh in 2010. “The FRG there was a life saver for me. That is what got me through it. It’s really important to have,” Erin said. “I was new to the (military) lifestyle and it is very different not being on or near a base.” Kevin, who was active duty Army for 8 years spoke often about life on a military base to his wife. So, it was eye-opening for Erin when she realized that camaraderie among spouses and children wasn’t automatically built into a guard unit. Although Company B had an FRG there, Erin learned it was “not fully active,” she said. She then made it her mission to change that, knowing how important an extended military family is in times of deployment and/or emergencies. As part of this, Erin has made herself into a walking/talking resource manual for the soldiers and spouses of Company B with information about everything from military health insurance to creating a monthly budget. As a lot of the guys are college students, there is even a resource available for them to receive tutoring, Erin said. When guardsman are gather for training the FRG operates a mini-concession for them, with soda, chips, water, etc. for sale. “It boosts the moral of the guys and we use the money for a Christmas party in December and a family picnic in July. The very little money from the sales goes right back to the guys,” Erin said. The gatherings are an opportunity to “grow friendships,” and that is really why she does what she does, she added. The FRG also meets monthly for 2-3 days at a time to build those relationships. Although Kevin has been deployed six times in his military career, none of those deployments have occurred in the three years since the couple’s son, Colt, was born. If Kevin is deployed again, Erin wants to assure that Colt has friends who understand. The FRG is designed to do just that and Erin is dedicated to ensuring it for her son, herself, and her extended military family at Troop B. “When the soldiers are there, I’m there 90 percent of the time,” she said. The FRG budget comes solely from the proceeds of the refreshment sales. Erin said all funds must be used to the benefit of everyone in the unit equally, according to regulations. The FSG is a non-profit, all-volunteer, organization that is audited by and reports to the United States government. Anyone wishing to contact the FRG may do so by calling the Pennsylvania Army National Guard Readiness Center in Waynesburg at 724-627-0529. The FSG does not solicit funds. Any GreeneSaver readers who would like to make a donation to the FSG may send a check made out to Company B Family Readiness Group, c/o Direct Results, 185 Wade St., Waynesburg, Pa. 15370 and we will gladly forward it on to them.

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By Tara Kinsell

CPL. MONTY LEGGETT

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he GreeneSaver joins the Leggett family in saluting, 2013 Waynesburg Central High School graduate, Cpl. Monty Leggett, 2nd Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division for his commitment to the freedom of United States citizens. Semper Fi Monty!

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GreeneSaver •

OCTOBER / NOVEMBER 2015


What’s your story? T

By Tara Kinsell

ucked away in the recesses of our minds are these random memories. You know the ones, murky to the point you wonder if it was actually a dream. I think the older we get the more some of them come to the forefront. Recently, while throwing ideas around the GreeneSaver brainstorming room, we began to talk about inviting readers to share their holiday memories, favorite traditions, one special memory, or maybe a string of them through the years. I started to think about what I would share if someone asked me, just to get the ball rolling. Of course it would be easy to come up with a year when a From left Tara’s sister Bridget, neighbor Tom Davis, sister Marcie, and Tara. coveted gift was received, the hot ticket item that seemed unattainable, but that would be rather mundane. Be- 68-years old at the time, came to my rescue. sides, if I begin to list the hot toys of my childhood There was at least enough snow on the ground some of our readers would have to look them up to to come about mid way up my calf. First, Tom had know what I was talking about. to drive me the roughly seven miles to school. We Instead, I am taking you back to the third lived in Clarksville Borough and it was a flat stretch grade. As we all know, anything more than three from there to the bottom of Pitt Gas hill. That part inches of snow shuts down our county schools, but of the journey was a piece of cake. But, there was no not when I was a kid. Those were the days when the way Tom’s car was making it up Pitt Gas hill in all of tires on school busses were wrapped in chains. You that snow. This kind man, still not wanting me to be were going to school! upset, got out of his car and took me by the hand, As it turned out, the bus made it to school the leading me up that hill. day of our Christmas play but I wasn’t on it. If you Now, I drove that hill just the other day, and I know me, picture me in a dress and patent leather can’t imagine how we made it up it in that snow, but shoes. I don’t remember a single thing about the we did. I have murky visions of being partly carried play. What I remember is how crushed I was when after almost pulling Tom to the ground. Those patI missed the school bus that morning, and wasn’t ent leathers weren’t very conducive for walking in going to be there for my part in that play! slippery conditions. We only had one car back then and my dad Tom Davis is long since gone from this world was at work. Across the street from us lived the but that is one Christmas play that I will never forDavis family, and Tom Davis, who was around get, even if I only remember how I got there. What is your story or tradition?? Let us know by emailing info@greenesaver.com, or writing, GreeneSaver, 185 Wade St., Waynesburg, PA 15370, or calling the GreeneSaver at 724-627-2040. PLEASE include your own phone number and contact info if you write or leave a message.

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I Love this P l ace

PITT GAS, PA

by Tara Kinsell

All You Need is Love

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Houses, such as these, were built to provide housing for coal miners in the town. Photo by Tara Kinsell.

Teenage George Handford and friends sharing good times as youth in Pitt Gas. From left, Charles Hager, George, John Wayne Lacey, Jim Gasper, and Albert Rota. All attended Pitt Gas school with George.

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n the banks of Ten Mile Creek, or Crick, as locals call it, the town of Pitt Gas, like so many towns in its surrounding area, was built on coal. It was also built on a hill. From the creek to the top of the town is a steady incline. George Handford, 78, of Mather, grew up in Pitt Gas. As a young boy, winter days in town meant a sled ride, but just one. “There was a little path over a steep hill that went down to the Baptist Church. It was red dog roads then,” said George. “By the time we got all the way to the end that was about the end of sled riding for the day. It took too long to walk back up the hill.” Sled riding, kick the can, baseball played with ‘found’ balls, things were much simpler then, George said. “We’d go to the ballgames and when a foul ball was hit we would kick it into the high grass and pick it up later. We’d play pickup games with that ball until it was falling apart and we’d taped it and taped it,” he said. “We would use it until we got another foul ball.” Unlike other mining towns, like Clarksville and Mather, that were built to have whatever the miners needed right in town, Pitt Gas had just one small company store located where the Pitt Gas Baptist Church is today, according to George. He also remembered a store in the bottom of a home owned by the Bear family. Having Clarksville such a short distance away with many more options for entertainment and retail shopping, Pitt Gas really didn’t need more. Besides, there was the swinging bridge, built by the mining company across Ten Mile for miners to get to work. It also served to ease travel from Pitt Gas to Clarksville, at least on foot. That isn’t possible today. Sadly, the swinging bridge is but a shell of what it once looked like. Just down from the bridge was a worn path that led down to an area of flat rocks in Ten Mile. George said it was called “car crossing.” It was so named because there were times when one could literally drive a car from one side of the Creek to the other. George said this was in the days before the Lock and Dam system made the water level rise too high to see the rocks.

“Before that, you would drive down there and wash your car in the middle of the crick. There would be cars lined up,” he said. Thelma told her husband she had no recollection of ‘car crossing,’ but remembered when people washed cars in the area known as 7 Creeks, over toward Marianna. Mel Remington, who was once the superintendent of the William Pitt Coal Mine at Pitt Gas, said some of the earliest mining in the area took place up 7 Creeks in the 1700s. Speaking of Pitt Gas, Mel said the name of the William Pitt mine, for which Pitt Gas was named, changed several times through the years. At one point, it was called Clyde 2. The mine, located on the other side of the swinging bridge, was Clyde 3. Clyde 1 was at Fredericktown. For George, who is 78, the memories are still thick from the days when everyone worked in the mines, people left their doors unlocked, and parents weren’t afraid to let the kids play outside after dark. “We would stay out to play under the street light until it was time to go to bed on a school day,” George said, adding he believed it was one thing that made it different back then. “We didn’t have much. We didn’t have cell phones or video games. The most important thing there, was L-O-V-E. There was love in the community, in the parents, and in the children. That was all we needed.”

Clyde 3 Mine circa 1930s. Photo from Ten Mile Creek Country. Used with permission of Casey Durdines. GreeneSaver •

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THE WALTERS By Shelly Brown

Recent photo of Buzz at his shop in Rogersville, holding the picture of his brother’s funeral march at Arlington Cemetery.

Buzz while serving in the U.S.M.C., front row, 3rd from left

he GreeneSaver joins Buzz Walters of Rogersville, in paying tribute to his three brothers, Bud, Bob & Jim Walters, and his own son Rikk, who have all served. And , we thank Buzz, too, a US Marine, who served his country, and continues to serve his community today. Like many others in our area, in previous Veteran Edition issues, we have featured Buzz and his story. Yet we believe you can never say it too often. Thank you. We appreciate you. We value you, and

we owe you our freedom. Shortly after Buzz came home from his military service, and not long after he began teaching and coaching at West Greene High School, Buzz was inspired to write a poem about what it is to be a Marine. He dedicated it to his brothers, and we are proud to share it here, in this special 2015 Veteran’s Tribute edition. Buzz says, “This was inspired by my own experiences and feelings. It’s what I felt, what I’m pretty sure most of us felt, then and now.”

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WHAT IS A MARINE He is your 17-18 year old boy From Poland Mine, PA or Anywhere USA He hear there is a war going on and His country needs him He is full of excitement as he says goodbye To his loved ones; a son, sister, brother, dad, mom He is confident that he can do the job and The war will be over when he gets there His confidence is soon shaken when the Sgt. at Yamasee says, “I’m your mother and father” There is no more civilian life; now only training He got up at 4:30; mainly because his bunk was turned Over; showered, shaved, sh--, shampoo, ready for formation He learned to sew, make bunks, shine shoes, (shine everything) Stand inspection, march, dig fox holes Qualify with rifle, to respect others, to become Part of a squad and hold up your end. He learned qualities such as; responsibility, pride Discipline, respect, courage, brotherhood; qualities He will use later in life. He became a Marine and when the DI congratulated him; Felt pride in accomplishment. After Paris Island and Camp Geiger he was sent To places he couldn’t spell or pronounce. He fought and died at Iwo Jima, Tarawa, Okinawa, Chosen Reservoir Khesanh; from Montezuma to Kuwait (Iraq). A Marine moves out when the Sgt. says he has a job to do. He knows no matter what happened his buddies will Bring him back. Who is this Marine? He left a boy and came back a man. He is your son, brother, uncle or dad. Others gave him Titles; jar head, bell hops, leathernecks, and devil dogs. He wore them well, gained their respect. He is proud of our country and our country is proud of him. God bless the USA and USMC Written to Honor his USMC Brothers Bud, Bob, Jim and son Rikk, by Sgt. Buzz Walters

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PICTURE PUZZLE WINNER Last Month’s Picture Puzzle Answer: Globe

Taylor Whitlatch of Waynesburg, PA

Winner of a DOMINO’S PARTY PACK is a

PICTURE PUZZLE WINNER Last Month’s Picture Puzzle Answer: Globe

Chester Kuczykowski of Clarksville, PA

Winner of a DOMINO’S PARTY PACK is a

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TAILGATE PARTY WINNER Congrats to Ellen Boros of Jefferson, winner of the Giant Eagle Steeler Tail Gate Party Package! Ellen will enjoy 3 pounds of wings, a nearly two foot long Italian Hoagie and a 36 count container of meatballs and sauce with hoagie buns. Bring on the party! Ellen Boros of Jefferson, PA

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Hospital Foundation Donates $12,000

They’ve Got the Spirit! The 2015 Spirit Award from the Academy for Adolescent Health and The Washington Health System Teen Outreach has been presented to three Greene County Human Services staff members. Karen Bennett, human services administrator; Melanie Trauth, mental health caseworker; and Ashley Bishop, high-fidelity wraparound youth support partner, received the award for their “ongoing, exceptional commitment to young people in Greene County.” The department was also recognized for its work promoting diversity and inclusion through various youth programs. From left, Bishop, Bennett, Dr. Mary Jo Podgurski, president of the Academy for

Adolescent Health and director of the Washington Health System Teen Outreach; and Trauth.

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The Waynesburg Volunteer Fire Department received an $880 donation on Oct. 5 from the proceeds of a chicken roast held for the grand opening of Allstate, Lisa Brown Agency, 140 Bill George Drive. Lisa is pictured presenting the check to Fire Chief Jeff Marshall.

for the Colony Division. From left, Wayne Wright, General Manager of Colony presents the award to Troy Smith, Jerry Smith, Wayne Wright, Debbie Lucas, Eric Smith and Tom Christopher of Rt. 21 Homes LLC.

University President Honored The Boy Scouts of America’s (BSA) General Greene District of the Laurel Highlands presented Douglas Lee, president of Waynesburg University, with its 2015 Good Citizen Award. Each year, the award honors an individual in the community who has enriched the region through dedication and commitment to the values of scouting.

worker in the Southeastern Greene School District; Dave Jones, executive director of the GCMHF; Dr. Morris Harper, board chairman of the CFGC; Sherry Kottke, food service director in the Jefferson-Morgan School District; and Brian Uplinger, superintendent of Central Greene School District look over items included in weekend food packs.

Lisa Brown Donates to Fire Department

Route 21 Homes Wins Sales Award

Route 21 Homes, 2118 E. Roy Furman Highway, Carmichaels has been named the winner of the 2014 Top 10 Single Sales Center Sales Volume Award for Colony Factory Crafted Homes of Pennsylvania. The Award is presented to the Colony Retailer that achieves the highest annual sales volume

The fight against hunger in Greene County has been helped by a $12,000 grant from the Greene County Memorial Hospital Foundation (GCMHF). The grant was presented to the weekend food program through the Community Foundation of Greene County (CFGC). The weekend food program was established to provide school age children nutritious meals over the weekend when they don’t have access to the free and reduced school breakfast and lunch program. More than 1,500 children have been identified as food insecure in Greene County, according to Feeding America. Weekend food packs include six light, nutritional meals for children that require no preparation and are non-perishable, such as; peanut butter, juice packs, oatmeal bars, cereal packs, etc. The program is active in all five Greene County school districts at a cost of approximately $195 per child, per year. From left, Kristen Rice, social

Lee’s involvement with BSA began in 1970 when he became a member of Boy Scout Troop 420. He earned his Eagle in 1975 with his Eagle project of working at a veterans nursing facility. Later, Lee served as an assistant scoutmaster and on the Mountaineer Area Council for BSA where he chaired its first effort to create an endowment fund.

University Students to Serve Over Break Thirty-seven Waynesburg University students committed themselves to performing public service hours over the fall break. More than a dozen of these students volunteered their services at various locations throughout Greene County, including work that assisted Greene County Habitat for Hu-

manity building homes. The remainder of the group gave a hand constructing a Virginia Worm Rail Fence, as well as stonewalls, in Gettysburg, Pa., partnering with the Gettysburg National Military Park and Daniel Lady Farm, a privately owned Civil War farm museum

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WWII Veterans’ Honor Roll Restored

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Bobtown Honor Roll photo courtesy of Brenda Stone.

hanks to donations of time and money, the Bobtown WWII Honor Roll received a face-lift in time for Veterans’ Day. With $5,000 from Chevron and a matching amount from Dunkard Township, the work was able to be completed before an Oct. 17 unveiling and community celebration that included a flyover,

music by the Mapletown High School Band, and a special salute to veterans. Although a large part of the work was contracted out, the restoration of the eagles on the monument was completed by Bobtown resident, Robert Perry through the goodness of his heart. Robert is pictured putting on some finishing touches.

Dessert Auction Being Held for McNamara Family Shane, Mack and Kim Boyle McNamara

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or more than three decades, anyone who shopped with any regularity at Gabler’s Drug Store in Carmichaels would encounter Kim McNamara. Fellow employee, Loretta Malinosky, said the store is just not the same since Kim, 48, passed away on Sept. 23 of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. “She started working up front while she was still in high school,” Malinosky said. “Soon she was moved to the pharmacy. She went to California University for teaching but she continued working here and this was the only job she ever had.” Friend, Nicole Baker, who organized a fundraiser to help the McNamara family with growing medical bills, wanted people to know it will still go on. “Kim was one of the sweetest people you could ever want to meet. We had planned a dessert auction to help Kim’s family with expenses before she passed away,” Baker said. “She didn’t have health insurance through her employer. Her premium on the insurance she did have didn’t cover all of the treatments and medicines so the debt accrued.”

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The dessert fundraiser will be held beginning at noon on Nov. 1 in the fellowship hall of the First United Methodist Church, Carmichaels with all proceeds going to Kim’s husband, Mack, and the couple’s son, Shane, 7. Tickets for a gift basket that will go off on the 7 pm drawing of the Pennsylvania Daily Number on Dec. 4 will also be available for purchase at the event. Also, a special item to be auctioned, in addition to the baked goods, on Nov. 1 is two tickets to the concert of Christian music artist Chris Tomlin. The concert is Nov. 14 in Pittsburgh. “I was so excited when I heard he was donating the tickets. People have really been generous in donating,” Baker said. Among the items in the basket are: Red Lobster gift cards, a 30-minute massage, oil changes, free pizzas, a one-month gym membership, hunting accessories, lottery tickets and a multitude of gift cards for area restaurants and retail establishments. For more information, contact Baker at 724317-8118.

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K Lt. Col. Stanley Scott Fowler, a 1992 graduate of JeffersonMorgan Jr. Sr. High School, with his wife, Pamela, a JAG attorney in the Air Force.

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im Fowler Smith remembered the year her baby brother, Scott, called home from a recruiter’s office in Pittsburgh to inform their parents, Gerald Fowler, and Deborah Fowler Campbell that he had enlisted in the United States Air Force. “It was in November (1992). We ended up having Thanksgiving early because he was scheduled to leave for basic training at Lackland Air Force Base before then,” she said. He had graduated the previous May from Jefferson-Morgan High School.

SCOTT FOWLER Today, 23 years later, Lt. Col. Stanley “Scott” Fowler will be the keynote speaker at the FilerSadlek American Legion Post 954 Veterans’ Day program on Nov. 11 in the same auditorium where he was graduated in 1992. Adding to the significance, that auditorium is named for Scott’s grandfather, the late Stanley Fowler, who served as a school board president in the district for many years. Debbie said she knows his grandfather and grandmother, Jean, would have been “popping the buttons off their shirts with pride,” at their grand-

By Tara Kinsell

son’s accomplishments. A graduate of the Air Force Academy Prep School, where he was first in his class in mathematics, Scott was recommended for the Air Force Academy by late state representative, Frank Mascara. His faith in Scott was well placed as he graduated in 1999 and went on to train to become a pilot. “Because of graduating first in his class he was able to choose which aircraft he wanted to fly,” Debbie said. “He fell in love with the C130 while at the Academy and so this was his choice.” continued on page 21

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continued from page 21, Fowler

Eventually, Scott landed at Pope Air Force Base in Fayetteville, N.C., where he ran into fellow Air Force Academy graduate, Pamela Shultz, who was an attorney with the JAG Corps. Pamela would later become his wife. Scott would, continue his education, earning a masters degree in operations research and training in air staff command. Scott and Pamela live in Greenville, S.C. where they are both still active duty military. We would like to extend a big welcome home to Lieutenant Colonel Fowler and our thanks to both him and Pamela for their service to our country.

Lt. Col. Stanley Scott Fowler behind the controls of a C130.

Cab Driving to Floral Designing…The Life of Louise

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y brother Jim had a store in Clarksville, Manfriedi’s Variety Store. I was working for him when all of a sudden somebody came in looking for someone to drive a cab. I called him up and before I knew it I was driving cab,” Louise said. “It was the easiest money I have ever made in my life,” Louise recalls, as she reminisces about her life in Greene County before, during and after the era of WWII. The only problem, besides the lack of street signs, was that her family didn’t approve. “They said it wasn’t proper for a young woman to drive a cab,” she said. Louise respected her family but she also had an independent streak. Besides, in addition to the money, driving the cab Louise Domon around the age she was when she was actually quite enjoyable, she said. began to drive a cab around Greene County. She is “I didn’t know where I was going half the time, especially pictured at a church event. in Pitt Gas. They would say, ‘make a left here, make a right there, but there weren’t any signs,” Louise said. “I drove all over the place. I drove around a lot of elderly people.” Louise says only one bad experience occurred during her cab driving days, and it’s one she has never forgotten. “I was coming down Fredericktown hill and it was snowing. A little kid on a sled came out into the road in front of my cab. It was the closest, most frightening thing in my life,” Louise said. “I was coming up over a grade when I saw him. To this day, I have no idea how I missed him. I swear he must have had a mark on his pants because I know he rubbed against the bumper. It was that close.” The daughter of Italian immigrants, Louise said she was always finding ways to make money because her parents just didn’t have any extra to give. “When my father (Luis) came here from Italy he couldn’t read or write. He was a coal miner. We moved 9 times in one year,” she said. Joe and Louise Domon in their uniforms for the Louise’s brother, Jeno was born in Ohio. When her mom United Mine Worker’s Band. There were few if any street signs when Louise Domon, of Sandy Plains, was expecting Louise, her father got a job at Clyde Mine #2, she said. started driving cab around the time of WWII. “He (her father) put my mom (Raquela) on a train and told the conductor to drop her off around the curve, up Sandy Plains Hill, where he had bought a house,” Louise said, noting he did so without Raquela ever seeing it. “It was April 2 and I was born on April 29. It was a dilapidated farm house.” No matter, the Manfriedi family made it home and Louise still lives on a portion of the property to this day. It was there on the family farm that the entrepreneurial spirit in little Louise kicked in. “I always knew how to make money. I sold dandelions, mushrooms, seeds, walnuts, anything that was sellable from the time I was 7, 8, 9 years old. We sold milk, eggs, and butter from the farm,” she said, noting that the money from buttermilk they sold went to her. One of 9 children, each played their part on the farm. Selling what they produced was one of Louise’s jobs before school each day. “I remember when the mine was striking and we weren’t allowed on the mine property. There was a mounted police on a great big horse with a rifle across his lap. We would hide behind the outhouse until he went down the hill and cut across the property to deliver,” she said. When Louise was a little older she joined the United Mine Workers Band where she was a majorette. It was there that she met her husband, Joe, who played clarinet in the band. It wasn’t long before they were a couple. After they married, Louise’s dad promised them a small piece of the property the family farm was on. The catch was they had to build a house on it before he would hand over the title. They bought an old barn with $100 borrowed from Joe’s sister and tore it down little-by-little to get them started. Louise would find work at the Davis’ Market in Dry Tavern. “I worked in the paint and hardware area. I loved painting. When a customer would come in and say they were

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By Tara Kinsell

looking for someone to do painting I would go and do it,” she said. “We started having people coming in looking for craft supplies. They would ask for styrofoam balls and sponges.” Louise said she suggested to the owner that they stock them but she was told they were happy with what that carried. Again the entrepreneur in her kicked in and Louise decided to open her own store to sell craft products but that quickly changed as she received requests for floral arrangements. “I was good at it but you had to have a piece of paper to hang on the wall. I went to Baltimore and took a six-week class in floral arranging and I knew more about it than the person teaching, it but I got that diploma,” she said, laughing. Eventually, sometime during the 1970s, Joe suggested that they create a shop at their house and that was how, for more than 20 years, Louise operated a floral shop on Sandy Plains. Sitting in her former home office with all of her memories around her in photo albums and plastic containers, she shares her many experiences, from driving that cab to taking a trip down the Nile on a vacation to Egypt. She talked about her children, Donna, and Joseph, Jr. “Jay” who is retired from the Air Force. “I did pretty well, you know?” she said, speaking of her business acumen. We’d say she’s done “pretty well,” in general.

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Book Review: A Breath Away

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J u d d said he wanted to write the book to show the psychological involvement of the characters love interests, rather than the physical. There are moments of intimacy between characters in the novel but they are more of the hand holding variety with a smattering of innuendo at times. There are some twists and turns in the storyline that the reader may find startling, especially the ending. "It couldn't have happened any other way," Judd said. He referenced one of several poems in the book to explain his position. "I wanted to write this from the male point of view. My wife (Sally Nelson Lacko) likes action books. She said it wasn't really her type of book but she liked the action parts of it…" he said. His next novel will be more to Sally's liking, he said, continuing with the character of Chris. Judd dedicated "A Breath Away: Life's Final Chapter," to his brothers, John, James and Paul, along with their parents. Paul, also a veteran, was awarded a Purple Heart with the 1st Marine Div. 7th Marine, for injuries sustained in Vietnam. He previously lived in Rogersville and Waynesburg. Brother John served in the Navy. Judd and Sally reside in Ruff Creek where they are currently making plans for their 50th wedding anniversary in 2016. The GreeneSaver is privileged to say THANK YOU as we pay tribute to the Lacko brothers for the service to our country, and to Judd, for sharing his talent as an author. We look forward to that next one. A Breath Away: Love’s Final Chapter is Author, J. Judson Lacko, left, in his Air Force uniform with his brothers Paul U.S.M.C.(center) and John, Navy, circa available for purchase on amazon.com.

. Judson Lacko, or Judd to his friends, began writing his debut novel, "A Breath Away: Love's Final Chapter," four years ago. In it he reflects on the turbulent 1960s loosely referencing events that took place in his own life. After high school, Judd entered Waynesburg College as a pre-med major but a year into his studies he realized he lacked the discipline necessary. Instead, he turned to the Air Force. But, that year at Waynesburg left a lasting impact on Judd who places the character of Chris, based loosely upon his own life, and Taylor, a young lady he met while working in the college cafeteria, on his former campus. Although Judd does not identify the school in the book as Waynesburg, during an interview he pointed out where some of the scenes take place on its campus and in the community parks that abut it. "A Breath Away: Love's Final Chapter," is in essence a tale of soul mates. Judd said he drew upon a high school romance to create the storyline between Chris and the character of Elise. As the story unfolds, Chris is forced to make choices that affect the course of that relationship. Along that journey he has to come to terms with these decisions, good and bad.

1960s.

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CLARENCE E. BURGHY

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rmy veteran Clarence E. Burghy, Sr. received a Bronze Star and two Purple Hearts while serving in the Korean War. We join the Burghy family of Waynesburg in remembering the sacrifices of Clarence, as we pay tribute and thanks all our precious veterans.

G ree n e Sce n e of the Pa st

by Tara Kinsell

When Pitt Gas Had Its Own School

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hen the Jefferson-Morgan School District was created in 1938, it was a result of the signing of the Ruth Brownfield Bill by then Governor George H. Earle to reduce the number of school districts in the state. The merger led to the construction of the Pitt Gas Elementary School, an 8-room, one-story brick schoolhouse. Students in nearby communities were bussed to the school where Donald Titus was its first principal. Other elementary schools in the district were located at Mather, Chartiers, Jefferson (the Central School), Dry Tavern, and Lippincott. Each operated independently with its own administration, gym and lunchroom facilities, and special programs.

Students continued to be bussed to these schools until the district built a single unified elementary school behind its high school in Jefferson. The Jefferson-Morgan Elementary Center opened for the 1982-83 school year, leaving vacant schools such as Pitt Gas. Eventually, the Pitt Gas School was purchased and utilized as a nursing home. It was torn down several years ago and the only trace of the school currently is a driveway that leads to an empty field. Thanks to a former Pitt Gas Elementary Student we received a photo of the second grade class of 1969 at the school. Geraldine Green, currently of Carmichaels, said the photo is of her sister Cindy’s class, taught by Mrs. Bacon. Do you recognize yourself in this photo? Let us know!

Photos of the Pitt Gas Elementary School were submitted by Ashley Cyr of Pitt Gas. If you have an interesting old photo from the area you’d like to share, just send it to: GreeneScene of the Past, 185 Wade Street, Waynesburg, PA 15370. Or email to: info@greenesaver.com with GreeneScene Past in subject line. The GreeneSaver can even scan your original in just a few minutes if you bring it to our office. We are particularly interested in photos of people and places in the Greene County area taken between 1950 and 1980, though we welcome previous dates, too.

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JOHN K. DOBBS By Shelly Brown

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1961 graduate of Cameron High School, John Dobbs was still in the Cameron, WV area, married and working, when he received his draft notice at the age of 24. “I remember thinking, it’s a bad place to go, don’t really want to, but I will, and I’ll just do the best I can. It was a hard experience, but I survived. Many of my buddies did not,” John reflects. Though the loss of some of his comrades still weighs heavily on John’s mind, even today, the truth is that his willingness to serve and protect actually saved the lives of many. This is evidenced by the awarding of a Bronze Star with V Device, for heroism during ground combat, along with two Purple Hearts. It was 1967 when John was drafted and, not long after, found himself in the front lines of battle in Vietnam. “I drove a WWII M48 Patton Tank…that’s what we had. It was named for General George Patton,” John recalls. When you look closely at the documentation, it’s fascinating to note that John’s Purple Heart Awards, both of them, are signed by George S. Patton, son of the general, who was John’s regimental commander at the time. It was mid May of 1968, during a mission behind enemy lines, when John was wounded the first time, and the story of that incident is best told in the announcement that accompanied the awarding of his Bronze Star, which reads in part: “Specialist Four Dobbs distinguished himself by heroism in connection with military operations against a hostile force on May 18, 1968 while serving with Co. D, 1st Squadron, 11th Armored Calvary Regiment, in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Dobbs was driving the lead tank on an assault against an enemy-held objective when suddenly the tank received a direct hit from an antitank rocket

Vietnam Veteran John K. Dobbs today

and he was wounded. Totally disregarding his painful wounds, Specialist Dobbs continued to drive the vehicle into the enemy bunker complex, pointing out hostile elements for the tank commander to fire on, until Specialist Dobbs’ wounds forced an evacuation. At the evacuation point, specialist Dobbs refused medical treatment and insisted on administering first aid to the more seriously injured, carrying litters, and directing medical evacuation aircraft. Only after all the wounded had been treated did Specialist Dobbs allow himself to be examined. Specialist Dobbs’ unwavering devotion to duty, deep concern for the welfare of his comrades and disregard of personal safety while under hostile fire were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.” John received a large amount of shrapnel in his head, neck and shoulders, and the complete loss of his hearing on his left side. “But I survived,” he says, with a weary look of sadness at the memory of others who paid the ultimate sacrifice that day. Later, John received another injury, and a second Purple Heart Award, before returning home from war. He relocated to Wind Ridge, PA in the early 1970s and worked for 32 years at PPG Industries in New Martinsville, WV before retiring in 1998. John has a son, John Dell Dobbs, and he also takes great joy in his 12-year-old grandson, Marshall Dobbs. John, along with so many of our precious veterans, continues to suffer not only ailments, but the unique emotional stresses that come from the awful experience of war. He copes. Let us in some way share that burden with our support of whatever opportunities present, with our prayers, and always with our demonstrated appreciation. Thank Army Specialist John K. Dobbs, driving a WWII M48 you, John K. Dobbs, and all who serve. Patton Tank, July 1968, Vietnam.

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TIME to ESCAPE

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by Tara Kinsell

he door closes behind us as time begins to tick away. We have one hour. It sounded like such a long time but when we begin to view it in minutes, not so much. Ticktock, tick-tock, we scurry about the room looking for the clues that will set us free in 59, 58, 57, one hurdle cleared. How many more are there? We are experiencing the “Escape Room” recently opened in Morgantown, WV. Before we were locked up, in the smaller of two rooms designed to test your ability to think quickly, logically and in tandem with your teammates, we were given our scenario. It seems we were serving detention, ala the Breakfast Club, with an early out granted only if we could locate the master key before the 56, 55, 54, minutes continued to ebb away. When the opportunity presented itself to have a go at this new Escape Room, I selected my teammates with care. Not knowing what knowledge would be necessary it seemed having some younger, honor students in the mix wouldn’t be a bad idea, 53, 52, 51, among them, my son, his girlfriend and a buddy, my close friend and her daughter. We worked well together, and individually, as 50, 49, 48, 47, time continued to tick. A requested clue slipped beneath the door. Aha!! This clears up some confusion. Two more free clues before we lose one minute for each that we request. We try to use them sparingly, 46, 45, 44, 43, 42. Crap! We request another freebie. At the discretion of the game master, who watches and listens to our attempts via video monitoring, subtle hints occasionally slide into the room, 41, 40, 39, 38. After our free clues are exhausted the ones that cost begin to eat at the time as we realize we have to work faster, 37, 36, 35, 34, when we go below half of our start time. The strategic selection of my teammates works well. Each has their own strengths. It helps that three of the kids are already used to working together in school. All of a sudden we realize we have less than 20 minutes. Where is this time going?? We are stumped on one of the larger pieces to this puzzle. A hint from the game master suggests we don’t focus too much on it. We are working on

other aspects but that one problem hangs over us, 14, 13, 12, 11, another puzzle solved. We collaborate on the next piece and it suddenly becomes clear. Working quickly we enter information to complete the next phase, 9, 8, 7, 6. The tension is building as we realize we are oh so close. Our clues are exhausted by now and the game master slides a final hint into the room, 5, 4. Hurrying across the room we are one tick away from the last component, 2, 1. Time is up. The game master and staff enter the room. “You were so close. You just needed...,” he said. “We had that,” I respond. We had arrived at it when the time ran out. “Finish it,” he says. One click and we reach the location of the master key. “You were so close. You would have made it if you had one more minute,” he tells us. We clear the room and pause for a photo with a “We Almost Escaped,” sign. Next time around, in the larger of the Escape Rooms, and with five more honor students we will hopefully drop that ‘almost.’ Room two supports at least that many players. The Escape Room is bringing the nation’s latest entertainment craze in immersive game experiences to our region. The Morgantown location is the first-of-its-kind in Mountaineer country, and our own back yard, in Westover at Exit 152. The Morgantown Escape Room is owned by Todd & Betsy Downer of Greene County, Bob & Dorothy Albright of Fayette County and David & Kellie Crowe of Greene County. Give it a try! You can make online reservations at www.morgantownescaperoom.com.

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FATHER AND SON By Tara Kinsell

Saving Souls One-on-One in Pitt Gas

Photo of Richard Belding while he was in the Navy, taken in 1960 at Lake Erie.

U.S.M.C. Col. Michael Belding

arine Col. Michael H. Belding, retired, was not even born when his father, Richard B. Belding joined the United States Navy in 1959, right out of high school. Richard would receive his training at the Naval Station Great Lakes recruit training command center in Lake County, Illinois before serving aboard the Navy destroyer, the U.S.S. Farragut DLG-6. Richard participated in the April 19, 1961 Bay of Pigs Invasion in Cuba. He was honorably discharged later that year as a gunner’s mate third class, E-4. About twenty years later, son, Michael, a 1981 graduate of Waynesburg Central High School, joined the Marine Corps. following his graduation from Penn State University in 1985 with a B.S. in Agricultural Science. Michael was commissioned a second lieutenant. He later earned his M.A. in management from Webster University and his M.S. in National Security Strategy from the National War College. Throughout his 27-year military career, Col. Belding flew CH-46E helicopters, while serving

as an aviation officer at all levels. He commanded Marine Medium Helicopter Squadron 261 in 2004, during Operation Iraqi Freedom. In 2008, Michael again deployed in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom, commanding Marine Aircraft Group 16 (REIN). Col. Belding’s joint assignments included service at the United States Transportation Command, Joint Force Headquarters, National Capitol Region; and, at the Institute of National Strategic Studies, National War College, Washington, D.C. He is a graduate of the Marine Corps Amphibious Warfare School, Marine Corps Command and Staff, Marine Aviation Weapons and Tactics Squadron-1, and the Weapons and Tactics Instructor Course. Col. Belding will be the featured speaker at the Greene County Veteran’s Day Parade & Program. On Nov. 8 (See page 2). The Belding Family, along with the GreeneSaver staff, pays tribute to father and son, Richard and Michael Belding for their contributions in defending the freedoms afforded to citizens of the United States.

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hen the Pitt Gas Missionary Church was built in 1935, Marie Harshman, 100, was just 20 years old, said Pastor Carl Leipold. “She was one of the first members, and maybe even a charter member,” Leipold added, speaking to the longevity of the church in a town with only one business, a tavern. Leipold said it was the Rev. Joseph Sabo who founded the church that originally held services in a nearby building it shared with the Pitt Gas Baptist Church congregation, prior to 1935. Sabo, a coal miner before he was a minister, often said he was saved in 1930 when a revival came to Pitt Gas. He credited the revival for leading him to the pulpit, where he paid special attention to the spiritual needs of his fellow coal miners, in a town that was built around a coal mine. Sabo continued to pastor the church for 49 years. It was one of two churches that he started in the area. At the time of his retirement in 1981, Sabo was splitting his time between both of them, the missionary church in Pitt Gas and one in Clarksville. Leipold said that is the extent of his knowledge of the church history. Like Sabo, he served both churches for a time. Currently, interim pastor Chuck Tracy leads the congregation at the Clarksville Missionary Church, with oversight by Leipold as Tracy pursues the credentials to be ordained in

the church. At one time, the Pitt Gas Missionary Church was the site of the Release Time Bible Program in the Pitt Gas Elementary School, where students, with parental permission, could leave school to attend Bible study. Today, the sole church service held at Pitt Gas Missionary is at 9:15 am on Sundays with junior church held in tandem. Services at Clarksville Missionary are held at 11 am with Sunday School preceding at 10 am, Leipold said. “Our biggest drawback (at Pitt Gas) is the early church service. A lot of people don’t want to get up that early and they will jokingly tell me that,” Leipold said. “But, we will stay more traditional with our time because there is always a chance that down the road on Sundays we will be back to one person serving both churches.” Leipold said the Pitt Gas Missionary Church averages 35 people on Sundays, 15 more than the actual membership rolls. “We are a very, very friendly church, very warm in greeting people. We want to reach people for Christ, to get as many people saved as we can and in a relationship with Jesus,” Leipold said. “But, we don’t have an organized outreach. Instead, we strive to reach the community on a one-on-one basis. All are welcome.”

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Wrestling Great Kolat Breaks His Silence

n a multi-part video series, produced by FloWrestling, Cary Kolat, the undefeated 4-time PIAA champion from Jefferson-Morgan High School breaks his silence about three controversial matches, overturned in his later wrestling career. Among the three was in the 2000 Sydney Olympic Games. “When they (FloWrestling) first approached me I wanted to talk to Erin first. I always run things past my wife and this was more personal between myself, her, and my parents. It wasn’t a fun experience at the end of my career,” Cary said. At a time in history when wrestling is taking a lot of hits, including the International Olympic Committee’s (IOC) decision in 2013 to drop and then reinstate wrestling to the 2020 Olympics over a six month period, Cary agreed to talk. “After talking to Erin, I wanted to be proactive, to show what kind of people we produce in the sport. The series is dead on,” he said. “I got flooded with emails (after it aired) by people from around the country telling me how sorry they were, people I don’t even know. It was overwhelming how people responded to it.” For Cary, who won his first national title when he was just 7-years old, an Olympic Gold Medal was his ultimate goal, his only goal, proving he was the best in the world. When others took the op-

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portunity away from him it was almost too much to bear for the Rices Landing native. Understandable, as there were rule changes made in the sport specifically because of what happened to take wins away from Cary, but nothing to rectify what was taken from him. For the past 15 years, he hasn’t said much about that time in his life publically. That changed with the FloWrestling series. “This was part of America; America got robbed. This wasn’t just Cary Kolat. America got robbed,” said a former classmate of Cary’s with vigor. “He had a 137-0 record in high school. Who does that? No one, no one but Cary Kolat did that.” We have to agree, there isn’t anyone like Cary. One simply has to watch the Cary Kolat Backflip video on YouTube to get a sense of the things that set him apart. In the years since Sydney, Cary has primarily been sharing the sport he loves as a coach and mentor to young wrestlers, including coaching at North Carolina Unversity, and currently as the head coach at Campbell University in Buies Creek, N.C. “It is a small program and at 42 you figure out what kind of person you are. I’m not a corporate Joe kind of guy. They have great administrative support at Campbell,” Cary said. “I’m starting my second season now and trying things to jump start this

program and get it going. When I took over it was in a little bit of trouble. We had 16 guys to start and it went down to 11 and now we have 43 kids.” Cary said he really feels like the program will hit its stride in a couple of years (Direct Results, home of the GreeneSaver, was proud to design and print t-shirts for Cary’s UNC wrestlers recently). One of the plusses of coaching the school is that recruitment for the team brings Cary closer to home, ‘Rices Landing,’ more often. “I make it now about 4 or 5 times a year when I’m coming to Ohio to see somebody or to Pittsburgh to see someone,” he said. “That is, and always

has been, a hotbed for wrestling recruitment. It is different there. It is always going to be home, that small little town. You really don’t lose that feeling.” Cary’s parents, Joe and Judy Kolat and sisters, Kim Kolat Kuhns and Tracy Kolat Holtschneider still live in Greene County. Cary makes his home with wife, Erin and their three children: daughters, Zoe, 14 and Grace, 10, and son, Ryder, 7. GreeneSaver readers can check out the FloWrestling series on Cary at FloWrestling.org.

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Coo l at S c h ool by Tara Kinsell

There is a New Robotics Team in Town

Pictured from left, brothers: Joshua, Ryon, Jobe and Ashton McCartney, work on Ripper the robot for the Greene County Robotics team. Team members, not pictured, include: Dalton Campbell, Julia Westich, Daniel Westich, Eli Broadwater, and Jonathan Baily. Photos submitted by Joshua McCartney

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otsIQ and similar educational programs are on the rise, a response to the highly successful BattleBots television series (in which homemade, remote controlled robots face-off in competition). As the television show grew in popularity, so did the number of student fans who wanted to build competitive robots of their own. It soon became evident that this activity, the sport of robots in competition, had the unique potential to impact middle school, high school and college students in a powerful and positive way: Through the process of robot building, student’s imaginations are captured as they design, build and compete with their own robotic creations; and through this hands-on effort students gain practical knowledge of math, science, engineering and manufacturing. When Joshua McCartney, a junior at Waynesburg Central, competed in the BotsIQ robotic competition with teammates from the Greene County Career and Technology Center (GCCTC) he had so much fun that he wanted to share the experience with his brother, Ashton, 14. The catch is that Ashton is homeschooled. Joshua set out to find a way for a homeschooled robotics team to enter the BotsIQ program. It turned out the process was quite simple. Joshua filled out the necessary paperwork and team Greene County Robotics was formed.

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“There are nine of us on the team. I thought it was a good way for kids to get together and learn about robotics, especially with the push to learn STEM (science technology engineering and mathematics) today,” Joshua said. “For the first two years we qualify for a $1050 grant from BotsIQ. It gets smaller in the third and fourth years.” The grants are designed to help teams get off the ground. Currently, the team is still waiting for its first grant money to come in so it can order the necessary parts for ‘Ripper,’ the name chosen for its first robot. “We chose a vertical, spinner, saw blade design. We all had a lot of say in the different aspects of the robot and then we tweaked them here and there. It has been a nice mash-up of everybody’s ideas,” he said. The members of the team range in age from 13 to 16. That vertical, spinning saw blade will help Ripper tear through the competition, at least that is the goal. The team will compete with Ripper, pinning Joshua against his former teammates at the GCCTC, in the spring but they don’t mind, he said. Our hats are off to Joshua for taking the initiative to bring robotics into the home-schooling program in the county.

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Oct Nov Greenesaver 2015  

This is our annual "Honoring Our Veteran" issue. Read all about local veterans and their families. And the race is heating up for our local...

Oct Nov Greenesaver 2015  

This is our annual "Honoring Our Veteran" issue. Read all about local veterans and their families. And the race is heating up for our local...

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