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NOVEMBER / DECEMBER

2016 • GreeneScene Magazine

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GreeneScene Magazine •

NOVEMBER / DECEMBER

2016


NOVEMBER / DECEMBER

2016 • GreeneScene Magazine

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E

I Love this P l ace

lisha Rinehart, whose obituary refers to him as “one of the oldest and most highly respected citizens of this county” died at the home of his son George N. Rinehart of Delphene on Friday, Sept. 14 1917. Elisha Rinehart, spent the better part of his life in Jackson Township, where he purchased a 224 acre farm in 1859 for $12 per acre. He continued to add to the farm, becoming one of the largest real estate holders in this part of Pennsylvania. His son George N. Rinehart, (the family calls him G.N.) became a Justice of the Peace in Jackson Twp. at Delphene, and continued to accumulate land. The family estimates that at one time the father and son pair held over 2,000 acres in western Jackson Twp. G.N. and his wife, Hester Moore Rinehart, were also widely known for establishing and operating the general store and Post Office at Delphene in 1889. Though G.N. died in 1932, Hester lived to the age of 93, finally passing in Nov. 1955. Great grandson Albie Rinehart shared a clipping of Hester’s obituary, which includes this interesting narrative on her life: “As a small girl, she saw soldiers returning home from the Civil War. Later she saw the excitement which prevailed in the Delphene and Bristoria sections when the first oil and gas wells were being drilled and lines laid.” Hmmm… sounds rather familiar as Mighty Marcellus repeats the cycle. The Delphene store was eventually passed to a grandson, Russel Rinehart, and later sold to Guy Lemmons. “I believe the store closed sometime in the mid 1940s, and the building was torn down,” says Jesse Rinehart, another great grandson of G.N. “In the early 50s, about 1952 & 53, Jack Smith delivered groceries by truck - staples like bread, flour and sugar - he went around to all the farmer’s houses, because there was no store at Delphene anymore,” he recalls. Jesse took time from his busy schedule, stop-

The store and post office at Delphene, established by George N. Rinehart. His granddaughter, Allif Woodruff Anderson is pictured in front. Photo circa 1940.

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JACKSON TOWNSHIP, PA by Shelly Brown

Illustration of the Peter M. Grimes farmstead with store and Post Office at White Cottage. The building on the far left is still standing, the original log cabin pictured below.

ping on his way home from the golf course one day, to entertain us with memories and stories about Jackson Township, where he was born in 1924. Yeah…Jesse’s memories go way back. “I remember how you could buy a thick slice of longhorn cheese at the store for 10 cents, and you got a handful of oyster crackers out of the barrel – whatever you could hold – to go with it for free,” Jesse reminisced. “I would ride my bike down there and watch ‘em play cards. Sometimes on Friday nights, Newt Morris would come in and play the fiddle.” And with a twinkle in his eye he also told of the “drip gas” that some in the neighborhood (who will remain unnamed) would help themselves to at the nearby compressor station. “They let it freeze, and that would separate the water from the gas – they could run it in cars, trucks or tractors,” he explained. Like all the kids at Delphene, Jesse went to Locust Spring School through the 8th grade. Then he chose to go to Rogersville for high school. “My older brother Willy had gone to Aleppo High School, but I wanted to be on the football team at Rogersville,” Jesse recalls. Willy rode a horse up and across the hill to Aleppo to get to school every day, for two years with his sister Kathleen on double behind him. When Jesse went to Rogersville, he had a different mode of transportation. “I drove a 1929 Ford Model A with a rumble seat, and I’d buy six gallons of gas for a dollar at McDowell’s Blue Sunoco gas station by Golden Oaks Park” Jesse says, and adds that sometimes his friend Bill Throckmorton would drive and he would ride in the rumble seat. That was in 1941. One could spend many hours listening to Jesse Rinehart reminisce about growing up in Jackson Township, “watching the beavers building their dam by Dave Kerns’ place or playing ball in Dave’s bottom down below the store… ,” it was a good place to be. Jesse left Delphene on April 15, 1943 when he went to fight in WWII. He served in the

South Pacific, saw the horrors of suicide cliff at Saipan. When he returned home, he spent some time in “Radio & Television school in Cleveland before opening Rinehart TV Service in Waynesburg where he lived and worked from 1952-1980. Anyone familiar with Jackson Township must also be familiar with the Grimes Family. I had the pleasure of spending an afternoon with The Honorable H. Terry Grimes and lovely wife Carlyn, in their new home, recently built on the same spot where Judge Grimes was raised on Golden A current photo of the original log cabin, once covered with white clapboard Oaks Road, across from siding, the homestead of Peter M. Grimes, farmer, merchant, Post Master and Willow Bank. Now Justice of the Peace at White Cottage. Today, it is the home of Carol & Ken semi-retired, Judge Peters, located on Golden Oaks Road at the foot of – what else- Grimes Hill. Grimes is a well-known and highly respected Road Oaks. Interestingly, the logs were not always man, though he was certainly not the first jurist in so evident. “When he first settled there, he actually his family. covered the original log structure with clapboard Three generations before him, Peter Martin siding and painted it white – which is why the Grimes was elected Justice of the Peace in 1855, community was called White Cottage, still desigserving at White Cottage in Jackson Township, nated on the maps today,” Judge Grimes explains. where he had been appointed Post Master two Peter Grimes not only operated the Post Office, years earlier. he established a store and supply business offering “He was my great, great grandfather,” says “dry goods, groceries, boots and shoes, hardware, Judge Grimes, “he lived at the foot of what became queensware and all kinds of goods to supply counknown as Grimes Hill, the house is still there.” The try trade,” according to an illustration created durhistoric log cabin to which the Judge refers is easily recognizable to anyone who travels Rt. 18/Golden I Love This Place continued on next page. GreeneScene Magazine •

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I Love This Place continued from previous page.

Even though she is a self-described “transplant” (a native of Oklahoma who met her love while he was stationed at Ft. Sill), Carlyn has an obvious appreciation for the things about Jackson that keep its people close. Even the people who didn’t start out there. Like Bobbi and David Cressey, who are just one example – there are many others – of people escaping the city and choosing Jackson Township, Greene County Pennsylvania, as their haven. They’ve come from Detroit, New York, New Jersey, Chicago, Pittsburgh, Columbus and other pillars of population. “We took a week off from our work in Washington D.C. and just drove west. Initially we had the idea that we might move to Morgantown, WV – so that’s where we headed,” Bobbi recalls. “While we were there, looking at a real estate magazine, we saw the farm for sale in Jackson Twp., Pennsylvania. We fell in love with it.” In 1994, though they didn’t know a soul here and had no idea what the future would hold, Bobbi and David Cressey quit their jobs, left the city and moved to their own 55 acres of heaven up a little hollow in Jackson Twp. David, a career librarian, worked with Eva K. Bowlby as well as Waynesburg University, and even operated a small library near the Jackson Twp. Municipal Bldg. for several years. Bobbi is recently retired from many years at Specialty Herbal store in Waynesburg, now enjoying more time at her country home. “We love it still. It’s the most beautiful place, secluded and quiet…we are definitely at home here,” she says with enthusiasm. The raw beauty and wilderness of Jackson Township is definitely what appeals to most of its inhabitants, according to Steve Kiger, who has served as a Twp. Supervisor for the past 19 years. “The people here do appreciate their privacy,” Steve affirms. “We maintain several hundred miles of road, and it’s all rural.” The Township even maintains the roads which meander through Pennsylvania State Game Lands, occupying thousands of acres over three separate areas of Jackson Township. “The game lands do attract people,” Steve says, “they have a pretty nice rifle range near Delphene, and folks come from all over to use that.” Private though they may be, Steve can also tell you about the spirit of community Jackson Township residents display. “We have a community center here that is used often and well for gatherings, dinners, meetings, and such. The people here are sociable and tend to care about each other. We also have a recycling program that most use to help keep our township clean,” Steve explains. There are

ing the era when the spot was the hub of the community (pictured at left). “A story has been passed down through the family that makes one think Peter may have cared more for animals than some people. They say when drivers would come to the store and load their wagons with supplies, if he felt the load was too heavy for the horses, he would make them unload half, take the wagon to the top of the hill to unload and then come back for the second half,” Judge Grimes shared. Peter Grimes remained an influential and respected citizen of the area, and, like his contemporary Elisha Rinehart mentioned earlier, began to accumulate property. “Whenever a farm would become available, he would buy it. Later, as his sons and daughters became adults, he would sell it Locust Spring School to them – he never gave it – he sold the properties to those of his children who wanted to settle and farm there, resulting in all the Grimes descendants, including the judge, still thriving in Jackson Township today. He comes from deep Jackson roots on his mother’s side as well – the Stockdale Family, who mostly settled in the area of Crooked Hill. One of the many fascinating stories Judge Grimes can share involves a large, long barreled, very old gun that is mounted on the wall in his study, the result of a familial coincidence. “This muzzle loader was made for a customer by Albert Jones of Aleppo, a gunsmith and my mother’s great, great uncle. But it did not come to me through my mother’s family at all. This gun was given to me by George Grimes, who received it from his great uncle, Lincoln Grimes. Lincoln’s father was Peter M. Grimes, my paternal ancestor, and the customer who commissioned Albert Jones to make the gun way back sometime around 1875.” When he was growing up, most of the one room school houses in the township were still opWillow Bank School erating. Young Terry went to Willow Bank his first two large compartment bins at the township build- Woodruff, Buzz, Bluff and others, as this collection four years and then to Locust Spring School, before ing, available 24 hours a day, one for cardboard and of hills and valleys has for centuries been home to he went on to high school at Rogersville. Like most paper, the other for plastic, glass and metal. Twp. a strong breed of pioneer people. And its majesJackson Twp. kids, he recalls the favorite winter officials transport the collections weekly to Greene tic mountain top views, pristine woodlands and past times of sled riding & hunting in the woods. Arc at Ruff Creek for recycling. “We also offer a meadows, and abundance of wildlife and nature atHe remembers the little stores and that used to be Fall and a Spring Clean-up day each year, when we tracts that breed still today. Some sunny day, take a on the main road such as Thomas’ at the top of bring in dumpsters and help residents dispose of drive down Golden Oaks Road and be sure to veer Grimes Hill and Lemmon’s Store (later Phillips’) large and hard to get rid of items,” Steve adds. off onto Crooked Hill, Willow Bank or Delphene at Nettle Hill and of course Rainbow Heights (see If time and space would permit, we could tell Road; wander around and back over to Grinnage GreeneScene of the Past on page 6). you of other families with rich histories in Jackson Run, Tunnel Road or Toms Run…Keyhole, TriJudge Grimes did leave the peace and quiet of Twp. We could speak of additional early settle- umph or Blockhouse Run…enjoy the sights and Jackson Twp. behind however when he served in ments at Bristoria, Falling Timber, Maranatha, sounds, and you’ll see why they love this place. the U.S. Army Artillery, active duty from 1966-69, followed by six years in the reserves. He then continued his education and career as a lawyer and later judge, serving on the bench for 23 years as President Judge and to date another six years as Senior Judge. They returned to Jackson Twp in 1980, and both Judge Grimes and Carlyn, a teacher at West Greene School District the last 13 years of her career, are enthuJudge Grimes has a candy dish from the siastic about the beauty This well preserved yellow brick house is an enduring sight at Delphene, the original home of George N. Rinehart, pictured on the left circa 1920s and the original PM Grimes store and the key to and benefits of life there. home of the Foley family today, pictured on the right.

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the Post Office at White Cottage.

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by Shelly Brown

G ree n e Sce n e of the Pa st

RAINBOW HEIGHTS

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lthough it’s been gone since sometime in the 1950s, most of the people who have a history in Jackson Township either actually remember Rainbow Heights, or more likely, remember their parents or grandparents talking about the place. The above photo comes to us compliments of The Honorable H. Terry Grimes, who couldn’t tell us the date it was taken, but quite easily identified the car in the photo behind the horse as a 1931 Ford. So we know it had to be taken after that. “It was quite famous – or infamous – depending on your perspective,” said Judge Grimes with a smile. Located on Golden Oaks Road at the top of Nettle Hill, Rainbow Heights was many things over the years. It was a store and, probably, originally an Inn with rooms to let on the top floor. It was a gas station, which is evident in this picture. “It was also a bar and restaurant, and the 2nd floor was converted to a dance hall,” added Judge Grimes. Many remember the place for the dance hall and regular square dances held there on Friday nights. Jesse Rinehart, another Jackson Twp. native, recalls climbing the stairs and setting in a balcony at Rainbow

Heights to watch the dancers when he was just a “wee little feller.” Jesse is now 92 years old. “There was even a barbershop in there at one time, Charlie Geho was the barber,” Jesse adds. According to Judge Grimes it was operated for a time – around the late 30s early 40s - by Paul & Bonnie Lewis. “If you know Tommy Ankrom – those were his grandparents,” he said. Rainbow Heights burned to the ground sometime in the 1950s. “I was in high school when it burned, we could see the flames and glow from our house down here,” Judge Grimes recalls from his recently built new home, now standing on the same spot as the house in which he grew up, in the valley down the hill a few miles from where Rainbow Heights once stood. Today, there is a large empty flat space there on the hilltop, serving as a handy pull-off spot for trucks and travelers. But those who remember will always point and, with a smile, say “that’s where it was…Rainbow Heights.” Thanks to Judge Grimes for sharing the picture and memories – there’s more to enjoy in our feature about Jackson Township in this month’s magazine.

If you have an interesting old photo from the area you’d like to share, just send it to: GreeneScene of the Past, 185 Wade Street, Waynesburg, PA 15370. Or email to: info@greenesaver.com with GreeneScene Past in subject line. The GreeneSaver can even scan your original in just a few minutes if you bring it to our office. We are particularly interested in photos of people and places in the Greene County area taken between 1950 and 1980, though we welcome previous dates, too.

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Bethany United Methodist Church

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By Shelly Brown mong the most beloved teachings of the Christian faith is Jesus’ famous “Sermon on the Mount,” when he climbed to the top of a hill to deliver his message to the multitudes. Mountain tops and high places often appear as holy places in scripture, where communion with our creator and strengthening of faith is accomplished. Such a place exists at Bethany United Methodist Church in Jackson Township, Greene County, PA. Perched at the apex of Nettle Hill on Golden Oaks Road, this simple country church clings to the faith as the small congregation continues to face the challenges that pursue so many rural churches today. In the past, when travel by horse or foot brought people to the closest house of worship, the pews at Bethany were filled and overflowing to the beautiful balcony that still graces the back of this church, built in 1908. While the The outside of Bethany UMC is flanked by very tall spruces and cedars, a testament to the endurance of this high house of number of worshippers on Sunday mornings is no God and the church within. longer so commanding, the spirit of today’s congregation has kept this high house of God open morning, when I visited Bethany United Methodist and inviting to those seeking His Word. The location of the church has certainly played Church, on invitation from Martha Berdine, whose history with the church reaches back some 40 years a part in both its appeal and its struggles. “We see the most stunning sunrises…and or more. With a stream of pure sunlight shining so rainbows, sometimes two and three arcs in the sky, right over the church,” says Nancy Martin, who bright through the windows it brought tears to my lives just down the road, in sight of Bethany, “but eyes, I listened to Pastor Gale Cobb as he delivered a there are also times when the wind is so strong it passionate sermon. Surrounded by rich, hand hewn has blown out the pilot light in the furnace,” she woodwork, stained glass and a cathedral ceiling, he adds with a chuckle. On May 5, 1996, the church spoke of God’s love, and the Father who will always building was struck by lightning, but did not burn. “have your back,” and it occurred to me that maybe These steadfast folks fixed the damage and went on it was a different “Son” that was moistening my eyes. We spoke that day about admiring the beauty about doing the Lord’s business. A deed shows the purchase of 2.75 acres on of our surroundings and the building we were in, March 27, 1909, from Rebecca and David Phillips, while acknowledging that the actual church is not at a cost of $137.50. The sign on the front of the the structure, it is the people. The people of Bethany, who gathered cans of building dates the church to 1908, which is confirmed by Helen Gump, a long-time parishioner. food for the Corner Cupboard Food Bank that day. Helen and her husband Bill Gump and family were The people who support programs like the Samariinstrumental in re-opening the church doors over tan’s Purse, 2nd Sam 9, Young Life, Gideons and the 40 years ago, when it closed for a brief time due to Benedictine Sister’s drive for shoes. The people who dwindling attendance. “We had been living in Ohio donated to recent WV flood victims. The people when the church closed in 1970. When we came who share the blessings they enjoy with others, and back, Bill, his mother Ida and I went about asking work to stay the course, helping the gospel message people if they wanted to come back, they did, and remain available to all. Come hear it, Sunday mornservices began again on Oct. 7, 1973.” Services have ings at 9:30am, from the mountain top, at Bethany continued ever since, including a crisp November United Methodist Church.

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Spo r t Sh o rt s

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RAIDERS ENJOY GREAT FALL SUCCESS

hat a fall sports season it was at Waynesburg Central High School! During a season that saw the Raider football team go winless, the other fall sports teams certainly picked up the slack, combining for four section titles and even an individual State Champion! Let’s start with Girls Soccer…. The Lady Raiders, coming off a season that saw them win their first ever playoff game last year, stormed through the regular season. They lost their season opener, but then won 12 games in a row. They would finish the regular season with a 15-2 record, losing only 1 section game, and outscoring their regular season opponents by a total of 72-15. This fall marked the first ever Section Title for Waynesburg in Girls Soccer and they earned a first round bye in the WPIAL Playoffs. After a 1-0 win over Charleroi in the Quarterfinals, the Lady Raiders earned their first ever berth in the WPIAL Semifinals! Their season ended there, however in a 3-1 loss to Freeport. Looking back on the season, head coach Joe Kijowski said, “I watch how hard they all work and the sacrifices they make. It was nice to see that they were rewarded for that.” The girls weren’t the only soccer team with success this fall, as the boys also won a section title, their first since 1996. The boys were even more dominant in the regular season than the girls as they finished with a record of 14-1, outscoring their opponents by a combined 82-7! The Raiders made history by winning their first playoff game in program history, a 2-0 win over Mount Pleasant, but suffered a heartbreaking loss in the Quarterfinals to Shady Side Academy, 3-2 in double overtime. “It was incredibly satisfying to win Waynesburg’s first section title in 20 years,” said head coach Matt Blair. “Winning our first playoff game was a great experience and I think will give us a lot of confidence going in to next season.” There was another first section title in program history for Waynesburg Volleyball. Ripping through their section schedule, Waynesburg lost only 1 section match and ended the season with a 13-match winning streak! “This section title did not come by accident,” said head coach Dan Higinbotham. “These girls have been working hard since 7th grade. They kept their focus the entire season and I am proud to be the coach of the first team to earn a section volleyball title at Waynesburg.” Unfortunately the Lady Raiders were not able to parlay the regular season success into postseason success as they made an early exit from the WPIAL playoffs, losing to Cardinal Wuerl

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by Jason Tennant

North Catholic. Moving on to more individualized sports, Waynesburg still experienced Cross Country team success too as the Boys Cross Country team was also a Section Champion this fall. “Winning our section is a great accomplishment,” said head coach Matt Brandstetter. “They train year-round. Their work ethic showed on the course.” Two runners in particular really stood out: Cade Rush and Ben Bumgarner. Both placed in the top 15 in the WPIAL, with Bumgarner finishing as WPIAL runner-up. Both went on to the state meet where Bumgarner took his career to new heights, winning a State Title! “Ben showed all season that he can be dominant in very big competitions,” said Brandstetter. “The state meet showed Ben’s strength.” There was one more individual bright spot for Waynesburg this fall as golfer Aaron Yorio qualified not only for the WPIAL Championships but also the State Championships. Yorio had a very memorable WPIAL Tournament as he struck a hole-in-one on the 15th hole to vault him into state qualifying position. He finished 17th in the state! On Yorio, his head coach Jeff Coss said, “Aaron had a great season both in the team aspect and individual postseason. He is a hard worker and loves competition.” It was literally a “banner” season for Waynesburg’s fall sports as there will be many additions to the banners hung in the Waynesburg Central Gymnasium. “The season was just unbelievable,” said Athletic Director Justin Stephenson. “To have

four Section Champions is something that just doesn’t come around very often. I told the kids, you’ll always have those memories and it’s just a great reward for all the hard work they and the coaches put in.”

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Christmas Tree

EXTRAVAGANZA P By Linda Moon

This beautiful and uniquely decorated Christmas tree from last year’s event paid homage to “The Church Ladies.”

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utting together the tree, stringing the lights, hanging the ornaments and tinsel. Tree decoration begins for most people after Thanksgiving. And yes, it can be a chore. But what if you could win an already decorated tree for your home or office? According to the President of the ACTS Board of Directors Evelyn Edwards, the idea for a tree auction was started by the board as a way to raise money to help the Cumberland Township Food Pantry. Every year since 2003, the ACTS (arts, crafts, talents and services) thrift shop of the Carmichaels United Methodist Church has sponsored the Christmas Tree Extravaganza by auctioning decorated trees with all of the proceeds going to the Cumberland Township Food Pantry. The first year there were 8 trees decorated and donated, and $193.00 was raised. Every year since then the number of trees donated and the dollar amount raised has continued to rise. In 2015 there were 29 trees donated and the money raised was $3,750. Since the beginning a total of $20,294.66 has been raised and donated to the Food Pantry through the tree auction. Trees are donated by individuals, com-

munity organizations, churches and businesses. They are taken to the fellowship hall of the church and decorated. All trees are then displayed in the fellowship hall which is open to anyone wanting to view the trees. The hall is staffed by volunteers from the church and employees of the ACTS Shop. Tickets can then be purchased at 3 for $1.00, 7 for $2.00 or 20 for $5.00 and deposited in donation cans that are available for each tree. The size of the trees donated in the past has ranged from 18 inches to 6 feet. In the 13 years that this event has taken place, Edwards states that she has never seen any 2 trees decorated alike. Manager of the ACTS Shop Carol Modrick takes her turn at staffing the fellowship hall. She sits and sells tickets and answers any questions. “I feel that it’s a good cause and a way to help support the food bank. It shows the community our support. I think it also shows the food bank and the people it helps that we care about them” says Modrick. “We just Praise the Lord for the idea in the first place and the continued growth. We have had many new people jump on board by submitting trees. Word has spread and it has become a family

event for many to wait and see if they win a tree before they put theirs up at home” said Edwards. “We hope you will come see and participate. You will be surprised to see so many trees decorated so differently!” Anyone wanting to donate and decorate a tree can go into the ACTS Shop and fill out an entry form. The ACTS Shop is open Mon-Friday from 9:30 to 3:30 and Saturdays from 10-2 and is located at 104 W. South St in Carmichaels. Trees will be set up on Friday, 12/02. The United Methodist Fellowship hall will be open for viewing, 10am – 7pm 12/03, 12/05 – 12/09. You can enter through the ACTS shop or the side door on South St. Admission is free. The drawings for the trees will be held Friday Dec 9th at 6:00 p.m. Winners do not have to be present to win but all trees must be picked up by noon the following day.

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2016 Toys for Tots

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ou can mark your calendars now, the Tri-County Leathernecks have announced December 17 will be the distribution date for the 2016 Toys for Tots program in Greene County. “This will be 34th year for the program,”said Buzz Walters, Commandant of the Leathernecks. The original event was funded in part by an elimination dinner sponsored by the Men and Woman of the Moose. The proceeds from the dinner were used to purchase toys. To this day, the Moose continues to support Toys for Tots in Greene County with the dinner, and many of the Moose members donate their own time and money for the program. “We could not do it without the Moose and the support of the generous people of Greene County who also donate toys. They have been great each year,” Buzz adds. New, unwrapped toys can be dropped at collection boxes throughout Waynesburg and Greene County – you’ll see them all over. The toy distribution on December 17, will be from 10am-Noon. Toys will be distributed to parents of children ages 0-12 years. There are some guidelines you need to know. Parents need to bring social security mumbers for every child, and proof of household Income. The following locations will have toy distribution , contact names and numbers are provided if you have questions in advance: Waynesburg - Greene County Fairgrounds Murray Williams • 724-627-8441 Buzz Walters • 724-499-5332 Carmichaels/Cumberland Township - Carmichaels American Legion Theresa Walters • 724-966-2009 Laura Walters Clarksville - St. Thomas Church Dick Saxby • 724-377-2450 Greensboro/Bobtown-Bobtown Fire Hall Toni Cline • 724-943-2108

WINNER!

Congratulations to Marge Kurilko of Dilliner, PA who correctly identified each of the Veterans Memorial Monuments featured in last months’ special tribute edition. 1. WWI Memorial on Jefferson Road (Rt. 188) near the Franklin Twp/ Morgan Twp line 2. Veterans Memorial in Clarksville, near the post office 3. Veterans Memorial near Hewitt Presbyterian Church in Rices Landing 4. Veterans Community Honor Roll in Graysville, near the Vol. Fire Company 5. Veterans Honor Roll in Rogersville, near Community Bank

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Waynesburg Chamber of Commerce’s 2016 Distinguished Service Awards

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he Waynesburg Area Chamber of Commerce hosts its annual Membership Banquet and presentation of Distinguished Service Awards on Saturday, November

19th. 2016 was the first year for a new award, “The McCracken Award of Excellence” for a business or organization, in addition to the Individual Distinguished Service Awards which have been awarded annually since 1988. The individual awards are bestowed based on lasting contributions to community welfare, participation in civic organizations, evidence of leadership ability, success in vocation, personal and/or business progress, and cooperation with other individuals and organizations. The award has no relation to work performed for the Chamber of Commerce. Jack McCracken was the first individual recipient. In 2004 the Organizational Distinguished Service Award was created, with the award going to the Social Service League of Waynesburg. Special awards have been presented from time to time over the years as well as posthumous awards. The new McCracken Legacy Award is awarded to a business or organization, having an operating presence in Greene County who has demonstrated ambition, profitability, growth, sound business planning, customer satisfaction and management of people; a commitment to social responsibility and exemplary community involvement; demonstrated a

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positive social and/or economic impact on the community and exemplary civic community leadership. The 2016 Distinguished Service Awards will be presented to Gene & Judy Rush, Individual Award winners; David Cumberledge, Posthumous Distinguished Service Award and First Federal Savings & Loan of Greene County, McCracken Legacy Award. Mr. & Mrs. Rush, Mr. Cumberledge and First Federal Savings & Loan of Greene County will be honored at the Chamber’s Annual Membership Meeting and Banquet to be held on Saturday, November 19 at Waynesburg University Benedum Dining Hall. The Chamber serves the community in many ways throughout the year by sponsoring the annual Christmas Parade and 5th Grade Career Days in Central Greene, Jefferson-Morgan and West Greene school districts. 2016 marked the 26th year that the Chamber has given a scholarship to a graduating Greene County high school senior who is going on to a two-year or four-year college, university or trade school. It also works with the business community to bring services and information to its members through meetings, newsletters, training seminars and networking gatherings. It also provides ribbon cuttings as part of grand opening celebrations for new member businesses in the county. The Greene County Business 2 Business Social serves the business community by providing a premier “Business-to-Business” networking event. The

2016 • GreeneScene Magazine

Chamber was recently ranked number 16 by the Pittsburgh Business Times on their list of “Largest Chambers in the Pittsburgh Region” with 360 members. The Chamber has made the list since 2005 when it debuted at number 23 and has been steadily climbing the list. The Chamber is very proud of this ranking which reflects the dedication of the staff and the Board of Directors to growing a vibrant and thriving Chamber to serve not only the business community but the general population as well.

Gene & Judy Rush received the individual Distinguished Service Award.

David Cumberledge, Posthumous Distinguished Service Award recipient.

First Federal Savings & Loan Association of Greene County was the recipient of the first McCracken Legacy Award.

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PRISON PUPS… Changing Lives

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he lives of those we serve will be forever changed through the opportunities and independence afforded by a steadfast relationship with a service or companion dog.” That is the vision that propels Canine Partners for Life (CPL), a nonprofit organization which trains full-service dogs to assist people with physical or cognitive disabilities perform everyday tasks. Founded in 1989, the organization thrives on a 45 acre property in Cochranville, Pennsylvania, though its reach is far beyond. The sometimes miraculous, and always heartwarming, stories of CPL clients tell of more than 650 service and companion dogs changing lives in 45 states. In 2001, a special program was launched by CPL, extending that reach in a unique way, by helping not just the people who need & receive a service dog, but also changing the lives of those who train them. The CPL Prison Puppy Raising Program was initiated 15 years ago when the Maryland Correctional Institute for Women in Jessup, MD became its first participant, where prison inmates provide the initial year of training for the dogs. The success and positive impact of the program on CPL’s mission led to its induction at several other institutions, now ten in PA and three in MD, including right here in our community, at SCI Greene. The Prison Puppy Raising Program at SCI Greene was initiated in October 2013, and the first puppies arrived at the facility in March 2014. Since that time 12 dogs have received their introduction into a lifetime of service and companionship, and twice that many men at SCI Greene have been responsible for it. Here’s how it works. The Prison Puppy Raising Program begins with the CPL in-house breeding program where the Labradors are whelped. The puppies remain at the main CPL facility in Cochran for the first eight to ten weeks of their lives, after which they are relocated for their first year of in home training either at a volunteer’s home or at one of the prison facilities. During the puppies’ first year of training they are house broken and learn basic obedience, house manners, and socialization. During that year they are evaluated at four, eight, and twelve month intervals to ensure their ability to obey commands and complete specific tasks necessary for a service dog. The puppies remain in the prison for anywhere between one year and eighteen months. When the puppies pass the required evaluations they are then returned to the CPL kennel to complete the second year of training which includes learning tasks tailored specifically for the final recipient of the service dog. During their stay at SCI Greene, each puppy is paired with two inmate trainers who take turns spending time with and training them. The puppies spend twenty-four hours a day with their inmate handlers who are responsible for feeding, grooming, and training them. The puppies live in the inmate’s cell and accompany them to all of their daily tasks including work, dining, and recreation. Inmate participants and the puppy they are working with must attend a half day of formal, structured training administered by a CPL trainer every other week. The inmates are even responsible for the cost of supplies for the pups they manage, holding fundraisers from which money is pooled into the Inmate General Welfare Fund, tagged for the food and supplies needed. SCI Greene usually hosts five puppies at one time, allowing for ten inmates to participate in the program. Inmate participants are selected based on a list of criteria and application process. Inmates who wish to participate in the Prison Puppy Raising Program must not be convicted of any violent crimes or crimes against animals or children, and must maintain good behavior for a specific period of time. Inmate

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By Jewel Wrick

handlers are qualified first based on their application and behavior by an institutional vote, and the final selection is made by the facility superintendent. Inmates who are selected for participation must maintain good behavior and complete the necessary training themselves on how to raise the puppies. They complete a minimum of four training classes administered by CPL before they are permitted to handle a puppy. “The inmate handlers learn responsibility and accountability, and the puppies have a generally positive effect on the general prison population,” said Tina Staley, the Program Coordinator at SCI Greene. Jennifer Swank, the Prison Puppy Raising Program Coordinator from CPL, explains that the inmate participants benefit by gaining experience and learning the skill of dog training, learning responsibility and compassion, and learning how to care for something or someone other than themselves. “Inmates who participate in the Puppy Raising Program are motivated by a desire to give something back to the community or to do something good with their lives,” she adds. After the puppies’ first year of training in the prison they return to the main CPL facility to learn tasks specific to the individual they will live with and assist after graduation. They become specialized in helping people with for pairing with people with a wide variety of conditions including Multiple Sclerosis (MS), Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson’s, Spinal Injury, Stroke, Arthritis, Heart Disease, or any disability that affects mobility. Service dogs can also be trained for “medical alert” for individuals who suffer from seizures, certain cardiac conditions, or diabetes. Puppies are generally matched with their recipients when they are two years old. Individuals who receive service dogs from CPL maintain a lifelong partnership with the organization. Service dogs can assist their owners with a multitude of daily activities depending on the specific needs of their condition. Common tasks for service dogs to assist with include: retrieving items, assisting with mobility, stability & walking, opening doors, assisting with laundry & dressing, and turning lights on and off. Some service dogs can even be trained to complete monetary transactions for their owner by giving their debit card to a cashier! For more information on CPL, visit www.k94life.org.

After the service dogs who spend their first year at SCI Greene graduate from the training program, photos are sent back to the prison so that the inmates can see the final product of their hard work. Two of the service dogs trained at SCI Greene are Lucee (top) and Rene (bottom).

GreeneScene Magazine •

NOVEMBER / DECEMBER

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I

n October of 1937 the Presbyterian Church of Carmichaels opened its door to a group of women interested in forming a women’s club. Out of that meeting came the Carmichaels Women’s Civic Club with the goal of promoting the arts, education and community service. The official formation was Feb 3, 1938. Later that year, the club became affiliated with the Pennsylvania Federation of Women’s Clubs. 79 years later, the club is still going strong. Meeting the first Thursday of every month in the Fellowship Hall of the Carmichaels United Methodist Church, the original roster of 27 women has grown to a current membership of 33 community members, teachers, homemakers and individuals from all walks of life and ages with an interest in public service. The oldest of the group is 80+ years young and has been a member for over 60 years. Current President Andrea Semenoff has been in the club for 24 years, serving as President for the last five. “I want to keep it going. It has a long history, and I am proud of our club and what it has accomplished,” Andrea says with enthusiasm. The very first project of the club was a Red Cross drive held the same year it was formed. Today, many projects continue to be sponsored by the club, including the enduring tradition of honoring a “Girl of the Month.” At each monthly meeting, one Carmichaels High School student is selected to speak about her future plans and is presented with a sterling silver charm. Every May, all the girls and their families are invited to an annual dinner for an update on their plans. In February, the club sponsors an annual cultural arts program, open to all Carmichaels School District students, grades 1-12. Categories for entry are literature, photography and art, with winners receiving certificates, ribbons and monetary prizes. Local winning entries go on to a district level and, if successful, to the state contest of the PA General Federation of Women’s Clubs. On the state level, an adult category invites club members to participate. Six years ago, Andrea’s short story about her grandson took first place at the state level. Another enduring project close to the hearts of club members is the nationally organized Wreaths Across America program. “We hold our ceremony at Laurel Point Cemetery, where a wreath is laid on the grave of each veteran. The money for the wreaths is donated by businesses, community members and club members,” explains Andrea. Additional club activities this year included

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Zoe Chambers on the left and Andrea Semenoff on the right filling purses with toiletries which will be donated to victims of domestic violence.

sponsoring a King Coal baseball team; adoption of a family from Domestic Violence Services of SW PA-Greene County office; collecting hot mixes- chocolate, oatmeal packs, tea, coffee, soup – for the “Say Thank You to a Soldier” program. Upcoming plans include donating child friendly foods to the local food bank, supporting the Carmichaels School District’s Backpack Feeding Program, providing volunteer readers at local school and public libraries, and coordinating a children’s book drive to benefit local libraries. In addition to the programs supported by outside donations, many of the clubs activities are funded by an annual calendar party held each April. Cheryl Voytek has served the club as Corresponding Secretary for five years, and is also passionate about its impact. “There is a rewarding feeling when you show others a bit of kindness. I am amazed at what a small group of women can accomplish within our community. Our president Andrea Semenoff has so much dedication and really is an inspiration for what we accomplish,” Cheryl said. Anyone with a desire to help others and support the community by becoming a member of the Carmichaels Women’s Civic Club is invited to attend a meeting, always held the first Thursday of the month at Carmichaels United Methodist Church fellowship hall at 6pm. Andrea offers a hearty welcome: “To ensure the future of our club, increasing membership is a must. We are always seeking new members because new members bring fresh ideas, energy and talents to our club.”

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Special Program at VFW

Christmas Parade Applications

“Since Carmichaels, PA VFW The Waynesburg Area Chamber of ComPost 3491 was chartered 80 years merce is still accepting late entry applications ago on June 21, 1936, many changes for the 2016 have taken place, but the mission D ow nt ow n has remained the same: to take care Waynesburg of our veterans in our community,” Christmas writes Michele Deems, VFW 3491 Parade, member. through Nov. Under the current command 23 at a fee of of Skip Black, Post VFW 3491 re- (L-R): Frank Smith-Chapter 34 Purple Hearts Commander, David Lee$20. No encently held a special where members VFW Dist. 24 Adjutant, Calvin Cox-VFW 3491 Member & Veterans tries will be were honored to share their rich Council of Greene President, Martin Pucci-VFW District 24 Commandaccepted afmilitary traditions and history. The er, Bob Martin VFW 3491 member,VFW 3491 Member, Aaron Deems program included presentations on VFW 4793 Past Commander, VFW Dist. 24, Bruce Black-VFW 3491 The Story of Taps, the meaning of a Second Vice, Skip Black VFW 3491 Commander. Photo by M. Deems. POW Table, and a display of folding of American’s the community -Peace and Faith program which has been promembers present. District 24 VFW Commander viding community meals and educational opporMartin Pucci was present with District Adjutant tunities open to the public through Carmichaels David Lee. Commander Pucci spoke on the PAX VFW 3491.

ter November 23rd. A limited number of scholarships are available for those groups who have financial need. The parade will be held on Sat., Dec. 3, at 2:30pm. There is no central theme but all entries are asked to portray the true Christmas Spirit. Trophies will be awarded to the top three floats. All floats and other entries are reminded that no live Santa is permitted on any unit in the parade as he is the guest of honor at the conclusion of the parade. FMI: www.waynesburgchamber.com or call 724-627-5926.

Winner of Alpaca Throw Lippencott Alpacas submits this photo of Kristy Vliet, owner of 5 Kidz Kandy, who won the throw made by the ladies from the Lippencott Alpacas Knitting Herd, and offered as the grand prize during Lippencott’s recent Annual Open House. The knitting ladies who made the throw are Rebecca White, Stephanie Mallory, Linda Harry, Marlene Volcko, Mary Ann Rygle, Becky McCollum and Lena Galing. Mark your calendar for Lippencott Alpaca’s Open House next year – Sep. 23-24, 2017.

Miss Rain Day Pet Supply Drive You have until Dec. 9 (it’s not that far away!) to help Miss Rain Day Bryn Patton help the animals. During her reign, Bryn has chosen for her service project to coordinate and execute a drive to collect food and other supplies needed at the Humane Society of Greene County. Direct Results, Home of GreeneScene Community Magazine is one of the drop off locations for the drive. Others include First Federal S&L locations in Carmichaels, Mt. Morris and both downtown and the drive through in Waynesburg. We looked in the very large, charmingly decorated box Bryn brought to our place – and it has a long way to go. Help fill it! Please stop and drop any contributions from the list below at Direct Results, 185 Wade St. (next to Auto Zone) Waynesburg, M-F, 8:30am-5pm. ITEMS NEEDED: Dog Food (cans or bags). Food is a priority and the most needed item. Other supplies needed are: newspapers, rugs, blankets, towels and sheets for bedding; nylon leashes, combs/brushes, cat and dog carriers (all types), clay litter; and toys such as chew toys, ping pong balls and fabric cat toys.

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Peculiar Postal Repositories Our GreeneScene Contest this month features a rather unusual mail box stand (see on page 3), and it inspired us to reach out to readers for more. If you have – or know someone who has – an entertaining mail box, whether it’s wonderful or…. just weird…we want to see it! Please take a picture of your extraordinary mail box and send or email it to us. Be sure to include your name and phone number, and your shirt size. Yes, we need

your shirt size because if we feature your mailbox in an upcoming issue – YOU’LL RECEIVE A FREE T-SHIRT! So, spread the word to your neighbors and everyone you know, GreeneScene is on the hunt for fun or funky mailboxes! Email pictures to info@greenescenemagazine.com or you can snail mail to GreeneScene 185 Wade St., Waynesburg, PA 15370.

Christmas Buffet – YUM!! The Greene County Career and Technology Center will be hosting its 27th Annual Christmas Buffet on Friday, December 9, 2016.  This year’s tantalizing International Christmas Buffet will consist of a menu with over sixteen salads, eighteen various entrees, four carving stations, assorted desserts, and much more.  The Culinary Department is pleased to announce that Chef Jeff Cecil and Pastry Chef Kathleen Kenny from Sullivan University will once again be joining the class in the kitchen for this year’s festivities. Waynesburg Central High School Band and Chorus will be providing holiday musical entertainment during the dining experience.   The community is invited to join us from Monetary donations are always helpful 11:30am till 1:00pm at a cost of $12.00 per for veterinary expenses, vaccinations, worming person ($6.00 for children under 12). medicine, etc. For more info or other drop-off locations, contact Miss Rain Day Bryn Patton at 724-833.2987 or Rain Day Scholarship, Inc., Jeanine Henry, at 724-747-4506.

Student chefs at GCCTC learn the culinary arts

GreeneScene Magazine •

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Co ol at Sc h ool

E

Get Out the Vote!

lection season is finally over and we now know who will fill the many public offices that were open both here in Pennsylvania and the United States this January. On November 8, registered voters across the country took to the polls to vote on the presidential election, and to fill seats open in both state and local offices. Just a few days earlier, however, on November 4, student “voters” at Carmichaels Area Middle-Senior High School were able to take part in the election in their own way. Joanne Yurick, Judge of Elections for Carmichaels Borough, had an idea that would provide a unique learning opportunity and some fun to local students. She took her idea to the faculty at the Carmichaels Area schools, where it was heartily welcomed. Though not yet of legal voting age, the students at both the middle school and high school were going to have the opportunity to vote in this election that has been demanding even more than the average attention over recent months. And perhaps most interesting of all would be seeing their results, before the actual election. Ms. Yurick provided the necessary tools - paper ballots. “The ballots were exactly as a registered voter would see if doing a paper/pencil voting and it is the same that appears on the voting machines” said Mrs. Zoe Cambers, CAMSHS Learning Support teacher and the facilitator for the mock-election

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by Tyler Whipkey

at the school. Students voted for the President of the United States, PA Attorney General, PA Auditor General, US Representative, PA Treasurer, US Senator and PA 50th District Representative in the General Assembly. “Next year, I hope to be able to provide actual voting machines for the students to use,” said Ms. Yurich. Elections were held during history classes in grades six through twelve, led by teachers Michael Pohlot, Travis Townsend, Scott Thompson, Rebecca Reed, Michael Gulino, and Jim Lane. Michael Pohlot, sixth grade history teacher at Carmichaels Middle School, helped to inform his students prior to voting. “I presented the different positions on various topics that the presidential candidates have supported. I then allowed each student to pick a side and we discussed why they picked these positions,” he said. Discussion included how the various positions would affect the well-being of their families. The students spent class time debating the topics, to help them make their voting decisions. “Some students then went home and researched the other elections [besides Presidential] on the sheet. I enjoyed this because it allows the students to be involved and have some relevance as to what is going on in our current political climate,” Mr. Pohlot added. His sixth grade classes ended with 54 votes for Donald Trump and 13 votes for

2016 • GreeneScene Magazine

Hillary Clinton. When the ballots were counted for all the students voting at the schools, the CAMSHS election results turned out to be a pretty good forecast of the real thing just days later. Donald Trump (R) came out as the presidential winner in this election with 287 votes, surpassing Hillary Clinton’s (D) 91 votes. The students also elected Pat Toomey (R) for US Senator, John Rafferty (R) for PA Attorney general, John Brown (R) for PA Auditor General, Otto Voit (R) for PA Treasurer, Bill Shuster (R) for US Representative, and Pam Snyder (D) for PA Representative.

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Downtown Waynesburg has the Spirit of the Season

P

lan your visit to Downtown Waynesburg from 5 to 8:30 pm on Friday, Dec. 2, for the 8th annual Holiday Open House, sponsored by EQT and presented by Waynesburg Prosperous & Beautiful. Serving as the kickoff to the Christmas shopping season, the Holiday Open House will feature extended hours at many Downtown Waynesburg stores, live entertainment, seasonal foods and fun for the whole family. Beginning at 4 pm, several blocks of High Street will be closed to motorized traffic. Activities start at 5pm with Santa on site to welcome children, visitors and shoppers alike. Free pictures with Santa will be provided by McMillen Photography at the Greene County Courthouse. At 6 pm, there will be a tree lighting ceremony for the big Christmas tree that graces the front of Greene County Courthouse. “This special evening has become a holiday tradition for many people in the area, reminiscent of an old fashioned Christmas, with carolers and all the sparkle and magic of small town America,” says event chair Caitlin Carlisle of Famers Insurance, which celebrated its relocation to downtown

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Waynesburg just last month. Merchants will extend their hours and offer special sales, door prizes and refreshments. As usual, fire barrels will be lit along High Street for holiday shoppers to pause for a visit and warm their hands. One of the most popular activities of the evening are the horse-drawn wagon rides by Rocky Ridge Acres, which for the first time will be FREE this year. “With the generous sponsorship of EQT, nearly all the activities are free this year. Take a ride through the decorated parks and streets of town in a horse drawn wagon, enjoy all the musical entertainment, get a free caricature drawing by popular artist Jeff Harris…there will much to see and do – and it’s for the whole family,” Caitlin adds. Lippencott Alpacas will also be at the festivities to welcome the holiday shoppers with their adorable alpacas. A children’s supervised craft and activity center - and special cookie decorating opportunity where children and all ages can decorate their own cookies - will be located at the Community Foundation of Greene County office on High Street. Greene Community Church will be there also, offering a free gift wrap center for your evening’s purchases . “Flix on Brix” is return-

ing - be sure to check the Waynesburg Prosperous & Beautiful Facebook page and vote on the holiday movie of your choice to be shown on the big brick screen. Greene County Tourist Promotion Agency’s souvenir maps, handdrawn by local artist Leslie Fehling and featuring the locations of all activities, food and participating merchants, will be distributed to help guide shoppers through the festivities. EQT is the lead sponsor of the Holiday Open House and Community Bank underwrites the window decorating competition among businesses. You can join in the judging by casting your vote for the best display at each participating location. Waynesburg Prosperous & Beautiful is a Main Street program that operates in conjunction with the Pennsylvania Downtown Center. Main Street programs emphasize critical time-sensitive stabilization and revitalization of historic downtowns business districts. For more information on the Holiday Open House, call 724-627-8119. There’s More the Next Day… The following day, Saturday, Dec. 3, Waynesburg Area Chamber of Commerce will present the 2016 Christmas Parade beginning at 2pm. The execution of the parade is underwritten by FirstEnergy Foundation. Miss Rain Day 2016, Brynn Patton, and the Chamber’s 2016 Distinguished Service Award winners, Gene & Judy Rush, the family of the late David Cumberledge and First Federal Savings & Loan of Greene County will have the honor of leading the parade down High Street as its Grand Marshals. WCYJ Television from Waynesburg University will videotape the parade for later broadcast on local stations. Late entries will be accepted in the parade through Nov. 23rd. If you want more info on the parade, call the Chamber office at 724-627-5926 or visit the website at www.waynesburgchamber.com. It’s Not Over Yet… Capping off the weekend events is “Christmas in the Burgh,” from 5-8pm on Sat-

urday night. This tasty event had such success its first year - last year - it’s destined to be an on-going tradition that welcomes folks from all over Greene County and beyond to downtown Waynesburg. It’s a walking tour to three designated locations with various offerings of gourmet foods & desserts, plus wine and spirits sampling, live musical entertainment and a Chinese auction. Wristbands for admission to all three locations for enjoying the entertainment and partaking of the gourmet goodies are available in advance for $25 per person at each of the locations hosting the event: First National Bank, Fashion Shoppe, and In Motion Dance & Fitness. Wristbands are also available 5 Kidz Kandy, which will be providing gourmet coffee and candy at the Fashion Shop that evening. Another highlight of the evening’s festivities back by popular demand will be the Cookie Contest, where you can sample a variety of specialty cookies and vote for your favorite! A new addition this year is the after party at the American Legion. Those with wristbands will be admitted for free to an extended evening of fun enjoying the live band Tomorrow’s News at the Legion. For more info on “Christmas in the Burg,” call 724-998-0937.

GreeneScene Magazine •

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Warm Night for Greene County Residents

Washington-Greene Adult Baseball in Vegas

Handing Over The Key…. From Left to Right: Jake Blaker, Director of Greene County Parks and Recreation; Commissioner Blair Zimmerman, Chair; Commissioner Archie Trader; Amy Switalski, Director of Housing and Family Resources for Greene County Human Services; Barb Wise, Director of the Greene County United Way and Program Manager of Warm Nights; Commissioner Dave Coder; Ashley Beaman Director of Greater Waynesburg Christian Outreach.

John Greenlee (left) of Clarksville and Mike Nath of Meadowlands proudly display the tournament finalist plaque the Orioles 50+ team received for making into the final round of the National Adult Baseball Association’s 50+/60+ National Fun

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Greene County Commissioners and a group of various agencies and residents have come together to ensure that on nights in December through March, when the temperature is 25 degrees or below, ALL Greene County residents will have a warm place to sleep. From December 1st through March 31st the Greene County Commissioners have offered the house that is located at the Greene County Fairgrounds to host the Warm Nights Program. With help from agencies such as the Greene County Human Services Housing Program, Greene County United Way, Greater Waynesburg Christian Outreach, Greene County Parks and Recreation, Waynesburg University, Salvation Army, Contura Energy Services and local residents, the program will be able to offer a warm overnight stay. “Our goal is to provide our community with warm and safe overnight accommodations within Tournament held in Las Vegas Oct 24-29, 2016. The a welcoming atmosphere” says Program Manager Orioles fell to the South Dakota Pheasants in the fi- Barbara Wise. nal play-off round. The Oirioles are in the Washing“Many thanks to the commissioners for allowton-Greene Adult Baseball League. Congrats, guys! ing us to carry out our mission to ensure that all people in Greene County will have a safe and warm

place to stay”. Hours of operation at the warming shelter will be from 7 PM to 7 AM and clients must register each day by 4:00 PM by calling the SPHS Crisis Hot Line at 1-800-417-9460 or dial 211 to be transferred. The shelter will accommodate service dogs and arrangements have been made with the Humane Society to house other pets. Transportation is available if prior notification is made when registering. No walk-ins are permitted. “This program can only run with the help of volunteers; which we are currently seeking to attend our upcoming training”, says Wise. Training for anyone who would like to volunteer for the Warm Nights Program, it will be held at the warming shelter on November 15th at 7 PM and on November 17th at 12 PM. You must have Act 33 PA Child Abuse History Clearance and Act 34 PA Criminal Background check. To register for the training, please call the United Way office at 724-852-1009 or Greene County Human Services and ask for Amy Switalski at 724-852-5276.

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“SHOP SMALL”

B

on Saturday Nov. 26

lack Friday?? Forget it. Crowds, traffic, common merchandise made overseas on sale for a few hours so everyone can fight over it. Frankly…some of us are a little tired of hearing about Black Friday. Even the “big boys” are talking about toning it down, it’s just too crazy and overboard. On the other hand “Small Saturday” is quite appealing. The actual name is “Small Business Saturday” – the latest trend for the weekend that kicks off holiday shopping. First introduced by American Express in 2010, it is a counterpart to Black Friday and Cyber Monday, which feature big box retail and e-commerce stores respectively. By contrast, Small Business Saturday encourages holiday shoppers to patronize brick and mortar businesses that are small and locally owned. We’ve got plenty of those in Greene County, and if you haven’t been “shopping small” recently, you will be pleasantly surprised at the variety and affordability you’re going to find when you do. Make that discovery on Saturday November 26th by checking out the unique shops all over Greene County. If you really want to have fun, just hop from shop to shop. Really… take downtown Waynesburg for example. We have a specialty gourmet candy shop plus a toy store, we have fine jewelry and artisan jewelry, several antiques and collectibles shops, hand crafted Americana gifts and décor, great deals on brand name fashions for men & women, craft & paper supplies, organic foods, herbals, skin and health care, salons and an incredible diversified art gallery that draws people from all over the eastern region of the country – right in downtown Waynesburg!

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We have the latest in computers and digital accessories, a home decorating center, everyone’s favorite dollar store and a supermarket to boot. Oh and did we mention food? Oh yeah, mouthwatering barbecue, sizzlin’ Mexican, enchanting Chinese, delectable deli and home style cooking… It’s ALL right there! Drive the short trip to downtown Waynesburg, park the car and walk up and down High Street. You’ll have more fun Shopping Small than at the mall! You’ll find better stuff, better deals, better service… Try it! Shop Small this Saturday November 26th. Many merchants are extending hours, offering sales and refreshments. Just remember the best reward you’ll receive by Shopping Small any day of the year is the quality of unique merchandise you’ll find, and how much you will be helping your local economy. Because that’s the other thing - when you Shop Small, you spend with local businesses, where your money does a whole lot more work for your community. $100 spent at a local business = $68 in revenue for the local community vs. only $43 when spent at chain stores. Small business provides nearly 70% of all new jobs in our country. Local merchants spend a much larger portion of total revenue on local labor to run the enterprise and sell the merchandise. Non-profit organizations receive on average 350% more support from local businesses than non-locally owned businesses. Buy Local, Buy Greene.

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Sheeps Head Shroom

S

Your Hometown Radio Station

1210

AM

hown here posing in the position of the world champion truffle hunting dog from Australia, is Greene County’s own Terence Keenan, who was proud to share with us a look at this relatively large 3 & ½ pound Sheeps Head mushroom he recently found at an undisclosed location in Greene County. Not only did Terence share a look at his shroom, he also enlightened us with the details – and a demonstration – of how certain dogs in Australia are expert at sniffing out truffles, a form of fungus that fetches a very high price down under, and all over. “Truffles are a delicacy,” Terence explained, and sure enough, our research shows that the “black gold” as the ugly fungus is also called, commonly claim close to $2,000 per kg (a kilogram is just over 2 lbs. or about 35 oz.). A long time traditional ingredient in French cooking, truffles are growing in popularity and used by chefs most often in poultry dishes, tomato based sauces and in – what else – scrambled eggs. They are, however, rare and difficult to find, unless you are a dog.

“The world champion truffle hunting dog in Australia found a 52.8 oz. truffle this summer,” Terence told us, then demonstrated the dog’s pose. It is thought to be the largest black truffle ever grown in the country, estimated to be worth $3,700 AUD ($2,841 is US dollars). Terence didn’t comment on the market value of his sheeps head mushroom, but did tell us it was going to an un-named buyer who would make delicious use of it.

Tune in for Crazy Dougie Wilson weekday mornings & J.T. Cash weekday afternoons

The Best Mix of current country hits and

country classics you’ll ever find! 26

GreeneScene Magazine •

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GreeneScene by Renee Carmer

BOWLBY BITS Holiday Open House – On Dec. 7, 3:30-6:30pm. Cookie Walk/Cookie Raffle, $3 per dozen (box) or $5 per dozen (Christmas tin). Pictures with Santa - $10 for two 5x7 photos. Story Time, 5-6pm. Raffle tickets on sale now for a Cookie Basket (12 different cookie-filled tins), a Children’s Christmas Basket (toys, games, books). All proceeds benefit the Bowlby Library. Annual Stuffed Animal Sleepover with the Bowlby Library mascot, Fetch. Youngsters bring their favorite stuffed animal on Dec. 7 for Holiday Story & Craft time at 5pm. Afterwards, the children say goodbye to their stuffed animals who spend the night with Fetch. Pick up stuffed animals the next day 11am-5pm. Adult Craft Night – 1st Thursday (10am-2pm) and 2nd Saturday (57pm): This month (Dec. 1 & 10) the project will be a pallet Christmas tree; cost $20 for materials. Pre-registration required. FREE American Red Cross CPR training – Dec. 5, 5-8pm. Pre-registration required. After Hours Holiday Pajama Party – Dec. 9, 4-8pm. Enjoy a holiday movie; cookies and milk, games, seasonal crafts and activities. Family members invited - wear your Christmas jammies! Please pre-register. (TAG) After-After Hours on Friday, Dec. 9, 8-10pm for teens 13-18. Suggested $2 donation; please pre-register. Curious George’s Christmas Party - Dec. 10, 11am-1pm. Curiousthemed games, crafts, & stories for ages 3-8. Light lunch provided. Pre-registration required. It’s Movie Night –Dec. 21, watch “How the Grinch Stole Christmas,” starring Jim Carrey, beginning at 6pm. FREE popcorn and beverages! Holiday Hours - Closed Dec. 24 -26 and Dec. 31. Bowlby Library hosts many free activities and programs including Computer and Software classes, Adult Coloring, T.O.P.S. weight loss, and more. The library also provides access to online tutoring, online language learning, mobile apps for free books, magazines & music to enjoy on your phone, tablet or computer. Call 724-627-9776 or stop in Eva K. Bowlby Public Library for more info or to register for any of the above events.

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GreeneScene Magazine •

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Nov Dec GreeneScene 2016  

We're giving thanks this November with coupons and contests! Read all about the history of Jackson Township in our "I Love This Place" secti...

Nov Dec GreeneScene 2016  

We're giving thanks this November with coupons and contests! Read all about the history of Jackson Township in our "I Love This Place" secti...

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