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Letters to Santa

cattered throughout this and the next issue of the GreeneSaver are letters to Santa from students in the third grade at Jefferson-Morgan Elementary School. We extend a huge thank you to third grade teacher, Heather Wise for helping us share the children’s

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wishes. We hope you enjoy reading them as much as we did. Seated, from left, Casey Herrod, Danica Grainey, Katarina Martin, Alisa Long, Riley Venick, Ronin Kramer, Evan Duke. Kneeling: Jaci Glover, Sarah Ankrom, Louis Ruscitti, Houston

Guesman, Alexis Speer, Alyson Harris, Isabelle Bazzoli. Standing: Brandon Dilts, Andrew Faddis, Brendan Wood, Landen Ostrich, Eric Basiorka, Franklin Staggers, Brennen Crawford, Christopher Palone and Michael Thistlethwaite. Photo courtesy of Heather Wise.

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Old Fashioned Christmas Tree Sale

here is something almost magical about that most classic of Christmas customs…choosing the perfect holiday tree for your home. It is never to be done alone, but always as a family outing with all the traditional trappings…your boots and toboggans and mufflers and mittens and a keen eye for the one tree among the rest that belongs in your living room. And where do you go to find this forest of fine Christmas trees? To the Kent Christmas Tree Farm off Rt. 218 south of Waynesburg, on Jay Phillips Hill Road, near Spraggs, where it has been the destination for tree hunting families for many, many years. Since 2008, however, it’s not only important where you go but WHEN you go on your tree hunting mission. Since that time, the Marisa Family, who purchased the Kent Tree Farm that same year, began to host the “Old Fashioned Christmas Tree Sale.” For one day every year, the farm’s fresh scent of live pines, spruces and firs mingles with the aroma of wood burning fires, spicy mulled cider and hot cocoa, as all the best traditions of Christmas come alive at the Kent Tree Farm. Local artisans offer their hand crafted gifts for sale, you can ride a wagon to and from the forest, baked goods and sweet treats will tempt your tastebuds and holiday music fills the air. This year, that one day is December 5, from 10am – 4pm. “It is a family run, very traditional, old fashioned, Christmas tree sale,” says Autumn Marisa Lexer, one of the family members who plan and present the special day each year. Although the “Old Fashioned Christmas Tree Sale” is held for one day only, purchase of trees is available all season on an honor system, according to Autumn. “We do have people who come throughout the year to buy trees for landscaping, and even Christmas trees if they couldn’t make the special sale day, but there are no attendants here on a reg-

ular basis,” she notes. Mr. Wesley Kent, who founded the tree farm many years ago, still lives nearby and enjoys helping folks, if he’s present, but the farm is no longer officially staffed. “We have found notes and money under a rock from people who stopped by to get their tree when no one was here,” Autumn admits with a laugh. It’s a beautiful thing to live in a community where such transactions can still be made. Your best plan, however, is to come on Saturday Dec 5, between 10am & 4pm. “It’s the same day as the Christmas Parade in Waynesburg,” Autumn notes, “Stop by before or after the parade, bring the family and make a whole day of it.”

By Shelly Brown

Today, the Kent Tree Farm boasts over 10,000 trees of varying sizes and species including Balsam Fir, Douglas Fir, Red Pine, Scotch Pine, Concolor Fir, White Spruce, Blue Spruce, and Norway Spruce. Tree prices for 2015 range from $25 to $40, plus tax. That includes cutting, trimming, wrapping and loading of the tree. Ten percent of the proceeds from the sale each year is donated to the Social Service League for Christmas gifts for local children. Credit cards are not accepted. For more information about the eighth annual “Old-fashioned Christmas Tree Sale,” call the Kent Tree Farm at 724-984-3010.

Wesley Kent gives a ride to a family with their Christmas tree at the Marisa family owned, Kent Tree Farm, in Spraggs.

Dear Santa, I have been extremely good this year. I will never forget that day when I was a baby and a picture with you. Do you remember that? The top thing on my list is if you can make Karlee not move! I would also like lps popular like Saige Tom Savvy and Brook. I would also like a lps cocer spaniel for Chrismas. I also want a phone for Chrismas. I am so happy that I got one of the teachers I have wanted! Love, Alexis 4

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Dear Santa, I have been extremely good this year! I hope I can get what I want. I want a new 3DS XL case, some new 3DS XL games, two 100 gift cards to itunes, Pokemon cards, a bouncey house and school supplies. You should have the best Christmas too!

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Sincerely, Andrew

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Joseph Simon is pictured here collecting the $100 prize for his uncle, Robert Swestyn, our GreeneScene Contest winner this month. Joseph said his uncle asked him to help fill out and mail in the entry form when they realized the photo, featured last month, was of the veteran's monument in the front yard of friend, Greg "Coon Dog" Schifko, located along Rt. 21 near Khedive. The two-sided monument is dedicated to POW/MIA's on one side and fallen soldiers on the reverse. According to Joe, the idea started when Greg had a load of dirt brought in to fill in a dip in his yard. “He asked me to level it out for him with my backhoe, then Greg got a great big rock from Douglas Greenhouse to put there, with the intention of making some type of military tribute.” A mutual friend, and Joseph’s neighbor, John "Hoof " Lough, also an Air Force veteran who served during the Viet Nam War, is, according to Joseph, "very artistic." "Hoof had made several things like that before, and Greg wanted it done for the 4th of July, he finished it in late May or early June," Joseph said. Although Greg is not a veteran, his father, William "Bud" Schifko, a longtime supervisor for Cumberland Township, did serve in the US Army. We thank Greg Schifko, and all involved in creating and displaying this monument - a daily reminder to passersby to remember those who’ve made the ultimate sacrifice.

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e is W e n y a W t is t r A Brief Sketch of A By Tara Kinsell

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n issue that includes a spotlight on the Greene County Village of Time and a focus on local artists would not be complete without a story about Wayne Wise. Wayne’s parents, Alberta and Keith, are featured in the story of Time itself, where they still live, and where the young Wayne Wise grew up, even “doodling” back then, as his parents describe it. If asked to describe Wayne with a single word today, ‘artist’ certainly fits in a myriad of ways, for you see, Wayne is a wordsmith, cartoonist, actor, and purveyor of artistic wisdom. The latter he has done for decades, first as a counselor in the Upward Bound Program, formerly held at Waynesburg College, later while instructing a course on Comics and Pop Culture at Chatham University in Pittsburgh, and most recently as the author of “Chutz-Pow: Superheroes of the Holocaust.” In this comic book style publication, the stories of five survivors of the Holocaust are told from a perspective of the resilience of the human spirit. The five persons selected for this first volume (another is in the works) were all natives of the Pittsburgh area. “In ten years there will be no survivors of the Holocaust left. They will all be gone. We recognized the need to continue telling these stories and for them to be more personal and more human,” Wayne said. “Superhero (in the title) is a metaphor for people who did extraordinary things in horrible situations.” It was a challenge to write these “incredibly complex” narratives in the unique rhythm of a comic book and “as a story, not just as a laundry list of what they did,” Wayne said.

In one particular account, a woman escaped from a camp only to be recaptured and sent to a death march a year or so later. “I had to decide, how do I address that without doing violence to her again,” he said. One of the other stories we told was of photographer Les Banos. If you live near Pittsburgh, you have seen Banos’ sport’s photographs,” Wayne said, noting one of Banos’ most famous shots as that of Roberto Clemente’s 3,000th hit. Banos, a personal friend of Clemente, was scheduled to be on the humanitarian flight that claimed the Pirate’s right fielder’s life in 1972. The Steelers were in the playoffs and Banos, who was a photographer for both teams, stayed behind. It was the second time in his life that Banos was saved from a certain death. “He was a double agent serving as an SS officer in Nazi occupied Germany during WWII (using his position to hide and render aid to Jews). For much of his life Les didn’t talk about that experience. My favorite quote from him is when he was asked why he didn’t talk about it, and he said, ‘I didn’t think anybody would believe me,’ Wayne recalls. “So much of his story had to be left out because I just didn’t have room.” However, according to Wayne, more of Les Banos’ story will be told in the second volume of “Chutz-Pow.” In that issue, the central figures will be Holocaust survivors who have received more world-wide recognition. He hopes that same widespread recognition will come to all of the Superheroes from the first volume as well. A project that was done through the Holocaust Center of the Jewish Federation of Pittsburgh in Squirrel Hill, “ChutzPow” is intended to be a teaching tool and

an educational curriculum has been developed around it for schools who want to use it. Although his recent work has focused more on his writing, Wayne has certainly used his artistic skills as an illustrator in past projects. Many years ago Wayne and collaborator, Fred Wheaton, a Waynesburg Central High School graduate, widely known for his artwork for Wacky Packages and Garbage Pail Kids, were the recipients of one of the first Xeric grants. The grant, from Peter Laird, one of the creators of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, was intended to help struggling comic book artists publish their work. The result for Wayne and Fred was Grey Legacy, a long version comic book. Wayne would later go on to write several novels that are currently available on Amazon.com both in paperback and as Ebooks. His recent work, “Chutz-Pow” is available for purchase at Phantom of the Attic Comics in Oakland, at the Toonseum on Liberty Ave. in downtown Pittsburgh, and at the Holocaust Center on Hazelwood Ave. in Squirrel Hill.

Late Pittsburgh sport’s photographer, Les Banos’ story as it is portrayed in a page from Chutz-Pow: Superheroes of the Holocaust.

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The cover of Chutz-Pow: Superheroes of the Holocaust, a teaching comic book that portrays the lives of five local Holocaust survivors through the writing of Greene County native, Wayne Wise and the artistry of Chris Moeller, Dave Wachter, M.L. Walker, and Mark Zingarelli.

Quirky artist Wayne Wise points out a self-portrait, entitled “Parallel Parking,” currently on display as part of The Art of Blogging: A Group Exhibit at Most Wanted Fine Art Gallery on Penn Avenue in Pittsburgh.

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I Love this P l a ce

SYCAMORE, PA

by Tara Kinsell

THE CLOCK IS TICKING ON THE VILLAGE OF TIME

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hen we selected the Village of Time in Mor- cooking with wood and light coming from ris Township as the subject for this month’s, gas lamps into the late 1940s. “I Love This Place,” we didn’t know its days Besides baseball as entertainment, were numbered. Under a cloudless sky, driving the Bennett’s and Wises said live music through what is left of Time, it was surreal seeing the remain- was played on the porches in the village. ing houses awaiting the wrecking ball. It suddenly became all The Phillips Boys Band and a guy Bill the more important that we capture the essence of Time. The knew as ‘Fat Sprowls’ could be heard on reason behind its imminent demise is tied to the purchase of the radio, playing at the Wheeling Jambothe village and surrounding land for expansion of operations ree. for the Bailey Mine. “Fat Sprowls could play anything,” he Its remaining residents, Keith and Alberta Wise, joined said. The Bennetts agreed that the Phillips’ me for breakfast at the Airport Restaurant where they shared and Sprowls were professional caliber mustories of Time, aka Dogtown. Later that day, sitting at their sicians. Even Keith played with the Philkitchen table in Graysville, William and Donna Bennett, long- lips’ boys at times, Alberta said. time residents of Time, added to the Wise’s recollections of it. When it came to education in the It has been many years since the Village of Time was more village, there was the Time School, one than just residences, but the Wises and Bennetts remember of 9 one-room schoolhouses that existed when it held two stores, a blacksmith shop, and its own school. at one time in Morris Township. Time The Time Post Office closed in 1928, before either couple’s col- School closed in the 1947-48 school year, lective recollection. according to Bill. “I remember when Time had its first radio in George So what of the Dog Town moniker? McNeely’s store and everyone gathered there in the evening to Well, it is purely conjecture on the part of Keith and Alberta Wise, just a few years ago, at an anniversary celebration. This year marked 74 years of listen to it,” Keith said, noting this was especially true during Alberta and Keith but they have surmised marriage for the couple. baseball games. it was due to the overwhelming majority Baseball was once a very big deal in the Village of Time of hunting dogs in the town. Most everyand George McNeely was in the thick of it, the Wises noted. one was a fox hunter, Keith said. He preferred hunting rac“He managed The Time Independents,” Keith explained. coons. It even led to his CB (citizens band radio) handle of “There was a big championship trophy in the store.” The Time “Coondog,” back in the 70s when he was driving truck. Independents were part of the National Trails Baseball League, “Mine was green thumb,” Alberta said. “I could put a National Stores. That trophy was won by the Independents, the stick in the ground and it would grow leaves.” only team from outside of Washington County in the league, Even though the Wises and Bennetts say the village was in 1931. known as Dog Town, the sign at the end of it read, “The VilIn a footnote about the store, Alberta said McNeely pur- lage of Time,” that is until it was stolen. chased it from George and Maggie Marshall in 1928. The Mar“We heard some noise outside our house and when we shalls had two sons and two daughters. Both boys, Fred and looked out there was a group of college aged kids. They waved George, Jr., were killed while serving in WWI. However, it was at us,” Bill said. “We watched them try to take the sign. It had McNeely’s ownership of the store that they remember best. been stolen before so it had big bolts through it.” “In the summertime, they would have cotton dresses for That apparently did not deter this group. 98 cents and all of the ladies would go there to see the latest “They hooked up chains to it and pulled it out,” he said. fashion,” Alberta said. “They honked the horn as they left.” “Gas in the old glass gas pumps was 5 cents a gallon,” It would be the last sign that marked the Village of Time, Keith added, making note of the Model T and then Model A an ironic foreshadowing of what was to come. Village of Time sign that was stolen in the night by a group of young people. Fords that he drove. In the late 1930s, driving that Model A, he was “picking up all of the girls,” he said grinning. “She (looking at Alberta) tried to beat ‘em out to sit in the seat beside me,” he preened. Alberta admitted he was right, and also to flirting in the rearview mirror with him when she was stuck in the backseat. It must have worked, after seventy-four years, Keith serving in WWII, and raising two sons (Warren and Wayne), the couple is still together. Bill and Donna Bennett had similar recollections of a place where evA residence, once used as a feed store and earlier as a general store was the site of the Time Post This Time Post Office Stamp is a remnant of a place that time has all but forgotten. The office eryone knew each other. Office in Morris Township. closed in 1924. Donna recalled her mother

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Dear Santa,

GreeneScene by Jeanine Henry

I have been extremely good this year! For Christmas I want Pokemon cards, a new skatbord, a set of drums. I also want a lot of roboties, video games, star wars tosy, a new xl DS, games for it, a case too. Santa can you get these things for these people too? Can you get new chalk for Mrs. Wise, a new promethean board pen for Mrs. Tonkavitch, a wooden pirate ship for Mrs. Price and a hole week off for them all. Thanks, Brendan 10

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Downtown Waynesburg has the Spirit of the Season

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oin Downtown Waynesburg from 5 to 8:30 p.m. Friday, Dec. 4, for the 7th annual Holiday Open House, sponsored by EQT and presented by Waynesburg Prosperous & Beautiful. Serving as the kickoff to the holiday shopping season, the Holiday Open House will feature extended hours at Downtown Waynesburg stores, live entertainment, seasonal foods and fun for the whole family. Beginning at 4 p.m., several blocks of High Street will be closed to motorized traffic. Activities start at 5 p.m. with Santa on site to welcome children, visitors and shoppers alike. Free pictures with Santa will be provided by McMillen Photography at the Greene County Courthouse. At 6 p.m., local officials will take part in the lighting of the Christmas tree on the steps of the courthouse. “Our goal this year is to bring a bit of Norman Rockwell to your holiday,” said event co-chair Karen Calvert. More than 25 merchants will extend their hours and offer special sales, door prizes and refreshments. Street vendors will be out selling seasonal treats such as roasted nuts, cider and cotton candy. Fire barrels will be lit along High Street for

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holiday shoppers to pause for a visit or to warm their hands. Horse-drawn wagons will offer shoppers a ride through the decorated parks and streets of town at a cost of $2 per person. Music will be provided throughout the evening by several area vocal and instrumental groups, and Lippencott Alpacas will also be at the festivities to welcome the holiday shoppers. Artist Jeff Harris will be back and offering free caricatures on commemorative Holiday Open House posters. A children’s supervised craft and activity center will be located at the Community Foundation of Greene County office on High Street, along with a free gift wrap center for your evening’s purchases. “Flix on Brix” is also returning this year. By public vote, “It’s a Wonderful Life” will be projected on the side of the Community Foundation building for an outdoor holiday movie experience. “This is a fantastic opportunity to celebrate the season with your family and see all that Downtown Waynesburg has to offer,” said event co-chair Caitlin Carlisle. Souvenir maps, hand-drawn by local artist Leslie Fehling and featuring the locations of all activities, food and participating merchants, will be distributed to help guide shoppers through the festivities. EQT is the lead sponsor of this year’s Holiday Open House with additional support from the Greene County Tourist Promotion Agency. Community Bank is sponsoring a window decorating competition among businesses. Join in the judging by casting your vote through a monetary donation at the location of your favorite display. Waynesburg Prosperous & Beautiful is a Main Street program that operates in conjunction with the Pennsylvania Downtown Center. Main Street programs emphasize critical time-sensitive stabilization and revitalization of historic downtowns business districts. For more information on the Holiday Open House, call 724627-8119 or 724-627-8687.

The following day, Saturday, Dec. 5, Waynesburg Area Chamber of Commerce will present the 2015 Christmas Parade beginning at 2pm. The execution of the parade is underwritten by FirstEnergy Foundation. Miss Rain Day 2015, Claire Kreider, and the Chamber’s 2015 Distinguished Service Award winners – Judge William Nalitz, Waynesburg Moose Lodge & Family Center and family of the late Donald K. Lindsay, will have the honor of leading the parade down High Street as its Grand Marshals. WCYJ Television from Waynesburg University will videotape the parade for later broadcast on local stations. Late entries will be accepted in the parade through Nov. 25th. If you want more info on the parade, call the Chamber office at 724-6275926 or visit the website at www.waynesburgchamber.com.

And capping off the weekend events is a new activity called “Christmas in the Burg,” organized to raise funds for the new Community Recreation Center being developed by the Greene County Memorial Hospital Foundation. On Saturday night, from 6-8 pm, three locations in downtown Waynesburg will be open and offering gourmet cheese, foods & desserts, plus wine and beer sampling. Wristbands for admission to all three locations to partake of the gourmet goodies are $25 per person and available for sale at each of the three locations: First National Bank, Fashion Shoppe, In Motion Dance & Fitness. And also at 5 Kidz Kandy, which will be providing gourmet coffee and candy at the Fashion Shoppe. Musical entertainment, Chinese auction and a cookie contest are all part of the evening’s festivities. For more info on the Saturday night event, call 724-998-0937.

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Family Traditions Teach Lessons In our October issue we asked readers to share their holiday stories and traditions with us. We also sent a shout out to our own friends and family members asking for theirs. We plan to share the results with you in the December issue. We’re still inviting your input, and again, to help you feel inspired, here are some family traditions of GreeneSaver reader Sherri Chun of Carmichaels. “On Christmas Eve we go to a candle light service, then we go have a birthday celebration for Jesus that night. We read a story about the birth of Jesus. We have cake and sing to him as well,” Sherri says. However, another traPictured are dozens of bears built during a past Hugs for the Holidays dition was born from Sherri’s deBuild-A-Bear Party. sire to teach her daughters, Kalei’a and Ke’Lani about the joys of giving. Sherri takes the girls to a Build-A-Bear-Party at book page explains that the “event is more than South Hills Village Mall each December. The party, building bears for the Holiday. It is building bears now in its seventh year, was started by Janae Layhue to share with those in need all year long.” She goes on to talk about the few bears that she of Coal Center, the older sister of a friend of Sherri’s. A mother of three boys, Layhue had the same holds back to give to children who may be suffering Front to back, Joy Morgan and Sandy Laux, members of the Ladies Auxiliary of Carmichaels American Legion idea as Sherri, to teach the boys about giving. The or simply in need of “a smile, a hug, or the feeling Post 400 look over stacks of handmade blankets on Veteran’s Day. idea of building a bear to give away grew out of that of being loved.” A flyer for the event reads, “Everyone needs a Members of the Carmichaels American Le- at the Veteran’s Day Program as a surprise, she said. desire. What began as a family event has grown to hug. A hug does so many things. It brings joy and be one that is supported by friends, acquaintances, gion Post 400 honor guard, and community band Guest speaker for the event, Captain Albert comfort for those who get them.” To date, more and even strangers to the Layhues. who served in the armed forces were presented John Brown, Jr., and his father, also a veteran, were Each year, the majority of the bears made at than 2,000 of those ‘bear’ hugs have been received with handmade patriotic blankets and certificates presented with a blanket as well for their service. on Nov. 11. The gifts were prepared by the ladies It was standing room only for the services that the party are given to the patients of Children’s by children in need of one. The Build-A-Bear Party for 2015 will be held auxiliary of the legion as a “small token of apprecia- included specially selected music from the post Hospital. Others are distributed via means such as: tion,” said Joy Morgan, president of the auxiliary. band and the POW/MIA Ceremony in remem- the Ronald McDonald House, an oncology clinic, on Dec. 12 all-day with special giveaways from 4 children in foster care, and those in homeless shel- pm to 9 pm. Donations are accepted in lieu of Fifty of the blankets were prepared to be distributed brance of those who never returned from war. someone traveling to the event to build a bear. For ters. In 2014 alone, 414 bears were made to give more information, visit the Facebook page or conaway and that was not the most in a single year. A tact Janae at holidaybearhugs@yahoo.com. post by Janae on the Hugs for the Holidays Face-

Veterans Receive Gifts in Carmichaels

Garden Club Thinks Pink in Greensboro

EQT Donations Help Food Bank Provide Food Security A grant from the EQT Foundation for the purchase of supplemental food bags for children was supplemented by an additional charitable donation from the comThe Think Pink garden at Cornerstone Care in Greensboro, planted and tended to by Marion Walker and pany to the Greene County Corner Susan Swala, a mother and daughter who are members of the Town and Country Garden Club. Cupboard Food Bank. The monies given also helped the Food Bank to With leaves continuing to fall off of trees, the Susan Swala, the “Think Pink” flower garden was provide food security for commuflower garden at Cornerstone Care in Greensboro designed to encourage breast cancer awareness. The nity members in need. continued to bloom in many shades of pink. Plant- Think Pink garden, a mixed perennial and annual ed and maintained by Town and Country Garden flower garden, is one of four beautification projects Club mother-daughter duo, Marion Walker and that the club maintains.

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From left, Candace Tustin, Executive Director-CCFB; Casey Durdines, Community Advisor-EQT Corporation; Nathanial ManchinLocal Government & Community Affairs Manager-EQT Corporation; and Jessica Cole-Operations Manager-CCFB.

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“Shop Small” on Saturday Nov. 28

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e’ve all heard of Black Friday. Frankly…come of us are a little tired of hearing about Black Friday. Even the “big boys” are talking about toning it down, it’s just too crazy and a bit overboard. On the other hand “Small Saturday” is quite appealing. The actual name is “Small Business Saturday” – the latest trend for the weekend that kicks off holiday shopping. First introduced by American Express in 2010, it is a counterpart to Black Friday and Cyber Monday, which feature big box retail and e-commerce stores respectively. By contrast, Small Business Saturday encourages holiday shoppers to patronize brick and mortar businesses that are small and locally owned. We’ve got plenty of those in Greene County,

and if you haven’t been “shopping small” recently, you will be pleasantly surprised at the variety and affordability you’re going to find when you do. Make that discovery on Saturday November 28th by checking out the unique shoppes all over Greene County. Downtown Waynesburg is welcoming shoppers on Small Business Saturday with a unique “selfie promotion in which participating merchants reward shoppers for taking & posting selfies at their stores. Many are extending hours, offering featured items, sales and refreshments. Just remember the best reward you’ll receive by “Shopping Small” on Saturday Nov. 28th is the quality of unique merchandise you’ll find and the fun you’ll have doing it. Not to mention how impressed your friends and family will be. And how much you will be helping your local economy.

Dear Santa, I have been really good this year. So I want these things: a new scooter, a new skateboard, some new neft gun bullets, a new sled, a winter suit, a game controller for my xbox, a new wheel for my bike, a shovel, some minecraft legos, and a minecraft wallpaper, and a tin of Pokemon. Love, Brandon 14

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VETERANS DAY WORD SCRAMBLE WINNER Janet Parker of Waynesburg, PA

Winner of a $50 Gift Card to PECJAKS SUNOCO is a

GreeneScene by Tammy Dunlap

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One Hour of One Day Just for Them

Sandy Seybold, of Waynesburg, whose son, Chad, was killed in an automobile accident in 2004, handcrafted more than 100 stained glass angel ornaments to be given to attendees of the 10th Annual Empty Chair Service in Waynesburg.

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t has been a decade since the shared grief of members of a homicide survivors’ group turned into what is known as the Empty Chair Service in Greene County. The service this year will be held on Dec. 14 at 7 pm at the First Christian Church of Waynesburg, located at the corner of Morris and Franklin streets. It was at a meeting of this survivors’ group that Sandy Seybold, whose son, Chad, was killed on Nov. 18, 2004, the result of a car accident, and Carol Furmanek, whose daughter, Rhonda, was murdered as a result of domestic violence on Dec.

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1, 1994, began to talk about the hardest time of the year for them--the holidays. “They said how difficult it was with all of the family dinners and gatherings during the holidays and that this was when they seemed to notice that empty chair more than any other time,” said Cherie Rumskey, victims witness coordinator for Greene County. As the group began to talk about that ‘empty chair,’ the idea began to develop as to how to address it in a tangible way. “Although it originated from the hearts of two women who lost their loved ones from a crime, it is open to anyone who has lost someone,” Cherie said. “No matter how you lose someone you still have similar feelings.” The scripted portion of the memorial service includes a reading of the names of the departed, a candle lighting ceremony, and a moment when family members place ‘memorial stars’ on a Christmas tree. Led by Reverend Dr. Donald Wilson, and Scott Chambers, pastor of the First Christian Church, the service is non-denominational. Special music will be provided by the Waynesburg University Lamplighters choral group. As is a tradition, each attendee will re-

ceive a handcrafted ornament from Sandy. “She makes over 100 ornaments every year, by herself. This year she wanted them to be extra special for the 10th anniversary so she made stained glass angels,” Cherie said. It is a solemn, and yet cathartic evening as the shared grief of attendees over a loss is expressed. For Sandy and Carol it is one of the ways they keep the memories of Chad and Rhonda alive. Attendees are invited to bring a photograph of their loved ones to be placed on the Memory Boards displayed for the service. After, all are invited to gather in the fellowship hall. “The service is a sad time but when they enter the fellowship hall and begin to share stories of their loved ones there is often laughter,” Cherie said. “There are literally people who have never missed it (the Empty Chair Service). There are around 60 people every year. A lot come from Washington County.” In some years the number has surpassed 80. She said organizers from the Greene County District Attorney’s Office and the victim witness assistance program know the service must always continue. “They (families) tell us, ‘This is what I look forward to every year, when all I can do and all I have to do is reflect’ on this person for this period of time,” Cherie said. “This time, this one hour is for them to remember them and to honor them. It is heartwarming to see someone who is filled with grief and yet they see another person hurting and they put their arm around them and comfort them. We know this (the program) can never stop.”

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Union Valley United Methodist Church

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f you drive just a short distance past the Village of Time, you come across the Union Valley United Methodist Church, at 180 Valley Church Road. Situated down a short path that crosses Boothe Run, UVUMC has served the areas of Gray and Morris townships since the late 1800s. Originally the church was called Oak Grove Church but the congregants renamed it Union Valley on the same day they decided to dedicate themselves to “arise and build.” Prior to this they were meeting in the “Old Valley Church,” six miles north east of Jacksonville (Jacktown). Land was purchased and for $995 the church was erected in late 1879. Since that time, the 136 year old church has seen multiple additions and renovations with the most recent ones taking place in 2003 when new carpet was added, a steeple built, the roof replaced and the old bell tower removed. Even with the updates, the UVUMC continues to maintain the charm and character of an old-time country church. One long-running tradition that has stayed alive at the church is the monthly gathering there of “The Sewing Circle of the Village of Time.” The group has been meeting at the church since 1970. Although stitching was certainly a common denominator and cause for its founding, the “Sewing Circle” has really had little to do with needles and thread for the last couple of decades, but it is still an active group. Long Time resident Alberta Wise (pun in-

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tended) joined the sewing circle when she was just 12-years old. Early on she actually belonged to the sewing circle at Union Valley and another one at Beulah Baptist Church, just down the road, but the two groups eventually merged into one. At 93-years old, Alberta is half of the pair that sewed the circle’s final quilt about twenty years ago. “It took one year to get it done. We folded it and handed it to the president (of the sewing circle) and said, “We’re done!” Alberta recalls. Quilt making had been the main function since the group’s inception, but many of the members just decided to give it up…the quilt making, not the meetings. From that point on, Alberta did what everyone else did at the monthly meeting of the Sewing Circle of the Village of Time, ate and socialized. Still today, about a dozen people, a mix of men and women, meet on the third Thursday of the month at UVUMC for the sewing circle. Many of the members of the sewing circle also happen to be members of the congregation of the UVUMC, some for decades. As mentioned before, though it retains an oldtime charm, UVUMC is certainly not behind the times. They have a website, which spells out their purpose and mission of the church. It reads, in part, “Here in our congregation we take part in service groups, we sign up for special action projects, we visit, we telephone, we lead, and we teach. We minister face-to-face in all kinds of ways, both when we gather and in informal contacts. Inspired by the example of Jesus and empowered by God’s love for us, we all carry out our ministry, both individually and together with others.” Join Pastor Scott Lawrence and the congregation of UVUMC for worship services on Sundays at 9 am.

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Dear Santa, I have been good this year. I want this year to be a goo year. I want a horse, a new tablet and lots of other stuff. I love when you swing by. Christmas is a good holiday to get families together. I will have a snack ready for you. I look forword to you every year. Love, Casey

2015 Distinguished Service Award Winners Named The Waynesburg Area Chamber of Commerce has selected their 2015 Distinguished Service Award recipients with the individual award going to senior Judge William Nalitz. The Waynesburg Moose Lodge & Family Center has been selected as the organization winner, and Donald K. Lindsey as this year’s posthumous Distinguished Service honoree.

Senior Judge William R. Nalitz Judge William Nalitz was a lawyer for 24 years and a judge for 17 years. He has been an active member of the Waynesburg Lion’s Club for 40 years and is an active member of Saint Anne’s church in Waynesburg. Judge Nalitz is an American Legion veteran and member of the Greene County Farm Bureau. Judge Nalitz has taught classes through his membership in the Pennsylvania Conference of State Trial Judges. He is an active member of the community and has served Greene County for more than 40 years. Judge Nalitz graduated from Seton-La Salle Catholic High School in 1962, and then attended Georgetown University. After earning his undergraduate degree, Nalitz served in the army during the Vietnam War. Once he was home, Nalitz went to Duquesne University for Law School where he earned his law degree. Judge Nalitz is now retired but still enjoys doing Senior Judge Work and volunteering in the community.

Each year, local residents are invited to make nominations for the awards which are based on lasting contributions to community welfare, participation in civic organizations, evidence of leadership ability, success in vocation, personal and/or business progress, and cooperation with other individuals and organizations. The award has no relation to work performed for the Chamber of Commerce.

Moose Lodge & Family Located at 140 S. Morgan St., in Waynesburg, the Waynesburg Moose Lodge 461 and Family Center has played an active role in the community for the past 100 years. The organization provides a place for members to unwind and enjoy each other’s company but it also affords them an opportunity to better the community in which they live, according to John VanMeter, the governor of Lodge 461. The lodge helps provide support for three main causes, including: Mooseheart, an unincorporated community near Chicago, Illinois where children live, learn, and receive meals and care they would not otherwise receive. Secondly, the lodge supports Moosehaven, a retirement community in Orange Park, Florida, where members of the Loyal Order of the Moose and Women of the Moose reside on a 72-acre campus with access to medical care and other amenities. Locally, the lodge hosts Mother’s Day and Father’s Day brunches, sponsors a Little League team, and partakes in countless projects on an annual basis such as the donation of the Christmas tree displayed on the steps of the county courthouse. The tree goes up the first Saturday after Thanksgiving and stays up until the first Saturday after the New Year. The Moose also makes charitable contributions to local businesses, organizations, and individuals. Moose Lodge #461 is comprised of approximately 1,200 male members and 400 women, making it one of the largest lodges by membership in its district. With this manpower, members of the Waynesburg lodge are able to participate in sizeable community service projects such as cleaning up an eight-mile stretch of Route 281 and building structures for local athletic teams and at community parks.

Donald K. Lindsey Mr. Lindsay was a long time resident of the Waynesburg community. He graduated in 1968 from Chartiers High School in Washington County. Mr. Lindsay began working as a produce manager for Thorofare Supermarkets. He later worked as a journeyman machinist at Washington Mould and Foundry, and as a quality control manager for Dynamet Corp. He was also owner and partner in T.L.C. Family Amusement Center in Waynesburg. In July 1992, he and his wife, Jeanette bought the Waynesburg Milling Company from family members. The Waynesburg Milling Company remained his passion as he worked in and served the community he loved. He served in the Pennsylvania Air National Guard 112th Tactical Fighter Group. He served as a Boy Scout leader during the formation of Troop 1280 in Waynesburg. Mr. Lindsay was a member of First United Methodist Church in Waynesburg. He served as a trustee, treasurer of the trustees, and dartball coach for his church. He was also a member of Rices Landing Boat Club, and a former member of Waynesburg Lions Club. Mr. Lindsey served on the 4H Advisory board and was heavily involved with all activities. Mr. Lindsey faithfully served his community and his legacy lives on through all the people he touched.

Judge William Nalitz, Donald Lindsay, and Waynesburg Moose Lodge & Family Center will be honored at the Chamber’s Annual Membership Meeting and Banquet to be held Nov. 22 at the Waynesburg University Benedum Dining Hall. The public is welcome to attend and may purchase tickets at the Chamber office prior to Nov. 16. For more information, call 724-627-5926.

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Waynesburg Lions Club roaring into its busy season

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he Waynesburg Lions Club is in the heavy duty outside brooms and corn cane brooms midst of its busiest time of the year. The are available for purchase, along with 20/30 gallon annual Koeze Nut Sale is underway and heavy duty garbage bags. Contact Tom and Kay the Christmas Tree Sale will commence Laskody to order yours at 724-627-3632. on Nov. 28. “Those two events for the WaynesLooking for a place to hold a small gatherburg Lions are our major fundraisers,” said Lion ing? Maybe you need somewhere to have a child’s John Mariner. “The proceeds help us to support birthday party or a baby shower. The Lions Club our various local charities, our beautification of Community Building, located in Lions Club Park Lions Park, and the scholarships for the boy and in Waynesburg holds 40-50 people. It is available girl of the month at Waynesburg Central High to rent year-round. In season, the park hosts three School.” pavilions that are also available for rental. FMI, Celebrating its 75th anniversary, the contact 724-627-8380. Waynesburg Lions were recently awarded the naSupporting the Lions Club helps it to contional Diamond Banner Patch for the Lions Cen- tinue with the philanthropic endeavors that help tennial Service Challenge of 2014-15. The award you, your neighbors and your family members. recognizes a clubs commitment to supporting Keep current with the Waynesburg Lions community children, assisting with vision needs, Club by liking its Facebook page, Waynesburg Lifeeding the hungry and improving the environ- ons & Community Park. ment. None of this would be possible without the support of the community who donates used eye glasses and takes part in the club’s many fundraisers, such as the nut sale. To purchase nuts or a chance on a Koeze Nut-Majestic gift basket, valued at $575, contact nut sale chairman, Russ Hall at 412-997-3650. The raffle will go off on Dec. 19 with the 7 pm drawing of the Pennsylvania Lottery Daily Number. Cashews, pecans, pistachios, malted milk balls, cream-nut peanut butter clusters, milk chocolate raisins, and cashew brittle are just a sampling of what the basket holds. If you are in need of a live Christmas tree, the Lions will be selling Fraser Firs, Douglas Firs, Canaan Firs and Scotch Pines from 11 am to 8 pm from Nov. 28 until all trees are sold. The Lions Christmas Tree Lot is located on E. Greene Street in Waynesburg. Prices range from $30 to $60. If you’re in need of cleaning supplies, specifically brooms and/or garbage bags, you’re in luck. The Waynesburg Lions Club sells both, year round. Tom Dorazio and Shelley Younken of the Waynesburg Lions House brooms, children’s toy brooms, Club at last year’s Lions Christmas Tree Sale.

Dear Santa,

GreeneScene by Donna Whipkey

I have been really good. I want some video games, pokemon cards, new Nintendo 3ds, minecraft legos, nerf gun, beats head phones, book, spygear, minecraft mini figures, legos, zoomer dinos, cruz speakers, trampoline, glow wubble bubble. Love, Eric

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S por t Sh or t s

by Tara Kinsell

Rachel Rohanna Shares Her Elation on Reaching the LPGA

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Rachel watches the ball at the end of her swing.

n our July issue we talked about Waynesburg native Rachel Rohanna Virgili’s ascent up the money rankings of the 2015 Symetra Tour, the sister tour of the Ladies Professional Golf

Rachel keeps a close eye on the competition.

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Rachel Rohanna Virgili signs autographs at the US Women’s Open.

Association. Rachel was sixth in the rankings then. It was the halfway point and so there was still a long way to go to a top ten finish at the end of the season. That is what is necessary to receive an LPGA Tour card. Rachel continued to make her mark round after round on the Symetra Tour in nail biter fashion, finishing rather consistently near the 10th spot leading up to the tour’s championship in Daytona Beach, Fla. in mid October. Finally, all of her hard work paid off. She birdied on the final hole to grab a top ten finish and her qualification for the 2016 LPGA Tour. We caught up with Rachel on a family golfing vacation in Mexico. “I didn’t find out (that she had her pro card) until about an hour after. There was a girl that was one shot ahead of me in the final turn. I thought I’d missed by about $100,” she said. “I was completely speechless.” She talked about the course that started it all for her, her family’s golf course in Waynesburg. She recalled her younger years when she, her sister, her brother, and cousin, Robert would be on the greens together. “Being a Rohanna growing up you never thought much of it (the opportunity having a family owned course affords). Robert and I talked about this a few weeks ago,” she said. “We’d be out there hitting 200 to 300 balls at a time, with small targets off of difficult lies and uphill out of bad grass.” Having so many scenarios and conditions available for them to hone their game has made all the difference. “We are very fortunate that this is our fam-

ily and we have such a great support system,” she added. After this brief break with family and friends to golf and take in the beaches of Mexico, Rachel will have a few days of home time, take in the first days of hunting season and then it is back to hitting it hard. With play taking her to Singapore, Australia, and Thailand, part of her game plan is to get a passport for her husband, Ethan, so he can join her. Although it may sound like a dream opportunity to get to travel to so many places, Rachel was quick to debunk that myth. “It sounds so awesome but it is still work,” she said, noting the travel time, practice rounds, time zone changes, and actual play time can really take it out of you. It leaves little time to explore any of these locations. “Last year on the Symetra Tour I had 20 starts in 5 weeks and put something like 6,000 miles on our vehicle in 5 weeks.” She wasn’t complaining at all, merely removing the perceived glamour of playing on the pro circuit. When asked if she always believed that the brass ring was within her reach, Rachel said, she never had any doubt in her game. “There were a lot of sacrifices made growing up to get here. I had no school dances or field trips. I’d be gone 2 to 3 weeks at a time (playing tournaments over the summer) while my friends were at home at the swimming pool,” she said, noting she wouldn’t change a thing. “All the work is part of the process and the journey. I can’t imagine any other lifestyle or career. I can’t wait to get started!” GreeneSaver •

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F

Co o l at Sc h o o l

or four nights in October, members of the class of 2016 at Carmichaels Area High School, terrorized close to 1,000 people. They waited in the dark, jumping from trees, crawling along the ground, and making themselves menaces in general. And, we think it was worthy of the “Cool At School,” title this month. A brainstorm of senior Shawn Dulaney, the Carmichaels Class of 2016 Haunted House, quickly became the place to be for a good-natured scare. Dulaney came up with the idea as a means

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to fundraise for the senior class trip in March to Los Angeles. If you have school-aged kids, you’ve probably experienced the dread that sets in when they come home with a fundraising form. Your kids, if they do the peddling, probably weren’t too thrilled either. Family and friends supportively purchase candy bars, miscellaneous brica-brac, hoagies, and entire wardrobes of t-shirts and sweatshirts in school colors year-after-year. “We are trying to do fundraisers that offer some type of service,” said Senior class sponsor, Cassie Menhart. “When we had our October meeting, it (a haunted house) wasn’t even in the plan.” After the idea was presented, everyone sprang into action to make it happen. With approval from the school board, a nod from district maintenance director Dave Franks, and a massive volunteer effort, things took shape in just one week. Rehearsals followed for the characters who greeted visitors in each themed area of the attraction. Creepy clowns, zombies, chainsaw wielding monsters, and eerie music set the tone for what many guests said was ‘as good,’ and even ‘better’

by Tara Kinsell

than other long-time haunted attractions in the area. “I’m just so proud of this class. There are 68 seniors going on this trip (there are 89 in the class). Fiftyfive participated in one way or another. That is 80 percent,” Menhart said. “It was really a lot of hard work. We were all really tired by the fourth night. I think the kids were really proud of what they accomplished.” When more people were needed to help out, more than 30 underclassmen stepped up to the plate, in addition to the adult volunteers, she said. “I already have juniors coming up to me asking if we can do it again next year,” she said. The only drawback to that, is the learning cottages that were used as part of this year’s haunted house will be gone by the end of the school year. The school’s loop trail, which made up the second half of the attraction, could continue to be part of any future haunted house in the district, Menhart said. Other fundraising ventures planned by the Class of 2016 include a bus trip to New York City, leaving Dec. 18 around 11 pm and returning late night on Dec. 19, and a deer hunter’s breakfast on Nov.

30 from 4 to 7:30 am at the Carmichaels Grange on Ceylon Road. It will include scrambled eggs, bacon, sausage, potatoes, pancakes, biscuits, sausage gravy, orange juice and coffee. The cost of the NYC bus trip is $85 per person and the breakfast is $7 per person. FMI, contact cmenhart@ carmarea.org who will forward the request to the appropriate person from the senior class booster organization.

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Dear Santa, I have been really good this year! I like math and recss at school. And for Chrimas I want Ipad and Itunes card. And Pockemom cards. And minion toy. And my friends Chis and Alexis and Riley and Alisa and Carlee. Love, Jaci

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Dear Santa, I have been really good this year! I wish I can have a neckroll, new gear for racing. Can I please have a KTM50 dirtbike, xbox 360 game like racing car, MXCS ATV Love. May I have a toy motorcross set. May I have a toy racecar set. May I have a set of SpongeBob movies? Love, Landen

G ree n e Sce n e of the Pa st BREESE FARMHOUSE THEN

O

by Tara Kinsell

ur GreeneScene of the Past this find. Pictured in front of that original porch month features a farmhouse built by Elymus (Elmus) Breese in the are the children and grandchildren of Elmus village of Time and his family in and Catherine “Kate” Breese: Laura Dell front of the house. The home dates back to Clutter, Icie May Clutter, Henry Allen Clutthe late 1800s, according to its most recent ter, Frank Clutter, Anna May Breese, Frances owner, Bill Bennett, who currently lives in Margaret Breese, and Mary Alberta Breese. Graysville. Bill said he estimates the time pe- Standing to the right, rear of the photo, James riod in which the home may have been built Franklin Breese and Catherine Huffman on what he knows of the age ranges of some Breese. Photos courtesy of Bill and Donna of the Breese children in the photograph. The Bennett. more recent photo of the structure, taken in 2004, was durBREESE FARMHOUSE IN 2004 ing the period when Bill and his wife, Donna, occupied the home. While residing there, the Bennetts decided to put a new porch on the house. Bill said it was then that he came across a little piece of history. Tucked in the rafter of the old farmhouse porch was a cane. The lightweight, rather thin, cane was obviously crafted by hand. “Someone must have stuck it up there while they were working and then just forgot about it,” Bill said, sharing the

If you have an interesting old photo from the area you’d like to share, just send it to: GreeneScene of the Past, 185 Wade Street, Waynesburg, PA 15370. Or email to: info@greenesaver.com with GreeneScene Past in subject line. The GreeneSaver can even scan your original in just a few minutes if you bring it to our office. We are particularly interested in photos of people and places in the Greene County area taken between 1950 and 1980, though we welcome previous dates, too.

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WAYNESBURG GALLERY FEATURING REGIONAL ART

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f you haven’t been inside the gallery at the corner of High and Church streets in downtown Waynesburg, you are missing out on an opportunity to purchase one-of-a-kind handcrafted items. For four years now, sixty-plus regional artists, working in a wide variety of mediums, have displayed their pieces at the Artbeat Gallery, owned and operated by local potters, Jim and Linda Winegar. The Winegars opened the shop to give artists in Southwestern Pennsylvania, and specifically Greene County, a place to display and sell their work. Roughly half of the artwork, ranging from jewelry to paintings and everything in between, was produced by Greene County artisans. A handful of the artists that display at Artbeat are from surrounding states, including Ohio, Maryland and West Virginia. In fact, many of the customers who venture through the doors of Artbeat are from other states. “That’s the surprising thing, the people that travel from other places to shop here,” said Linda. “Recently we have had a lot of people from Michigan.” The Winegars attribute an ongoing and changing display at the I79 Welcome Center in Kirby for leading travelers from the Interstate to Artbeat in Downtown Waynesburg. It has been responsible for visitors from as far away as Utah, Montana and California stopping by, Jim notes. “It has been exciting working with the artists and seeing what’s happening with art in the region and watching the evolution of what they are doing,” Jim said. Travelers who find their treasures at Artbeat, but don’t want to take a fragile thrown pot, glass piece, or large framed picture along on the journey have nothing to fear. The Winegars, with 28 years of

experience in selling their own pottery to recipients around the country, have learned well how to ship any piece of art anywhere. Whether you want to send it out as a gift, or take it home to enjoy, local residents have right here in our own community this treasure trove of original art and hand crafted pieces at our fingertips. A great gallery you shouldn’t miss. Artbeat is open from 10 am to 5 pm, Monday through Friday and 10 am to 4 pm on Saturdays. It is closed on Sundays. After Thanksgiving it will operate on extended holiday hours. For more information, follow the Artbeat Art Gallery Facebook page, visit its website at http:// artbeat-gallery.com, or phone 724-833-9058.

Turned wood pieces, beaded jewelry, metal work, and tapestry are among the work of more than 60 regional artists available for purchase at the Artbeat Gallery in downtown Waynesburg.

Paintings, pottery, photography, and hand-woven baskets are just some of the work being displayed for sale at the Artbeat Gallery in Waynesburg.

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1946

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Your friend, Michael

. Bowl K b va

1957

Literacy Information

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Enrichment

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Fun

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Dear Santa, , I haven t been so good this year but I am trying hard! I would like the new call of duty black ops 3. I would like a lot of games and a lot of toys. My last wish is I would like a four wheeler just for me!

Holiday Open House - The Friends of the Bowlby Public Library invite you to the Holiday Open House, Wed., Dec. 2 from 3:30-6:30pm. Cookies on sale for $3/doz. (box container) or $5/ doz. (Christmas Tin provided by the Friends). Pictures with Santa, $10 for two 5x7 photos. Holiday Story Time from 5-6pm. Raffle tickets on sale now for giant Cookie Basket (filled with 12 different cookie-filled tins), a Children’s Christmas Basket (filled with toys, games, books, etc.), and a Holiday Quilt Raffle, all to be drawn during Open House , Dec 2. Annual Stuffed Animal Sleepover - The Bowlby Library mascot, Fetch, invites his stuffed friends to the Annual Stuffed Animal Sleepover! Youngsters of all ages can bring their favorite stuffed animal to the library on Wed., Dec. 2. At 5pm Fetch and his friends -- and their owners -- can enjoy a special Holiday Story Time. After story time & craft time, the children say goodbye to their stuffed animals and the fun overnight adventure begins. See what happens when the library is closed. Your stuffed animals will make new friends, play, and maybe even sleep. Pick up your stuffed animal the next day between 11 am-5 pm. Adult Craft Night - New monthly Adult Craft Night will be held on the first Thursday of each month, and now also on the second Saturday each month. Adult Craft Night will be Thurs., Dec. 3, 5-7pm or Sat., Dec. 12, 10am - Noon. This month’s project will be a tomato cage Christmas tree; cost is $20 for materials. Seating is limited; please call to register in advance.

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BOWLBY BITS

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After Hours Holiday Pajama Party – Fri., Dec. 11 from 4-8pm, hosted by the Children’s & Family Literacy Departments. Enjoy viewing a holiday movie and sharing warm cookies and milk, along with games, seasonal crafts, and activities. All family members are encouraged to attend. Don’t forget to wear your Christmas jammies! Call to register in advance. The Bowlby Public Library will be closed Dec. 24 & 25 in observance of the Christmas Holidays, and closing early on New Year’s Eve, business hours on Dec 31 will be 10am – 4pm. The library will be closed Jan. 1, New Year’s Day. FMI or to register for any of the above events call 724-627-9776 or stop by the Bowlby Public Library at 311 N. West St., Waynesburg.

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Fall Wreath Demonstration

Kas Maddich shows off one of the fall wreaths that she displayed as samples for a demonstration on how to make them at the Town and Country Garden Club’s October meeting.

Fall Foliage  Wreaths was the topic at the October meeting of the Town and Country Garden  club. The program was presented by club member, Kas Maddich, who shared various methods of making wreaths from fall foliage such as pampas grass, pinecones, leaves, teasal, cornflowers, black-eyed Susan and golden rod. Kas also demonstrated making bows and other adornments for the wreaths. Attendees also learned that a winter bird feeder can be made by constructing a natural wreath of dried leaves,  weeds,  flowers,  grasses,  acorns,  and  pinecones  and then coating with peanut butter and embedded  with  birdseed.    As a special treat, each  member  in attendance received  a  fall  apple  with  a  tag  congratulating  the  club  on  its  64th  Anniversary. It was organized in October 1951.

Letters from Santa Now through Dec. 11, local children are invited to mail their letters to Santa Claus, c/o the Greene County Department of Recreation, 107 Fairgrounds Road, Waynesburg, Pa. 15370. To receive a reply from Santa, a letter request form, including the child’s contact and basic information, gender, age and gifts requested from Santa must be completed by a parent or guardian. A

sample template is available at www.co.greene. pa.us. One request per child is permitted. There is no cost for to receive a Santa letter as funding has been provided through the sponsorship of CONSOL Energy, Noble Energy, the County of Greene, and through fundraising efforts by the Department of Recreation throughout the year.

Crouse School House Painting Raffle

Complimentary Community Dinner Rice Energy is sponsoring a communitywide Thanksgiving dinner in Greene County on Nov. 21 from 1 pm to 4 pm at the Army National Guard Readiness Center, located at 500 Evergreene Technology Park in Waynesburg. The “Plate of Plenty Community Dinner” will include: turkey, mashed potatoes, corn, stuffing, green been casserole, crescent rolls, pie and ice cream. There is absolutely no charge involved. Take-out is not available for this event. Free transportation for those who need it will be available at the following times: 12:30 pm from the Graysville Center Township VFD in Rogersville

12:40 pm from West Greene Senior High School 1:30 pm from Bobtown Elementary School 1:45 pm from the Mount Morris American Legion Post 2 pm from the Jefferson-Morgan Junior Senior High School 2 pm from the Nemacolin VFD 2:15 pm from the Carmichaels VFD All attendees will receive a warm winter coat, and weather permitting, the “Ricecream” truck will also make an appearance. Please regHere’s a chance to win an original paintister by calling 855-258-8326 or online at www. ing of the Crouse School House by local Greene plateofplenty2015.eventbrite.com County Artist Barbara Deynzer.  Raffle tickets are now on sale for the beautifully framed canvas  with the drawing to be held in time for Christmas, during the Greene County Historical Society Museum’s Christmas Open House event The Greene County Department of Recreation’s in December.   Tickets are 2 for $5, and avail-

Breakfast with Mr. & Mrs. Claus

annual breakfast with Santa and Mrs. Claus is on Dec. 5, from 9 am to 11 am, in the lower level of the 4-H building at the Greene County Fairgrounds. Breakfast will be prepared by Chef Dan Wagner, culinary arts instructor at Greene County Career and Technology Center. Cost is $8 per person. Children will receive a picture with Santa, Santa hat, and a special treat. They will also have an opportunity to create Christmas craft projects and a coloring contest will be held with prizes awarded by age category. For more information on “Breakfast with Santa,” or “Letters from Santa,” call the Department of Recreation at 724-852-5323. Hudson Davis puts in his requests with Santa at one of the annual Breakfast with Santa events, held by the Greene County Department of Recreation. Photo from the Department of Recreation.

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able in Rogersville at Rush Grocery, Community Bank in Rogersville, Walters Take Down Tire, at the Graysville store in Graysville, and in Waynesburg at Art Beat and the GreeneSaver office. All monies from ticket sales are for the restoration and future maintenance of the Crouse School House near Rogersville.

Toys for Tots The Greene County Leathernecks Toys for Tots distribution is Saturday, Dec. 19 from 10am – noon at four different sites in Greene County: St. Hughs Catholic Church in Clarksville, American Legion in Carmichaels, the Bobtown Fire Hall and the Greene County Fairgrounds in Waynesburg. Children up to 12 years of age are welcome, they must have a SS#, and parent must have proof of income. Collection sites are now accepting donations of new toys for the program. Collection boxes can be found at all area Community Bank branches, the Rices Landing and Waynesburg Giant Eagle stores, Dollar General in Waynesburg, Rush Grocery in Rogersville and other locations. For more info on the Toys for Tots, call 724-499-5332.

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VETERANS DAY TRIBUTE

Photos courtesy of Tara Kinsell, Jeanine Henry, and Buzz Walters.

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OPERATION CHRISTMAS CHILD

Dear Santa, I have been really good this year! I want to get a xbobx one for Christmas and I want video sports games that come with it like football and baseball. I especially a fifty inch flatscreen TV.

Seated: Joyce Syder. Center: Marjie Shaffer, Janie Shrum, Jane Snyder, Frank Huffman, Shirley Huffman, Judith Hamlin, Wendy Haywood, Sara Christopher, Tammy Amalong and Sue Rice. Back: Kathy Howard, Jim Howard and Pastor Brian Carroll. Not pictured: Susan Christopher

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he Greater Purpose Team Ministry made up of six United Methodist Churches located in Jefferson, Rices Landing, Fredericktown, Denbo, Howe, and Roscoe worked together to assemble 231 shoeboxes for Operation Christmas Child through Samaritan’s Purse. By working together we were able to increase what we did last year by 51 boxes. Our 231 boxes

will be delivered to Oak View United Methodist Church where our boxes will join with other boxes to continue their journey to be delivered to a child. The mission of Operation Christmas Child is to demonstrate God’s love in a tangible way to needy children around the world, and together with the local church worldwide, to share the Good News of Jesus Christ.

Your friend, Ronin

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Your Hometown Radio Station

1210

AM

Tune in for Crazy Dougie Wilson weekday mornings & J.T. Cash weekday afternoons

Dear Santa, I have been a good girld this year. For Christmas I want a popcorn maker that is red on the bottom silver on top and has a yellow crank. I also want a scooter for my doll and a oreo ice pack and play-doh.

The Best Mix of current country hits and

country classics you’ll ever find!

NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2015

• GreeneSaver

Love, Zoey

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Nov Dec GreeneSaver 2015  

Let's do the Turkey Trot! The GreeneSaver brings you the history of Time (Dogtown) in this issue. And don't miss the contests, coupons and u...

Nov Dec GreeneSaver 2015  

Let's do the Turkey Trot! The GreeneSaver brings you the history of Time (Dogtown) in this issue. And don't miss the contests, coupons and u...

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