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NOVEMBER / DECEMBER

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

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GreeneScene Magazine •

NOVEMBER / DECEMBER

2017


NOVEMBER / DECEMBER

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

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I Love this P l a ce

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by Colleen Nelson

The Distillery at Lippencott operated from the mid 1800s through the turn of the 20th century. Photo from the E.P. Taylor collection.

hat’s not to love about Lippencott, with its scattering of stately old homes that let you know this was a prosperous farming village in the 19th century? There is a classic covered bridge to admire as you take that scenic drive on Route 221 from Ruff Creek through town, and then past the nine-hole Greene County Country Club to where the road ends at the intersection of Route 188. The Cox Bridge is one of seven still standing in the county. It straddles Ruff Creek, just outside of town, along a stretch of rich bottomland, still farmed in places and slated for development in others. The creek is said to have been named Ruff ’s Creek after an indigenous chief, who once used the area as a hunting ground. Lena Galing grew up on the Hawkins family farm – now called Lippencott Alpacas, on Meadowbrook Road. She remembers her father telling her this tale, and others. “My great grandfather bought the old Bell Farm in the 1870s so we weren’t the original settlers. But we heard things growing up. People said the Bell house was haunted - I never saw anything but others say they did. I lived there until I was two, then my family built this house.” “This house” is neat and 1950-ish, with a hillside of fuzzy alpacas grazing where cattle once roamed rising up behind it. Inside the Farm Store that sits on the other side of the driveway, Lena has photos of Lippencott as it once was, hanging on the wall. One is the old one room brick schoolhouse across the road from Cox Bridge where her father Jim Hawkins and his nine siblings went to school. “My dad told me he used to go ice skating on the creek with just his shoes.” Lippencott or Lippincott? The name is spelled both ways, Lena pointed out, depending on which sign you looked at coming in and out of town.

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LIPPENCOTT, PA

Lippencotts were some of the first settlers here and one branch of the family owned the distillery that sat in town beside the creek, turning locally grown corn and rye into the kind of product that spawned the Whisky Rebellion in this part of the Western Frontier. When president George Washington decided to tax the only goods – jugs of whisky - that farmers could get to market on the

muddy trails that linked them to the world, farmers revolted, were subdued but continued brewing and grumbling as they paid taxes on their popular product. Eighty some years later, in 1874, the temperance movement made Greene County dry, but Lippencott’s distillery which started in the mid1800s, continued to make whisky and sell it elsewhere until the Temperance War of 1906-08 finally

Cox Farm Bridge, one of only seven remaining in Greene County, crosses Ruff Creek near Lippencott.

shut down all county breweries and distilleries. The name Lippencott dates back to 11th century England, when “cott” indicated a homestead (also the root of the word cottage…old Saxon language) There’s not a lot of information about the town on file at Cornerstone Geneology but the family has donated many records, including a large family tree, to Cornerstone. Both spellings are used through the generations. Greene County’s own Albie Rinehart tells of the time he was at his winter getaway in Florida, had stopped to visit a neighbor, Dona Jones, when he spotted a bit of Lippencott hanging on the wall of her Florida home. It was an original Land Grant in the name of William Lippincott, for property located in Greene County, Pennsylvania. Of course it grabbed Albie’s eye, and opened up the “small world” conversation. Eventually, Dona gave the framed document to Albie to bring back home and it now hangs in the records room at the courthouse, with a fine family history to tell. Dona is a descendant of William Lippincott; her mother Jane Day, who gave her the grant to hang, was a great-great granddaughter. The family originated in Devonshire England in 1020 and William came to Greene County in October, 1812. His son Uriah was a teacher and husbandry farmer with 400 acres of land. His descendants formed many businesses and served in various occupations. One was the distillery and another a hotel in Washington. Albie’s research shows that today, Terry Dayton may own at least a portion of the original property from the grant. The history of Lippencott is rich; however, it is today’s generation of farmers that have brought renown and far-reaching recognition to our little village of Lippencott, with the production of three

Lena Galing of Lippencott Alpacas enjoys frolicking with the herd. GreeneScene Magazine •

NOVEMBER / DECEMBER

2017


Greene County Register & Recorder Donna Tharp and Albie Rinehart hold the original “Warrant” or land grant in the name of William Lippencott found its way home from Florida and is now on display at the Greene County courthouse.

quite unique types of animals. In 1982 investment broker Keith Martin bought the old McClellend house and one acre on Crayne Run Road with dreams of leaving the cutthroat stock market life behind. He and wife Mary, a flight attendant, didn’t quit their day jobs but spent the next few years making the once stately house that was built in 1873 livable, while acquiring enough land to become farmers. The Martins were looking for a life that would match their values to raise the two children they would eventually have. “It occurred to me that, among my clients and circle of acquaintances, the people I admired most were farmers. I identified, not necessarily with their work, but with their principles and life priorities – family, home and the value of honest labor,” Keith said. By 1989, Keith left investing to become Elysian Fields, raising lamb that is now the preferred American lamb used by internationally renown chefs around the country. It was a transition of hard work and attention to every detail of raising the best lamb for the best cuts. Making a profit, Keith learned in a few short years, meant cutting out the middlemen who process the meat and deliver the product. In the early 1990s Martin decided to hand deliver some choice cuts to Ruggeri’s Food Shop, a gourmet and specialty foods purveyor in Squirrel Hill. “ I pulled one of my old suits off the shelf, and headed to Ruggeri’s. I’ll never forget the look on John’s face when he looked at the meat, then looked at me, and said, ‘where did you get that?’ He wanted to place an order on the spot.” Elysian Fields now does its own USDA processing and the meat is delivered by truck or by air to restaurants all over the United States. If you ever want to try some, remember, Elysian Fields donates its lamb for free tastings at the Greene County Sheep and Fiber Fest every third weekend in May. Cattle are still raised all over the county for their grass fed beef, but in Lippencott, Buckin’ B Cattle Company on Meadowbrook Road raises them to ride – hopefully for 8 seconds if you’re lucky. “I rode him – but not for long!” ranch hand

NOVEMBER / DECEMBER

J.C. Tennant grinned as he pointed to Clementine, one of owner Matt DeJohn’s favorite bulls. And no wonder - Clementine has been on television and was named the Southern Extreme Bull Riding Association (SEBRA) Bucking Bull of the year in 2014. His penchant for dumping riders has brought him rock star status in the world of rodeo sports. Matt started riding bulls in college and by the time he graduated WVU in 2001 he was hooked on the prize money for a good ride and the excitement of the sport, but even more impressed with the business of raising the bulls that are judged right along with the riders in competition. A year later, after a couple of significant falls, he gave up riding and went into business with some bulls and trailers and a rented pasture near Eighty Four, Pa. Today Buckin’ B Cattle Company’s home is on a 50-acre farm in Lippencott, with a pasture full of Brahma crosses of varying patterns, colors and spots, with or without horns, but all living the life of the rodeo star or star-to-be. Matt DeJohn and his Buckin’ B Cattle Company have nine times been named “Producer of the Year” by his peers in SEBRA. Buckin’ B Bulls are contracted to events all over the country to include such venues as the PBR at Madison Square Garden, NY; the American Quarter Horse Congress in Columbus, OH and the PBR World Finals at Las Vegas, Nevada. Matt also produces over 20 of his own bull riding events in OH, WV, PA, MD, TN, and KY every year, many sanctioned by SEBRA and/or PBR. Local residents are fortunate to enjoy Buckin B’s “home show” every spring right here at the Greene County Fairgrounds, typically the third weekend of April. A little further up the same road, Lena and Phil Galing’s alpacas are as sweet and polite as Matt’s bulls are feisty and unpredictable. The fleece they produce is beyond soft and the bright skeins of alpaca yarn are much coveted by knitters. Hunters and anyone who wants to be wonderfully warm outside make pilgrimages to Lena’s store for socks. sweaters, gloves and scarves and there are stocking stuffer finger puppets and fuzzy stuffed alpacas for kids. “I never thought I’d come home and raise

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

The historic brick farm house (AKA the McClelland House) on Crayne Run Rd. was built in 1873 and restored by Keith and Mary Martin of Elysian Fields Farm.

Clementine, award winning bull in the Buckin B Cattle Company herd, and ranch hand J.C. Tennant.

alpacas, but here I am!” Lena said. When she and husband Phil retired from Army life in 2001, the lure of farming took hold when they decided to stay and help her dad manage his cattle and Phil got his first calf named Pricilla. But alpacas proved to be more fun, profitable and easy to raise. After meeting her first alpaca at the Sheep and Fiber Festival in 2003, Lena fell in love and got into the business that November with five “girls”. Now the Galing’s ever-growing herd

of many colored animals, from white to shades of fawn to gray and black are guarded by two Great Pyrenees dogs and visited regularly by school kids and shoppers who love to pet these Peruvian transplants who have taken so well to living in Lippencott. We’ll be open every day until Christmas but call first so we don’t miss you,” Lena said. “If no one’s in the store, stand at the fence and yell. I’m around somewhere!”

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BOWLBY BITS Library will also be CLOSED Monday, December 25, for Christmas holiday. Library will be CLOSING EARLY on Saturday, December 23 & December 30 at 1:30 p.m. HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE - Wednesday, December 6, 3:00 - 6:30pm. Sponsored by the Friends of the Bowlby Library - There will be a Cookie Walk, Cookie Raffle Basket, Children’s Holiday Raffle Basket, Photos with Santa, Storytime with Santa, Live Music & Refreshments! Raffle tickets are $1 each/$5 for 6 tickets. FETCH’S STUFFED ANIMAL SLEEPOVER - Children of all ages & their favorite stuffed character are invited to the library Wednesday, Dec. 6 @ 5pm for stories & crafts with Fetch! Kids will then leave their “friends” to have a sleepover with Fetch, or perhaps some library mayhem! CPR/AED TRAINING CLASS - Monday, December 4 @ 5:00 pm. FREE & open to the public. Sponsored by Greene Co. Memorial Hospital Foundation. CREATIVE CRAFTING FOR ADULTS – December 7, at 5:00 pm. Project is a deco mesh angel. Cost for materials: $20. Please call library for more info at 724.627.9776. CODING SQUAD - for kids ages 6-12. Meets on Thursdays at 5:00pm, last class is December 7. MOVIE NIGHTS @ THE LIBRARY – Enjoy a movie here at the library every Wednesday evening beginning at 6:00 p.m. FREE popcorn and beverages! December 6 ~ no movie; Holiday Open House December 12 ~ Despicable Me 3 December 20 ~ The Case for Christ December 27 ~ Spiderman: Homecoming *starts at 5:30pm AFTER HOURS Holiday Pajama Party - for children & families on Friday December 8, 4:008:00pm. AFTER-AFTER HOURS FOR TEENS - Holiday Pajama Party for teens 13-18yrs, Friday, December 8, 8:00-10:00pm. BOWLBY ROCKS! - Adults are invited to participate in the latest craze - painting rocks! Will meet on Saturday, December 2 @ 12:00-2:00pm. Bring two clean rocks with you to paint! WILD KRATTS STORY TIMES - Saturdays, December 9 (Oh my...Bears!) at 11:00am. Join us for stories, snacks, crafts & show. LIBRARY LEGO CLUB - meets Saturdays, December 2 & 16 at 11:00am Call or stop in Eva K. Bowlby Public Library for more info or to register for any of the above events. 724-627-9776 • 311 N. West St., Waynesburg, PA 15370

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GreeneScene Magazine •

NOVEMBER / DECEMBER

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G ree n e Sce n e of the Pa st

his old photo hanging on the wall at Lippencott Alpacas Farm Store on Meadowbrook Rd. is fascinating for showing what public services were available to farming families at Adamson Store in Lippencott – or was it still called Martinsville? at the turn of the last century.

“If you look close you see that sign that says ‘Public Telephone pay station’ Lena Galing said, pointing to a detail in the amazingly sharp image. Underneath the sign is a wagon with two dapper African Americans wearing white shirts and dark vests, sitting in the drivers seat. To the right is a gathering of men, boys and a couple of working

dogs – hounds most likely used to hunt for game and warn families of intruders at the gate. Goods can be seen hanging in the windows of the store and advertisements are tacked to trees, posts and walls. This is what life looked like in 1895 in Lippencott, when everything you needed for everyday living might be found in stores like this and farmers

by Colleen Nelson

and their families gathered here to get their mail, make a still rare phone call and talk to neighbors about the weather, that most important of all topics when it comes to planting, harvesting or gauging what the next week might bring. Lena pointed to a young man in the middle, sitting beside his dog. “We think that’s my grandfather. We got this photo and the one of the old Lippencott distillery from our neighbor E.P. Taylor’s collection and I love having them in the shop to show people what this town used to look like. It had everything that a family needed. When I was growing up I remember the blacksmith shop being open, right across from the elementary school.” Today, Lippencott doesn’t have a store or a post office and every home does have a telephone, of course. The old store building is still there, its pre-twentieth century lines beautifully preserved, its outbuildings part of the landscape at the corner of Route 221 “Lippencott Road” and Meadowbrook Road. Phil and Cheryl Cowan live here now and the signs at the corner let you know that Lippencott Alpacas is just up that Meadowbrook Road, along with Buckin’ B Cattle Company. These historic homes and farms of Lippencott have survived to tell the story of late 19th century life in rural farming communities, The local store was an anchor and a bellwether for the new times that would come, things like telephones and eventually the gas stations when vehicles replaced the horses and wagons that came to town for supplies and stayed to shoot the breeze.

1894 Photo of Adamson Store in Lippencott, from the collection of E.P. Taylor. The photo at lower left is the same building, taken from the opposite side, today it is the Cowan residence. If you have an interesting old photo from the area you’d like to share, just send it to: GreeneScene of the Past, 185 Wade Street, Waynesburg, PA 15370. Or email to: info@greenescene.com with GreeneScene Past in subject line. The GreeneScene Community Magazine can even scan your original in just a few minutes if you bring it to our office. We are particularly interested in photos of people and places in the Greene County area taken between 1950 and 1980, though we welcome previous dates, too.

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omething old, something new – there are two Baptist churches in Lippencott and one has a cemetery with some venerable occupants whose birthdays date back to the 1700s. In Greene County, that’s about as old as it gets. There are no fancy modern signs out front on Calvary Baptist Church on Lippencott Road telling when services are held and the weathered ramp suggests that some of the congregation has given up its love of climbing steps to get to the front door. The little white outhouse still sits demurely off to the right, with a bird house dangling from the eaves, and the large hewn rocks that level the yard from the road are an impressive display of the roll-up-your-sleeves spirit that helped build this old wooden church with its beautiful bell tower. “My ancestor Silas Crayne is buried here and so is his brother. He was a Revolutionary Veteran,” Connie Martin Grimes said. She and her family are lifetime members and the family trees of Connie and her husband Ernie Grimes go back to the first pioneer families. She also has the history of the church documented and is happy to share the story. Calvary Baptist Church was a frontier mission church when it applied to join Redstone Baptist Association in 1819. In 1828 the land was officially deeded to the church and by 1830 the Mission Church of Lippincott had it first regular minister, Rev. Barnett Whitlatch, who would set the spiritual tone in his 37 years of service. The church and all its records were lost to fire a few years after his death in 1867 and the present church was built in 1883. It would not be called Calvary Baptist until 1910. “Ernie’s great grandfather Charles T Grimes helped prepare the Rules of Order for the church when it was established as it is now, Independent Baptist, ” Connie said. “This is a family church for us. Ernie’s a deacon, I’m a deaconess, my daughter’s involved and I play the piano. We’re not large – we get 30 or 35 on a Sunday, maybe 50 on holidays. But from this little church we had a missionary to Sudan for 40 years and over the years some of our young people feel the call and break out and start their own church or take on a mission. When my grandparents on the Acklin side started going here in the 1930s they brought all their children and grandchildren with them and that brought new life to the church. I remember playing on the gravestones when I was little, not realizing some of them were my relatives!” The website findagrave.com lists another Revolutionary War veteran buried in the old cemetery - Dennis Smith who was born in Germany in 1738. Smith left his German surname Schmidt behind

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when he came to America and married Elizabeth Zook in November 14, 1771 in Pennsylvania. He served seven years as a Revolutionary sergeant in Captain George Myers’ Company, Washington County and was granted a land warrant for 500 acres in the “Virginia Military District” that included much of Greene County. He died August 24, 1829 and his proud descendants put a photo of his grave in Lippincott online. The church basement is used by the community for meetings, including a TOPS group on Thursday evenings. Sunday School starts at 9:30 a.m. and services are at 10:45 a.m. There is bible study and prayer every Wednesday at 6 p.m. with choir practice at 7 p.m., Connie said. “We’re very casual, not stuffy - a melting pot of old farm families and friends who join because they know someone here.” Just a few country blocks down the road on Route 221, Faith Baptist Church is easy to spot – it holds services in the old brick building that was once the elementary school before Central Greene consolidated and brought kids from outlying township schools to Waynesburg in the 1970s. In 1978 Faith Baptist Church, which had been holding mission meetings in a parsonage basement on Piper Ridge Road near Lippencott, bought the building at auction. Pastor Paul Roofner came onboard in 1982 and the church expanded to include Open Door Christian School in 1993. The school has approximately 75 students from pre-school through grade 12 who learn Christian values along with the Abeka curriculum that has plenty of room for engaging projects in the community and learning from real world experiences. The school is happy to say it uses the same school bell that once brought the kids of Lippencott through the doors in the morning and sent them home in the afternoon, school director Raelene Keller said. “We just finished our Walk of Faithathon and our high school Christmas play is December 12 at 7 p.m. Everyone is invited.” Sunday school starts at 9:45 a.m. with worship at 11 a.m. There is a Sunday night service, Teen Disciples and a Joy Club for children at 6 pm and Wednesday prayers at 7 p.m.

GreeneScene Magazine •

NOVEMBER / DECEMBER

2017


GreeneScene by Sarah Andrews

NOVEMBER / DECEMBER

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

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Spo r t S ho rt s

by Jason Tennant

Historic Season for Waynesburg Girls Soccer

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hree years ago, the Waynesburg Girls Soccer team won a total of 5 games. That team’s leading scorer was freshman by the name of Madison Clayton, who participated as a student at Jefferson-Morgan under a co-op program. The 2017 season ended on Saturday, November 11th at Hempfield Area High School in a heartbreaking, 1-0 loss to Bedford in the PIAA Quarterfinals. Clayton, along with fellow senior starters Claire Garber and Elle Hampson have been on a remarkable journey over the last three seasons, taking a program that had never even won a WPIAL playoff game to the doorstep of the State Semifinals! Waynesburg went 11-3-1 during the 2015 regular season, more than doubling their win total from the previous season. Then came the first big milestone, as the Lady Raiders defeated Yough in the first round of the WPIAL playoffs for their first ever postseason win! They would lose to Mars in the WPIAL Quarterfinals. The following season, it was one step further as the 15-2 Raiders won their section title and earned a first round bye in the WPIAL Playoffs. They defeated Charleroi in the Quarterfinals, only to fall to Freeport in the Semifinals by a score of 3-1. Then came the 2017 campaign…. After dropping a game to South Fayette in their second game of the season, Waynesburg tore through their regular season, winning 15 straight games to finish 16-1 and win a second straight Section title. The team’s numbers were staggering. The Lady Raiders outscored their regular season opponents by a combined 125-12. Clayton again led the team in goals scored with 53 and freshman Rhea Kijowski exploded onto the scene with 30 goals and

26 assists! After defeating Avonworth, 5-0 in the WPIAL Quarterfinals, Waynesburg got a semifinal rematch with Freeport and Waynesburg destroyed the Yellow Jackets, 7-0 to earn their first ever berth in the WPIAL Championship Game. The Lady Raiders made the most of that by claiming the WPIAL title with a 4-2 win over defending champion Freedom. Immediately after the win, head coach Joe Kijowski was at a loss for words. “I’m so lucky. The girls have worked so hard for this. We always had this goal in mind, but to actually achieve it, there are no words that can describe it right now.” The Lady Raiders would achieve another first as they earned their first ever PIAA Playoff win when they defeated Harbor Creek, 6-0 in their first ever state playoff appearance. Unfortunately the season would still end on a disappointing note as they would lose in the PIAA Quarterfinals in unthinkable fashion. The Raiders who had scored 147 goals coming into that game, were held scoreless by Bedford. Waynesburg definitely had the better of the scoring chances in the

Photo by Dar Gram

game, but could not put a shot in the back of the net. Bedford’s Taylor Downs scored less than eight minutes into the game and aside from a missed penalty kick late, the Bison never really had another good scoring opportunity in the game but made the 1 goal hold up for the win. It was a season of many “firsts” for the Waynesburg Girls Soccer program and the Raiders fell just two wins shy of the State Championship Game. Here’s hoping there are more “firsts” in store next season!

Carmichaels Football Ends Long Playoff Drought

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armichaels has easily been the County’s most successful football program over the last decade, only missing the WPIAL Playoffs twice in that span. However, for a County that hadn’t won a WPIAL Playoff game since 2006, an appearance in the WPIAL Quarterfinals was long overdue and that made Carmichaels’ 28-8 win over Western Beaver on November 3rd all the more meaningful. This year’s Mighty Mikes team seemed to pick up steam as the season went on, and you can go back to a Week 3 game against West Greene as maybe the game that got the ball rolling. There was hype surrounding the game as the upstart Pioneers were an impressive 3-0 heading into the game, and midway through the third quar-

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ter, it looked as if West Greene might defeat the Mikes for the first time in over 20 years. The Mikes had fallen behind 30-16 after a touchdown run by Zach Pettit, but Pettit was hurt on the play and didn’t return. Injury or no injury, the Mikes still rallied from behind to score 20 unanswered points and walk away with a 36-30 win. From that point on, the Mikes only got stronger week after week. Their only loss was to an outstanding California team and Carmichaels locked down second place in the Tri-County South with a very impressive 31-14 win over Fort Cherry. Jefferson-Morgan had been the last Greene County team to win a playoff game as they reached the WPIAL Semifinals in 2006. It had been even longer for Carmichaels as their last WPIAL Playoff

win was a 32-0 Quarterfinal win over Fort Cherry on November 9, 2002. The Mikes had lost 13 consecutive playoff games since that day. That long drought came to an end this season with the win over Western Beaver. “It’s nice to win a playoff game for the first time is so long,” said head coach Ryan Krull. “I’m just so proud or our team.” The season came to an end with a 37-12 loss to Clairton, but Krull has an eye to the future. “Our kids were disappointed after the loss, which is a good thing that will make them hungry moving forward,” said Krull. “I’m excited for the future.”

GreeneScene Magazine •

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CORNERSTONE CARE FOCUS GROUPS

ornerstone Care is a network of nonprofit Federally Qualified Community Health Centers (FQHC) that serve communities in Southwestern Pennsylvania. There are 10 locations including the Mobile Medical and Dental Unit. Services include: Family Medicine, Family Planning, Dental Services, Psychiatry, Counseling, and Pediatrics. The Outreach Department has a multitude of programs that all focus on community needs. School Based Dental Exams, Cleanings and Sealants, Children’s Oral Health Outreach, Clinical Breast Exams, Family Planning, Access Matters, Mobile Medical, and free assistance from Certified Navigators for Health Insurance. Cornerstone partners with a number of funders and organizations in the community to offer these programs. Cornerstone Care is currently putting together four focus groups to help them better address the healthcare needs of our communities. They are inviting area residents to share your thoughts, opinions, and suggestions about healthcare, outreach, and all other matters that you believe a local provider like Cornerstone should address. “We value the voices of our patients and community, your input is important,” said Donna Simpson, Director of Communication and Outreach for Cornerstone Care. Who is asked to participate? “We are looking for Cornerstone Care patients, parents of our pediatric patients, and community residents. You do not need to be a patient to participate. All applicants are welcome,” Donna explained. If you are interested in sharing your views,

opinions, reactions and suggestions about how Cornerstone Care can best reach people and serve their health care needs and community, you may want to consider applying to be a member of a focus group. The four focus groups will be conducted in December 2017. The first two will be held in Greene County at the West High Street Location and two will be held in Washington County at Cornerstone’s Burgettstown office. This will consist of just two evenings and applicants must be available for both days. Each focus group will have 12 participants. All participants that actively participate will receive a Wal-Mart gift card valued at $25. There will be food and beverages provided for all that attend. For Greene County the focus groups will be on December 11 and 12 from 6:00PM-8:00PM. The location is at 501 West High Street, Waynesburg. For Washington County the groups will meet on December 13 and 14 from 6:00PM8:00PM. The group will meet at 1227 Smith Township State Rd., Burgettstown. Those that would like to participate may fill out the one page application at www.cornerstonecare.com. For any questions please call (724) 852-1001 Ext. 306.

GreeneScene by Autumn Lee

NOVEMBER / DECEMBER

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

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VETERANS WORD SEARCH WINNER

Ron Mason of Waynesburg found all the Veteran related words and was the lucky winner of the random drawing for FIVE free ultimate car wash’s from Stuck’s Laserwash!

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GreeneScene Magazine •

NOVEMBER / DECEMBER

2017


“Shop Small” on Saturday Nov. 25 Black Friday?? Forget it. Crowds, traffic, common merchandise made overseas on sale for a few hours so everyone can fight over it. It’s just too crazy and overboard…and really not the value you once thought it was. Definitely out. On the other hand “Small Saturday” is quite appealing. The actual name is “Small Business Saturday” – the latest trend for the weekend that kicks off holiday shopping. First introduced by American Express in 2010, it is a counterpart to Black Friday and Cyber Monday, which feature big box retail and e-commerce stores respectively. By contrast, Small Business Saturday encourages holiday shoppers to patronize brick and mortar businesses that are small and locally owned. We’ve got plenty of those in Greene County, and if you haven’t been “shopping small” recently, you will be pleasantly surprised at the variety and affordability you’re going to find when you do. Make that discovery on Saturday November 25th by checking out the unique shops all over Greene County. If you really want to have fun, just hop from shop to shop. Really… take downtown Waynesburg for example. We have a specialty gourmet candy shop, we have leading names in jewelry and accessories, plus artisan jewelry, several antiques and collectibles shops, hand crafted Americana gifts and décor, great deals on brand name fashions for men & women, organic foods, herbals, skin and health care, salons and an incredible diversified art gallery that draws people from all over the eastern region of the country – right to downtown Waynesburg! There’s a very cool comic book store, a couple of coffee houses, a custom computer store, a home decorating center, everyone’s favorite dollar store and a supermarket to boot. The new Lily Bees addition to the floral shop offers some of the country’s best in gourmet foods, indulgent soaps, lotions & candles, Amish crafts and incredible home décor. Oh and speaking of food… Downtown Waynesburg offers plenty: mouth-watering barbecue better than you’ll find anywhere, sizzlin’ authentic Mexican, and enchanting Chinese (yes, the newly remodeled Lam’s Garden is OPEN!). You’ll find the freshest most delectable deli and home style cooking… It’s ALL right there! Drive the short trip to downtown Waynesburg, park the car and walk up and down High Street.

You’ll have more fun Shopping Small than at the mall! You’ll find better stuff, better deals, better service… Try it! Shop Small this Saturday November 25th. Many merchants are extending hours, offering sales and refreshments. Just remember the best reward you’ll receive by Shopping Small any day of the year is the quality of unique merchandise you’ll find, and how much you will be helping your local economy. Because that’s the other thing - when you Shop Small, you spend with local businesses, where your money does a whole lot more work for your community. $100 spent at a local business = $68 in revenue for the local community vs. only $43 when spent at chain stores. Small business provides nearly 70% of all new jobs in our country. Local merchants spend a much larger portion of total revenue on local labor to run the enterprise and sell the merchandise. Non-profit organizations receive on average 350% more support from local businesses than non-locally owned businesses. Buy Local, Buy Greene.

10TH ANNUAL HALLOWEEN SPOOKTACULAR

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he Greene County Chamber of Commerce, in partnership with Waynesburg Borough, held the 10th Annual Halloween Spooktacular on Oct. 31. The event is open to employees who work for any Chamber of Commerce member business and/or any business that is located within the Borough limits.  There were 51 participants this year, who were judged by a panel of three: State Representative Pam Snyder, Chamber President Jeff McCracken, and co-owner of Direct Results Shelly Brown. Treat bags, sponsored by First Federal Savings & Loan, were provided to each participant. Trophies, sponsored by Lisa Brown Allstate Insurance, were awarded to 1st place winners, and medals sponsored by Betsy Rohanna McClure were awarded to 2nd & 3rd places. Cash prizes were awarded to all winners: 3rd Place Individual “Taco Belle” Candy Hoskins of First Federal Savings & Loan - $50, sponsor PcSquared 3rd Place Group “The Pittsburgh Perogies” Darlene Humble, Marge Kurilko, Vickie Steinmiller, Christine Booth of Greene County Treasurer’s Office -$50, sponsor Laick Design. 2nd Place Individual “One Night Stand” Shanna Meyers of Greene County Human Services - $50, sponsor McCracken’s Pharmacy. 2nd Place Group “Hocus Pocus” Regina

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Morris, Jamie Titchnell, Holly Miller of Logan Law Office - $50, sponsor Med Express. Best Individual “Peter Pan” Jordan Brooks of First Federal Savings & Loan - $100, sponsor Coaches’ Café & Trophy Best Group “Alice In Wonderland” Sheila Stewart, Connie Jones, Janice Babyak, Rachel Moore, Breanna Kelley of First National Bank of PA –- $100, sponsor Rhodes & Hammers Printing Most Original “We Like our Puns Intended” Carrie Watters, Amanda Hall, Shayna Kerr, Laurie Fink, Brittany Ellis, Kelly Graham and Deanna Davis of First Federal S&L Drive Thru - $100, sponsor Baily Agency. The hand decorated pumpkin (artist Chamber Director Melody Longstreth), sponsored by Sheriff Brian Tennant is also awarded to the Most Original. A new category called “Most Entertaining” was added by the judges at the last minute this year. “It is going to become a permanent part of the competition from this year forward,” said Melody, “Be sure to check out the Chamber and Borough’s Facebook pages for a video clip!” Winners of the first Most Entertaining Award were “The California Raisins” Janice Lahew, Lisa Murdock, Megan Goodwin, Candace Buchanan, Crystal Walters of the Greene County Clerk of Courts office $100, sponsored by State Representative Pam Snyder.

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

“The California Raisins” of the Greene County Clerk’s Office won the “Most Entertaining” Award.

“Peter Pan” Jordan Brooks of First Federal S&L won the “Best Individual” Award.

“Alice in Wonderland” of First National Bank won the “Best Group” Award.

“We Like Our Puns Intended” of First Federal S&L Drive-Through won the “Most Original” Award.

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Town Homes Built In Rogersville By John Dorean

Cook, Center Township Supervisor. Board Chairman of the Redevelopment Authority John Dorean commented, “This is really a remarkable project. As someone who has been involved in housing issues in the county for more than 35 years, I know how difficult it is to get a project like this completed in the West Greene area. Infrastructure issues of water and sewage have always been a stumbling block. So, the fact that the McNays were willing to donate this particular piece of ground in Rogersville, where there is already infrastructure in place, has made this decades-long dream a reality. This private/public partnership that in this case includes a local contractor doing the work as well is, we certainly Ground Breaking for the New Town Homes in Rogersville on Sep. 29, 2017. Pictured (l-r), front row: Thelma Szarell, RACG Board Member; hope, the future for improved housing John & Kathy McNay, property owners who donated the land, Marcia throughout the county.” Sonneborn, Board Member. Middle row: Melissa Grover, PA Housing FiFunding for the project has come nance Agency; Archie Trader, Greene Co Commissioner; Seann McCol- from the PA Housing Affordability lum; Barry Nelson, Board Member; Eric Cowden, Field Representative and Rehabilitation Enhancement Fund of Senator Camera Bartolotta. Back Row: Representative Pam Snyder; (PHARE). PHARE funds assist to creDave Calvario, Director of RACG; Paul Cook, Center Twp Supervisor; Ralph Burchianti, Board Member; Butch Deter, Center Twp. Supervisor. ate affordable housing and redevelop land to serve new purposes. The townhomes will sell in the hat do you do with a century old $165,000 range and a Home Ownschool that served the community ers Association will cover cutting grass and other of Rogersville for decades, but be- outside items. The Greene County Tax Abatement came too costly to repair over time? Program applies to this development. Repurpose the land to serve a new role for the next For more information contact Dave Calvario 100 years. at the Redevelopment Authority of Greene County, Through a gracious donation of the old school 724-852-5306. in Rogersville from John and Kathy McNay of Prosperity, the Center Township Supervisors and the Redevelopment Authority of Greene County are repurposing the site where the Center Township High School once stood. Town Homes are being constructed on the site of the old school, bringing new life to the land and its ability to serve the community. The first of four planned duplex Town Homes is currently under construction. Each home will have 3 bedrooms, 2 ½ baths, contain approximately 1,600 square feet, with the master suite on the first Photo of the original Center Township High School in floor, and have a one-car garage. Rogersville. Construction on the brick building began in “This new development is a plus for our comthe fall of 1910 by contractor C.C. Sellers of Rogersville. munity, and will add value to the tax base and There were fifty-four students enrolled when the high school property values of homes in Rogersville,” said Paul opened in 1914.

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The Holiday Season is HERE!

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he Holiday Season is HERE! If your home isn’t ready yet, let the Perfect Arrangement and Lily Bees make it easy! This is where you’ll find warm & wonderful, unique décor and do your shopping! Lily Bee’s has new and exciting gift ideas for men, women and kids arriving daily! Creative Christmas décor and accessories for your own home, and gifts that get attention, it’s all here. Christmas Decor Our three in-house creative designers can customize wreaths, crafts, holiday silks, and holiday fresh, to put the final touches on your holiday decorations. Also, whether you like Amish, primitive, country, or modern, you will find original designs, and heart-warming creations to adorn your home at Lily Bee’s. We also carry candles, gourmet treats, ornaments, and holiday accessories to give your home that welcoming feeling you are hoping for. Christmas Gifts Lily Bee’s has become the regional expert on custom gift baskets that really wow recipients. Not only will our designers customize the contents with combinations of home décor, luxurious bath and body products, gourmet foods and more, the container can be the best part of the gift! You better believe it’s not just baskets! From country fresh crates or crocks to ammo crates and tool boxes for

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2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

men’s gift collections. Choose from a striking selection of containers, add silks or fresh flowers if you like, and fill it with such products as: • Milkhouse Candles (All-natural with country elegance) • Tea Forte (As featured by Omni Hotels) • Bumbleberry Honey and Honey Creams (Decadence to die for) • Mud-Pie Home Accessories (Simply beautiful) • Duke Cannon Men’s Bath Products (Time to step up from Dial soap) • Peanut Shop Peanuts (A Williamsburg tradition) • Michelle by Design (Women’s luxury indulgences) • Bequet Caramels (Award-winning Montana confections) You can also add scarves, plush for kids, snow globes, lotions, and more. You can even bring in a bottle of their favorite beverage to add to the presentation! Don’t send that same box of candy again this year… let Lily Bee’s help you make this year memorable. The Perfect Arrangement and Lily Bee’ offer daily delivery to all of Greene County and beyond. And remember, it doesn’t have to be a holiday or special occasion to send flowers or a basket. It is always a good time to make someone’s day. It just takes one call. The Perfect

Arrangement and Lily Bee’s does it all. 724-627-3191. Or, visit our store, and see what the BUZZZZZZ is all about at Lily Bee’s, and The Perfect Arrangement.

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Ground Breaking on Medical Marijuana Facility

Lions Club International 100th Anniversary

Greene County Commissioners joined AGRiMED in a ground breaking ceremony for the medical marijuana growing and processing plant to be located off Thomas Road in Cumberland Township, Greene Co, pa.

The Greene County Commissioners issued a proclamation last month in celebration of the Lions Club International on its 100th Anniversary in October. The Lions Club International is the largest service club organization in the world, aiding the blind and visually impaired, providing youth activities, environmental projects and humanitarian services. The Waynesburg Lions Club was chartered on October 22, 1940 and has contributed to our local community with the annual July 4th celebration,

Halloween Parade, student recognition, scholarships and maintaining the Waynesburg Lions Club & Community Park among other services. “We are entering our 77th year serving this community and we are very proud,” said Herb Thompson, Waynesburg Lions Club president. Pictured (l-r) are Commissioner Archie Trader; Commissioner Dave Coder; Herb Thompson, Waynesburg Lions Club president; and Commissioner Blair Zimmerman.

Winter Apparel Drive State Rep. Pam Snyder, D-Greene/Fayette/ Washington, has announced that her three constituent service offices will again collect winter clothes to benefit area families. “This is the fifth year we’ve collected winter gear for local residents, and the response has been tremendous,” Snyder said. “Residents have opened their hearts and closets to meet the need locally for cold-weather gear such as coats, jackets, gloves, mittens, scarves, hats and boots.” Donations will be accepted through Dec. 6 at the following times and locations: 9am to 4pm Mon-Fri at the Carmichaels office, 104 S. Market St. 9am to 4pm Mon-Fri at the Waynesburg

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office, 93 E. High St. 9am to 4pm Mon-Fri at the Brownsville office, 113 Thornton Rd. All new and gently used items collected will be distributed through the Waynesburg Salvation Army, the Masontown Helping Hands Ministry and Crosskeys Human Services of Brownsville. “Hundreds of families throughout Greene, Fayette and Washington counties have benefitted from the donations since we began the drive in 2013,” Snyder said. “The donations create warmth and joy not only among recipients but within the donors, too.” FMI: Call Snyder’s Carmichaels office at 724-966-8953.

AGRiMED Industries continued their journey making history in Pa. on Wed., Oct. 11, 2017 with a formal groundbreaking ceremony at a 61-acre site in Cumberland Township for the first building of AGRiMED Industries’ medical marijuana growing and processing plant. This phase one building will be an indoor grow facility and will comply with the Pennsylvania Department of Health Medical Marijuana Program (Act 16 of 2016). While this is the first building to be on AGRiMED’s site, the company says there are plans in action for perpetual expansion. According to a news release provided by the company, “AGRiMED Industries is committed to creating and providing the model environment for medical cannabis growing and processing. Some of these initiatives include dynamic sustainable agriculture of plant-based medicine production, renewable energy application, entrepreneurship and education about wellness and healthy living just to scratch the surface.” “The state-of-the-art facility to be located in Cumberland Township will be used to develop new innovations in the medical cannabis and agriculture industries as well as take part in economic development activities and community engagement. These facilities will allow for a greater number of patients in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania to have safe, convenient and affordable access to highquality natural cannabis-based medicines.” At the ground-breaking ceremony, both local dignitaries and company representatives emphasized that not only will AGRiMED’s high tech and innovative facilities serve patients statewide in its development and production of the highestquality strains of medical cannabis; but also that AGRiMED is committed to growing the local workforce and very backbone of Greene County by creating many career opportunities in the coming months. Greene County Commissioner Blair Zimmerman said, “Everyone knows about the problems

Greene County Commissioner Chairperson Blair Zimmerman with Jack Ham, Steelers Hall of Famer and spokesperson/consultant for AGRiMED.

in the coal industry that have hit Greene County particularly hard in the last few years. Any industry that can create family-sustaining jobs is good.” Company officials said there will be approximately 20 jobs created initially and that number will rise to over 60 with plant expansion. Over the next five years, AGRiMED has positioned itself to become a significant component to the medical cannabis industry whether through its high-quality strains or its sustainable energy efforts. Plus, beyond Greene County, AGRiMED has pending applications to develop additional processing facilities in order to cultivate more industry innovation and develop new products in additional states. Legendary Pittsburgh  Steeler and native son Jack  Ham, spokesperson and consultant for  AGRiMED, served as master of ceremonies for the groundbreaking, which was co-hosted by the construction contractor for the project—Accelerated Construction Industries, LLC  of Morgantown, West Virginia. To learn more about its career opportunities or for more information on AGRiMED Industries visit  https://AGRiMEDindustries.com.

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Coo l at S c h ool

The following feature originally appeared in the Nov. 9, 2017 issue of The Yellow Jacket, Waynesburg University’s award winning, student-run newspaper. GreeneScene Community Magazine is pleased to share this and future stories from The Yellow Jacket with our readers, as we give these young journalists an opportunity to broaden their audience and share the good news of our region and campus with you. You can also follow The Yellow Jacket online at https://issuu.com/ wuyellowjacket.

MOCK EMERGENCY TRAINING SESSION HELD FOR STUDENTS By Mattie Winowitch, Executive Editor of the Yellow Jacket

Criminal justice and nursing students are pictured with Waynesburg Borough Police and Waynesburg University faculty members.

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aynesburg University held a Mock Emergency Training Session Tuesday, Nov. 7, in the Paul R. Stewart Science Hall to provide an experiential learning opportunity for senior nursing students. The training session, held between 1 p.m. and 3 p.m., was for students in the Clinical Prevention and Population Health course (NUR 419) to prepare them for an emergency situation in a hospital setting. The original idea for the Mock Emergency Training Session was from Dr. Kathy Stolfer, associate professor of Nursing. Stolfer came up with the idea in August after learning from a medical resource about the importance of training health care workers in this manner. “One of the things that has been documented throughout the literature is that health care professionals are very much at risk for being harmed or killed,” Stolfer said. “Particularly, [emergency rooms] are big areas where incidents do happen…unfortunately we have to prepare for the new norm because this can happen anywhere.” The critical incident scenario was set up in the Simulation Lab to replicate an emergency room setting. It combined both an active shooter and a workplace-violence incident. Stolfer worked alongside Eve Weaver, Simulation Lab coordinator, who agreed on the importance of the event.  “We need to prepare them for what could happen, what’s going to happen or what they might see,” Weaver said. “We think about these incidents as all happening at a church or happening at a concert, but we never stop and think about what’s happening in a healthcare setting.”Another layer of the event was the collaborative effort between the Nursing Department, Criminal Justice Department, Department of Communication, local police and University Relations. James Tanda, director of Security Operations and Emergency Management, was a lead facilitator in representing the Criminal Justice Department. Stolfer reached out to Tanda when she first came up with the idea and began to conceptualize the entire operation.  “This event was about educating senior nursing students who experience, unfortunately, violence and things like this on the job, and we wanted to bring this prac-

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tical experience to them,” said Tanda. “We also wanted our criminal justice students to participate for them to collaborate.” To get criminal justice students involved, Tanda chose five students from the department to simulate victims for the nursing students, while also giving them a chance to observe law enforcement officials in action. “The students get a chance to work in a high-stress environment where real police are responding, and simulated victims are shot, including themselves, and they get a chance to get a different perspective,” Tanda said.After planning for the event had commenced, Stolfer and Tanda quickly involved Stacey Brodak, vice president for Institutional Advancement and University Relations. Upon hearing about it, she immediately started thinking big-picture. “We wanted to make sure that students, faculty and even the surrounding community would not be concerned if they saw the police cars showing up on campus,” Brodak said. As a precaution, students were alerted via e-mail and the university alert system, e2campus, that the Mock Emergency Training Exercise would be taking place. For Brodak, there were two components of the event: “You had the internal piece that was the people involved in the simulation, and then there was the communication externally just so everybody knew it was a drill,” she said. It was also Brodak’s idea to invite Department of Communication students to benefit from the mock press conference after the simulation and debriefing sessions were over. However, despite the participation from the other departments, the day, according to Tanda, was for the nursing students and their preparation for potentially violent situations. “No campus, no hospital [and] no workplace is immune from this or safe from [violence],” said Tanda. “Although we practice and pray for the best, we prepare for the worst. We are doing our part to make sure we are ready in case anything like this were to happen, but in light of Las Vegas, the Baptist church in Texas and other attacks this past year, there is no better time to prepare than now.” Editor’s Note: Teghan Simonton and Luke Goodling contributed to this report.

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Greene: Earth and Sky

By Pete Zapadka

Carmichaels Area graduate is Lion-hearted and constantly Angry

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eeting fascinating people and finding new friends isn’t difficult in Greene County. Whether you make an acquaintance at one of our popular festivals, along a country road, or on the sidewalk in Carmichaels or Waynesburg, it’s clear this county has a diverse and engaging populace. And among these people, many can come with a catchy, memorable name. Consider this roadside conversation of a some time ago near the White Covered Bridge during a walk with Farley and Ingrid Toothman. Genial husband Farley is judge of Greene County Court of Common Pleas and his amiable wife Ingrid is a Doctor of Dental Medicine. Wait a minute. So Dr. Toothman is . . . a dentist? “Why do you think I married him” Ingrid said with a laugh. Then there was Rain Day a few years back, when for the first time in memory, a booth featuring information on the Pennsylvania State University was set up on High Street. And among those staffing the booth was a young woman who, honestly, was Angry. Any sort of attitude would be understandable. After all, she was set up in territory that leans predominately toward the West Virginia Mountaineers to the south and the Pitt Panthers to the north. And, of course, this is right in the backyard of the smaller Waynesburg University. But never underestimate Rachel Angry. This affable lady, a 2001 Carmichaels Area High School graduate now living in McClellandtown, is a ball of energy and is as engaging as can be. She is something of an ambassador for the Nittany Lions of Penn State – her alma mater and her employer – and makes many appearances throughout the year across Greene County to help promote the university to prospective students. Sometimes, she has the Nittany Lion mascot at the outings she attends. “My full time gig with Penn State – specifically Penn State Fayette – is Admissions Counselor. I recruit out of 43 schools in the Tri-State area – Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Maryland,” Angry said. “And I am very proud to recruit out of all of the high schools in Greene County.” Her vibrancy inspires her to reach beyond her job duties. Angry also is a board member for the Washington-Greene Counties Chapter of the Penn State Alumni Association. The-16 foot float she designed and engineered won first place in the 2016 Penn State homecoming parade in the in state alumni chapter category. The $500 award was donated to THON, the a 46-hour fund-raising dance marathon held in February at Penn State. THON is a student-run philanthropy committed to enhancing the lives of children and families impacted by childhood cancer. She first became Angry when she married mail carrier Mike Angry on Valentine’s Day, 2014, and immediately started getting questions and comments. “When people learn that’s my last name, some of the first things I hear is, ‘. . . oh my gosh, I would

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never describe you as that.’ . . . it’s still a constant, weekly joke that I run into, that people don’t believe it’s my name. It’s an incredibly fun last name and it really gets conversation going and makes people laugh,” she said. Angry apparently didn’t want to waste what little time remains in her day. She started a small crafting business, Angry Bee Designs, on the side. “The name obviously came from Angry, my last name; Bee because I collect bee stuff,” she said. “So I just used the two things I’m most passionate about.” Angry does “upcycling” – she recycles old license plates and old barn wood to make commemorative signs, and makes scarves, blankets and pillows from T-shirts and other clothing material. Angry Bee Designs has appeared the past few years at the White Covered Bridge Festival in September. Upcoming shows include the Holiday Extravaganza to benefit the Carmichaels and Cumberland Township Volunteer Fire Department on Saturday, Nov. 18, and the Carmichaels Elementary Musical Mikes Holiday Craft Show on Sunday, Dec. 3. If her extra-optimistic approach is hard to believe, be sure to see her in person. Angry credits her parents for instilling her positive attitude. Her mother is Doris Peterson, magistrate’s assistant with Lee Watson, Magisterial District Judge, in Carmichaels. Her father is Wayne Peterson, a mechanic, welder and handyman with D Kovach Trucking. She said her mother and father make friends virtually everywhere they go. The family in September stopped to hold a lively and gregarious conversation outside of a restaurant along East College Avenue in State College. “I’m lucky I got those genes passed along,” she said. “I just don’t know any other way to be. I know misery loves company, but it’s never going to find it when I’m around.” Pete Zapadka is a Greene County property owner and a retired local news editor at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. He can be reached at pzapadka@yahoo.com. GreeneScene Magazine •

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Downtown Waynesburg has the Spirit of the Season

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lan your visit to Downtown Waynesburg from 5 to 8:30 pm on Friday, Dec. 1, for the 9th annual Holiday Open House, sponsored by EQT and presented by Waynesburg Prosperous & Beautiful. Serving as the kickoff to the Christmas shopping season, the Holiday Open House will feature extended hours at many Downtown Waynesburg stores, live entertainment, seasonal foods and fun for the whole family. This year brings back many favorite activities like the free Wagon rides, caricatures & pictures with Santa, plus some new entertainment includ-

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ing the Memories & Melodies DJ Party on the west end, and the Cricket Wireless Letters from Santa Station. Beginning at 4 pm, several blocks of High Street will be closed to motorized traffic. Activities start at 5pm with Santa & Mrs. Claus on site to welcome children, visitors and shoppers alike. Free pictures with Santa will be provided by McMillen Photography at the Greene County Courthouse and Mrs. Claus will be handing out free Santa bags with treats, compliments of First Federal Savings & Loan. All the other activities begin around 5pm as well, and at 6pm, there will be a tree lighting ceremony for the big Christmas tree that graces the front of Greene County Courthouse. Mark your calendar and watch for the specially decorated store fronts to remind you as well. Most downtown merchants will be lighting and decorating their windows in advance to compete for the coveted snow crystal award and cash prizes for best decorated windows, sponsored by Community Bank. “This special evening has become a holiday tradition for many people in the area, reminiscent of an old fashioned Christmas, with carolers and all the sparkle and magic of small town America,” says event chair Joanne Marshall of Greene County Tourist Promotion Agency. Merchants will extend their hours and offer special sales, door prizes and refreshments. As usual, fire barrels will be lit along High Street for holiday shoppers to pause for a visit and warm their hands. One of the most popular activities of the evening are the horse-drawn wagon rides by Rocky Ridge Acres, which offers free rides all evening. “With the generous sponsorship of EQT, nearly all the activities are free this year. Take a ride through the decorated parks and streets of town in a horse drawn wagon, enjoy all the musical entertainment, get a free caricature drawing by popular artist Jeff Harris…there will much to see and do – and it’s for the whole family,” Joanne adds. The Cricket Wireless Letters from Santa Station is presented in conjunction with the Greene County Department of Recreation’s annual Letters from Santa program. Children who come with their parents to the Holiday Open House can write their letters to Santa that evening, or pick-up the forms to send in later. Either way, thanks to Greene County Dept. of Rec’s special coordination with the North Pole, each child who participates will receive a personal letter from Santa. Lippencott Alpacas will also be at the festivities to welcome the holiday shoppers with their adorable live alpacas and alpaca apparel, accessories, yarns and gifts. Greene County Tourist Promotion Agency’s souvenir maps, hand-drawn by local artist Leslie Fehling and featuring the locations of all activities, food and participating merchants, will be distributed to help guide shoppers through the festivities.

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

EQT is the lead sponsor of the Holiday Open House and Community Bank underwrites the window decorating competition among businesses. You can join in the judging by casting your vote for the best display at each participating location. Waynesburg Prosperous & Beautiful is a Main Street program that operates in conjunction with the Pennsylvania Downtown Center. Main Street programs emphasize critical time-sensitive stabilization and revitalization of historic downtowns business districts. For more information on the Holiday Open House, call 724-627-8119. There’s More the Next Day… The following day, Saturday, Dec. 2, Greene County Chamber of Commerce will present the

2017 Christmas Parade beginning at 2pm. The execution of the parade is underwritten by FirstEnergy Foundation. Miss Rain Day 2017, Eden Rogers, and the Chamber’s 2017 Distinguished Service Award winner, Chuck Bailey and wife Shirley, and McCracken Legaxy Award winner Waynesburg University, representated by President Doug Lee and wife Katheryn will have the honor of leading the parade down High Street as its Grand Marshals. WCYJ Television from Waynesburg University will videotape the parade for later broadcast on local stations. Late entries will be accepted in the parade through Nov. 22. If you want more info on the parade, call the Chamber office at 724-627-5926 or visit the website at www.greenechamber.org.

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Letters from Santa Local children may send a letter to Santa in care of the Department of Recreation and receive a personalized letter from Santa just before Christmas. Parents are requested to send a completed letter request form, along with the child’s letter, to Greene County Department of Recreation, ATTN: Santa Claus, 107 Fairgrounds Road, Waynesburg, PA 15370. Requests must be received by Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017. The form includes the child’s contact and basic information including gender, age and any gifts requested from Santa. “Dear Santa” templates and letter request forms are available online at www.

co.greene.pa.us. There is no fee for Letters from Santa as funding has been provided through various sponsors and fundraising efforts the Department of Recreation holds throughout the year. Requests are limited to one per child. Dept. of Recreation representatives will also be set-up at the Holiday Open House in Downtown Waynesburg on Friday night, Dec. 1, from 5-8pm. The request forms and templates for Letters from Santa will be available there, children can write their letters that night, or take the forms home with them to be returned by mail. FMI: call the Department of Recreation at 724-852-5323.

Christmas Parade Applications Available

Oh, Brother! We left something out. In our recent Tribute to Veterans, we shared a reader’s submission of a photo of Isaac Leo Tustin, who was killed in action during WWII. Among the family members listed, one important

name was omitted, that of Isaac’s full brother, Joseph Franklin Tustin. Thank you to Jan TeagarThe Greene County Chamber of Commerce den for bringing the unintended oversight to our will present the 2017 Downtown Waynesburg attention. Christmas Parade on Sat., Dec. 2 at 2pm. The execution of the Parade is underwritten by FirstEnergy Foundation. Late entries are still being accepted through Nov. 22 at a fee of $20. Parade line-up will begin at noon. Parade line-up is different this year. Be sure to check in advance for line-up instructions. There is no cen-

2017 Toys for Tots

tral theme but all entries are asked to portray the true Christmas Spirit. Trophies will be awarded to the top three floats. All entries are reminded that no live Santa is permitted on any unit in the parade as he is the guest of honor at the conclusion of the parade. Download the parade application from www.greenechamber.org  FMI call Chamber office at 724-627-5926 or email info@ greenechamber.org.

Continuing the Work

You can mark your calendars now, the TriCounty Leathernecks have announced December 16 will be the distribution date for the 2016 Toys for Tots program in Greene County. “This will be 35th year for the program,” said Buzz Walters, Commandant of the Leathernecks. The original event was funded in part by an elimination dinner sponsored by the Men and Woman of the Moose. The proceeds from the dinner were used to purchase toys. To this day, the Moose continues to support Toys for Tots in Greene County with the dinner, and many of the Moose members donate their own time and money for the program. “We could not do it without the Moose and the support of the generous people of Greene County who also donate toys. They have been great each year,” Buzz adds. New, unwrapped toys can be dropped at collection boxes throughout Waynesburg and

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Greene County – you’ll see them all over. The toy distribution on December 16, will be from 10am-Noon. Toys will be distributed to parents of children ages 0-12 years. There are some guidelines you need to know. Parents need to bring social security numbers for every child, and proof of household Income. Children should NOT accompany parents. The following locations will have toy distribution, contact names and numbers are provided if you have questions in advance: Waynesburg - Greene County Fairgrounds Buzz Walters, 724-499-5332 Carmichaels/Cumberland Township - Carmichaels American Legion - Theresa Walters & Laura Walters, 724-966-2009 Clarksville - St. Thomas Church - Dick Saxby, 724-377-2450 Greensboro/Bobtown-Bobtown Fire Hall Toni Cline, 724-943-2108

In last month’s issue we “Shined the Light” on the Coalition for a Brighter Greene and the cooperative effort from several other groups and individuals in our community to address issues of alcohol and drug addiction and recovery efforts here. We need to correct a few statements in that report. According to Chris Gardner, whose correct title was Director of Development and Compliance for Greene County (now retired), there were 296 people in attendance at the very first Town Hall Meeting on October 21, 2015, when the Coalition was spawned. The current President of the Coalition for a Brighter Greene, Pastor Richard Berkey of the Rolling Meadows Church of God in Waynesburg, also clarified for us that it was volunteer Jim Maraney who first introduced the movie Appalachian Dawn and began coordinating public showings in our community. Pastor Berkey had gone to one of those first public showings and then joined Jim’s effort in facilitating additional showings. At press time last month, the third Town Hall Meeting was just about to happen on Oct. 26, 2017 at the Greene County Court House. The effort is still going strong, and there is much work yet to be done to address drug, alcohol and mental health issues in our communities. For those who couldn’t be there, a recording of the

entire meeting is available on Youtube, just search “Town Hall Meeting Greene County PA.” The work continues every day of the year. “This effort was started and is maintained by the volunteers and grass roots people in our community who have lived with these issues and know that we have to address them,” said Chris Gardner. As we said in our spotlight last month, Coalition for a Brighter Greene continues to fight for more prevention services and get the word out about the needs that underserved rural communities face. They have also established a detox and rehabilitation scholarship fund, if anyone wants to make a contribution, The Coalition for a Brighter Greene is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization. Your tax deductible contribution in any amount is welcome and appreciated. Your check made payable to Coalition for a Brighter Greene, can be mailed to 395 Park Avenue, Waynesburg, PA 15370. If you’d like to learn more about the scholarship fund and how it will help, or learn more about the Coalition for a Brighter Greene in general, you can contact President Richard Berky through the Rolling Meadows Church of God at 724-627-6323. The next Town Hall Meeting has already been scheduled for Thursday, October 11, 2018 at the Greene County Courthouse.

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GreeneScene by Joan Ianelli

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Your Hometown Radio Station

1210

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Tune in for Crazy Dougie Wilson weekday mornings & J.T. Cash weekday afternoons

The Best Mix of current country hits and

country classics you’ll ever find! 24

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2017

Nov Dec GreeneScene 2017  

The holidays are upon us! Get up to date information on events here in Greene County. Enter to win Lottery Scratch-off tickets thanks to PA...

Nov Dec GreeneScene 2017  

The holidays are upon us! Get up to date information on events here in Greene County. Enter to win Lottery Scratch-off tickets thanks to PA...

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