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MAY / JUNE

2016 • GreeneScene Magazine

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Dock to Lock Race Draws Over 90

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ver ninety runners and walkers turned out for the annual Dock to Lock 5K Run/Walk, on May 7 at the Greene River Trail. Prizes were given for the top three male and female runners and walkers overall, as well as the top three male and female runners and walkers in various age categories. The top three overall winners in the 5K run were: Male: 1st - Aaron Mylan, 17, of Rices Landing, 17:13; 2nd - Colten Davidson, 16, of Jefferson, 20:10; 3rd - Kaden Statler, 14, of Core, WV, 20:43. Female: 1st - Rachel Jones, 16, of Holbrook, 22:11; 2nd Amy Koontz, 40, of Monongahela, 23:27; 3rd - Brooke Barner, 12, of Waynesburg, 25:21. The top three overall winners in the 5K walk were: Male: 1st - Michael Journic, 60, of Carmichaels, 40:13; 2nd - Robert Mcelheny, 12, of Waynesburg, 44:13; 3rd - John Hair, 56, of Carmichaels, 45:31. Female: 1st - Linda Keller, 63, of Waynesburg, 42:07; 2nd - Jennifer Campbell, 44, of Rices Landing, 43:08; 3rd Kristine Knepp, 63, of Jefferson, 43:40. Proceeds from Dock to Lock benefit Department of Recreation programs, such as the summer Day Camp pro-

Aaron Mylan, 17, of Rices Landing crosses the finish line as first overall for the Dock to Lock 5K run with a time of 17:13.

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gram, which offers free activities for county children ages 5 to 15. This year, Day Camp will be held June 20 through July 29 at various locations across the county. For more information on Department of Recreation programs, call 724-852-5323.

Michael Journic, 60, of Carmichaels finished first overall among all walkers with a time of 40:13.

GreeneScene Magazine •

MAY / JUNE

2016


COAL MINERS

HAVE YOU EXPERIENCED A LAY-OFF?

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here is help. Dave Baer, a dislocated coal miner, was recently hired by Southwest Training Services, Inc. as a Peer Counselor for laid-off coal miners and other individuals that have lost their jobs due to the decline in the mining industry. He is encouraging his fellow miners to come in to the PA CareerLink® for services.

“My job is to now help and recruit laid-off mine (and mining related) workers to utilize services available to them and their families. We also can help you find food banks and direct you to agencies that will help you pay necessary bills.” MAY / JUNE

2016 • GreeneScene Magazine

There are many valuable employment and training opportunities available at our PA CareerLink® offices. The Southwest Corner Workforce Development Area (which is Beaver, Greene and Washington Counties) provides up to $8,000.00 for classroom training in an in-demand occupation. If you are not interested in classroom training, On-The-Job Training is available as well. We can work with companies to develop On-The-Job Training (OJT) contracts where you can earn a wage throughout your training at a company. Any individuals interested may visit their local PA CareerLink® office for more information. The Southwest Workforce Development Board has applied for and been awarded more than 1.5 million dollars to help anyone and everyone affected by the loss of our coal mines. Call Ami Gatts, Director,  at 724-229-5083 or email agatts@washingtongreene.org to learn how you can benefit.

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I Love this P l a ce

t was a rainy day in Greene County when my daughter, Jordan, and I set out to visit the town of Brave. It was the first time for both of us. Although I had an opportunity to look at the wonderfully documented book, “A Village Called Brave, A History of Brave, Pennsylvania,” by James Hoy, we still didn’t know what to expect. What we found was a small town with a lot of heart. One of the locations we set out to find was based upon an old black and white photograph. It simply said it was shot from Kent’s Hill. From research we knew that the Kent family played a prominent role in the town. In fact, the Methodist Church there still bears the Kent name, Kent’s Chapel UMC. One can learn about the church from our Shining the Light column this month (see page 12). The town itself is believed to have been named after the dog of a former post mistress. Apparently, this story of how Brave got its name has never been disputed but hasn’t exactly been confirmed either, from the stories that still circulate. As we looked for a street with a sign that said it was Kent’s Hill, we seemed to be striking out. There are not a lot of streets in Brave but we weren’t so sure that we had seen all of the town. When we encountered a group of children playing, Jordan and I decided to pull over and ask if they had heard of it. They were very friendly and all too willing to help, calling for their mom. She too was especially helpful, although after living there her whole life, she had no recollection of a Kent’s Hill. Very kindly, she made a phone call and we were dispatched to a neighbor’s house to talk to Matt Cumberledge, who, we were told, knows his history. Unfortunately, Matt wasn’t home, but another very nice person who lived there, I believe his mother, also offered her assistance taking my number down. It was that way all through the town of Brave, even on a very dreary, rainy day, the residents were all smiling and willing to lend a hand in our search. One tip eventually led us to a location that overlooked the houses as was seen in the photograph. It is now called Orchard Road but that orchard was originally called, Kent’s Orchard. Along this road is where Ramona Mills lives, ironically, in a house that was owned by, you guessed it, one of the Kent family. Ramona, who grew up in Brave, just happens to be someone we know quite well and she was very willing to share stories of the town she loves. “I wouldn’t trade growing up here for anywhere else. Of course when I was younger I would say I couldn’t wait to move away,” she said. “Looking back now, I know how special a place it was.” Ramona views the town where she grew up as “one of the neatest little towns” she has ever seen - where people showed great pride in their homes. “Everyone looked out for each other,” she says, of her childhood in Brave. She recalled a time when a stranger stopped his car and tried to offer her a ride and then became more insistent when she refused. Ramona credits a neighbor for blowing her car horn and forcing this man to move along. Only later did they find out he was

1910 Largest Pumping Station in the World

BRAVE, PA

by Tara Kinsell

Circa 1920s Brave from Kent Hill

Brave from Orchard, today’s view from the former Kent Hill

wanted in another state for a child abduction. Everyone in Brave simply knew everyone else and that was probably in great part due to the People’s Natural Gas Company that operated a plant there. At one time it is estimated that almost the entire population of the town was associated with the plant in one way or another. When it closed in 1959 it was a real hit to the town’s economic well-being. Eventually, the plant would be turned into a brass plant by Accurate Forging but it never again provided the level of employment PNG had. Today the plant is still in operation under Cerro Fabricating Products but with a very small workforce. The effects of these changes can be witnessed with the decline in activity and population.

An annual homecoming celebration, once quite popular with a homecoming queen, parade and other festivities finally fell away, there are a few vacant homes and, as Ramona observes, “not a lot going on…” However, there is a group of folks who continue to reunite, their commonality being they each once attended the elementary school in Brave. The decline is not an unusual story for small towns like Brave across the country, with our digital age and economic changes creating a different face on the community. But the heart….now that’s what still defines Ramona’s home town, and the place we found so helpful and inviting. She gave a nod to Wayne Township tax collector, Joan Lemley, as one example. “Whenever something happens, someone passes away or a family has a tragedy, she is right away calling and saying, ‘Hey, we are going to have a dinner. What can you give?’ That’s how she has always been,” Ramona said. She equated it to Little House on the Prairie and went so far as to say she saw Brave that way as a little girl, even admitting that she would sometimes pretend the clerk at the old store was Nels Olson and his wife, Harriett, from the Laura Ingalls Wilder Books and TV series of the same name. Perhaps that is the charm that we too found in Brave on a rainy day in May. It felt a little like Walnut Grove and why we find it so easy to say “I Love This Place.”

The Plant houses Cerro Fabricating Products today

Editor’s Note: The current day photos of Brave were taken by Tara during her visit; the two historical photos we share are part of the collection included in “A Village Called Brave, A History of Brave, Pennsylvania,” by James Hoy. If you are interested in reading an in-depth history and study of Brave and the people who settled the area, this is a great one. You may find it at your local library, the Greene County Genealogical Society or for sale online.

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GreeneScene Magazine •

MAY / JUNE

2016


GreeneScene by Brad Wilson

MAY / JUNE

2016 • GreeneScene Magazine

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GREENESPORTS

Student Athlete of the Year Scholarship

(L to R): Brandon Robinson, J-M Assistant Principal; Joe Orr, Principal; Donna Furnie, Superintendent; Morgan Simkovic; Tony Barbetta, Softball Coach; Lanfer Simpson, GreeneSports; Jason Tennant, GreeneSports; Lisa Olson, Volleyball Coach.

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fter spending four years competing in three sports for Jefferson-Morgan High School, Morgan Simkovic was rewarded for her excellence in both athletics and academics with the second annual $1,000 GreeneSports.net Student-Athlete of the Year Scholarship. Simkovic was selected from a pool of seniors attending the five Greene County high schools who had all been named a GreeneSports.net Athlete of the Week at least once during the current school year. Morgan was a five-time GreeneSports.net Athlete of the Week. She was also a member of seven J-M teams that made the postseason and was mentioned in a total of 44 GreeneSports.net webcasts. While there were many candidates, Morgan’s long list of accomplishments was more than worthy of the accolade. She received a combined 10 varsity letters (volleyball 4, softball 4, basketball 2) as a Rocket and was part of some of the school’s most accomplished teams, including the memorable 2015 softball squad that captured J-M’s first WPIAL title in the sport. She was honored as a team captain with the Rocket softball team this past spring, a two-time second-team all-conference honoree and a one-time first-team all-conference selection. Simkovic was also a part of two softball section champions and this past winter’s basketball section championship squad. When it comes to volleyball, which Morgan said was her “all-time favorite sport,” she was afour-year, first-team all-conference pick, as well as a third-team all-district honoree. “Few if any student-athletes better exemplify what this scholarship is about than Morgan Simkovic,” said Jason Tennant, co-owner and co-founder of GreeneSports.net. “Her accomplishments throughout her four years at Jefferson-Morgan more than qualify her for our scholarship, which we know will be put to good use.” As accomplished as she was as an athlete, Morgan was just as impressive in the classroom. She will graduate with a 4.08 cumulative GPA, which ranks third in the 2016 graduating class. Morgan has also

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been recognized as a Tri-County Athletic Directors’ Association Scholar-Athlete, one of the April Lions’ Club Students of the Month, the Clarksville Lions’ Club Student of the Year, an American Legion Essay Winner, a Student Forum Scholar Leader and a United States Army Reserve National ScholarAthlete. She also served as Student Council President, Leo Club Vice President and Interact Club President. She was active with the National Honor Society, SADD, the Envirothon, Big Brothers & Big Sisters, the school yearbook and was an athletic director aide. She is a member of Calvary Baptist Church and a proud member of Colby’s Stars Foundation, Inc. Morgan will attend Slippery Rock University, where she plans on studying Exercise Science as a Pre-Physical Therapy student. Her future academic home has already recognized Simkovic with the SRU Achievement Award and the SRU Opportunity Award. “Morgan’s achievements in sports and in the classroom are outstanding,” said Lanfer Simpson, co-owner and co-founder of GreeneSports.net. “But, more importantly, she’s a good person from a great family…I’m sure she’ll be successful in whatever avenue she chooses in her future.” After receiving the GreeneSports.net StudentAthlete of the Year Scholarship, a modest Morgan was quick to deflect the credit for four years of excellence to those who supported her over her time at Jefferson-Morgan. “I want to thank all of my teammates and coaches for pushing me and enabling me to do all that I was able to do in athletics,” she said. “I am so honored to receive this scholarship.” Founded in 2009, GreeneSports.net is an online audio streaming service that provides the most thorough coverage of local high school and collegiate sports. It features both live and archived webcasts of football, volleyball, boys soccer, girls soccer, boys golf, girls golf, boys basketball, girls basketball, wrestling, baseball and softball to countless fans and supporters of local athletes throughout the world. To find out more, go to www.greenesports.net.

GreeneScene by Jeanine Henry

GreeneScene Magazine •

MAY / JUNE

2016


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G ree n e Sce n e of the Pa st A Mansion No More

ocated on Forney Hollow Road, near Spraggs in Wayne Township, the Thralls Mansion held a certain charm, infused by its original owner, Major Ernest Washington Thralls, U.S. Calvary. A ceramic mosaic floor, patterned as a Mexican rug, greeted guests in the main entryway. The tiles were brought back from Mexico, where the major was stationed during his military service. A builtin mahogany sideboard in Renaissance-Revival style was one of the outstanding features in the dining room. Hand-hewn, oak ceiling beams highlighted the living room - wood reclaimed from an earlier farmhouse on the property. This farmhouse had been the home of Major Thralls’ great-grandparents. The mansion was truly special; in fact, it was so unique that it

was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1999 as one of the best examples of Spanish Revival architecture in the east. Much of the information we share with you here comes from the National Register, and Greene County’s website listing of local places on the National Register. It might have appeared out-of-place among other neighboring structures with its heavy Spanish influence but it reflected similar residences a young Ernest Thralls encountered while serving as a first lieutenant with Company L, 3rd Indiana Regiment of the National Guard in the Mexican Expedition. He is credited with helping to form this unit. The rank of major came while he served in the Army with Res. Co. G 152nd Infantry 38th Division in France and Germany during WWI. It was 1939 when a 58-year old Major Thralls built the 2 1/2 story, 13-room mansion with its 17-inch thick sandstone walls, stone archway, stained glass windows, chandeliers, and terraces to the front and rear on his family’s homestead. Sadly, this stately GreeneScene of the Past was damaged beyond repair by longwall mining, and in 2007 it was torn down.

by Tara Kinsell

Its owners, Diane and Roy Brendel, who purchased it in 1971, built a smaller, more modest home in the area behind where it stood. They incorporated as many of the features of the original mansion as possible, having saved things like the stained glass windows and chandeliers from ruin. The photographs we share are courtesy of Roy Brendel and William Dulaney, both relatives of the Major’s. As for the visionary who built a Spanish Revival mansion in Wayne Township, Major Ernest Washington Thralls died in Greene County on April 13, 1956. He was laid out in the mansion that bore his name and interred in Arlington National Cemetery.

If you have an interesting old photo from the area you’d like to share, just send it to: GreeneScene of the Past, 185 Wade Street, Waynesburg, PA 15370. Or email to: info@greenesaver.com with GreeneScene Past in subject line. The GreeneSaver can even scan your original in just a few minutes if you bring it to our office. We are particularly interested in photos of people and places in the Greene County area taken between 1950 and 1980, though we welcome previous dates, too.

MAY / JUNE

2016 • GreeneScene Magazine

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Conservation District Honors J. Robert Rice

From left, Greg Hopkins, Director; Bill Wentzel, Director; Gay Thistle, Associate Director; Thomas Headlee, Director; Jim Cowell, Director; J. Robert Rice, Director Emeritus; Bradley Eisiminger, Chairman; Back Row: Jeff Rode, Associate Director; Bill Cree Jr., Associate Director.

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he Greene County Conservation District honored J. Robert Rice at a dedication ceremony during Soil and Water Conservation Week on Tuesday, April 26 at the Greene County Historical Society Museum. A tri-colored beech tree was planted in recognition of Rice’s fifty years of service to the Greene County Conservation District Board. Rice was first appointed to the Conservation District Board as a farmer director in 1965 and remains active today as the director emeritus and the Dirt and Gravel Program Quality Assurance board member. Rice’s service to the board includes three years as farmer director, nine years as district treasurer, thirty-three years as district chairman and the past five years as director emeritus. Rice, a life-long resident of Greene County, operated a 327-acre farm in Gilmore Township, owned and operated the general store in Jolly-

town, is a former Gilmore Township Supervisor, a local historian and a respected voice for the conservation movement both inside and outside the county borders. Rice was involved in many large projects undertaken during his tenure on the board as Chairman and director including: the building of the flood control project PA 647 that protects the city of Wheeling, WV; the development of the Southwest Project Grass; the development of the Greene County soils mapping in the late 70’s; the USGS groundwater study that surveyed drilled water wells in the county; and encouraged the hiring of a full-time district staff to oversee the county’s natural resources. The Greene County Conservation District Board commends Mr. J. Robert Rice for his many years of service to the community, conservation district and local farmers.

GreeneScene by Brad Wilson

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GreeneScene Magazine •

MAY / JUNE

2016


LOCAL STUDENTS TOUR FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN

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irst Federal Savings and Loan Association of Greene County recently welcomed four Waynesburg Central High School students who visited the Waynesburg main office as part of a youth education program offered through Southwest Training Services, Inc. The students received a short tour of the bank and met with Chad Moore, First Vice President/ Treasurer, and Chuck Trump, Vice President, to discuss financial literacy and banking. Students in the youth program had recently observed Financial Literacy Month, and the visit

to First Federal provided an opportunity to learn more about banking and what to expect as they enter adulthood and the workforce, according to Jillian Chappel, Youth Case Manager for Southwest Training Services, Inc. The agency helps with job and career development and incorporates resources such as tours and career exploration to further its students’ success. Pictured (l-r): Chad Moore, First Federal First Vice President/Treasurer; WCHS students Aireal Eckles, Destiny Withrow, Nasema Wilson, Nik Shelton; and Chuck Trump, First Federal Vice President.

GreeneScene by Nancy Horr MAY / JUNE

2016 • GreeneScene Magazine

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Poets Recognized by Bowlby Library

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or a second year, the Eva K. Bowlby Public Library in Waynesburg has held a poetry competition in celebration of National Poetry Month. Poets of all ages in Greene County had an opportunity to enter their original work in the competition by age category. Out of 32 submissions, judges from Waynesburg University’s Muse & Stone publication narrowed it down to five winners, one from each category. The winners are as follows: Kory Taylor in the kindergarten through

second grade group wrote an ode to his favorite teacher, “Mrs. Stoneking.” J.J. Martinez in the third through fifth grade category wrote, “The Springtime Tree.” Jonathan Davis in the sixth through eighth grade category wrote, “Knee of Christianity.” In the high school category, Taylor Phillips’ winning poem, “Briar Patch,” dealt with love and loss. Finally, in the adult category, Harriet Villers’ winning entry, “Skyflowers,” renders a poetic description of fireworks. We congratulate the winners and share their work with you.

“The Knee of Christianity,” by Jonathan Davis An undying life, Jesus is He; I know forever he loves me, God is his father, His word will remain; His undying love will forever be the same. At the beginning of time through Adam and Eve, That is where a nation was to be conceived. Evil was not known until it was shown. Evil was upon us with one bit alone. Now and forever they shall see, how evil will forever be. He died on the cross for you and me; for our sins to be forgiven but only on a bending Knee of Christianity.

Winners of the Bowlby Library poetry contest, in front from left, J.J. Martinez and Kory Taylor. Second row, Jonathan Davis and Taylor Phillips. Not pictured, Harriet Villers.

“Briar Patch,” by Taylor Phillips If you could, would you spare a moment to tell me one more time the simply beautiful details of metamorphosis? It seems it’s been so long since we last talked, and I’ve forgotten how it works. I can’t quite recall the sound of your voice when you told your favorite part of the story, but I know it felt like a lullaby to me. In quiet moments, I daydream about the endless magic in your tales that transformed fiction into fact, morphing you into a monarch that flew far away from me and from safety. How I wish I could just remember if the transition from one stage of life to the next is supposed to be so painful! If I were stronger, if I were weaker, perhaps I would have joined you then; we could have made a cozy home fit for two. They say The End is a new beginning, but sunshine still hasn’t reached this far into the briar patch. Pieces of your shredded body are still scattered in these forgotten weeds, your malformed wings, divided up and carried away by ants starving for a taste of you, no matter what it cost. How I miss your butterfly kisses. Perhaps your cracked cocoon can still be found in what remains of “us.” I’m dying to see what’s left of the creature I lost to the winds of change. Yes, it’s been a lifetime since I’ve seen you whole, and patience was your virtue, not mine-Six feet will never be close enough.

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“Skyflowers,” by Harriet Villers Fireworks on a midnight blur black sky I call them skyflowers, On a cloudless after twilight night, Diamonds flashing a prism on dark blue. Booming squalls of thunder Before each colored light shower Reflections beam down from the heavens Brilliant gems of every hue. Skyflowers are a work of a giant jeweler Arranging his gems on an indigo backdrop Dropped onto a blacktop. Skyflowers only bloom for a moment And melt away in the midnight sky. Their beauty is remembered Only later in the mind’s eye.

“The Springtime Tree,” by J.J. Martinez There once was a tree who felt very free. This tree had many nests; It made him feel the very best. Its leaves were very green, It made people feel like they’re in a dream. Its branches were a light brown; It was the best tree in town. The air and sunlight made it grow; The tree put on a spectacular show. Nature makes me feel amazed; I could stare at a tree for days.

“Mrs. Stoneking,” by Kory Taylor Mrs. Stoneking is nice, And, she likes to eat rice. Her favorite color is green, And, she’s not mean. She’s a nice teacher, And, she’s not a creature.

BOWLBY BITS Tiny Tim Tomato Project - Tues., June 7, 5pm, for children 2-8 yrs. Greene County Master Gardeners guide youngsters on planting & growing their own tomato plant. Also special stories & crafts about gardening. Personal & Home Safety, 3 Part Series - “Keep Me Safe from Fire,” is June 4, with Center Twp. VFD teaching about fire safety with Sparky the fire dog & Franklin Twp. VFD bringing a fire engine. “Keep Me Healthy,” is June 11, with FREE American Red Cross CPR Certification, FREE FBI digital fingerprinting for kids, & health tips by Dr. Amy Diamond. “Keep Me Safe & Protected” is June 18, with STARS staff sharing info on personal safety and teen volunteer’s skit titled “Stranger Danger with Little Red.” All sessions are 10am – noon. Register in advance. Teen After-After Hours - Friday, June 10, 8-10pm, it’s a Costume Dance Party! Put on your finest or fanciest attire & bring a friend. Suggested $2 donation at the door.

Bowlby Book Club - Mon., June 13, 6pm. Discussion will be on The Silver Star by Jeanette Walls. New members welcome! Summer Reading Kick-Off Festival - Sat., June 25, 11am~1pm on the lawn. Our theme is “On Your Mark, Get Set, Read!” focusing on wellness, fitness & sports. Story Hours for all ages 0 - adult, July 6 - Aug 12. FREE lunches provided by the Greater Pittsburgh Area Food Bank. Wine Tasting - June 26, 1-5pm, at Thistlewaite Vineyard in Jefferson, hosted by the Friends of Bowlby Library. Wine tasting, raffles, door prizes, vendors & live entertainment by Bob Podish. Free admission! Summer Hours - Begin June 27 and continue through Labor Day: Mon-Thu 10am - 7pm; Fri/Sat 9:30am - 3:30 pm. For more info, or to register for any of these events, call Bowlby Public Library at 724-627-9776.

GreeneScene Magazine •

MAY / JUNE

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Midsummer’s Night Open House

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An Evening of Revelry and Retail

ith the promise of sunny summer days on the way, mark your calendars for Waynesburg Prosperous & Beautiful’s Annual Summer Open House in historic downtown Waynesburg! The festivities begin at 4pm on Friday, June 24, with many merchants extending their hours to 8pm or later that evening. The theme is a Midsummer’s Night Open House and you can expect downtown Waynesburg to be transformed into a whimsical and exciting place for the evening, complete with music, live street entertainers, themed photo ops, costumed characters, plenty of food and fun. Of course, you’ll also find sidewalk sales, special “one-day only” bargains, door prizes and refreshments, and a special Downtown Trivia scavenger hunt with The “Rock the Chalk” Artists’ competition will return to the Summer $250 grand prize! Open House in downtown Waynesburg on June 24. We’ll also be “Rocking the Chalk” again with an artist’s chalk art competition. More than a dozen accomplished artists The Greaser, filling the air with all of your favorite will be creating chalk art as you watch at stations classic tunes live from the courthouse steps. throughout downtown. Winners will receive cash A special “Face in the Hole” photo art board prizes, and a special “People’s Choice” award will be has been hand-crafted and painted by local artists offered based on the votes of visitors that evening. just for the evening, so you and your friends and There may be a few openings left, if you are an ac- family can actually step into the Midsummer’s complished artist and would like to be considered Night scene, take keepsake photos for fun posting and sharing. Other photo ops will be scattered throughout downtown as well. Also, a special one-night-only Downtown Trivia Scavenger Hunt will be offered with a prize of $250 for the winner. There is no admission or entry fees – the entire enchanted evening is made possible by participating merchants and the major event sponsors EQT and Greene County Tourist Promotion Agency. It is coordinated by Waynesburg Prosperous & Beautiful, Inc. Be sure to like them on Facebook to keep updated on this event and more happenings in and around downtown Waynesburg. Save the date! June 24, from 4-8pm, come celebrate a Midsummer’s Night on the picturesque streets of downtown Waynesburg. Remember—you can unleash the power of your consumer dollars when you Buy Local, Buy Greene! For a list of participating merchants, check www.waynesburgpa. org, or find and join the event on Facebook.

for the competition, contact Art Beat Gallery at 724-833-9058. Actually, everyone can join in the sidewalk chalk fun, even if you’re not in the competition. Free chalk and designated areas will be provided to all who want to express their creativity on the sidewalks, with no age limit—open to young and old alike! An exciting new attraction for this year’s event is Fire Dancer ViolaLee, who will be performing on the sidewalks throughout downtown. A multitalented performer, folk artist, yogini and dancer, ViolaLee will amaze you with her skills and grace as she handles live fire while dancing. And keeping the beat will be WANB’s Crazy Dougie Wilson, aka

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2016 • GreeneScene Magazine

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Shining the Light on Kent’s Chapel

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hile visiting the town of Brave, the focus of this month’s I Love This Place feature, my daughter and I stopped by the Kent’s Chapel United Methodist Church. Prior to stopping, we pulled over at a house two doors down for directions to another location we were hoping to find. As it turned out, the family we met sitting on their front porch had just moved to Brave and are the newest members of Kent’s Chapel, according to Pastor Monica Calvert. Pastor Calvert knows all of the members of her church just two years after taking the charge there. “It is a small congregation but a very faithful, very giving congregation,” Pastor Calvert said. “They try to help with the community as much as they possibly can.” In fact, when the family moved into Brave shortly before Thanksgiving the congregation quickly went to work making it a nice holiday for them. “They (the congregants) thought it would be a nice idea to provide them with a Thanksgiving dinner. They got together and took a full-course meal down to this new family so they would have something to cook for Thanksgiving,” she said. “It was pretty awesome.” Pastor Calvert said the 105-year old church is one of the prettiest she has ever seen. “It is absolutely beautiful inside, perfect for weddings. I’ve officiated three weddings since I came here,” she added. “It is absolutely stunning the way this church is laid out.” Pastor Calvert gave credit to good foresight on the part of the church’s founders. Photos displayed in the back of the church from the 1920s through 1940s show the number of people involved in the early days of the church, when the town was thriving. First services of the Kent’s Chapel UMC were held, prior to 1873, in an old school that was located between Brave and Pine Bank. It wasn’t long before it moved to a simple structure at Shamrock, near Brave. Eventually, it outgrew that church and the current building was erected in 1911 on land

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donated by Ingram Kent. Kent traded some of his land with People’s Natural Gas Company in exchange for the bricks to build the church. Employees of the Brave Pump Station donated a bell for the chapel and residents joined together to dig the building’s foundation. The joint efforts show how united the Brave community was, and not surprisingly so, with the majority of its residents working at the gas company plant. “They have seen a lot of changes over the years happen in this community, especially economic changes. They are still seeing economic changes,” Pastor Calvert notes. “They are very supportive and stand behind each other. The people at Kent are very friendly and very welcoming.” Pastor Calvert said the congregation that ranges from a 2 1/2 year old to an 86-year old are very understanding of the fact that she can’t be there all of the time. The pastor lives in Morgantown and serves three churches in the Brave Charge, including Kent’s Chapel, Valley Chapel, and Spraggs UMC. The youth group in the charge rotates meetings from one church to the next. A children’s service is included during the regular Sunday service that is held at 11 am. he 2016 Flashlight Drag racing season “It is a very family-based church. I feel very has begun at the Greene County Airport blessed to be the pastor of this congregation,” Pasin Waynesburg. Four remaining races tor Calvert said, before inviting me to visit and see will be held Sundays on Jun. 19, Aug. 21, how pretty the church is for myself. Kent’s Chapel Sept. 18 and Oct. 9. Rain dates are scheduled for UMC is located at 141 Oak Forrest Road, in Brave. the following Sunday with the exception of Sept. 18, Contact Pastor Calvert at mlcalvert1@hotmail.com. which will be announced at a later date. Gates open at noon, with races scheduled to run from 2 to 6 p.m. Admission is $6 to watch and $30 to race. For the races, street-legal cars and trucks are eligible to race, and all drivers must have appropriate paperwork, including a valid driver’s license, current state registration and proof of insurance. Passengers are not allowed. All racers must sign a waiver and attend a mandatory drivers’ meeting prior to the start of the event.

Flashlight Drag Season is HERE!

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For drivers wishing to race convertible cars, the top must be up, or the driver should wear a helmet. Mufflers and Pennsylvania Department of Transportation-approved tires are required. There will be no refunds. Produced by Altered Gas Performance Events, LLC, Flashlight Drags consists of a 1/8-mile race along the airport runway. The format is heads-up, meaning that both vehicles leave the starting line at the same time. The name of the event refers back to the early days of drag racing, when a flashlight was used to signal the start. For more information, call the Department of Recreation at 724-852-5323, or visit www.flashlightdrags.com for updates, a complete set of driver rules and to view videos from the races. Photo by Dan Dishart. GreeneScene Magazine •

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PICTURE PUZZLE WINNER of the 4 Pittsburgh Pirates baseball tickets Barbara Bedilion of Waynesburg, PA

Last months picture puzzle answer is: UMBRELLA 14

GreeneScene Magazine •

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Little Libraries… Sharing a Love of Reading

t started in Wisconsin in 2009. One man’s tribute to his retired school teacher mother has since become a growing phenomenon known as little free libraries. That man, Todd Bol, built a miniature one-room schoolhouse, placed it on a pole in his front yard and filled it with books for the taking. The idea was such a hit that today there are an estimated 36,000 plus “official” little free libraries around the world. To be an official one, the library must be registered with littlefreelibrary.org. However, there are many more free, small, handcrafted little libraries popping up that are spinoffs of Bol’s original idea. Three such little lending libraries are located in Greene County; the Greene County Department of Recreation’s Canary Library, the Greensboro Free Library and the Little Colonial Library. The Canary Library started in June of 2014, originally offered as a mobile-type unit at the county-run swimming pools. This year it will expand to

tween three former teachers right in their own neighborhood. “I came up with the idea two years ago this August. I had read an article about the little library and how it started,” said Suzanne Cole of Colonial Plan in Franklin Township. Suzanne talked to her next-door neighbors, Judi and Joe Cook, about the idea and they graciously offered to have it placed on their property, at what happens to be the corner of Colonial Drive and Rinehart Lane. “I talked to William “Bill” Brown who is an excellent craftsman and asked if he could build it. He used a lot of materials he had on hand and it is as weatherproof as any house could be,” Suzanne said. “Judi and I put out books of our own and that friends have given to us.” Suzanne said they try to follow themes, such as the holidays, and based upon the time of year, with some of the selections. However, there is a hearty amount of romance novels and mysteries

others. A peek inside shows an assortment of offerings to borrow. There is no doubt these little free lending libraries are finding success. Former Greensboro mayor, Mary Shine, said she even selected one to read when she recently took a vacation. “I’m really proud of them,” Suzanne said of

include a more permanent fixture in the grassy area next to the Greene County Community Foundation office in Waynesburg Borough. Pam Blaker, Greene County Parks and Recreation manager, credits the work of retired school teacher, Debbie Bristor, for helping to get the ball rolling for the Canary Library. Debbie, who worked in the Carmichaels Elementary Center for many years, operated a cart there for students to purchase snacks and various other items. The monies from the cart were then donated to families in need and other worthy causes. When she retired, the surplus monies continued to be used to support the community. Following her own love of reading, Debbie began to investigate using the funds to create a free lending library. After searching for just the right spot, Debbie joined forces with the department of recreation to come up with the permanent home in downtown Waynesburg. The Little Colonial Library also stemmed from a love of reading, and was a joint effort be-

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By Tara Kinsell

the two libraries she can see from her window. “I came home one day and at the bottom of my driveway, written in chalk in big bold letters, it said, ‘The Little Libraries Rock.’ That’s been the best feedback ever!” We agree with the anonymous writer!

that occupy the Little Colonial Library. “It is a good way for people to clean out their supply of books and share them. The basic concept is to take a book and leave a book,” Suzanne said. “We know people leave books and we have at least two very generous donors who have purchased books, particularly for our children’s library.” She was referring to a second Little Children’s Colonial Library that was built by craftsman, Dave Thompson, when it became apparent there was a need for two to house all of the materials. Joe even added an Adirondack chair in case anyone wanted to stay awhile and read. “We left a notepad for people to leave us messages and we got very positive feedback, nothing has been negative about it,” Suzanne said. “There has been no vandalism or anything like that either.” Although we weren’t able to ascertain much information about the third little library, located at the log cabin in Greensboro, we know it has been there for roughly the same amount of time as the

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Carmichaels Teams Win Greene County Envirothon

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ixty-five students from Greene County’s five high schools competed in the 29th annual Greene County Envirothon on May 4 at Wana B Park in Carmichaels. Teams of five students tested their environmental knowledge in the areas of soils, forestry, wildlife, aquatics and the 2016 current issue, Invasive Species: A Challenge to the Environment, Economy, and Society. Carmichaels Team #1 won this year’s competition with a score of 429 points out of a possible 500 points. Team members Blake Conard, Emma Lowry, Ryan Swartz, Brady Watters, Kaleb Wilson and team advisor Kevin Willis will represent Greene County at the PA State Envirothon, which is scheduled for May 24-25 at the Susquehanna University in Selinsgrove and Camp Mount Luther located in Mifflinburg, PA. Carmichaels Team #2, consisting of students Finn Dobosh, Joey Kurincak, Jacob Hair, Joel Spishock, Stephen Zacoi and advi-

Second Place Envirothon Team Carmichaels Team #2, from left, Anastasia Roof, Columbia Pipeline Group; Steve Morgan, CONSOL Energy; Greene Co. Commissioner Archie Trader; team members Joey Kurincak9th, Finn Dobosh-9th, Joel Spishock-11th, Jacob

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sor Kevin Willis, earned second place with a score of 387. The third-place team was Carmichaels Team #3, which included students Ashley Jones, Britney Pollock, Keiriel Neel, Chris Ross, Katelyn Sinn and advisor Kevin Willis. The team earned 350 points. The Greene County Envirothon is organized each year by the Greene County Conservation District and is funded through various donations and grants including Community Foundation of Greene County’s Community Grants Program, EQT Foundation, CONSOL Energy, Columbia Pipeline Group, Spectra Energy, PA Envirothon. Each student on the winning team secured a $500 college scholarship funded by donations made by these organizations and the Greene County Conservation District. For more information on the Greene County Envirothon, call the Greene County Conservation District at 724-852-5278.

First Place Envirothon Team. Carmichaels Team #1, from left, Anastasia Roof, Columbia Pipeline Group; Steve Morgan, CONSOL Energy; Greene Co. Commissioner Archie Trader; team members Brady Watters-11th, Kaleb Wilson-11th, Emma Lowry-12th, Blake

Hair-9th, Stephen Zacoi-9th, team advisor Kevin Willis; Mike Belding and Greg Hopkins, GCCD Board of Directors; Bettie Stammerjohn, Community Foundation of Greene County; Bill Wentzel, GCCD Board of Directors.

Third Place Envirothon Team Carmichaels Team #3, from left, Anastasia Roof, Columbia Pipeline Group; Steve Morgan, CONSOL Energy; Greene Co. Commissioner Archie Trader; team members Ashley Jones-10th, Chris Ross-12th, Keiriel Neel-11th, Britney Pol-

Conard-12th, Ryan Swartz-9th, team advisor Kevin Willis; Mike Belding, GCCD Board of Directors; Bettie Stammerjohn, Community Foundation of Greene County; Bill Wentzel, GCCD Board of Directors.

lock-9th, Katelyn Sinn-10th, team advisor Kevin Willis; Mike Belding and Greg Hopkins, GCCD Board of Directors; Bettie Stammerjohn, Community Foundation of Greene County; Bill Wentzel, GCCD Board of Directors.

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Hawkeyes Benefit Shoot

Greene County Director of Recreation, Jake Blaker, with Emily Ozohonish, the High Overall Youth Female award winner at the Hawkeye’s annual benefit shoot May 1 at Hunting Hills in Dilliner.

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wenty-three individuals won awards during a May 1 benefit shoot at Hunting Hills in Dilliner. The shoot was hosted by the Hunting Hills Hawkeyes, Greene County’s Scholastic Clay Target Program team.

Participants competed individually or in teams of five shooting 100 clay targets. Award categories included youth, ladies, male and team. The following awards were given:

• High Overall Male: Rex Buckhalter of Dilliner. • High Overall Female: Pam Blaker of Carmichaels. • Adult: Second Place, Matt Friend of Point Marion; third place, Ron Brandenburg; fourth place, Chuck Mallory of Greensboro; fifth place, John Riley of Waynesburg • High Overall Youth Female: Emily Ozohonish of Jefferson. • High Overall Youth Male: Tristan Cole of Waynesburg. • Senior Varsity: Champion, Randy Durr of Greensboro, and runner-up, Brandon Sanders of Waynesburg. • Junior Varsity: Champion, Cameron Cernuska of Jefferson, and runner-up, Corey John of Holbrook. • Intermediate Advanced: Champion, Tristan Cole of Waynesburg, and runner-up, Arran Hinerman of Waynesburg, • Intermediate Entry: Champion, Owen Hughes of Rogersville, and runner-up, Landon Friend of Point Marion. • Rookie: Champion, Robbie Dillon of Adah, and runner-up, Cole Jones of Jefferson. • Team: First Place, Advanced Masonry with Andrew Buchtan, Rex Buckhalter, Eugen Latusek, Chris Popernack and Jay Salosky; and second place, Team Mallory with Randy Coss, Landon Friend, Matt Friend, Chuck Mallory and Tom Pavel.

The Hawkeyes will compete June 18 in the annual Pennsylvania Scholastic Clay Target Program Sporting Clays Championship at Buffer Creek Sporting Clays, Inc. in Somerset. This event involves youth shooters from across the state compet-

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ing in a 100-target shoot to determine state winners in six skill divisions. For more information about the scholastic shooting program, call the Greene County Department of Recreation at 724-852-5323.

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Civil Air Patrol Forming in Greene

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ood News, Greene County! Capt. David Shaw, Deputy Commander for Cadets with Washington County Civil Air Patrol, has embarked upon the formation of a squadron in Greene County. Two open houses will be held on July 18 and Aug. 8 at 6:30 pm both days at Waynesburg VFW Post 4793, 445 E. Lincoln St., Waynesburg. “The entire community is welcome to attend and learn more about the Civil Air Patrol,” said Capt. Shaw. “Members of the CAP will be present to greet visitors and explain CAP’s missions for America.” For the uninitiated, the CAP is an auxiliary of the United States Air Force that performs roughly 90 percent of its continental United States inland search and rescue missions as tasked by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center. CAP has been actively performing missions for the last 75-years. In 2014, it was awarded the Congressional Gold Medal in honor of the heroic efforts of its WWII veterans. This all-volunteer force is operated like a business, Capt. Shaw stressed, although there are no salaries paid for its 56,000 members nationwide. Adults who join are called “seniors” and work to serve their communities and country, to develop skills in emergency services, communication, administration, logistics, aviation and more. Where CAP can really shine, though, especially in Greene County, is by offering new and meaningful experiences for our youth.

Capt. Shaw says it’s best when youth, called “cadets,” start the program early, as they become eligible at age 12. The cadet program offers a vast array of programming for participants in the areas of leadership, aerospace, fitness and character development. One of the recent events for the Washington squad included model rocketry, information on astrology, EMS skill training, fire building, and tent construction for an overnight stay. “If we have a squadron here [in Greene County] it will cut the drive time and prep time by three hours or more each week for our participants,” Capt. Shaw said. Currently, those living in Greene County who are in CAP have the options of traveling to either Morgantown, W.Va. or Washington County to participate with the squadrons located in those areas. Capt. Shaw hopes the new squadron here in Greene will be especially active with the Saving Our Aviation Resources (S.O.A.R.) group at the Greene County Airport as the group has expressed its desire to have a CAP squadron in the county for quite some time. One of the benefits of the program is that cadets get to experience five power flights and five glider flights between the ages of 12 and 18. He said that participants do not have to be bound for military service, nor do adults need to have prior military service to be a part of CAP. However, cadets entering the armed forces will have the opportunity to do so at a higher pay

grade, if they have earned the Gen. Billy Mitchell Award. To receive this award, cadets are required to pass a physical and aeronautics exam. “It is just such a good program for youth and adults,” said Capt. Shaw, but it is always most re-

warding to see how great an impact it makes in the lives of the cadets.” For more information, contact Capt. Shaw at 724-627-8545, or at captshaw@squadron606.us.

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GreeneScene Magazine •

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Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) Workshop

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f you are a landowner and have a stream with open pasture, crop or hayland, or fields with low, wet spots, please read on! You need not be a farmer to participate. Wouldn’t it be great to get paid to conserve your property! The Greene County Conservation District, with help from the Washington-Greene Farm Service Agency and Pheasants Forever, will be hosting a FREE Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) informational workshop and tour on Saturday, June 25, 2016. Registration for the event will begin at the Greene County Fairgrounds at 9:00 AM. After a few short presentations from CREP specialists, the group will visit a local farm currently participating in the CREP program. Lunch will be provided to those who register by June 20, 2016 by calling Karlie Wright at 724-852-5278 or emailing kwright@co.greene.pa.us. CREP is administered by the United States’ Department of Agriculture’s Farm Service Agency, and is a partnership between farms, state and federal governments, and private groups. CREP is available for eligible cropland, and marginal pastureland along non-forested streams. CREPPA.org explains that most rural, un-forested areas within 180 feet of streams, ponds, lakes, and wetlands with open water are eligible. Even very small and seasonal streams qualify! Forested buf-

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fers must be at least 35-feet wide, and buffers over 50-feet wide earn substantially more. You do not need to be a farmer to participate! Areas with more than one-third coverage by existing trees and shrubs are not eligible. There are many practices available such as, forested riparian buffers, wetland restoration, filter strips, and grasses. Water quality and wildlife habitat are just two of the many benefits that these practices provide. CREP participants are paid an annual rental fee based on many different factors and each contract is different. Contracts can be from 10 to 15 years in length and success is based on a 70% success rate within 3 years. So these are just a few highlights of the program. If you have land that you would like to receive an annual payment for being a good conservation partner, come join us and learn more. Call Karlie Wright at 724-852-5278 or email kwright@ co.greene.pa.us for more information and to register for the workshop. Financial and other support for the CREP Outreach Program Office Mini-grant Program is provided by the Pennsylvania Association of Conservation Districts, Inc. through a Growing Greener Watershed Protection grant from the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection and with additional support from USDANRCS.”

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Spo r t Sh o rt s Lady Pioneers Could Win It All!

West Greene Relay Team Makes History The 4 X 800 meter relay team at West Greene High School overcame the loss of two members, the first to illness and the second to an injury, to advance to the WPIAL Track and Field Championship at Baldwin High School on May 19. The three remaining team members; Rachel Jones, Bailey Machesky, and Sarah Courtwright, along with new addition, Jade Rittenhouse, made school history as the first 4 X 800 meter team from the school to advance

In front, from left: Shelby Morris, Gina Mankey, and Madison Lampe. Standing L to R:  Asst. Nicole Redlinger, McKenna Lampe, Madison Renner, Brianna Goodwin, Linzee Stover, Lexie Mooney, Mackenzie Carpenter, Asst. Jeff Stover, Makenzie Thomas, Marissa Rode, Head Coach Bill Simms, Bailey Bennington, Brittany Bonnema, Haleigh Thomas, Savannah Pettit, Kaitlyn Rizor, Asst. Eric Bedilion, Emily Goodwin, Jessica Orndoff, Sage Vliet, Morgan Stover, Hunter Fredericks.

It has been a stellar season for the West Greene Pioneers Softball Team who’ve earned a section title and broken the record for wins in a season. It is the first time the team has won a section title since the 1983 season. It is that team’s record of 18 wins that the 2016 Lady Pioneers toppled. “We are looking forward to the playoffs,” said an excited head coach, Billy Simms, adding, “Several girls are having an outstanding season.” Simms said the final two wins of the season, a convincing 12-0 route over Avella and a 5-4 nonsection game with Bentworth were enough to tie

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to the WPIAL Championship. Also making her mark for the Pioneers at the Section 6AA Championship is Mikhayla Post who tied the 200 meter school record of 27:94, set by Jessica Black in 2011. Mikhayla previously broke her own school record in the 400 meter with a time of 1:04:07, while winning a gold medal at the Monessen Track and Field Invitational on April 16.

Greene County Special Olympic Team Headed to States

and then break school’s season win record. “We finished the regular season undefeated in Section 1-A, 10-0,” Simms said. “We clinched the playoff berth at Fort Cherry (with a win of 20-0) before winning the Section 1-A title outright with a convincing win over Jefferson-Morgan (17-0) on May 3.” The 2016 lady Pioneers completed the regular season with an overall record of 19-1. The team’s lone loss of 4-3 came on April 1 at the Cal Ripken Experience against Moore Catholic of Staten Island, NY.

Carmichaels Students Run Marathon in Memory of Brother and Friend

Carmichaels Area High School senior, Shawn Dulaney, and friends; Jonathan Christopher, Dalton Joseph and Austin Ewart ran in the 2016 Pittsburgh Marathon on May 1 in memory of Shawn’s brother,

by Tara Kinsell

Police officers congratulate the gold medal winning Greene County Special Olympic 3-on-3 basketball team, from left, Ralph Wilkins, Fred Snyder, John Ferguson, Missy Cain and Shawn Journic.

The “Rockets,” the Greene County Special Today, all 50 states and over 40 countries have their Olympic 3-on-3 basketball team, won gold on April own version of the run. 30 at Carnegie Mellon University to advance to the state competition June 2-4 at Penn State University. Head coach of the Rockets is Riana Berenson-Journic, mother of the youngest member of the team, Shawn Journic. Assistant coaches are Jackie Floeck, Dawn Lewin-Ellis, and Rebecca Hodgeman, student volunteers from Waynesburg University. The team has also been invited to lead the carrying of the Special Olympics Torch for the Law Enforcement Torch Run (LETR), beginning at PNC Park, on May 31. The LETR is the carrying of the torch across the Western region of the Special Olympics in Pennsylvania, ending on the campus of the Penn State University for the opening ceremonies of the summer games. The LETR, started in 1981 by a member of law enforcement in Wichita Kansas, is the largest grassroots fundraising program benefiting the Special Far left, at rear, Demi Lewin-Ellis, student volunteer from WaynesJessy Dulaney. Jessy, a Waynesburg University se- Olympics. In 1984 the torch run was adburg University, and team member, Ralph Wilkins. In front of them, from left, are players John Ferguson, Missy Cain, and Fred Snyder. In nior, passed away March 21, the result of injuries opted by the International Association the foreground, youngest team member, Shawn Journic with coach sustained in an automobile accident. of Chiefs of Police when it endorsed the Rebecca Hodgeman and coach Jackie Floeck holding the camera. Special Olympics as its official charity. GreeneScene Magazine •

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Extra Help on Medications for Seniors

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he program is called “Extra Help” and that is exactly what it provides - extra help for qualified seniors to pay for prescription medications. This program is a special part of Medicare drug coverage that provides additional assistance to seniors with limited incomes. If you are single with a monthly income of less than $1,485, and resources less than $13,640, you qualify. If you are married with a monthly income of less than $2,003 and resources less than $27,250 you qualify. Resources do not include your home, vehicles, personal possessions, life insurance, burial plots, irrevocable burial contracts, or back payments from Social Security of SSI. Assets that are considered resources include bank accounts (exempting $1,500 in savings intended for funeral expenses), IRAs and the value of investments, and extra real estate. Additionally, not all income is counted. There are variations in the criteria of what counts as “income” and what doesn’t. For this reason, it is important that a person does not assume he or she is not qualified. Income includes money you receive from Social Security, wages, dividends, alimony, and rental property. It does not include funds acquired through loans or a reverse mortgage. And there are other exceptions. This program is worth a phone call to find out if you can save on prescription medications. There are four levels of Extra Help in place for 2016 and 2017. Level one: If you receive full Medicaid benefits and live in a nursing home, you automatically qualify for full Extra Help and pay nothing

GreeneScene by Tara Kinsell

for your prescription drug coverage with no premiums, deductibles or copays. Level two: If you receive Medicaid or SSI, or the state pays your Medicare premiums, you automatically qualify for full Extra Help. You pay no premium or deductible for Medicare drug coverage. Copays are dependent upon your income and are very nominal. Level three: If your current income is no higher than $1,336 per month for a single or $1,802 for a married couple living together, and your assets (mainly savings) are no more than $8,780 for a single, or $13,930 married, you pay no premium or deductible. Your copays for each prescription are $2.95 for generic drugs, $7.40 brand name drugs and nothing for catastrophic coverage. Level four: If your current income as a single is no higher than $1,485 per month or $2,002 as a married couple living together, and your assets (mainly savings) are no more than $13,640 for a single or $27,250 married, living together, you pay a percentage of your plan’s premium depending on income. You also pay an annual deductible of $74 in 2016 and $82 in 2017. You pay no more than 15 percent of the cost of each prescription. Again, to fully understand how your own personal situation fits with the Extra Help eligibility criteria, it is important that you call the source directly for information. To receive an Extra Help application, contact PA Link at 724-2235115, ext. 615 or APPRISE at 1-888-300-2704, ext. 4438. Spouses can apply together on the same application. Even if only one is applying, details must be given of the spouse’s income, assets, and they must also sign the form.

Editor’s Note: All the above figures and calculations are based on information found on medicare. gov website at the time The GreeneScene went to press. We cannot vouch for its accuracy and we are not attempting to provide counseling or interpretation, but only to make our readers aware of the existence of the Extra Help program. Please contact the sources provided above directly for information.

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GreeneScene Magazine •

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GreeneScene by Jeanine Henry

Co o l at Sc h o o l

by Tara Kinsell

Waynesburg Culinary Student to Study Abroad

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e revisit a past subject of our Cool at School column this month, Richard Sager. Richard was recently selected from a field of 600 as one of five Pennsylvania Presidential Scholars and became a semi-finalist for the U.S. Presidential Scholars Program. An honors student, Richard’s work has always been at the top of his craft as a culinary student. We recognize him this month for his selection to the student exchange program through Congress-Bundestag Youth Exchange (CBYX) and Nacel Open Door, Inc. to study abroad for a year in Germany. “I’m taking it all with open arms. I’m ready to explore and ready to see what the world has to offer me,” Richard said, sharing the news of his selection. On May 17, Richard graduated from the culinary program at the Greene County Career and Technology Center as the student of the year. He will receive his high school diploma from Waynesburg Central. Looking at Richard’s years at the GCCTC, his inclusion to CBYX is not surprising. After all, this is the young man who earned a gold medal as a sophomore at the

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2014 Family Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) national leadership competition for his conceptual restaurant, Abruzzo’s. This project involved spending over 300 hours gathering tax information, creating blueprints, compiling building code data, and creating a cost analysis to present in San Antonio, Texas at the national competition. In 2015, he followed this up by inventing a product he calls “In and Out Foods,” healthy, gourmet meals that are freeze dried. “It works similar to the military’s readyto-eat meals. On one layer of the meal you have the entree. In a separate layer, the chemical reaction takes place that heats the food,” Richard told us last year. “There is a small access point for you to add water that causes the chemical reaction that heats it.” Richard presented his invention at the national SkillsUSA competition in Washington, D.C. where he earned a silver medal. Currently he is working on getting a provisional patent so he can take In and Out Foods to the market. He is hopeful it will take off and one day help to fund his future endeavors. His final project at the GCCTC was the design and creation of a hospitality, tourism

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and recreation website for the 2016 FCCLA competition. He took first place at states but will miss the national competition, slated for July, to begin his international journey. “I will have a two-day orientation in Washington, D.C. starting on June 28 and fly out on June 30 to Bonn, Germany,” he said. Although this will be Richard’s first time flying out of the country, he said his parents are more “excited than anything,” for him. “They are excited to see me use my education to further myself and take the opportunities that lie ahead of me,” he added. As a CBYX participant, Richard will spend July and August learning the German language and from September through June of 2017 he will perform an internship. While he is in Germany, Richard will live with a host family through Nacel Open Door, Inc. When he returns to the United States, Richard will study hospitality management at Johnson & Wales University in Rhode Island. As the Germany exchange has a significant financial investment involved, Richard is hoping to receive donations or sponsorships to help defray the cost. Anyone interested in helping Richard fulfill his dreams may do so by contacting the GCCTC at 724-627-3106.

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Conservation Leadership School Scholarships

Chamber Announces Scholarship Winner

Lindsey Gilbert, winner of the 26th Annual Waynesburg Chamber of Commerce Scholarship

The Waynesburg Area Chamber of Commerce Scholarship Fund Committee awarded the Chamber’s 26th annual scholarship to Lindsey Gilbert of Waynesburg. Lindsey is a graduating senior at Waynesburg Central High School. She is also currently enrolled at California University as a student.

Seventeen year old Lindsey plans to attend California University of Pennsylvania to purse a degree in Sociology of Deviance. She is the daughter of James and Heather Gilbert of Waynesburg. This scholarship, the twenty-sixth for the Chamber, is presented each year to a Greene County senior who plans to attend a college, university or trade school. The scholarship is awarded based on grade point average and a 500 word essay. In addition to the scholarship, Lindsey will also receive a laptop courtesy of John Frownfelter, owner of PCsquared and a custom backpack from the Greene County United Way. This year, thirty-three applications for the scholarship were received by the Chamber. The committee had a difficult task of selecting one winner from the qualified field. The Chamber of Commerce would like to thank all who participated in the process.

Garden Club Awards Scholarship Christopher Ross, a senior at Carmichaels Area High School was awarded a $1,000 scholarship by the Town and Country Garden Club. Helen Barbor, scholarship chairman, made the presentation. Christopher will attend Gannon University in Erie and major in Freshwater and Marine Biology with a career goal of becoming an Ecologist or Environmental Consultant. He and his mother Rachel were guests at the club’s May meeting. This is the 26th annual scholarship awarded to a graduating senior. The club’s annual Cookie Walk Luncheon in November is the scholarship fundraiser. From left, Helen Barbor, scholarship chairman of the Town and Country Garden Club presents Carmichaels Senior, Christopher Ross with a $1,000 scholarship.

Central Greene Students Compete in Scrabble Tournament Students from Central Greene School District’s Waynesburg Central Elementary School, Margaret Bell Miller Middle School and Waynesburg Central High School participated in the Fayette Invitational Regional Scrabble Tournament (F.I.R.S.T.) on May 6, 2016. The tournament is an annual event sponsored by Davis & Davis, Attorneys at Law. Students from Central Greene, Brownsville, Uniontown, and Carmichaels school districts competed in the event. Central Greene Scrabble team members put forth an outstanding performance with the team bringing home four 1st place trophies and one honorable mention. Team members who competed in their grade levels included WCES third graders JJ Martinez-1st place and Joe Kirsch-honorable mention; MBM sixth grader Makenzie Barchiesi-1st place and 7th grader Jonah Higley-1st place; and WCHS senior Kalem Nabors-1st place.

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Three Greene County High School Students were awarded full scholarships to Penn State University’s Conservation Leadership School as part of the week-long celebration of Soil and Water Stewardship week. The Conservation District Board of Directors awarded these scholarships based on the merits of essays the students submitted. Gabrielle Muilenburg, of Mapletown High School, Ryan Swartz and Stephen Zacoi, both of Carmichaels Area High School, were awarded full scholarships at the April 26th Conservation District monthly meeting. All three scholarships were funded in part by Columbia Pipeline Group and by the Greene County Conservation District. “These scholarships will provide these students with a tremendous opportunity and experience they will remember for the rest of their lives,” said Bradley Eisiminger, Chairman, Greene County Conservation District Board of Directors. The Conservation Leadership School is hosted

Conservation Leadership School Scholarship Winners, from left, Gabrielle Muilenburg, of Mapletown High School, Ryan Swartz and Stephen Zacoi, both of Carmichaels Area High School.

Career Day at Jefferson-Morgan Elementary The Waynesburg Area Chamber of Commerce recently presented the “Annual Fifth Grade Career Day” for students at Jefferson-Morgan Elementary. The event is part of the Chamber’s community service program and provides students in Greene County the opportunity to explore various career possibilities. Professionals share information about their specific vocations and offer an enjoyable way for students to apply what they have learned in studying career choices by listening to and speaking with a professional. The Waynesburg Chamber offers a career day at Waynesburg Central, Jefferson-Morgan and West Greene Elementary schools. The students vote for their favorite presenter, and taking the top honors at Jefferson were Shannon Cagle and Christy Halliday from Waynesburg Animal Hospital. These presenters will be honored at the upcoming Chamber of Commerce Membership Lun-

cheon on May 25th at Waynesburg University. Others taking part were: Chuck Trump, Katie Horr and Elizabeth Menhart of First Federal Savings & Loan, members of the Jefferson Volunteer Fire Company, Emily Bryan of Greene County Primary Care, Jeff McCracken, retired, of McCracken Pharmacy and Danin Greusel and Nicole Maltese of MedExpress.

Garden Club Members Recognized

Scrabble is a game that involves strategy and benefits students academically in the areas of spelling, word recognition, vocabulary development, computation, decision making, risk taking, good sportsmanship, fair play, and social skills.

Scrabble Tournament Team, from left, Makenzie Barchiesi, Kalem Nabors, Joe Kirsch, Jonah Higley, and JJ Martinez.

by Penn State each year at the Stone Valley Recreation Area in Petersburg, Pa. Students spend one full week learning about the environment and our role as stewards through fun, hands-on activities and field trips.

Town & Country Garden club members, (l-r) Kay Bair, President; Terri Laird, First Vice President; and Helen Barbor, Publicity Chairman exhibit the Certificates of Recognition received at the 85th Garden Club Federation of Pennsylvania Convention at the Nittany Lion Inn, State College, PA.

Three members of the Town & Country Garden Club were recognized at the 85th Garden Club Federation of Pennsylvania Convention in April at the Nittany Lion Inn, State College. Certificates awarded were: First place for 2015-2016 Yearbook, 2015 Publicity Press Book and 2015 Flower Schedule. Also, a third place for a Book of Evidence for the 2015 Standard Flower Show, “Beauties of the Earth” staged in a public building. The certificates awarded were in the category of small clubs of 29 members or less. “Attending the convention offers a great opportunity to interact with fellow gardeners, attend a variety of workshops and return with a multitude of information and ideas,” stated Kay Bair, club president. The first place award for the for 2015-2016 Yearbook and the 2015 Publicity Press Book have been sent to the Central Atlantic Region for further judging. GreeneScene Magazine •

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Arts in Greene Conservation District Poster & Coloring Contest

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Conservation Districts Poster Contest later this year. The theme for this year’s contest was “We All Need Trees.” Entries were judged on their conservation message, visual effectiveness, originality and universal appeal. Winners are pictured from left: 1st place, Landon Matthews-3rd Grade West Greene Elementary School, son of Summer Matthews; 2nd place Karissa Thompson-3rd Grade West Greene Elementary School, daughter of Gary and Debbie Thompson; 3rd place Pieper Whipkey-3rd Grade West Greene Elementary School, daughter of Toby and Jim Whipkey.

The top four pre-k coloring contest entrants received bicycles and helmets. The coloring contest was open to children up to 5 that had not yet entered elementary school. Winners are pictured from left: Elaina Beazell, 4 yrs. old of Christian Sandbox, daughter of Noah and Joni Beazell; Abigail Kalka, 4 yrs. old of Christian Sandbox, daughter of are Jeremy and Nicole Kalka; Aria Finley, 4 yrs. old of St. Ann’s Pre-School, daughter of Lauren and Drew Finley; Nora Christner, 5 yrs. old of St. Ann’s Pre-School, daughter of Sara and Mark Christner. The Conservation District received 66 total entries and would like to thank all who participated in this educational opportunity.

2nd - 3rd Grade Poster Contest Winners

he Greene County Conservation District announced the winners of this year’s poster contest and coloring contest open to all Greene County children in pre-k through 12th grade. Both contests offer young people an opportunity to express their views on natural resources and the environment through art. Posters were judged in five different grade-based categories: K1st, 2nd-3rd, 4th-6th, 7th-9th and 10th-12th. The top three entrants in each category received cash prizes. The first-place poster from each category also advances to the statewide Pennsylvania Association of

Pre-k Poster Contest Winners

Annual Gallery Showing Held in Carmichaels

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armichaels Area High School art student’s exhibited their work on May 13 at the fourth annual Carmichaels Area High School Art Show held at the Greene Academy of Art in Carmichaels. Student work created throughout the 2015-16 school year, includes ceramics, sculpture, drawing, painting, printmaking and mixed media, some of which are award-winning pieces from the Scholas-

tic Art and Writing Awards. This year, the senior Advanced Art students displayed portfolios in the exhibit. “I am so impressed with all of the students, and the seniors deserve recognition for the hard work they’ve put in throughout the years,” said Marlynn White, high school art teacher. “They selected several of their favorite pieces to be presented as portfolios in the show. It gave them a chance to shine in

one of the last events of their high school careers.” In its fourth year at the academy, White said she feels it is “the perfect venue for the event.” “The Greene Academy is dedicated to promoting the arts in the area, and the historic aspect of the building fits perfectly with the style of art my students tend to portray,” she said. “I couldn’t ask for a better way to present this show.”

A sculpture created by senior, Jeffrey Pratt.

A sculpture created by senior, Kasey Ruse.

A painting by senior, Calyssa Lavery.

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A sculpture created by junior, Morgan Faddis. GreeneScene Magazine •

MAY / JUNE

2016


Meet the Grantmakers The Community Foundation of Greene County and Grantmakers of Western Pennsylvania will sponsor a Meet the Grantmakers forum on June 9 in Waynesburg, from 3-4:30pm, third floor, Waynesburg University Stover Campus Center. The session will feature representatives from local and regional foundations and corporate grantmaking programs that support programs in southwestern Pennsylvania. The Meet the Grantmakers is open to any individuals representing nonprofit organizations of all types and sizes, and other members of the community who work with, or are interested in learning about,

grants to benefit Greene County programs and activities. Ellen Rossi of the EQT Foundation and at least two other grantmakers will share information about their grantmaking programs. Additionally, Bettie Stammerjohn of the Community Foundation of Greene County (CFGC) will be available to share information about CFGC’s various grant opportunities for nonprofit organizations and school programs. It is free to attend but space is limited and registration is required. To register call 724-627-2010 or email cfgcpa@ gmail.com.

No-Till Drill For Rent

Grants Available The Community Foundation of Greene County (CFGC) is accepting applications for the CFGC summer Community Grants for project activities beginning after August 1. The deadline to apply is June 1, 2016. The Foundation expects to award three to five grants ranging between $500 and $2,000 per grant project. Proposed projects may include (but are not limited to): Arts, Culture & Humanities; Children, Youth &

Families; Community and Economic Development; Education; Environment; Health & Fitness; and Human Services. A new priority beginning this year is for projects focusing on helping women and girls achieve their full potential with a mini grant of $500 from the new Cindy’s Wind Fund for Women and Girls. FMI, contact the CFGC at 724-627-2010.

Pools to Open Memorial Day Weekend The first swim of the season in Greene County will be held on May 28. The Alpha Aquatic Center in Waynesburg will open at noon and the Carmichaels and Mon View Pools will open at 1 pm over the three-day Memorial Day weekend. The pools will then close while school remains in session and reopen daily beginning June 4. The department of recreation is offering a family-of-four season pass special during May: $299 for the Alpha Aquatic Center and $199 for Carmichaels or Mon View pools. Regular sea-

son hours at Alpha will be Sun-Thu, noon-7pm & Fri/Sat noon-8pm. Daily admission at Alpha is $6 for children ages 17 & under and seniors ages 62 & older. Daily admission for adults ages 18 to 61 is $8. Carmichaels and Monview pools will operate from 1-7pm daily. The daily admission rates at these pools are $4 for children 17& under and seniors 62 & older. The rate for ages 18 to 61 is $6. FMI 724-852-5323.

Swimming Lessons Offered

The Greene County Conservation District has purchased a seven-foot Great Plains End Wheel No-Till Drill equipped with three seed boxes that is available for rent to Greene County farmers and landowners. The Conservation District’s goal is to reduce soil loss, protect and promote the wise use of precious soils, raise animals and support the natural world around each of us. The Conservation District’s drill rental program encourages and assists farmers in implementing no-till crop production systems, which includes cover crops and promotes good pasture management. No-till involves planting the seed directly into the soil without plowing, tilling or disking. Advantages include reducing operator’s time and expenses; promoting healthier soils through building soil structure and adding or-

Registration for swimming lessons that will sons are $25 per class and payment is due upon be offered this summer at the Alpha Aquatic registration. Each class is designed for swimmers Center in Waynesburg and the Carmichaels Pool of certain levels. Class instructors will determine at Wana B Park will be held from 9am -6 pm, which class to place each swimmer. A maximum June 1 at Alpha and June 2 at Carmichaels. Any- of five swimmers must be registered for each ganic matter; feeding beneficial microorganisms; one who is unable to attend the registration may class to run with a maximum of 15 swimmers reducing soil loss from erosion and increasing register their child during pool business hours up per class. FMI, call the Greene County Dept. of infiltration and increasing yields due to optimal until the first day of class, as space permits. Les- Recreation at 724-852-5323. soil conditions. The drill will be available from the Conservation District on a first-come, first-served basis. A refundable deposit of $150 is required to schedule a three-day rental. A 55hp or larger tractor is required for operating the drill and a heavy duty truck is required for transport. The Conservation District also offers a two-ton wet lime spreader for rent. For more details, please contact Karlie Applications are now available for the Little Wright at the Greene County Conservation Miss Firecracker Pageant, sponsored by WaynesDistrict at kwright@co.greene.pa.us or 724-852- burg Lions Club and Waynesburg Sewing Center. 5278. The pageant is staged during the Lions Club Annual 4th of July celebration at Greene County Fairgrounds. It is a noncompetitive pageant for girls ages 5 to 8 (as of July 4, 2016). Participants appear in patriotic attire and are interviewed on stage, with ing your home, providers retain $978 a month a winner being determined by a random drawing of for each individual residing in their home for flowers. The winner receives a crown, sash, trophy services that are provided. Services can include, and bouquet. Each contestant receives a participacooking, cleaning, laundry, medication setup, tion medal. Pictured is the reigning 2015 Little Miss scheduling and providing transportation to Firecracker, Marissa Sue Tharp, daughter of Cory & Natasha Tharp, who will crown the new queen. The medical appointments. Domiciliary care homes can accommodate deadline for application is June 14, 2016. FMI, call 1 to 3 residents and are certified to meet the re- Eleanor Chapman at (724) 627-5284.

Little Miss Firecracker

Domiciliary Care Providers Needed The Southwestern Area Agency on the Aging, Inc. is looking for individuals to open their homes and offer a safe, nurturing family environment for eligible adults that are unable to live independently due to physical, intellectual, or agerelated impairments. Domiciliary care providers come from all walks of life. They are everyday people making a difference in their community and in the lives of others. In return for shar-

MAY / JUNE

2016 • GreeneScene Magazine

quired fire, health, and local zoning standards. FMI about becoming a domiciliary care provider, call 1-800-411-5655.

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GreeneScene Magazine •

MAY / JUNE

2016

May June GreeneScene 2016  

This month, the GreeneScene Magazine brings you a little history of the town of Brave. With summer around the corner check out all of the ev...

May June GreeneScene 2016  

This month, the GreeneScene Magazine brings you a little history of the town of Brave. With summer around the corner check out all of the ev...

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