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Scoring Points at the Envirothon!

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ifty-three high school students from four of Greene County’s five school districts competed in the 28th annual Greene County Envirothon held at the end of April at Wana B Park in Carmichaels. Teams of five students tested their environmental knowledge in the areas of soils, forestry, wildlife, aquatics and the 2015 current issue, urban and community forestry. Carmichaels Team #1 won this year’s competition with a score of 418 points out of a possible 500 points. Team members Blake Conard, Ashley Dotson, Emma Lowry, Philip Mikalik and Kaleb Wilson and team advisor Kevin Willis will represent Greene County at the state Envirothon, which is scheduled for May 19-20 at the University of Pittsburgh Johnstown and the Windber Recreation Park in Windber, Pa. Mapletown Team #1, consisting of students Reid Griffin, Ryan Kovach, Luke Pecjak, Garrett Phillips and Abby Shipley and advisors Amber Burkett and Sara London, earned second place with a score of 373. The third-place team was Carmichaels Team #2, which included students Allie Christopher, Zachary Juliani, Joel Spishock, Brady Watters, Parker Woodring and advisor Willis. The team earned 371 points. Carmichaels Team #1, Envirothon winners. Pictured, from l. to r., are Michelle Anderson, Alpha Natural Resources; To celebrate their first and third place victories, William Wentzel, GCCD Board of Directors; Greene County Commissioner Chuck Morris; team members Blake the Carmichaels Envirothon teams, under the diConard, Ashley Dotson, Kaleb Wilson and Emma Lowry; Commissioner Archie Trader; team member Philip Mikalik; team advisor Kevin Willis; Commissioner Blair Zimmerman; Jessica Kearns, CONSOL Energy; and Bettie rection of foresters Russ Gibbs and Brian Wolyniac, planted 35 oak trees in a vacant area near the entrance Stammerjohn, Community Foundation of Greene County. to Wana B Park. The trees were grown in the Carmi-

chaels Native Plant Greenhouse. The Greene County Envirothon is organized each year by the Greene County Conservation District and is funded through a grant from the Community Foundation of Greene County’s Pennsylvania Education Improvement Tax Credit (EITC) program through CONSOL Energy. Each student on the winning team secured a $500 college scholarship funded by Alpha Natural Resources and the Greene County Conservation District. In addition to the continued financial support of Community Foundation of Greene County, CONSOL Energy and Alpha Natural Resources, other partners that made the event successful include Greene County Commissioners Chuck Morris, Archie Trader and Blair Zimmerman; Greene County Department of Economic Development; Kevin Paul, U.S. Department of Agriculture; Russ Gibbs, state Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Bureau of Forestry; William Wentzel, Greene County Conservation District; Chuck Kubasik, state Department of Environmental Protection; Eric Davis, state Fish and Boat Commission; Jeremy Febinger, Frank Maykuth and Amanda Powell, state Game Commission; Brian Wolyniak, Penn State Extension; and Michelle Anderson, Alpha Natural Resources. For more information on the Greene County Envirothon, call the Greene County Conservation District at 724-852-5278.

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Mapletown Team #1 won second place at this year’s Greene County Envirothon. Pictured, from l. to r., are William Wentzel, GCCD Board of Directors; team advisor Sara London; team members Garrett Phillips, Ryan Kovach, Reid Griffin, Luke Pecjak and Abby Shipley; and team advisor Amber Burkett.

Carmichaels Team #2 won third place at this year’s Greene County Envirothon. Pictured, from l. to r., are Michelle Anderson, Alpha Natural Resources; team members Brady Watters, Zachary Juliani, Joel Spishock and Allie Christopher; William Wentzel, GCCD Board of Directors; team member Parker Woodring; and team advisor Kevin Willis.

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Dock to Lock Recap!

One hundred and twenty runners and walkers start the 2015 Dock to Lock 5K Run/Walk, held Saturday, May 9, along the Greene River Trail.

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ne hundred and twenty runners and walkers turned out for the annual Dock to Lock 5K Run/Walk, held Saturday, May 9, along the Greene River Trail. The race began at 9 a.m. at the trail starting point at the Greene Cove Yacht Club in Millsboro, Pa. An awards ceremony at the Rices Landing Fire Hall followed the race. Prizes were given for the top three male and female runners and walkers overall, as well as the top three male and female runners and walkers in various age categories. The overall winners in the 5K run were: • Male: First place, Aaron Mylan, 16, of Rices Landing, 18:30. • Female: First place, Jackie Horvath, 51, of Ligonier, 21:35. The overall winners in the 5K walk were: • Male: First place, Gerard Bertrand, 65, of Venetia, 32:31. • Female: First place, Natalie Miller, 52, of Fredericktown, 39:28. A random drawing for prizes was also held following the race. The following participants present at the awards ceremony won $25 Wal-Mart gift cards: Lori Kubincanek of Fredericktown, Robert McElheny of Waynesburg, Stush Sadowski of Lawrence and Hannah Schaum of Rices Landing. Dock to Lock runners and walkers were timed by SERJ Racing Services of Uniontown. Race results may be viewed online at www. serjracing.com. The Greene County Sheriff ’s office provided event security. Proceeds from Dock to

Lock benefit Department of Recreation programs, such as the summer Day Camp program, which offers free activities for county children ages 5 to 15. This year, Day Camp will be held June 15 through July 24 at various locations across the county. Major sponsors of this year’s Dock to Lock included the Greene County Commissioners, First Student, Noble Energy, Rices Landing Volunteer Fire Department, Road ID and Wal-Mart. For more information on Department of Recreation programs, call 724-852-5323, or visit www. co.greene.pa.us.

Aaron Mylan, 16, of Rices Landing crosses the finish line during the 2015 Dock to Lock 5K Run/Walk. Aaron finished first overall among all runners and walkers.

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Summer Open House

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ith the promise of sunny summer days on the way, plan to celebrate the season with Waynesburg Prosperous & Beautiful’s Annual Summer Open House in historic downtown Waynesburg! The festivities begin at 4pm on Friday, June 19, with many merchants extending their hours to 8pm or later that evening. You’ll find sidewalk sales, special “one-day only” bargains and door prizes, and plenty of fun, food and entertainment on the streets of downtown. The “Rock the Chalk” sidewalk chalk art competition has already attracted more than a dozen artists, and entry is still open. Winners will receive trophies, and a special “People’s Choice” award will be offered based on the votes of visitors that evening. There is no entry fee, and all materials are provided. Pre-registration is required to enter the competition. Email Jim and Linda Winegar, coordinators of the competition, at artbeatingreene@gmail.com, or stop in at the ArtBeat store on the corner of Church and High, downtown, for more information. Everyone can join in the sidewalk chalk fun, even if you’re not in the competition. Free chalk and designated areas will be provided to all who want to express their creativity on the sidewalks, with no age limit—open to young and old alike! Free caricatures will be offered by local artist, Jeff Harris, compliments of Greene County Tourist Promotion Agency. Balloon artist Robin Kelly of Pittsburgh will be back with magically created balloon souvenirs, free to children of all ages. Music will fill the air with all of your favorite classic tunes, spun by local legend, the “Greene County Greaser,” Dougie Wilson, live

on the courthouse steps; and Carl Donley is back by popular demand, singing on the sidewalks and entertaining the crowds with favorite oldies from the 50s, 60s, and early 70s. Keep strolling up the block and you’ll find more live entertainment, including members of the James D. Randolph Kiltie Band decked out in authentic apparel as they play the pipes for you. Although unconfirmed at press time, the West Virginia Public Theater is also expected to contribute to the street entertainment for the evening. Renowned artist Leslie Fehling has contributed an original water color of Waynesburg’s historic and beautiful down town, painted specifically for the 2015 Summer Open House raffle. The painting is matted and framed to a 12” X 16” finished piece on display now at ArtBeat on the corner of High & Church Streets downtown, where tickets can be purchased for $2 each or 3 for $5 now and on the night of the event. Sponsors that are helping make the event possible include CONSOL Energy, First Federal Savings and Loan Association of Greene County, Community Bank, Greene County Tourist Promotion Agency, First National Bank, and participating merchants and vendors. Save the date! June 19, from 4-8pm, come celebrate summer on the picturesque streets of downtown Waynesburg. Remember—you can unleash the power of your consumer dollars when you Buy Local, Buy Greene! For a list of participating merchants, check www.waynesburgpa.org, or find and join the event on Facebook.

GreeneScene by Jeanine Henry

Renowned artist Leslie Fehling has contributed an original water color of Waynesburg’s historic and beautiful down town, painted specifically for the 2015 Summer Open House raffle. The painting, and tickets for a chance to win, are now available at ArtBeat on the corner of High and Church Streets in downtown Waynesburg.

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he Greene County Memorial Hospital Foundation recently presented a gift to Waynesburg University to help fund a simulation manikin, SimMan 3G, which will be used to simulate patient care experiences in the University’s Nursing Simulation Lab. An advanced patient simulator that can display multiple physiological symptoms, SimMan 3G will provide the most up-to-date simulation education for the sophomore, junior and senior level nursing students in Waynesburg’s Department of Nursing. Dr. Nancy Mosser, professor of nursing and chair and director of the University’s Department of Nursing, said that SimMan 3G will enhance the education of the nursing students. “A viable nursing program must have simulation experiences for students,” said Mosser. “In today’s highly technical health care environment, providing nursing care for patients with complex, multisystem health care disorders can be an overwhelming experience for student nurses. SimMan 3G will allow them to experience realistic learning situations in the simulation lab with an advanced high-fidelity simulator, before caring for patients.” With more than 65 separate features, SimMan 3G can simulate

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spontaneous breathing, seizure activity, bleeding at multiple sites, patient voices, secretion and intubation capabilities and laryngospasm. These features enable students to gain experience in the areas of airway skills and complication management, cardiac assessment and interventions, respiratory and cardiac monitoring, circulatory assessment and pharmacological drug recognition, among others.

Built in 2008, the University’s Nursing Simulation Lab includes eight rooms with audio-video digital recording, remote-viewing capabilities and high-fidelity simulators. The lab provides a safe and effective environment for students to learn and to apply cognitive, psychomotor and decision-making skills.

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Breaking New Ground

Pennies for the Cure

A groundbreaking for Independence Place, a Students at Springhill-Freeport Elementary School spent six weeks collecting money in their class- four unit apartment building located at 1392 Jefrooms to benefit cancer research. Their money was turned in through Sam’s Pals at Relay For Life in May. ferson Avenue, Jefferson Borough, Greene County, Students were able to collect $310.09. Great work, kids! took place on May 12, 2015. The new four unit structure will contain two fully accessible two bedroom units on the ground floor for persons with mobility impairments, and two additional two bedroom units on the second floor for individuals needing affordable rental housing. The two street level apartments will be designed for wheelchair accessibility throughout, including zero step entries, roll-in shower, wide hallways, and accessible kitchen. All four apartments will include two bedrooms, one accessible bath, a powder room, living/dining room, and kitchen and will be made available to qualified individuals. Applications are now being accepted. Referrals to the units will come through Greene County Human Services, the Southwestern Pennsylvania Area Agency on Aging (AAA), Tri-County Patriots for Independent Living (TRIPIL), and Accessible Dreams. Pennsylvania Housing Finance Agency (PHFA) awarded $514,000 to Accessible Dreams, a 501(c)(3) not for profit developer of accessible

housing, and the Redevelopment Authority of the County of Greene (RACG), to construct the four affordable living units at 1392 Jefferson Road in Jefferson Borough, Greene County. The funding is being made available through the Pennsylvania Housing Affordability and Rehabilitation Enhancement (PHARE) Fund and Marcellus Shale impact fees. The Commissioners of Greene County supported this project in an effort to address the needs for affordable and accessible apartments, especially for persons with disabilities. Washington Federal Savings and Loan of Greene County also participated in the support of the project. The project is also supported by Pennsylvania Developmental Disabilities Council (PADDC) grant to support an increase in housing options for persons with disabilities. Accessible Dreams is a 501(c)(3), not-for-profit developer of accessible housing, whose mission it is to expand opportunities for independent living for people with disabilities by increasing the inventory of accessible housing choices in southwestern PA. Accessible Dreams is an affiliate organization of TRIPIL, located in Washington, PA. For more information, call 724-223-5115.

Back: Zach Harris; Madyson Debolt, Colten Thomas, Neil Lemmon, Mackensie Wise; Desirae Lemmon; Michael Dixon. Front: Kaitlyn Gary; Andrew Cain; BreAnna McDiffit; Hunter Gorby; Courtney Main.

Denim Day! Consumers at the Open Arms Drop In Center in Waynesburg recently participated in Denim Day 2015 to show their support for Ending Sexual Violence across Greene County. For more information or to assist in raising awareness of this issue, please contact the SPHS CARE Center STTARS Program at 724229-5007 or 724-627-6108. 

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The Greene County Memorial Hospital Foundation has partnered with Greene County United Way to help with the shortfall in donations this year. These restricted funds will directly help maximize health related programs that are funded through United Way, such as: The Senior Services Support Program which helps older adults of Greene County with home delivered meals and eldercare; the Smile for Life Program,

which offers a school-based oral health curriculum in all the elementary schools including Head Start; the Prescription Assistance Program, which assists patients in need with free or low cost prescriptions; and the Psychosocial Rehabilitation Program and Emergency Direct Assistance. “We are really excited and thanks to the generosity of the hospital foundation, we have almost made our goal of $250,000,” said Executive Director of Greene County United Way, Barb Wise. Greene County United Way provides funding to seventeen partner agencies, which in turn provide the services that are vital to improving the quality of life for neighbors in need. These programs impact lives by promoting health & wellness, strengthening families, nurturing children and supporting seniors. Pictured L to R:  Chad Moore, President of Greene County United For more information or donaWay and First Vice President/Treasurer at First Federal Savings and tions to Greene County United Way, Loan; David Jones, Executive Director of Greene County Memorial please contact the office at 724-852Hospital Foundation; Barbara Wise, Executive Director of Greene 1009 or visit the web site at www. County United Way and Sheila Stewart, President of Greene County greenecountyunitedway.homestead. Memorial Hospital Foundation. com.

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GOODBYE TO GRAYSVILLE F

or many who went to school in western Greene County, an era is ending soon as the Graysville Elementary School concludes its final year of operation before closing forever. Opened in 1970, the building was created to accommodate a consolidation between Nineveh, Rogersville and Wind Ridge schools. Declining enrollment has demanded another conAlbie and students welcome the Goose Family to Graysville Elementary in solidation, with Graysville May of 2001 Elementary and SpringhillFreeport Elementary schools closing, and resuming classes in a newly constructed most schools, Albie is quick to point out that there building on the West Greene Campus facility, which are still many people in the area who seek out Betty’s already houses the middle and senior high school. recipe for rolls. One person with an intimate familiarity of the The school’s library was part of the “hub” of the soon-to-close school in Graysville is Albie Rinehart, building, and was a place much loved by the stuwho was the facility’s Head Teacher from the year dents. According to Albie, credit goes to the school’s it opened until his retirement in 2002. His memo- librarian, Mary Berryman, who happened to be the daughter of Roy E. Furman, Lieutenant Governor of Pennsylvania, and the man for whom the Roy E. Furman highway is named. “The kids loved Mrs. Berryman and the library,” Albie says. Recess times were full of excitement, too, he remembers. “The playground was exciting for these rural kids; being able to interact with other kids was a true joy, because, being largely rural, they didn’t have a lot of other kids to play with, usually. It had two baseball fields, two tennis courts, a sliding board and swings, and a set of monkey bars that the kids would conquer, trying to get to the top.” When the snow fell, it brought even more fun. “We started with traditional sleds with runners,” Albie says, “then we got toboggans. The kids did their own fundraising to buy this equipment. Someone got the idea of bringries weave the story of much of the school’s 45 year ing inner tubes from car tires, and the kids would history, starting with its unique design. Albie is lov- ride down the hill; one day, somebody brought in ingly honest as he relates, with a smile “The school a tractor inner tube, so half a dozen kids could ride itself, from an aerial view it almost looks like a toilet on it!” seat. It was an interesting concept, and it was nice, While the technological innovations, great because it didn’t take you very long to get from one food and fun playtimes make for a better experiplace to another because of the circular design.” ence, the most important thing about any school Albie fondly recalls the experience of watching is making sure that students learn, and Albie and the building rise, from the ground up, and credits the staff took great care to make sure this was the the school’s principal, Bill Throckmorton, as one of foremost goal. the visionaries that made it possible. “Mr. Throck“Many of the children came from poor famimorton was my very best friend in life. I always lies. Their income was low, but they were able to called him ‘Mr. Throckmorton,’ because he was my succeed in learning, and I attribute much of that to teacher in junior high school. He had all the input their self-esteem. They felt good about themselves, on what he wanted in that school, and we would go they were motivated to learn; they realized they from Rogersville to Graysville a couple of times a could do this if they wanted to,” Albie points out. week,” Albie recalls. “There’d be no lights, but he To create one final set of memories at the could tell me, ‘This is where the cable TV is going to school, Albie worked with the West Greene Parent be,’ and, ‘This is where the restroom is going to be.’ Organization to arrange a Closing Celebration at It was a state of the art school.” Graysville Elementary on May 27th, from 4pm— Another unique feature, perhaps taken for 8pm. All past and present faculty, staff, parents, granted in most schools today, was the cafeteria. students, alumni and community members are wel“Betty Hewitt was the head cook there,” Albie re- come to attend. Elementary yearbooks transferred members. “We’d never had cafeterias in the other to digital format on CDs and commemorative ornabuildings. They had all of this new equipment put ments will be available to purchase, with proceeds into the new building, but no one ever showed the benefitting the West Greene Parent Organization. cooks how to prepare the food using this equipA similar celebration is planned for Springhillment, so they had to train themselves. What was Freeport Elementary, which is also closing at the kind of neat was that the cooks brought their own end of this school year, on Thursday May 28th from home recipes.” A far cry from the pre-packaged, 4—6:30pm. pre-prepared cafeteria foods currently served in

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Greensboro Baptist Church

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hundred and ten years is a long time, one could argue. That’s how long it’s been since the Greensboro Baptist Church’s current building was dedicated in 1905. The real story of the church actually stretches much farther back in time. One person who knows a great deal about the church is board member, Charles Mallory. Charles has compiled an account, not only of the church, but of the entire Baptist history through Greene County, which actually pre-dates the signing of the Declaration of Independence. “Baptists have been in this area since its earliest settled history,” Charles notes. “During the 1700s, those living in and around Greensboro traveled by horse and buggy to the Goshen Baptist Church—now the John Corbly Memorial Church—in Garard’s Fort, established in 1771 by Rev. John Corbly.” While this trip would only take 15—20 minutes by modern automobile, a horse and buggy trip might take as much as one or even two hours, depending on road conditions, weather, and how many people were being carried—not exactly an easy commitment every Sunday. “In Greensboro,” Charles observes, “Robert Jones, the grandson of a Welsh Baptist minister was the strong influence bringing together people for Bible study and prayer in a local home in the early 1800s. By 1820, the fellowship, growing in spiritual strength, called Rev. Francis Downey, a local farmer and preacher. On December 4, 1830, nine charter members met to sign a covenant forming the ‘First Baptist Church of Greensboro.’” It may come as a surprise to some that the

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group began doing overseas missions work in Burma in 1832, even though there was not yet an actual building that housed the church! This changed in 1845, when Robert Jones, one of the founders of the original group, purchased a plot of land for $50, and a meeting house was built in roughly the same location as the present-day building. “By 1901, a new school building had been erected in Greensboro,” Charles says. “The architect, Mr. Parreco, was hired by the Baptists to design a church of ‘lofty design’ in sandstone and with beautiful stained glass windows imported from Italy, along with a lighted stained glass dome in the sanctuary.” As noted at the beginning, the new church was dedicated in 1905, and has welcomed 41 pastors over its more than 180 year history. The most recent is Rev. Tim Tanner of Masontown, who took over ministerial duties in the church at the beginning of 2015. Rev. Tanner and his wife, Terrie, are looking forward to growing with the congregation, planning for the future and attracting new people to the flock. “My passion is to see the local church function as a healthy New Testament church, reaching its community for Christ,” Rev. Tanner says, adding, “This involves everybody praying and working together to experience a genuine move of God, called ‘revival,’ which will bring church growth in all age groups.” Services are held at 10am, Sunday mornings; the historic church is located at 115 Water Street in Greensboro.

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aptist Join Us! B m e h e l h t Be ion k e e r acat C V ff u R Bible Churcs frhomoRufff Creek General Store) (acros

June 7-11 • 6-8pm Come join us for fun, fellowship & refreshments!

724-627-6218

www.bbcruffcreek.org

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School!

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“Keep On Clipping!”

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Scholarship Available Thanks to a donation from Alpha Natural Resources, the Greene County Conservation District is offering one full scholarship to the 2015 Conservation Leadership School, which will be held during two sessions this summer at Stone Valley Recreation Area in University Park, Pa. Hosted by Penn State’s School of Forest Resources, Conservation Leadership School is a one-week residential program for high school students interested in learning more about the environment through exploration of natural habitats and hands-on educational and recreational activities. This year’s session will focus on technology and its impact on the natural environment. The winning student can choose which session to attend – June 21-27 or July 5-11. Students will spend one week in an outdoor classroom exploring forests, fields, streams and lakes, and will have the opportunity to go canoeing, hiking, bird watching and fishing, among other recreational activities. Subjects also include aquatic habitat enhancement, home water analysis, hunter-trapper education, team-building, and green initiatives, recycling and composting. The

regular cost is $525 for the week-long session. The Conservation District’s scholarship is open to all Greene County students ages 1418 who have completed at least their freshman year of high school and who are interested in the environment. To apply for the scholarship, students must submit a typed essay of 500-1,000 words in length. The essay should briefly detail the student’s background and explain why he or she would be the best recipient of the scholarship and how attending the Conservation Leadership School would benefit the student’s future plans. All essays should include a name, address and phone number. The deadline for submitting essays is Monday, June 1. Essays may be mailed to the Greene County Conservation District at 19 S. Washington St., Fort Jackson Building Suite 150, Waynesburg, PA 15370. Essays may also be faxed to 724852-5341 or e-mailed to Jared Zinn at jzinn@ co.greene.pa.us. The subject line should read “Conservation Leadership.” For more information, call the Conservation District at 724-852-5278.

Important Info for Salon Workers Do you work in a hair or nail salon? 1 in 4 women will experience domestic violence in her life. With odds this high, there is a very good chance that you will be face to face with a victim one day at your salon. If you would like more information and resources for your salon, please contact the Education and Training Department of Domestic Violence Services of Southwestern Pennsylvania by calling 724-852-2373 in Greene Co., 724-223-5477 in Washington, or 724-437-2530 in Fayette, or email edutrain@peacefromdv.org.

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The Fredericktown Area Public Library’s premier fund-raising event, The Sip of Summer Outdoor Wine Tasting, will be held for the third year at the beautiful Waleski Horse Farm near Richeyville, Pa. on Friday, June 19 from 7-10 p.m. The seven wineries showcasing their samples are: Christian W. Klay Winery, Greenhouse Winery, J & D Cellars Winery and Vineyard, Reece Winery, Ripepi Winery & Vineyard, Shields Demesne Winery and Thistlethwaite Winery. This 21-and-over only event will include a sandwich basket, chocolate fountain and

fresh fruit station catered by Trisha’s Treats Café, a free wine glass, entertainment featuring Bob Podish on guitar, vendors with food and unique gift items, a basket raffle and door prize. Tickets are $30 and must be purchased in advance and are available at the library, from any committee member, at Zebley Law Office in Centerville, or online at www.washlibs.org/ fredericktown. Last date to purchase tickets is June 13th. All proceeds benefit the library.

Committee members featured in their Sip of Summer Aprons are from l to r: Joan Helsel, Jennifer Holleran, Susie Zebley, Theda Diethorn, Carole Breitweiser and Michele Dolak. Committee members not pictured are: John Greenlee, Tom Karolewics, Cheryl Matesich, Ed Petsko, Carol Slagle and Dawn Bell.

Looking for Fair Stories… It’s that time of year again—next month’s GreeneSaver will be our popular “Fair Guide” issue, featuring information and schedules for all of the area’s fun fairs! We’d love to hear from our readers who may have memories or stories of going to the fair! Did you win a blue ribbon for a pie, only to have a judge drop it on his way off the stage? Did you display a 4-H goat with a bad habit of eating purses? Tell us your stories, or—even better—share your fair photos with us! OK, readers—have at it!

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GreeneScene of the Past

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here is more than one story to this month’s GreeneScene of the Past. We were fortunate to have Ronald Lemley of Waynesburg bring us this classic picture, taken in front of the Greene County Courthouse. The exact date is unknown, but based on the automobiles and style of dress of the people, Ron estimates it to be close to 100 years old! Whether the event creating the stir was an election or people awaiting results from a trial is not known for sure; naturally, we welcome any input from our readers on the subject. Ronald got the photo from his late father, Russell I. Lemley, who is pictured standing in front of the rear-most car, with his hands on his hips. “That’s how he always stood,” Ron remembered. The other part of the story came from a personal history that Russell typed up, featuring a connection to a story featured in a recent GreeneSaver. Remembering a story about his Uncle John, Russell wrote: “Uncle John was the sheriff of Greene Co. back then, and on his last year in office a friend of his by the name of John Eisminger killed a huxter [sic] and escaped to New Orleans. Uncle John went by train to New Orleans to bring him back to Waynesburg. When they released him to Uncle John in New Orleans jail, he said to Eisminger, ‘If you will promise

me to go back to Greene Co. and not try to escape, I will take off the hand cuffs.’ When they arrived at W.W. Railroad station there was a large crowd, and someone told Judge Inghram that he did not have hand cuffs on. So then the Judge called Uncle John to his office and bawled him Russell I. Lemley out for not having the hand cuffs on the prisoner.” John Eisminger, you may recall, was the subject of our interview with Greene County Public Defender, Pat Fitch, who is writing a book about this last man to be executed by hanging in the county. Our thanks to Ron Lemley (and to his father, Russell) for this great photograph, and interesting story!

A page from Russell Lemley’s personal biography. If you have an interesting old photo from the area you’d like to share, just send it to: GreeneScene of the Past, 185 Wade Street, Waynesburg, PA 15370. Or email to: info@greenesaver.com with GreeneScene Past in subject line. The GreeneSaver can even scan your original in just a few minutes if you bring it to our office. We are particularly interested in photos of people and places in the Greene County area taken between 1950 and 1980, though we welcome previous dates, too.

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ome ideas are just too good to resist. “Car guys all hang out in garages and do a lot of brainstorming for stupid things to do with cars. That’s kind of how the idea evolved,” says Michael Schindel. He continues, “One of my buddies lived near an airport, and when he was growing up he said, ‘Man, I always wanted to take my car and do a drag shot down that runway, but I knew I’d get arrested.’” Mike became inspired. “I said, ‘Great, that’s what we’ll do!’ and my buddy said, ‘No, no! We’re going to get arrested if we do that!’” Undeterred, Mike recalls, “I said, ‘No—I’ll ask for permission first, and then we’ll go and do it!’ That idea never entered those other two guys’ heads, that you could ask for permission to do something, rather than just go do it and get arrested!” Mike, who lives near Cranberry, paid a visit to the Zelienople Airport Authority to propose the idea, met with some skepticism, but finally received approval. “We did it as a two day event over a weekend, and halfway through day one they’d invited us back for next year,” he remembers, laughing. “I said, ‘We still have a day and a half to screw this up—why don’t you wait ‘til it’s over, and then if you still want it, we can talk.’” They wanted it. More than that, so did many other small airports in the area. Thus, the “Flashlight Drags” were born. Started in 2001, the Flashlight Drags were held at several different airports before the Greene County Airport in Waynesburg was made the permanent home of the event in 2010. “Greene County is the only airport in the country that will do these races,” Mike notes. “There are a lot of smaller airports that are privately owned that could do it, but the layout of those airports isn’t conducive for safety issues, so we don’t go there.” It turns out that Greene County Airport does just fine as a venue, hosting an average of 185 participants and 1200—1300 spectators for each event. “It’s a terrific time. A lot of people come who aren’t even all that crazy about racing, but they just like to have a good family outing,” Mike observes. “We have people who have their family reunions here!

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It’s just hard to describe, how well it’s accepted by the community.” The Flashlight Drags consist of five races, one per month, and not only are all people invited to watch—they’re also invited to compete. “All of our cars are street legal—our cars can drive to the event,” says Mike, proudly pointing out that the motto of the event is, “Street Racing Without the Jail Time.” “It feels a little illegal when you’re doing it,” he confesses, “because, you know—it’s an airport, and you shouldn’t be drag racing there, but you’re drag racing, and it’s got the support of the police and the county, so it’s a real relaxed atmosphere.” Dan Ross of Carmichaels has been a part of the Flashlight Drags since almost the very beginning. “I missed the first one,” he notes, “but I think I hit them all after that.” His story mirrors Mike’s inspiration to create the event. “As a teenager growing up here, I’d take my ’49 Mercury out onto Route 21 and think it’d be nice to get out on that airport runway and see what it would do, but of course it was illegal at that time. In later years when they started the Flashlight Drags, I got involved with it.” Dan will be racing in this year’s events in his yellow 1954 MG, concluding, “The Flashlight Drags—it’s about having fun.” This year’s Flashlight Drags will be held at Greene County Airport on May 31st, June 28th, July 26th, August 30th, and September 12th. Gates open at noon, and races are held from 2pm—6pm. The cost is only $30 to race, and $6 for spectators. For more information, including special events, news about this year’s “Outlaw Hour” events, and much more, visit www.flashlightdrags.com.

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Historic Hanna Hall Bell Restored

GreeneScene by Ann Newman

By Nick Farrell

W

aynesburg University’s campus rang with a celebratory sound during this year’s Commencement exercises, thanks to the generosity of the Class of 2015. The senior class gift funded the restoration of the bell that once hung in the cupola of Hanna Hall, and on Sunday, the Class of 2015 became the first class to have that bell mark their graduation in more than a century. Cast in 1875, the bell once proclaimed each new day of learning at Waynesburg University – welcoming both men and women to an institution of higher learning that was one of the first in the nation to educate both equally. Today, Hanna Hall remains one of the two oldest buildings in America with that historic distinction. Now on display next to Hanna Hall in Cusick Court, the bell was removed from the cupola more than a century ago because it was too heavy for the structure. Emblazoned on the bell is the Latin phrase “Pro veritate et virtute,” which translates to “For truth and courage.” A plaque will accompany the bell in its new, permanent location to explain its history, the

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meaning of the Latin phrase and the significance of the generosity of the class of 2015. “The whole thing behind the bell is that it ties our history into the present day,” said Joshuah Dains, Student Senate president and a member of the senior class gift committee. “To me, this reaffirms the school’s mission by returning a landmark to our campus that existed in the University’s early years and connects current students to that rich past.” Vincent Allen Inc. Metal Restoration in Pittsburgh returned the bell to its original state by shining the bell’s metal surface and removing the grime that developed during years of storage. “I’m extremely proud and overwhelmed by how many seniors and their families have given to make this project possible,” said Vikki Beppler, assistant director of Alumni Relations. “We’ve had more student gifts given than in years past. I’m really proud of the seniors stepping up and raising the money on their own.” This year’s senior class gift of $8,000, which included donations from future alumni and their families, funded the entire project.

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I

n last month’s Driving the Future, we took a brief look at the history of fire resistant (FR) clothing, including the differences (or lack thereof) between “inherent” and “treated” fabrics. In this installment, we will examine the various ratings systems for this specialty clothing and clarify definitions and differences. It must be noted that many workplaces have specific requirements regarding safety ratings for FR apparel depending on the type of work being done, which must always be observed. Also, the information provided in this column is intended to provide basic explanations only, and is not meant to endorse, suggest or recommend any certain item of clothing or rating level. Two acronyms are used to identify two specific types of clothing: “FR” and “AR.” “FR,” as noted last month, simply stands for “Fire Resistant.” “AR” means “Arc Rated,” and, while the primary purpose of both FR and AR clothing is to resist ignition, AR clothing is specifically designed to resist ignition from arc flash, as might happen during arc welding or electrical work. All AR clothing is also fire resistant, but not all FR clothing is AR rated, which is why checking labels is vitally important to make sure the proper clothing is selected. For FR clothing to earn an arc rating, it must pass through a series of tests, being exposed to electrical arcs numerous times, with sensors measuring the heat transfer through the fabric. Mathematical modeling then predicts whether a 2nd degree burn would result, calculating the energy likely to cause a 2nd degree burn 50% of the time. These figures are used to establish the arc rating for a given piece of clothing. Fire resistant garments that are not specifically arc rated are subjected to a similar series of tests, but using a 3 second flash fire rather than

an electrical arc as the source of ignition. Nonarc rated garments may be appropriate for those whose work carries no risk of exposure to arc flash, though many companies, to ensure compliance with National Fire Prevention Association (NFPA) standards, require that employees consistently wear protective clothing that is both FR and AR rated. Established in 1896, the NFPA’s mission is to “Reduce the worldwide burden of fire and other hazards on the quality of life by providing and advocating consensus codes and standards, research, training, and  education (www.nfpa.org).” Part of this mission, as it relates to FR clothing, was to set up a Hazard Risk Category (HRC) system, which is a consistent, standardized code applied to every FR and AR garment, to help determine its suitability for a given task. The HRC ratings system moves from 1 through 4, with 1 being the lowest amount of protection, and 4 the highest. Items that commonly earn a “1” rating include FR undergarments, and unlined work shirts and pants. Coveralls and overalls often receive a “2” rating; lined vests and outerwear such as jackets and parkas are typical of clothing that receives a “3” or “4” rating. In order to obtain the required total rating for a given job, workers may “layer up,” as, for instance, a T-shirt, unlined work shirt and light jacket that all had an HRC rating of 1 would provide the same protection as one garment with a rating of 3. To ensure the proper level of protection, be sure to consult your work place’s safety personnel to find out about their requirements; for questions about HRC ratings or specific clothing items, finding a reputable FR apparel dealer can be an easy path to having an expert on call to assist with all of your FR needs.

GreeneScene by Dennis Snyder

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Department of Recreation Swimming Safety B

y the time you read these words, nearly all of the area’s public pools will likely be opened, and individuals fortunate enough to have their own swimming pools at home will either be getting them ready for action, or are already enjoying them. There’s nothing more fun that cooling off in a pool on a hot summer day, but there are also few activities that have more potential to turn dangerous for those whose swimming skills aren’t all that they could be, children and adults, alike. Given this fact, the Greene County Department of Recreation is offering low cost swimming classes for ages 6 months through adult at the Alpha Aquatic Center in Waynesburg, and Carmichaels Pool in Carmichaels. Sign-ups for swim lessons will be held from 9 am to 6 pm Tuesday, May 26, at Alpha Aquatic Center, and from 9 am to 6 pm Thursday, May 28, at Carmichaels Pool. Lessons are $25 per class, and payment will be due upon signing up for classes. Each class is designed for swimmers of certain skill levels. Class instructors will determine in which class to place each swimmer. A minimum of five swimmers must be signed up for each class to run. The maximum for each class is 15 swimmers. Some classes may be combined or canceled due to enrollment. Refunds will only be given if the Department of Recreation cancels a class.

GreeneScene by Jeanine Henry

The class levels are as follows: • Parent and Child Aquatics for parents and children ages 6 months to 3 years • Pre-School Aquatics for ages 4 to 5 • Level 1, Introduction to Water Skills • Level 2, Fundamental Aquatic Skills • Level 3, Stroke Development • Level 4, Stroke Improvement • Level 5, Stroke Refinement • Level 6, Swimming and Skill Proficiency The schedule of classes at Alpha Aquatic Center is: • June 15-19: 9-11 a.m., Levels 4 and 5; 10-11 a.m., Level 2 • June 22-26: 9-10 a.m., Level 3; 10-11 a.m., Level 1; 10:30-11 a.m., Parent and Child • July 6-10: 9-10 a.m., Level 3; 9-11 a.m., Level 6; 10-11 a.m., Level 1 • July 13-17: 9-11 a.m., Level 4; 10-11 a.m., Level 2; 10:30-11 a.m., Preschool The schedule of classes at Carmichaels Pool is: • June 15-19: 10 a.m.-noon, Levels 4 and 5; 11 a.m.-noon, Level 2 • June 22-26: 10-11 a.m., Level 3; 11 a.m.-noon, Level 1; 11:30 a.m.-noon, Parent and Child • July 6-10: 10-11 a.m., Level 3; 10 a.m.-noon, Level 6; 11 a.m.-noon, Level 1 • July 13-17: 10 a.m.-noon, Level 4; 11 a.m.-noon, Level 2; 11:30 a.m.-noon, Preschool Both pools, as well as Mon View Pool in Greensboro, will open Saturday, May 23, for the threeday holiday weekend. All three pools will then be closed for swimming while school is in session from Tuesday, May 26, through Friday, May 29, and will be open daily beginning Saturday, May 30. Carmichaels and Mon View will close for the season Saturday, Aug. 15. Alpha Aquatic Center will be closed the week of Aug. 31-Sept. 4 as students return to school. Alpha will then reopen for the Labor Day weekend and officially close for the season Monday, Sept. 7. Pool admission prices vary per location. Hours are 1 to 7 pm daily at Carmichaels and Mon View, and, at Alpha, noon to 7 pm Sunday through Thursday and noon to 8 pm Friday and Saturday. Pool hours are subject to change due to staff availability or inclement weather. For more information about swimming lessons, call the Department of Recreation at 724-8525323.

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Honoring Fallen Heroes S

tate Rep. Pam Snyder, D-Greene/Fayette/ Washington, said Gov. Tom Wolf recently signed into law her measure honoring two members of America’s armed forces from southwestern Pennsylvania killed in action in Vietnam and Somalia. “The ultimate sacrifices of two men from Washington and Greene counties will not be forgotten by those who bask in the freedoms they fought to preserve,” said Snyder of Act 3 of 2015. “Although their sacrifices were separated by more than a quarter century, our respect and appreciation have not diminished for either of our local heroes.” Act 3 names the Exit 28 Mon-Fayette Expressway Interchange with state routes 43 and 88 in Centerville, Washington County, as the Marine Corporal Thomas R. Matty Memorial Interchange. It also names the Route 88 bridge over Muddy Creek in Cumberland Township, Greene County, as the Army Corporal Richard W. Kowalewski, Jr. Memorial Bridge. Snyder said Matty was 22 years old when he was killed by artillery fire in the Quang Nam Province near Da Nang on Dec, 21, 1967, six weeks after arriving in Vietnam. “Bethlehem-Center High School still honors him with an award presented annually to a graduating senior,” Snyder said. “Soon, key infrastructure in the region will forever recall his sacrifice.” Snyder said Matty, a native of Denbo, Washington County, served with the 1st Marine Division and was one of 2,633 military deaths from Penn-

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sylvania during the Vietnam Conflict. Matty also is honored with an inscription on the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. Kowalewski, who was born in Waynesburg and later lived in Crucible, was killed Oct. 3, 1993, during a search-and-rescue mission in Mogadishu, Somalia. He was a member of 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, and was deployed to Somalia in August 1993 as part of a United Nations peacekeeping operation. “Corporal Kowalewski was one of the 18 Ranger and Delta Force members killed in what has been described as the U.S. military’s single most costly firefight since Vietnam,” said Snyder, noting that Kowalewski joined the Army just two days after graduating from Carmichaels Area High School in 1992. Snyder said the street battle in Mogadishu and Kowalewski’s role in the convoy sent to rescue downed helicopter pilots were depicted in the novel and movie “Black Hawk Down.” “His stirring courage and devotion in the midst of a firefight will not be forgotten,” Snyder said. “A hero of his mettle deserves a bridge named in his honor and so much more.” Snyder said ceremonies for the two corporals will be arranged. The state Turnpike Commission and Department of Transportation will be responsible for erecting appropriate signs at the two locations. The law, which takes effect in 60 days, passed unanimously in the House and Senate.

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To The Mat!

By Regis Whetzel

S

ome readers may recall Gavin Teasdale’s name from the story featured in the March issue of the GreeneSaver, recognizing his victory at the PIAA Wrestling Tournament in Hershey, PA. What many may not know is that this is just a part of Gavin’s extensive worldwide wrestling experience. Recently, Gavin was a part of Team USA, representing not just Rices Landing, but the entire country, at the Junior Pan American Championships in Havana, Cuba. Gavin was selected to be part of the team based largely on his past wins, of which there have been many. “He was a member of the World Team last year,” said Gavin’s mom, Kristen Haywood. “He went to Slovakia to compete; they pick one person from the United States for each weight class, and he won that last year and went to the World Competition.” His standing there, along with the abilities demonstrated in other competitions, secured Gavin’s spot on Team USA, and the trip to Havana. “They had Greco-Roman and Freestyle wrestling,” Kristen noted, “which was kind of a ‘package deal’ to go to this. They didn’t want to take two teams. When he went to the Worlds, they took two teams, but he wrestled both at the Pan-Am games.” Another Rices Landing native, Olympic wrestling competitor, Cary Kolat, left his home in North Carolina and traveled with the team to Cuba, specifically to coach Gavin in the hope of leading him to victory. Although Greco-Roman style isn’t Gavin’s specialty, he still managed to take home a bronze medal for his performance. During the Freestyle competitions, Gavin really got his chance to shine. “He took the gold medal, there,” said Kristen, continuing, “He wrestled a kid from Peru first, and beat

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him; then he defeated a wrestler from Mexico—he pinned him down! Then, in the finals, he beat the kid from Cuba!” And how does it go over when a wrestler from Team USA defeats a wrestler from the Cuban team on his own home turf? “Needless to say, they were not too happy when it ended,” Kristen remembers. “I was cheering.” Kristen, Gavin, and the whole team did manage to get in some sightseeing while in Havana, and found the experience interesting and fun, and it also proved to be quite a reality check. Although trade and travel restrictions to Cuba are in the process of easing, Kristen points out, “You still can’t travel there unless it’s to compete in something. We were only able to go because we were a part of the USA wrestling team. We were there for a week, and it was a heck of a lot different than back here. We’re a lot more fortunate here; it was a big eye opener for the kids to see what other kids have, compared to themselves. It was like Havana was stuck in a time warp, with all of the old cars.” With such a full schedule, is Gavin ready for some relaxation time? “No—he’s on his way to his coach’s house in Ebensburg,” Kristen said during our interview. “He’s training for the World Competition now. He’ll do the World Team trials in three weeks, in Akron, Ohio.” Gavin has had a fully packed year, winning his first state title as a freshman, enjoying an undefeated season, winning the gold in Cuba, and preparing now for still more tournaments. As Kristen sums up, “It’s all year ‘round with him. He still practices every day, and goes to the gym—it’s just constant!”

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! e c a R o t Get Ready T

he 2015 Rain Day race, which benefits Greene County Habitat for Humanity, is getting ready for its 37th annual running on Saturday, July 25th—the Saturday before Rain Day! There are two races: a Kids’ 1 Mile Fun Run, and a 5k Run/ Walk. Pre-registration is welcome; race-day registration takes place starting at 8:15 in the parking lot behind McCracken’s Pharmacy at 595 East High Street in Waynesburg. The Kids’ 1 Mile Fun Run starts at 9am, and the 5k Run/Walk kicks off at 9:30am.

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The first 50 people to register will receive a free admission to the Alpha Aquatic Center, and the cost to participate is just $10 for the Fun Run, $15 for the Run/Walk, if pre-registered. If registered on the day of the race, cost is $12 for the Fun Run, and $18 for the Run/Walk. Registration applications are available on the Greene County Habitat for Humanity website, www.greenecountyhabitat.net; for more information, call the Habitat offices at 724-852-2598.

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Memorial Day Services 2015 Sunday – May 24, 2015 The Brooks-Crago American Legion Post No. 816 of Rices Landing, PA will hold services as follows: • 1:15 PM Assembly for the parade will be at the Brooks-Crago American Legion Post #816. • 2:00 PM The parade will begin at the post home and proceed to the Honor Roll located between the Hewitt Cemetery & the Hewitt Presbyterian Church. The participants are as follows: JeffersonMorgan High School Band, Boy & Girl Scouts of Rices Landing; and the Rices Landing Volunteer Fire Department. Pam Snyder, State Representative for the 50th District will serve as the speaker for the ceremonies. HG/FS • Included in the services the Reading of General Logan’s Orders by Scot Lippencott, Adjutant for the Legion & the reading of In Flanders Field by Dean Virgili • Invocation & Benediction by Reverend Geoff Roch of the Hewitt Presbyterian Church, Rices Landing. • Following this service, another service will be held at the Crucible Cemetery Honor Roll. • The American Legion would like to invite everyone to the Post Home following the service where the Auxiliary has provided a light snack. The James R. Maxon American Legion Post No. 992 of Mt. Morris, PA will hold services as follows: • 11:00 AM Services at Kiger Cemetery - Honor Guard/Firing Squad • 11:20 AM Claughton Chapel Cemetery – HG/FS The Carmichaels Honor Guard consisting of the Carmichaels American Legion Post No. 400, Carmichaels VFW Post No. 3491; and Greensboro VFW Post No. 6303 will participate and have services as follows: • 12:00 PM Garards Fort Cemetery with John Brown, Retired from the US Army as a Commissioned Officer after 25 years of service with the 28TH Infantry Division Company Battalion during 19721997; will serve as the speaker for the service. HG/FS • 1:00 PM, Greensboro VFW Honor Roll with a salute to the deceased and placement of the wreath to honor our deceased at the Monument. HG/FS Monday – May 25, 2015 The Carmichaels Honor Guard, consisting of members of Carmichaels American Legion Post No. 400; and Carmichaels VFW Post No. 3491 will participate in the listed services: • 10:00 AM Nemacolin Honor Roll • 11:00 AM Crucible Honor • 1:00 PM Laurel Point Cemetery services with the speaker being Pam Snyder, State Representative for the 50th District. The participants are as follows: Frank Ricco & the American Legion Post Band. • Invocation & Benediction by Reverend Reagan Fike of the First Christian Church of Carmichaels. • 1:30 PM Lunch provided at the Carmichaels Legion Post No. 400 served by the Ladies Auxiliary. Waynesburg VFW Post No. 4793 will hold a service at: • 11:00 AM at the Post home on Lincoln Street with Terry Hoyle, Jr. as the Master of Ceremonies. • The Invocation & Benediction by Zane W. Mitchell; with the National Anthem to be sung by Sandra Huffman. • Speaker of the day will be the Honorable Judge H. Terry Grimes, a Member of both the American Legion & the VFW Post. The participants are as follows: The Boy Scouts & Cub Scouts of Troop 1280; along with the Girl Scouts of Greene County. • The VFW Post would like to invite everyone to the Post Home following the service where the Auxiliary has provided food & refreshments. The Filer-Sadlek Post No. 954 of Jefferson, PA will have services as follows: • 11:00 AM Mather Honor Roll/Post Office with the speaker Reverend Rick Bower, of the Jefferson United Methodist Church. Followed with a salute to the deceased; and placement of the wreath at the Honor Roll. • 11:30 AM Jefferson Cemetery with a salute to the deceased and wreath placement at the Honor Roll. • 12:00 PM Service at the Veterans’ section of the Greene County Memorial Park, with a salute to the deceased and wreath placed at the base of the American Flag. The James R. Maxon American Legion Post No. 992 of Mt. Morris will have services as follows: • 10:15 AM Services at the Mt. Morris United Methodist Church. • 11:00 AM Parade from the Mt. Morris United Methodist Church to the Creek with a salute to the deceased by throwing a flower into the creek in memory of the Navy. • 12:00 PM Ceremonies at the Cedar Grove Cemetery, with the speaker being Patrick St. Clair, Retired from the US Army as a Command Sergeant Major. Followed by the placement of the wreath in honor of our deceased at the Monument. HG/FS. **For your information: HG – Honor Guard & FS – Firing Squad

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For the Love of the Song F

By Regis Whetzel

irst there are the names you know: John Lennon and Yoko Ono, Chuck Berry, Bo Diddley, Mick Jagger, Stevie Wonder, Paul Simon… Next are the names you might not know: Gary Van Scyoc, Dennis Ferrante, and Dan Festog. Dan Festog has been a fixture in music in Greene County and the surrounding area as an independent engineer and producer for several years. His list of clients and credits fills several computer screens’ worth of information. Dennis Ferrante is a Grammy Award winning producer whose credits include Hall and Oates, Cher, Alice Cooper, and countless other artists. He was John Lennon’s sound engineer at the world famous Record Plant studio in New York. His Grammy came for his work restoring the complete recordings of Duke Ellington, and he’s also responsible for re-mastering the entire Elvis Presley catalog. Gary Van Scyoc is a man of many hats: renowned bassist for many of John Lennon’s solo recordings, member of the Dynatones, Pig Iron, and the Elephant’s Memory Band, music educator and creator of his own bass method book, “Shortcuts to Improving your Bass Playing,” singer, songwriter, and Greene County native. Gary had an inspiration that transformed into what can only be called a labor of love: “I got this concept a few years back,” Gary recalls. “I was at the Jacktown Fair, and Jacktown is very dear to me. It’s where my grandparents lived, in Wind Ridge. I got dumped there by my parents when I was very young, in my preschool years, up to my teens and beyond, in the summers. My mother and father worked, so they needed a babysitter, and I had the chance—though I didn’t realize it at the time—to spend summers in a place that was just unbelievably great for a young child to grow up. Of course, the highlight was the Jacktown Fair,” he notes. “When the fair came to town, the place totally transformed.” Many years ago, Gary had written a song called “Wind Ridge,” produced by John Lennon and released in 1972. Now, a different idea was stirring. “I said, ‘I really should write another song specifically about the fair, because it was such a big deal for me.’ It was such a big ‘to-do,’ with the fair queen and everything; I have it in the song, and I couldn’t be happier with it.” Titled simply, “The Jacktown Fair,” Gary truly made the recording of the song a Greene County event. All musicians who played the session are locally based, and included Gary’s brother, Jay, on bass; Bill Harding on drums; Bill’s brother, “Beeb” Harding on guitar; and Greg Short playing 12-string guitar. “I also hired a Greene County caterer, the Chuck Wagon, to bring food the day of the session,” Gary noted, “so you get the message— it’s all about Greene County. I could have recorded it at a thousand other studios, but I really wanted to hold true to the concept of doing it all in Greene County. It means a lot to me.” This is where Dan Festog comes in. Longtime supporter of the Jacktown Fair, Dan’s “Silent Wing

Studio” in Bobtown was the place to go to lay down the tracks for the new song. Working closely with producer, Dennis Ferrante, Dan used his skills as a recording engineer to make sure that everyone was happy with the sound, and make for as smooth a session as possible. “Dennis’ job was basically to tell me whether he liked the way things sounded, and, if he didn’t, how he wanted it changed,” Dan recalls. Dan had the unique experience of watching the song take shape from the ground, up, transforming from an idea in Gary’s mind to actual recorded audio, ready to be tweaked, fine-tuned, and mastered into a finished product. “They’ve got a good song,” he affirms. “I was surprised at how good it sounded, because all I’d seen before was the lyrics.” Elaborating, he notes, “Part of the hook is a lyric that is infamous around here—‘You Can’t Die Happy ‘til You’ve Been to the Jacktown Fair.’ People have been saying that for years! The song gets stuck in your head, and it serves its purpose as a good, memorable tune, so I would give it a thumbs up,” Dan concludes; “it’s a very cool song.” With the basic tracks recorded, the final step was mixing and mastering at Rojo Sound Studio in New Jersey, overseen by Gary and Dennis. Now, the song is available as a special bonus track on Gary’s album, “Pop Goes the Elephant,” and will be released as a single, all available at www.garyvanscyoc.com. In addition, Gary plans to donate the song to Walter Burns of the Jacktown Fair committee, “to do whatever they want with it,” he says. The timing could hardly be better, as the Jacktown Fair is celebrating its 150th anniversary this summer. Often noted as one of the oldest continuously running fairs in the country, the fair, which is presented by the Richhill Agricultural Society, has launched a new website, and will be featuring many commemorative items for sale in honor of this special anniversary. Visit jacktownfair.org. At press time, the song, “The Jacktown Fair,” was not yet released as either a single or on an album, but the GreeneSaver will be sure to provide more details on the song’s release in next month’s special “Fair Guide” edition. Having clearly come straight from Gary’s heart, he sums up his feelings about his newest release with graceful enthusiasm, saying, “It really means a lot to me. It’s not about—I already have more than enough credentials; it’s just about giving back, and the whole vibe of the Jacktown Fair and all the memories are very important to me.”

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T

OF BE SH ST OW !!

th

Photo Contest

he GreeneSaver is a proud sponsor, for the 12th consecutive year, of the annual Waynesburg Sheep & Fiber Festival Photo Contest & Exhibit. The 2015 exhibit was on display at the Pennsylvania Welcome Center at Kirby for a few weeks prior to the festival, which was staged at the Greene County Fairgrounds May 16 & 17, 2015. “We had a good response this year, what really impressed us was the quality of so many entries. The judges worked hard and deliberated quite a bit in choosing the winners,” said Mary Briggs, coordinator of the contest & exhibit. Winners in each category receive monetary awards of $20 for 1st, $15 for 2nd, $10 for 3rd, and $5 for 4th place, plus commemorative ribbons. In addition, a Best of Show rosette and People’s Choice rosette were awarded. The Best of Show is chosen in advance by the judges. The People’s Choice is a result of votes placed by festival visitors over the two-day event. Following are the winners in each category: Animal: 1st Place to Cathy Butcher for Field of Orange. 2nd, 3rd & 4th place went to Ann Newman. An honorable mentions was presented to Mary Briggs. People: Kelly Sherrick won 1st Place with her Going Country Portrait. 2nd Place was taken by Rebekkah Miller and 3rd Place by Jerry Hardy. Scenery: 1st Place in scenery and the People’s Choice Award went to Alan Butcher for Dusk at Blackwater River. 2nd place went to Lena Galing (Editor’s note: an adaptation of Lena’s 2nd Place photo titled Panty Line is featured on the front cover of this issue of the GreeneSaver) 3rd place was awarded to Cathy Butcher, and 4th Place was also taken by Lena Galing. Honorable Mentions were given to Ann Newman and Sandra Miller in the scenery category.

SCENERY - 1ST PLACE

Still Life: Kelly Scherrick made a clean sweep in this category winning 1st – 4th, with Rainbows in April capturing the blue ribbon. An honorable mention was awarded to Bridget Vernon for Old Wash House. Youth: 1st place and the Judge’s Best of Show Award was taken by Mason Boni of Avella, PA with his photo titled Move Your Feet, Lose Your Seat. 2nd Place was awarded to Rachel Sloneker, 3rd to Eli Porbin and 4th Place to Tyler Snyder. Honorable Mentions were also awarded in the Youth Category for additional entries from Mason Boni and Rachel Sloneker.

PEOPLE - 1ST PLACE

Best of Show - Avella resident Mason Boni’s 1st place picture in the Youth Entries category, Move Your Feet, Lose Your Seat, was also named Best of Show by the judges.

Photo by Kelly Scherrick of Waynesburg, PA; titled Going Country

STILL LIFE - 1ST PLACE

ANIMAL - 1ST PLACE

Photo by Cathy Butcher of Waynesburg, Pa, titled Field of Orange Photo by Alan Butcher of Waynesburg, titled Dusk at Blackwater River

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Photo by Kelly Scherrick of Waynesburg, PA, titled Rainbows in April GreeneSaver •

MAY / JUNE 2015


2015 Relay For Life T

he 20th Annual Relay For Life was held on May 2 & 3 at Waynesburg Central High School Raider Field of Pride. Escorted by local law enforcement officers and the Patriot Dream Riders Association, students from local high schools carried the torch in the torch run from the high school around Greene County and back. The Opening Ceremony was emceed by Andrew Stocky, Sports Broadcaster/Anchorman who recognized the committee, sponsors and Greene County citizens for their contributions to the success of the event. For the past three years, the Relay For Life of Greene County has been in the top ten in the nation in per capita fundraising for a community with a population under 40,000 persons. “Our 2015 goal is $175,000 which I am sure, with how Greene County always rallies together, we will meet. There are still funds coming in, so the actual totals will be given at the wrap-up party on June 1st,” said Janice Blair-Martin, Lead Coordinator of the Greene County event. As Greene County Commissioners Chuck Morris, Archie Trader and Blair Zimmerman read the survivors’ names, the 110 survivors along with their caregivers gathered on the track for the ceremonial Survivor’s Lap. Leading the Survivor’s Lap was 2015 Relay Ambassadors, Addy Morrison, Colby Simkovic, Daniel Bradmon, RJ Ehnerd and Kaiden Wooten. The survivors and their caregivers enjoyed a luncheon catered by Dan Wagner and the Greene County Career & Technology Culinary Arts Students and sponsored by Cornerstone Care. The day’s special activities included children’s games, frozen t-shirt contest, music, entertainment and line dancing. When not participating or taking a brief rest, team members could be found taking turns walking laps for the 24 hours symbolizing that cancer doesn’t sleep. A highlight of the afternoon brought some romance to the field as well, when Co-Lead Dillon Spencer sprang a surprise marriage proposal on his girlfriend, Chelsea Hardy during the first ever Flash Mob that broke out at 2pm on Saturday. Well of course, she said yes. Later in the evening, the Luminaria Ceremony was held to remember those who are now fighting cancer and those who have lost their lives to cancer. Local Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts assisted with the placement of the luminaria bags. The weekend event had a record 38 teams participating, with 13 all new teams joining the fight in 2015. Winners of both the campsite decorating contest and spirit stick contest were Team Sparks in first place, Jefferson-Morgan School District in second and First Federal

MAY / JUNE 2015

• GreeneSaver

Savings & Loan Association in third place. The winner of the Relay Queen contest was JP Hennen from Wally’s Warriors Team. Several Mini-Relays are also held each year as a part of the community Relay For Life. Waynesburg University’s Mini Relay raised over $16,000, Rocking Rolling Meadows brought in $1,071 and the Central Greene School District Mini Relay Event will be held at the end of May to add even more to the Greene County contributions. “It was truly an awesome day, during my eight years of involvement, I do not recall more beautiful weather or emotionally charged atmosphere,” said Janice, “We welcomed many new participants, Greene County is strong in our commitment to finish this fight.” Contributions can still be made, for information on how you can support the Relay for Life of Greene County, contact the American Cancer Society office for Washington & Greene Counties at 724-222-6911.

Relay for Life of Greene County Co-Lead Dillon Spencer of Amity, PA created a special flash mob to the tune “Marry You” by Glee Cast that occurred at 2pm on Saturday, May 2nd during the annual Relay at the Raider Field of Pride in Waynesburg. He also used the occasion to make a very public proposal to girlfriend Chelsea Hardy, who agreed to marry him.

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MAY / JUNE 2015

May June GreeneSaver 2015  

Win money, Pirates Tickets, and a gift card from the May / June GreeneSaver, Get info about upcoming summer events throughout Greene County....

May June GreeneSaver 2015  

Win money, Pirates Tickets, and a gift card from the May / June GreeneSaver, Get info about upcoming summer events throughout Greene County....

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