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Hoopin’ with the Jackets! W

aynesburg University is holding a “Hoopin’ with the Jackets” Basketball Skills Camp at the university for boys and girls entering grades 3 to 9, led by Coach Mark Christner, and sponsored by Lids Team Sports. Described as, “A fun week full of basketball teaching and competitive games,” Coach Christner and his staff will instruct campers on the fundamentals of shooting, footwork, ball handing, basic offense movements and team defense. Coach Christner’s staff will consist of Jacket basketball players and coaches. Contests will include Hot Shot, 1-1, Free Throw and a daily shooting game for camp pizza. Campers will also play in game situations such as 2-2, 3-3, and 5-5 based on age and skill level. Every camper will have individual attention and will be encouraged to learn new skills, as well as build on previously learned skills. Team building concepts will also be taught in the daily take away session of camp. All campers will receive a Waynesburg water bottle, “Swarm” towel, have an opportunity to win prizes, and enjoy daily basketball and fun. The camp takes place Monday, June 9 through Friday, June 13. Daily times are 9am-12pm for grades 3-5, and 1pm-4pm for grades 6-9. Camp will be held at the Rudy Marisa Fieldhouse on the Waynesburg University campus, and cost is $75 per child. Registration forms can be found at www.waynesburgsports.com, by clicking on “Men’s Sports,” then “Basketball.” For more information, visit the above Internet site, or call 724-8523466.

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n I n O C ome

! n e p O e r ’ e W W

ith the promise of sunny, summer days on the way, plan to celebrate the season with Waynesburg Prosperous & Beautiful’s Annual Summer Open House in beautiful historic, downtown Waynesburg! The festivities begin at 4pm on Friday, June 6, with many merchants extending their hours to 8pm or later that evening. You’ll find sidewalk sales, special “one day only” bargains and door prizes, and plenty of fun, food and entertainment on the streets of downtown. The “Rock the Chalk” sidewalk chalk art competition has attracted several local artists already, and entry is still open. Winners will receive trophies, and a special “People’s Choice” award will be offered based on the votes of visitors that evening. There is no fee for entry, and all necessary materials and supplies are provided. You do need to pre-register, however, if you are an artist interested in the competition. You can email Jim and Linda Winegar, coordinators of the competition, at artbeatingreene@gmail.com, or stop in the ArtBeat Store on the corner of Church and High in downtown, Waynesburg for more information. Everyone can join in the sidewalk chalk drawing fun – even if you’re not in the competition. Free chalk and designated areas will be provided to anyone who wants to express his or her creativity on the sidewalks throughout the evening. No age limit…young and old alike can have some fun! In addition to the sidewalk chalk art activities, FREE caricatures will once again be offered by Greene County Tourist Promotion Agency with artist Jeff Harris. Free balloon souvenirs will be magically created and handed out to children of all ages by Balloon Artist Robin Kelly of Pittsburgh. Music will fill the air with all your favorite classic tunes, spun by local legend, the “Greene County Greaser,” Dougie Wilson, appearing live on the courthouse steps. Also appearing live on the streets of downtown Waynesburg that evening will be Carl Donley, a Greene County native who currently lives in Bentleyville. Carl will perform doo-wop and easy listening songs from the 50’s, 60’s and early 70’s. He is the last surviving member of the oldies group Del-Rayes, which formed in 1969 in Chicago. The group recorded cover songs and toured as an opening act before breaking up in the late 1970’s, when he returned to Southwestern Pennsylvania. Carl has continued to perform throughout the region, often playing state theatres. Savor the flavor of summer with street vendors Moore’s Hot Dogs, Hungarian Smokehouse specialties, Willow Tree Farm Baked goodies, and hand dipped ice cream. All our local downtown restaurants will also be offering specials and inviting you to dine in downtown during the Summer Open House on Friday evening, June 6. In addition to everything mentioned above, there will also be two special raffles offered: one for free passes to the Alpha Aquatic Center; and another for an original water color painting by renowned local artist, Leslie Fehling, commissioned just for the 2014 Downtown Waynesburg Summer Open House event. Save the date, and come celebrate summer on the picturesque streets of downtown Waynesburg. Remember you can unleash the power of your consumer dollars when you Buy Local, Buy Greene! For a list of participating merchants, check www.waynesburgpa.org, or find and join the event on Facebook.

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175 Wade Street, Suite D • Waynesburg, PA 15370 (former roller rink) 4

GreeneSaver •

Hours: M-F: 10-5 Sat: 10-3

Owner: Linda Jones MAY / JUNE

2014


On Your Marks… Get Set…

GO!GO!GO!GO!GO!

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inety runners and walkers turned out for the annual Dock to Lock 5K Run/Walk, held Saturday, May 10, along the Greene River Trail. The race began at the trail starting point at the Greene Cove Yacht Club in Jefferson Township. An awards ceremony at the Rices Landing Fire Hall followed the race. Prizes were given for the top three male and female runners and walkers overall, as well as the top three male and female runners and walkers in various age categories. The first place winners in the 5K run were: • Male: First place, Sean Hilverding, 18, of Spraggs, 16:33. • Female: First place, Casey Bamberger, 17, of Prosperity, 23:06. The first place winners in the 5K walk were: • Male: First place, Gerard Bertrand, 64, of Venetia, 30:19. • Female: First place, Kathy Paes, 58, of Eighty Four, 38:54. A random drawing for prizes was also held following the race. The following participants won $25 Wal-Mart gift cards: Casey Bamberger of Prosperity, Larry Douglas of Waynesburg, Greg Reikowski of Washington and Hannah Schiren of Frostburg, MD. Janet Cunningham of Carmichaels won four Wild Things tickets. Two Miss Greene County queens – Junior Miss Remmey Lohr and Petite Miss Bailey Barnyak – handed out water to race participants at the finish line and assisted with the awards ceremony. The Greene County Sheriff ’s office provided event security. Dock to Lock runners and walkers were timed by SERJ Racing Services of Uniontown. Complete race results may be viewed online at www.serjracing.com. Proceeds from Dock to Lock benefit Department of Recreation programs, such as the summer Day Camp program, which offers free activities for county children ages 5 to 15. This year, Day Camp will be held June 16 through July 25 at various locations across the county. Major sponsors of this year’s Dock to Lock included the Greene County Commissioners, First Federal Savings and Loan of Greene County, First Student, Rices Landing Volunteer Fire Department, Road ID, Wal-Mart and Waynesburg University. Additional sponsors included Logan Law Office, R&D Watters Septic Service Inc. and Waynesburg Milling. The next race scheduled for the Greene River Trail is the Heroes Run/Walk on Saturday, Sept. 20. The race features a 5K run and walk and a 15K run and benefits memorial funds established in honor of Army Spc. Gregory Cox and Marine Lance Cpl. Steven Phillips, both of whom were killed in Iraq. For more information, visit www.co.greene.pa.us.

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xpanding on a theme begun last month, this edition of Driving the Future looks at another educational program designed to provide an introductory, yet quite comprehensive “primer” for high school students interested in entering the oil and gas industry, post-graduation. Led by instructor Dennis Dull at the Mon Valley Career and Technology Center (MVCTC), the program works with six high schools in the Mon Valley area (Beth-Center, Bentworth, Monesson, California, Charleroi and Ringgold) to provide part-day education, five days a week, designed specifically to prepare students to move seamlessly into the industry. “The program is pretty unique,” says Dennis. “With every drill site, there are about 150 different positions that are involved. We don’t try to train for any one of them; what I try to do is give them a taste of everything, and allow them to determine what route they want to go.” He expands the point further, noting, “Some want to be roughnecks or roustabouts; some may want to work on a pipeline. I have one young lady who was talking about going on to college to become a petroleum engineer.” A 3-year program geared toward sophomores, juniors and seniors, the educational approach is simple and effective: “I try to break it into ‘upstream, midstream, and downstream’—the exploration, the distribution, and then the end user,” Dennis notes. As it relates to what is often physically demanding work, he realizes that “book learning” can only go so far, though, adding, “We try to make it as hands on as possible.” His facility makes this kind of practical learning readily accessible. “We have a well-head, a separator tank, and expansion tank, right here in my lab. Throughout the course of their years here, kids dismantle it, reassemble it, and know how to dismantle the valves, and reassemble them. They’re getting experience with things that they are physically going to be doing.” On the “human side,” Dennis understands that there are other lessons that are just as important as the mechanical training. “We are very honest with them, ” he states. “If they take what we would consider the ‘traditional route’ for a roughneck or roustabout, these kids will be working 12 hours a day, 7 days a week, 2 weeks at a time; then, depending on who they go with, anywhere from a week to 10 days off. The drilling rigs never stop. We tease that, ‘It’s always a beautiful day on the rig,’ whether it’s 90 degrees above, or 10 degrees below. The workers are going to be out there in those elements.” The MVCTC program is still in its infancy, relatively speaking; the advantage to this, according to Dennis, is that it affords great flexibility in what can be taught, specifically designing the curriculum to meet the demands of the industry. “We’re in a situation here where we have a lot of ‘industry’ right around us,” he observes. “If they come to me and say, ‘Hey, if your kids know this, this, and this, then we would be interested in them,’ then guess what I’m teaching?” Even more guidance is available as students near graduation. “The senior year, I help them write their resumes, we go through interview training, so we are trying to make them as marketable as possible to the industry, and they will have the opportunity to earn their SafeGulf/SafeLand certification, which is an internationally recognized safety certification. Most of the rigs require that you have that before they permit you on-site.” Dennis affirms. It is this laser-beam focus, along with the ability to, as Dennis phrases it, “Morph into the demand” of the industry, that makes the MVCTC program unique. “I know that these kids are being taught skills that specific companies want,” he concludes, “and that’s my objective—I kind of feel like an employment agency that happens to teach skills with it, because that’s what I’m trying to do: get these kids ready to be productive citizens out there in the world.”

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Local Sports Hero Makes (Really!) Good…

Daisies and Brownies and Police, Oh, My! Waynesburg Daisy & Brownies, Troop 51778 recently visited the borough police department. Officer Lisa Sowden showed the girls the equipment she uses on the job and talked about her daily responsibilities. Officer Asa Winters demonstrated Izzy the borough’s K9.

Be Prepared… For Some Awards!

Nineveh native, Greg Hopkins, already a local sports star from his time as a quarterback, wrestler, and record-setting javelin thrower in high school, made good—about as good as you can get, in fact—when he was elected to the Arena Football Hall of Fame, class of 2013. The induction ceremony took place in April, during the 2014 Arena Football Hall of Fame Weekend, and was televised on the CBS Sports Network. Greg’s accomplishments on the Arena Football field are impressive: Pictured in front of Hopkins General Store of Nineveh. Photo by playing as both a linebacker and Samuel Crowe. wide receiver, he made the “Ironman Team” four times, the “First Team All-Arena” two times, was named Arena Football League’s (AFL) “Ironman of the Year” in 2002, and made #14 in the AFL’s list of the “20 Greatest Players.” Greg’s AFL career was spent in the Albany Firebirds (which later became the Indiana Firebirds) from 1996-2001; and the Los Angeles Avengers from 2002-2006. In 2007, the Avengers officially retired his jersey, #82, during a halftime ceremony. Congratulations to Greg from all of us at the GreeneSaver! Maybe you can stop by and toss the pigskin around with us for a while next time you’re in the neighborhood..?

CHAMBER ANNOUNCES WINNER OF 24th ANNUAL SCHOLARSHIP

The Waynesburg Area Chamber of Commerce Scholarship Fund Committee has announced that their 24th annual $1,500 scholarship will be awarded to Allyson Younken of Waynesburg Central High School. Seventeen year old Allyson plans to attend Penn State University Main Campus to pursue a degree in Animal Science this fall.  Allyson is the daughter of Mike and Shelley Younken of Waynesburg. This scholarship is presented each year to a Greene County senior who plans to attend a college, university or trade school.  The scholarship is awarded based on grade point average and a 500 word essay. This year, twenty-one applications for the scholarship were received by the Chamber.  The committee had a difficult task of selecting one winner from the qualified field.  The Chamber of Commerce would like to thank all members who participated in the selection process. The scholarship will be presented at the Chamber’s Quarterly Membership Networking Luncheon on May 28th at noon.  The luncheon will be held in the Benedum Dining Hall on the Waynesburg University Campus and is open to the public.  Reservations are required and may be made by calling the Chamber office at Eighteen family members attended the dedication of John Humble Drive at Cornerstone Ministry 724-627-5926.  The cost of the luncheon is $15. Center on Willis Road in Morgantown.  John was the Capital Funds Chairman for Cornerstone and with his leadership $350,000 was raised for the camp.  Not only was he a top notch fund raiser, he was an encourager and always challenged the staff to reach for the stars.  He obtained a $35,000 grant for the gym renovation and numerous gifts from those who attendThe staff of Southwestern ed  our annual Business LunPennsylvania Human Services cheon.  He always said, “You’ve (SPHS) C.A.R.E. Center Waynesgot to ask for what you want.”  burg recently hosted an open He loved children and the local house event to celebrate Mental community and always wanted Health Awareness Month. For to share his Christianity with more information about mental others.  Said Judy Virgili, Exhealth services or resources inecutive Director of Cornerstone, cluding outpatient therapy, crisis “We miss you, John, not only for services, or community treatwhat you did but specifically for ment, please call the C.A.R.E. who you were:  a man of integCenter at 724-627-6108. rity and a love for others.” In early May, the Central Greene District Commissioners of the Laurel Highlands Council of Boy Scouts of America held their annual recognition dinner at the Greene County Vo-Tech School, where awards were presented to those who have made a great impact on scouting in Greene County. Ethan Phillips of Waynesburg received the District Award of Merit, a national award presented within each district to leaders who have gone above expectations in their service. Ethan is the Cub Master of Pack 1280, Assistant Scout Master of Troop 1280, and recently completed National Camp School at Camp Gayasuta in Pittsburgh. Dr. Bruce Barnett, a retired professor of biology from Waynesburg University, was recognized for his 46 years of service to the district. Having filled many roles in that time, his departure from the District Committee will be deeply felt. Congratulations to Ethan and Bruce for work well done, and to all others honored at the event!

John Humble Drive Dedication at Cornerstone Ministry Center

Looks Like It Was Fun…

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Memorial Day Services - 2014

Sunday – May 25, 2014 The Brooks-Crago American Legion Post No. 816 of Rices Landing, PA will hold services as follows: • 2:00 PM - A parade will begin at the post home and proceed to the Honor Roll located between the Hewitt Cemetery & the Hewitt Presbyterian Church. Kit Watson, Pennsylvania Adjutant for the American Legion will serve as the speaker for the ceremonies. • Following this service, another service will be held at the Crucible Cemetery Honor Roll. • The American Legion would like to invite everyone to the Post Home following the service where the Auxiliary has provided a light snack. The James R. Maxon American Legion Post No. 992 of Mt. Morris, PA will hold services as follows: • 11:00 AM - Kiger Cemetery - Honor Guard/Firing Squad followed immediately to a service as follows: • 11:05 AM - Claughton Chapel Cemetery – Honor Guard/Firing Squad. The Carmichaels Honor Guard consisting of the Carmichaels American Legion Post No. 400, Carmichaels VFW Post No. 3491, Greensboro VFW Post No. 6303; and Bobtown VFW Post No. 5567 will participate and have services as follows: • 12:00 PM - Garard’s Fort Cemetery with Dr. Lawrence M. Stratton, Director of The Stover Center for Constitutional Studies & Moral Leadership with the Waynesburg University will serve as the speaker for the service. Honor Guard/Firing Squad. • 1:00 PM - Greensboro VFW Honor Roll with a salute to the deceased and placement of the wreath to honor our deceased at the Monument. Honor Guard/Firing Squad. Monday – May 26, 2014 Four separate programs will be held across the County as follows: The Carmichaels Honor Guard, consisting of members of Carmichaels American Legion Post No. 400, Carmichaels VFW Post No. 3491, Greensboro VFW Post No. 6303; and Bobtown VFW Post No. 5567; will participate in the listed services: • 10:00 AM - Nemacolin Honor Roll. • 11:00 AM - Crucible Honor Roll with Pam Snyder, State Representative for the 50th District and Robert W.Teagarden, III, Army Veteran Combat Specialist with the PA ARGN will serve as the speakers for the service. • 12:30 PM - Parade from the American Legion Post No. 400 to the Laurel Point Cemetery. (Frank Ricco & the American Legion Post Band) • 1:00 PM - Laurel Point Cemetery with Martin J. Yoskovich, Funeral Director as the speaker for the service. • 1:30 PM - Lunch provided at the Carmichaels VFW Post No. 3491 served by the Ladies Auxiliary. Waynesburg VFW Post No. 4793 will hold a service at: • 11:00 AM - at the Post home on Lincoln Street with Blair Zimmerman, Greene County Commissioner as the speaker. • 2:30 PM - the VFW Post No. 4793, James E. Farrell American Legion Post No. 330; and the DAV Chapter 123 of Waynesburg will participate in a Dedication of a Veterans Monument in Aleppo, PA at the Aleppo Brethren Church. The Filer-Sadlek Post No. 954 of Jefferson, PA will have services as follows: • 11:00 AM - Mather Honor Roll/Post Office with the speaker, Pastor Brad Edgar, of the Clarksville Christian Church. • 11:30 AM - Jefferson Cemetery. • 12:00 PM - Service at the Veterans’ section of the Greene County Memorial Park. The James R. Maxon American Legion Post No. 992 of Mt. Morris will have services as follows: • 10:00 AM - Services at the Mt. Morris United Methodist Church. • 11:00 AM - Parade from the Mt. Morris United Methodist Church to the Creek. • 12:00 PM - Ceremonies at the Cedar Grove Cemetery.

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Bowlby Bits

he Bowlby Public Library is having a Spring Book Sale during the weeks of June 2 through June 14th, selling many used books recently withdrawn from their shelves, as well as donated books. The Book Sale is being held at the library’s Gazebo located at 311 North West St. and is open during normal business hours. The Tiny Tim Tomato Project will be held on Tuesday, June 3, at 5pm for children ages 2-8. Master Gardener Bob Bedison will be on hand to guide youngsters in planting and growing their very own healthy tomato plant! There will also be special stories and crafts about gardening with Mrs. Kerry McClure, head of the Children’s department. Please call or visit to register. The Family Literacy and Children’s Departments at the Bowlby Public Library present a three part series for children and their families on personal & home safety. The first session of the safety series, “Keep Me Safe from Fire,” will be offered on Saturday, June 7, from 10am-12pm. The second session, “Keep Me Safe from Danger,” on Saturday, June 14, will feature a representative from the American Red Cross. This session will focus on emergency preparedness for younger elementary & preschool children from 10am12pm. From 1-3pm, there will be a “Zombie Apocalypse Party” designed primarily to teach older elementary students through teenagers how to be prepared for emergency situations. The third session, “Keep Me Safe and Protected,” will be Saturday, June 21, 10am- 12pm. Please call or visit to register. The Bowlby Book Club will be meeting on Tuesday, June 9th at 6pm. The book discussion will be Hope Unseen by Smiley & Crandall. New members are always welcome to attend and join the club! The Bowlby Public Library will be offering FREE computer classes on Microsoft Word Tuesday, June 17 & 24, 11am-12pm. Seating is limited so please call to reserve your spot. The Bowlby Library Summer Reading Kick-Off Festival is on Saturday, June 28 from 11am-1pm on the lawn. Call the library today at to register your elementary aged child(ren) for the summer reading clubs in the Children’s Department. The theme this summer is “Fizz, Boom, Read!” In conjunction with the reading clubs, the Family Literacy Department is enrolling children in their “Fizz, Boom: Learn!” program where the concentration will be on keeping math and science skills sharp during the summer months. FREE lunches will also be provided during summer reading programs for children by the Greater Pittsburgh Area Food Bank. Community Action Southwest is collaborating with the Bowlby Library to offer six workshops on Job Development. A workshop will be offered every other month with the first workshop scheduled for Monday, June 16th, at the library. “Barriers to Gaining Employment” will begin promptly at 1pm, ending at 3pm. Bowlby Library will provide educational activities for children accompanying their parents during this workshop. For more information or to register for any of these events, please stop by or call Bowlby Public Library at 724-627-9776.

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Honors to Local Envirothon-ers!

ixty-eight high school students from Greene County’s five school districts competed in the 27th annual Greene County Envirothon, held in late April at Ryerson Station State Park in Wind Ridge. Teams of five students tested their environmental knowledge in the areas of soils, forestry, wildlife, aquatics and the 2014 current issue, sustaining local agriculture and buying locally. Carmichaels Team #1 won this year’s competition with a score of 439.5 points out of a possible 500 points. Team members Tyler Crago, Ashley Dotson, Doug Kowalewski, Emma Lowry and Philip Mikalik and team advisor Kevin Willis will represent Greene County at the state Envirothon, which will be held at Susquehanna University in Selinsgrove, PA near the end of May. Mapletown Team #1, consisting of students Eric Armel, Ried Griffin, Sara Hlatky, Katelyn Kelly and Ryan Kovach and advisors Amber Burkett and Sara London, earned second place with a score of 334. The third-place team was Carmichaels Team #2, which included students Allie Christopher, Blake Conard, Taylor Dodson, Connor Spangler and Parker Woodring and advisor Willis. The team earned 318.5 points. The Greene County Envirothon is organized each year by the Greene County Conservation District and is funded through a grant from the Community Foundation of Greene County’s Pennsylvania Education Improvement Tax Credit (EITC) program through CONSOL Energy. Each student on the winning team secured a $500 college scholarship funded by Alpha Natural Resources. Congratulations to all of the participants for demonstrating the importance of being aware to take care of your world! For more information on the Greene Carmichaels Team #1, winners of this year’s Greene County Envirothon. L. to R., Tom Headlee, GCCD board director; County Envirothon, call the Greene County Michelle Anderson, Alpha Natural Resources; Jim Cowell, GCCD board director; team members Doug Kowalewski, Philip Mikalik, Tyler Crago and Emma Lowry; team advisor Kevin Willis; and team member Ashley Dotson. Conservation District at 724-852-5278.

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Relay For Life

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he 16th Annual Relay For Life was held on May 3rd & 4th at the Waynesburg Central High School Raider Field of Pride. Escorted by local law enforcement officers and Greene County ABATE, eleven students from local high schools carried the torch in the torch run from the high school to the Greene County Court House and back. The Opening Ceremony was emceed by Andrew Stocky, Sports Broadcaster/Anchorman wherein the committee, sponsors and Greene County citizens were recognized for their contributions to the success of the event. Most notably, in 2012 the Relay For Life of Greene County was 2nd in the nation in per capita fundraising for a community with a population under 40,000 persons, raising $6 for every man, woman and child in the county. Also the 2012 event ranked 162nd out of 5300 Relays nationwide in total fundraising without regard to population size. In 2013 Greene County was in the top 10 in the nation for fundraising as well. Greene County may be small in size but we are mighty to rally for a good cause! As the Greene County Commissioners Chuck Morris, Archie Trader and Blair Zimmerman read the survivors’ names, the 124 survivors along with their caregivers gathered on the track for the ceremonial Survivor’s Lap. Leading the Survivor’s Lap was 2013 Relay Ambassadors, Addy Morrison, 6, and Colby Simkovic, 12, both of Jefferson, Daniel Bradmon 11, and Robert “RJ” Ehnerd, 16 . The survivors and their caregivers enjoyed a luncheon catered by Dan Wagner and the Greene County Career & Technology Culinary Arts Students and entertainment by Autumn Laskody. Some of the day’s activities included children’s games, frozen t-shirt contest, music, entertainment and line dancing. When not participating or taking a brief rest, team members could be found taking turns walking laps for the 24 hours symbolizing that cancer doesn’t sleep. At 9:00pm the Luminaria Ceremony was held to remember those fighting cancer and also those who have lost their lives to cancer. Girl Scout Troop 53591 assisted with the placement of the luminaria bags. Later in the evening the Boy Scout Troop #1280 had a Fight Back/Pack the Track/ACS CAN lap, a lap was walked celebrating the event as an ACS CAN event (American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network) with over 66 members joining this affiliate organization of ACS that serves the political interests of the ACS in the fight against cancer. Out of the 27 teams, the winners of the campsite decorating contest were the first place was the Greene County 4H team, second place Team Sparx and third place Moschetta’s. There was a tie for the winner of the spirit stick contest Sam’s Pals and the Greene County 4H team. Our Relay Queen contest was won by Tristan Gould from Bethlehem Center Community Team. Several Mini-Relays were also held as a part of the community Relay For Life and included Waynesburg University, Rocking Rolling Meadows and Central Greene School District. Janice Blair-Martin, Event Chair, said “It really is a great day full of so many emotions. It’s great reconnecting with fellow Relayers and Survivors as well as meeting new ones. How amazing it was to see the track half filled with Survivors and caregivers that means our efforts are well worth the outcome. We are here to “FINISH THE FIGHT” against this awful disease. But it’s more than just that day—all year long, the committee, teams, volunteers, organizations, schools, churches and businesses from Greene County work together to raise funds for cancer awareness, cancer patient services and cancer research.” And as you may remember months leading up to last year’s Relay and also in the Opening Ceremony, people were encouraged to participate in the Cancer Prevention Study-3 (CPS-3). Greene County, as usual, stepped up to the plate and exceeded the goal and registered 132 participants. And nationally they made their goal of 300,000 people. When the cure is found, those participants will be able to say, I played a part in history.” To date, the 2014 Relay for Life of Greene County has raised approximately $145,000.00 and counting. Donations can still be made until August 31. For more information, call Amy Brooks, American Cancer Society at 724-222-6911.

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Cache the Spirit of Greene!

It’s Time to Get YouR

Geek On!

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esidents of Greene County may soon add a new verb to their vocabulary—‘geek.’ Flenniken Public Library, as well as the entire Greene County Library System, is participating in Geek the Library, a community‐based public awareness campaign. The campaign highlights what people are passionate about and how libraries can support them, in an effort to heighten awareness about the critical funding issues public libraries face. Geek the Library features local educational material that introduces ‘geek’ as a verb, and encourages the public to talk about what they ‘geek’— whether it’s engineering, superheroes or art. The public awareness campaign illustrates the fact that everyone is passionate about something—everyone ‘geeks’ something—and that the library supports them all. Flenniken Public Library is currently offering the following ways for you to get your geek on! Start your geeking off right by stopping in the library from now through May 31st and pick through our wide selection of used books at our Friends of the Library Book Sale. This is a great opportunity to prepare your summer reading collection. We will accept monetary donations. Print what you geek using the library’s 3D printing services. Making a print is as easy as getting some quick instruction from the library staff, and then downloading a file to the printer. If you are really feeling adventurous, you can create your own design! Do you geek higher education? If so learn more about getting financial aid when a representative from the Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance Agency (PHEAA) makes a visit to the library on Monday June 9th at 5:00. Pre-register by calling 724-966-5263. Show everyone what you geek by stopping in the library to get an 8.5 x 11 poster made of you geeking out through May 27! Feel free to bring in supplies to really personalize your poster. Do you geek ruffle scarfs, but have no idea how to crochet them? Come to the library on May 28th at 6:00 to learn to create your own. This is a beginning-crochet skill. EVERYONE can do it! Please register for this event by calling 724-966-5263 so we have enough materials, but please let us know if you have your own crochet needle and Sashay yarn. The cost of the yarn and needle is $5.00 if you purchase them through the library.

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he Greene County Department of Recreation is once again offering “Cache Me If You Can,” a geocaching game designed to showcase eight recreation sites across Greene County. Geocaching is an outdoor treasure-hunting game using global positioning system (GPS) software and GPS-enabled devices, such as smart phones. Prizes or other items of interest are hidden at specific sets of GPS coordinates, and participants are challenged to find each geocache. The Department of Recreation first introduced the game in Greene County in 2012 and has received entries from explorers as far away as Allegan, Mich. For the Greene County game, participants must visit each of the eight sites, find a pass code located inside each geocache container and send the pass codes along with the participant’s name, address, phone number and T-shirt size to the Department of Recreation, 107 Fairgrounds Road, Waynesburg, PA 15370. Information can also be e-mailed to pblaker@co.greene.pa.us. All participants will receive an official “Cache Me If You Can” Department of Recreation T-shirt (only adult sizes available). The first 10 entries will receive a single-admission pool pass to Alpha Aquatic Center in Waynesburg. The game ends Dec. 1, 2014. The eight county recreation sites are: • Mon View Park, 377 Stoney Hill Road, Greensboro, PA 15338 • Wana B Park, 355 Ceylon Road, Carmichaels, PA 15320 • Greene River Trail, Greene Cove Trail Head, Millsboro, PA 15487 • Greene River Trail, Old Crucible Mine Site, Crucible, PA 15325 • Greene County Airport, 417 E. Roy Furman Highway, Waynesburg, PA 15370 • Greene County Tennis Courts, 900 Rolling Meadows Road, Waynesburg, PA 15370 • Greene County Fairgrounds, 107 Fairgrounds Road, Waynesburg, PA 15370 • Alpha Aquatic Center, 200 E. Roy Furman Highway, Waynesburg, PA 15370 For a full brochure of GPS coordinates and clues, call the Department of Recreation at 724-852-5323, or visit www.co.greene.pa.us.

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Clipper

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aptist Join Us! B m e h e l h t Be ion k e e r acat C V ff u R Bible Churcfrohm RoufffCreek General Store) (across

June 8-12 • 6-8pm

“Keep On Clipping!”

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School!

Come join us for fun, fellowship & refreshments!

724-627-6218

www.bbcruffcreek.org

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xciting things are happening at Kennywood! For the first time in three decades, the park is getting an entertaining new “sit-down” restaurant! “Johnny Rockets,” scheduled to open in June, is a dining experience filled with fun for the whole family. “Johnny Rockets” features traditional American fun foods like burgers, hot dogs, “melts,” and milkshakes, but what sets it apart is the singing and dancing waitstaff, sure to make any visit memorable. Of course, the rides are awesome, from the Jack Rabbit, built in 1921, to the newest stomach-churner, the Black Widow. Two special days will bring members of the community together to check out the new, enjoy the old, and have a fun day at one of the country’s great amusement parks! Friday June 20 is 4-H Day at Kennywood. Through an exclusive mail-in program for 4-H members and families, All Day Fun Passes are available for just $23 (plus $2, S+H). These passes can be used on 4-H day, or any regular operating day in May, June or September, and weekdays in July and August. Fun Passes may be used on weekends in July or August with an additional $10 surcharge per pass. Orders and payment must be received by June 1, checks payable to “Extension Special Fund,” and sent to 26 West High St., Room 1, Waynesburg, PA 15370-1324. Greene County Day at Kennywood Park, co-sponsored by the Chamber and Williams Energy, is scheduled for Tuesday, July 1st. Tickets are available in the Waynesburg Area Chamber of Commerce Office, located at 143 East High Street, from May 27th at 10am, through June 30 at 3pm. The first 100 tickets purchased will also come with $10 in “Fun Money” which is also being sponsored by Williams.  The Fun Money can be used by guests to purchase food, play games and buy souvenirs in the park. Cost is $25.00 for a Ride All Day ticket. Williams Energy has also underwritten the cost of the bus transportation this year, making it free to ride the bus to and from Kennywood; however, a $15 deposit is required to hold each free bus seat, and will be refunded upon boarding the bus.  Bus tickets will be available until the bus is filled. Bus will leave the Greene County Fairgrounds lot at 10am and will depart Kennywood at 10pm. For more information, contact the Chamber office at 724-627-5926.

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Safety Day!

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he Penn State Extension Greene County 4-H Program held a Progressive Agriculture Safety Day for third grade students in early May, at the Greene County Fairgrounds. The event provided students from Central Greene, West Greene, and Carmichaels School Districts a fun-filled day of safety education coordinated and delivered by local volunteers.   Presenters from Southwest Regional Medical Center and EMS Southwest provided first aid information; Domestic Violence Services of Southwestern PA provided safe practices for being home alone; The USDA shared information about food safety; and Ten Mile Power Squadron taught about boating safety. Cumberland and Waynesburg/Franklin Township Fire Departments were on hand to teach fire safety using the Smokehouse and a fire truck; The PA Game Commission shared knowledge about wild animal safety; West Virginia University’s Bike Safety group shared their expertise on bike safety, including helmet use; the Greene County Drug and Alcohol Program showed the children how drugs and alcohol can impair behavior and impact lives; the American Cancer Society brought awareness of sun exposure and skin cancer; the Greene County Sherriff ’s Office and PennDOT shared information about highway safety; and Allegheny General Hospital’s Life Flight helicopter made an appearance at lunch time.  The 300 children attending received a T-shirt to commemorate the day and valuable information to take home. T-shirts were provided by the Progressive Agriculture Safety Foundation. Through generous donations from Consol Energy, Chevron, Walmart, Greene County Farm Bureau, Greene County Memorial Hospital Foundation, and Tentmakers, all children received a smoke detector to use at home and an ultraviolet sun sensitive bracelet. In addition, two children from each classroom will be chosen through a drawing to receive a new bike helmet. Penn State Extension and the Greene County 4-H Program would like to thank all that were involved in making the 2014 Progressive AG Safety Day a success, saying, “We couldn’t have done it without you. Together, we can protect our children.”

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GreeneScene of the Past used may (Author’s Note: The newspaper reproduction in this article first appeared in print in 1904. Although deemed acceptable at the time, some terminology terms, these “fix” or redact to not chosen have we however, document, the of nature historical the preserve To be considered inappropriate by modern readers. and would like to assure readers that it is not our intention to cause discomfort or offense.)

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ast month’s GreeneScene of the Past featured Silas Ogden, who was known as somewhat of a “fixture” in and around Waynesburg in the early half of the 20th century. The piece told of how he came to be in this area by way of the Underground Railroad when he was quite young, how he lost his sight due to an accident incurred while splitting rails with a maul, and how he came to be an accomplished street musician and baseball fan, known for being able to effortlessly navigate the area despite his blindness. As always, we invited readers who had any other interesting facts about Silas’ life to contact us. This month, we were fortunate to receive a fascinating, heartbreaking story in which Silas was a central figure, though not the most important player in the drama. We were sent a message from Jeanie Herrod of Carmichaels, which said, in part, “I read your recent story about Silas Ogden with great interest. His name and another story from his interesting life have been a part of my family history since 1904. I grew up listening to the story about how ‘Uncle Willie died in the well.’ He died saving Silas Ogden’s life…” Jeanie provided remarkably well-preserved newspaper clippings that relate how her great-uncle, William Sams, descended into a well filled with poisonous gases in an attempt to save Silas, who lay unconscious at the bottom, and lost his own life in the process. “My mother was Betty Sams Herrod Jones,” Jeanie says, connecting the dots of her genealogy; “her father was Corbly Pierce Sams, and the man who saved Silas Ogden from certain death at the bottom of the well was my mother’s uncle, William ‘Willie’ Sams. The story made quite an impact on Jeanie’s mother, Betty; Jeanie wrote, “My mom was so proud of the uncle she had never met, that she told this story repeatedly. Willie was a hero. The man he saved, Silas Ogden, eventually went blind, but lived to an old age. Mom even got to meet him when she returned to Waynesburg as a teenager.” It was during this trip, in the late 1940s, that Betty took a haunting picture of Silas Ogden that had to have been taken not long before his death in 1950, at the age of 88. Willie Sams was 23 years old at the time of his tragic death on August 16th, 1904, but his story has outlived him by over a hundred years, thanks to his descendants. We appreciate the opportunity to share it with our readers, with many thanks to Jeanie Herrod for her diligence in preserving this piece of Greene County history.

Silas Ogden

Wi l

s m a S . W l i am

If you have an interesting old photo from the area you’d like to share, just send it to: GreeneScene of the Past, 185 Wade Street, Waynesburg, PA 15370. Or email to: info@greenesaver.com with GreeneScene Past in subject line. The GreeneSaver can even scan your original in just a few minutes if you bring it to our office. We are particularly interested in photos of people and places in the Greene County area taken between 1950 and 1980, though we welcome previous dates, too.

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Ready to Dive In..? Greene County’s public pools are hiring qualified lifeguards during the busy summer swimming season. Candidates must be at least 16 years of age and possess current lifeguard certification, or be able to pass courses in professional lifeguarding, first-aid and CPR/AED training. Lifeguards hired for the summer will need to attend a mandatory training session, which will be scheduled prior to the start of the swim season during the Memorial Day holiday weekend. A lifeguard certification course and a water safety instructor course will be offered. For more information, call the Department of Recreation at 724-852-5323 or the Human Resources office at 724-852-5200, or visit www.co.greene.pa.us to apply online.

Need Money to Do Good in Greene? It’s that special time of year; the air is warmer, the birds are singing, the trees are blooming… and the Community Foundation of Greene County (CFGC) announces they are accepting applications for the summer discretionary grant round! Applications will be accepted until June 16 for the first round of grants. The Foundation expects to award three to five grants between $500 and $5,000 per grant. The average grant size is $2,000. Successful grant awards will be announced in late July for projects that will begin after August 1, 2014. Eligible applicants include nonprofit, charitable, tax-exempt organizations, as well as educational institutions or schools, religious organizations, and government organizations, whose purposes and programs benefit Greene County residents. CFGC seeks to fund organizations and ideas that will have a significant and lasting impact on Greene County, its residents, infrastructure and future. Past projects that have made use of these grants include the community garden at Flenniken Public Library, and equipment to make the “Movie and Lecture Series” at the Greene County Historical society possible, according to CFGC Executive Director, Bettie Stammerjohn. Grant guidelines, application procedures and application form are available on the Foundation website at www.cfgcpa.org. Applications may be received by postal mail, hand-delivery, e-mail, or fax. Please note that e-mail or fax submissions must also mail a copy of the application form with original signature within 48 hours of the deadline. For additional information, contact the Foundation office at 724-627-2010, or e-mail cfgcpa@ gmail.com.

Gentlemen (and Ladies!), Start Your Engines!

Memory Good to Fair..? Attention, readers! Believe it or not, “that time of year” isn’t as far away as you might think! Fair Season will be upon us before you can blink twice, and we’d love to hear some stories or see pictures of favorite memories from a local fair! Did you show a prize cow? Win a ribbon for your rhubarb jam? Realize too late that eating 10 hot dogs before going on the Tilt-A-Whirl probably wasn’t your best idea ever? Let us know so we can share your story in the upcoming Fair Guide edition of the GreeneSaver!

How Does Your Garden Grow? Another “that time of year” is on the way, too! All of you gardeners out there, we want to see what you’ve got! From now through harvest, please send us pictures and stories of the biggest, bestest, most record-breakingest veggies and flowers that your garden produces, so we can let the whole area know that your thumbs are the greenest in the land…

How to Avoid Endless Love… The Greene County Department of Recreation will offer an all-ages week-long tennis camp at the county’s tennis courts at 900 Rolling Meadows Road in Waynesburg. The tennis camp will run from Monday, June 16, through Friday, June 20. Instruction sessions are 8:30 to 9:45 a.m. for children ages 7 to 10, and 10 to 11:30 a.m. for age 11 and older. The camp costs $45 and includes a T-shirt. The deadline to register for the camp is Tuesday, June 10. Tennis skills such as serving, forehand, backhand and volleying will be taught throughout the week, and campers will also learn how to play in singles and doubles competition. Camp instructors will be Ron Headlee, Jessica Bazzoli and John Buchanan, all certified United States Tennis Association instructors. All three have played tennis competitively for years and have often worked with young children. Buchanan is currently in charge of the Greene County tennis league. The tennis camp is sponsored by the Greene County Commissioners and the Department of Recreation. For more information, or to register for the tennis camp, call 724-852-5323, or Headlee at 724-984-2953.

Wine Not Enjoy a Lovely Glass?

The Board of Trustees and Friends of the Fredericktown Area Public Library are planning the 2nd Annual “Sip of Summer,” an outdoor wine tasting event, to be held Friday evening, June 20th at the Waleski Horse Farm in Richeyville, Pa. The event will be held from 7-10 p.m. and is an over 21 only event. Seven wineries from Greene, WashingFlashlight Drags have returned to the Greene County Airport in Waynesburg. Remaining events ton, Fayette, Westmoreland and are Sundays, June 1, July 6 and Aug. 3; and Saturday, Sept. 13. Clearfield Counties will showcase Gates open at 11am, with races scheduled 2-6 pm. Admission is $6 to watch and $30 to race. their samples: Bee Kind Winery, Children under 12 are admitted free. Street-legal cars and trucks are eligible to race; you can get all the Christian W. Klay Winery, Greendetails and rules online at www.flashlightdrags.com. house Winery, J & D Cellars Winery & Vineyard, Ripepi Winery & Vineyard, Shields Demesne Winery, New for 2014 is an “Outlaw Hour” from 6 to 7 pm, in lieu of the “Big Dog” class. The entry fee is and Thistlethwaite Winery & Vineyard. $25, and one winner after each event will receive a portion of the entry purse. Drivers will earn points Tickets are $25, which includes a free wine glass, four food stations featuring fresh fruit, fresh all season, and the top drivers at the end of the season will share the remaining portion of the purse. All vegetables, a cheese fountain and a chocolate fountain catered by Trisha’s Treats Café in Fredericktown, drivers must attend a mandatory meeting at 5 pm prior to the start of each Outlaw Hour. coffee and water, live entertainment with Bob Podish on guitar, vendors with food and unique gift Produced by Altered Gas Performance Events, LLC, Flashlight Drags is a 1/8-mile course along items for sale, a basket raffle, and door prizes. Tours of the Waleski residence (the historic Welsh-Emery the airport runway. Drivers can race as many times as they want and against any of the other racers, house) will be offered on a limited basis for a small fee. all for fun. The format is heads-up, meaning that both vehicles leave the starting line at the same time. Tickets must be purchased in advance. They are available now at the library, Zebley Law office in The name of the event refers back to the early days of drag racing, when a flashlight was used to signal Centerville , from any Library Board Member or Library Friend or thru PayPal at www.washlibs.org/ the start. fredericktown. For more information, call the Department of Recreation at 724-852-5323, or All proceeds directly benefit the library. visit www.flashlightdrags.com for updates, and videos of past races.

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his month’s Cool@School demonstrates that good news isn’t just reserved for our “Good News” section! The GreeneSaver congratulates Central Greene School District’s Junior League Quiz Bowl teams for a successful 2013-2014 season and tournament. Quiz Bowl is a Jeopardy-style question and answer competition in which students are asked questions to show their knowledge in the categories of Literature, Science, Mathematics, Arts, Music, Religion, Mythology, Philosophy, History, Geography, General Knowledge, Current Events, Pop Culture, and Sports. Students benefit by being exposed to a broad range of academic subjects, increasing memorization and study skills, developing critical and strategic thinking skills, learning teamwork and fair play, experiencing leadership and expanding capacity for responsibility. The Varsity team, made up of 7th and 8th graders Will Behm, Myles Cramer, Cade Rush, Cole Leathers, Matt Hawk and Emily McCarty were undefeated in the regular season for a 1st place finish. They walked away from the double elimination tournament held in lateApril with a first place finish as well. The Varsity team Margaret Bell Miller Middle School Varsity Team members attend Margaret Bell Miller Middle School. The Junior Varsity team, consisting of 5th and 6th members display their 1st place plaque. grade students from Waynesburg Central Elementary Row 1: Coach Alice Matis Row 2: Cade Rush, Emily McCarty and Margaret Bell Miller Middle School, finished the Row 3: Matt Hawk, Myles Cramer, Will Behm regular season in third place. After a hard fought battle at the double elimination tournament, Junior Varsity team members Ray Behm, Mary Larkin , Luca Augustine, Rainey Block, Meghan Braun, Hayden Church, Jonah Higley, and Olivia Sanvicente took it down to the wire with a 7th round loss to finish in second place.   The Quiz Bowl Academic competitions are sponsored by the Tri-County Academic League. Teams from Central Greene compete against their counterparts from Albert Gallatin, Jefferson-MorJunior Varsity Team members from Margaret Bell Miller gan, Uniontown, Laurel Highlands, Brownsville, Carmichaels, West Greene, Avella and Southeastern Middle School and Waynesburg Central Elementary School: Greene (Mapletown) school districts. Row 1: Hayden Church, Meghan Braun, Luca Augustine, The GreeneSaver gladly echoes the sentiments of Central Greene School District, which said in Olivia Sanvicente a recent press release, “Central Greene is proud of our students for the outstanding effort they consis- Row 2: Coach Mark Willis, Mary Larkin, Jonah Higley, Ray Behm, Rainey Block, Coach Alice Matis tently put forth to accomplish such amazing tasks.”

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T he Potters, t he Clay, and t he Memories By Regis Whet zel

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n the last edition of the GreeneSaver, readers may recall, we initially set out to explore the history of the famous “Greensboro pottery,” and became completely—and enjoyably—sidetracked by the story of the beautiful, custom-made number plaques that adorn the houses in town. This time, we shall strive to maintain our focus! The story of pottery making in Greensboro begins with the story of Greensboro, itself, and that story begins before there even was a “United States of America,” officially. Settled originally by the Native American Mingo tribe, of the Northern Iroquois, Greensboro was originally known as “Delight,” because of the ideal farming conditions along the Monongahela River which ran alongside the town. As early as the mid-1700s, settlers from the south and east started staking claims in Delight; in the early 1780s, Elias Stone purchased the entire town, dividing it into blocks of streets, many of which still carry their original names. In February of 1790, the town’s name was changed from “Delight” to “Greensburgh” (and was later changed to “Greensboro”), in honor of Nathanael Greene, the Revolutionary War hero for whom Greene County (and many other towns and landmarks across the United States) was named. A perfect “river town” in the age when river traffic was king, Greensboro soon established itself as an important center of trade. A familiar name to residents of Southwestern Pennsylvania, Albert Gallatin, purchased lots in Greensboro with his business partners in the 1790s, as well as plots of farmland to develop across the river in another location that also became well known for its pottery—New Geneva, in Fayette County. It was Gallatin who was responsible for bringing the first glass crafters to the area, persuading a group of German glass blowers to establish themselves in Greensboro, rather than in Kentucky, as they’d originally planned. When Gallatin sold his interest in the glass making company to one of the craftsmen, they moved their production to the northern part of the town, known to this day as “Glassworks.” In the decades preceding the Civil War, glassmaking was a serious industrial endeavor for many towns along the river; once the war was over, however, the focus shifted for Greensboro to the making of earthenware, and, by the middle of the 19th century, Greensboro stoneware potteries easily ranked among the most productive in the eastern United States. The manufacture and sale of stoneware was, in fact, the leading industry in the town. Certain potters stood out, and are prized by collectors; Vance, Hamilton and Jones, Reppert, and Boughner are some of the most well-known. The combined output of the potteries was staggering, as the demand increased. Popularity of Greensboro-born works (as well as those from across the river in New Geneva) spread as companies built special platform boats called “river arks,” onto which they would load the fruits of their craft, and the boats, manned by a crew of two or three, would transport the pottery nearly as far as the rivers would carry them, west through Ohio, and as far south as New Orleans. One of the keys to the success of the pottery in its day, and one of the reasons why it is so prized among collectors now, is the unique appearance and texture of the pieces. There were two primary factors at work in creating the “look” of Greensboro pottery. The first is the process of “salt glazing,” where everyday table salt was thrown into the kiln while the pottery was being fired. Doing this caused chemicals in the salt to react with chemicals in the clay, creating the characteristic “orange peel” coating of glass on the surface of the finished piece. The other was the use of a substance called “cobalt oxide” to paint or stencil designs on the pre-fired pottery. When it emerged from the kiln, the cobalt oxide designs appeared as the brilliant blue color that is so well known to devotees of the works. A gradual but steady westward migration of craftspeople took an unrecoverable toll on the art of Greensboro pottery; where once there had been more than 30 working potteries in the area, by 1890 there were only three remaining. By the start of World War I, there were no functioning pottery plants in Greensboro, bringing an era of uniquely artistic prosperity to an unceremonious end. Far from being reduced to a paragraph in a chapter of a history book, though, these beautiful works remain quite alive in the hearts of those who love them. Antique pieces of Greensboro pottery may often be cherished family heirlooms, and a quick glance at any online auction site reveals that there is a devoted following that extends far beyond the borders of the community that gave them birth, as thousands of dollars may change hands for even one simple jug in good condition. And so it is: the “era” of pottery in and around Greensboro ended a century ago, it is true. But, for an artist, there is no greater hope than that the art will live on and be embraced, though the artist may have long since left the world. The artisans This giant, “partially buried” replica of a piece of Greensboro pottery was created who created Greensboro pottery, if they are aware from some higher dimension, must be looking in 2012 by artist Jami S. Rinehart, and is on display in front of the log cabin in down and smiling. downtown Greensboro.

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Serious Business... O

By Regis Whetzel

n a cold, gray, rain-spattered morning, a team of firefighters works urgently to rescue a young child trapped in the twisted remains of what was once an automobile. The child’s mother, who was also trapped, has recently been freed, and is receiving medical attention. Commands are shouted into walkie-talkies; responders move as quickly as possible while being loaded down with the weight of smokestained firefighting coats and pants, helmets and equipment. The eye cannot move without seeing swirling red lights mounted atop burly fire trucks and rescue vehicles, with ambulances standing ready to transport the injured, once extricated. Several yards away, another vehicle—perhaps a pickup truck, though, honestly, it’s difficult to be sure, reduced as it is to an upside-down heap of scrap metal—lies silent. A figure is lying on the ground beside the wreckage, covered completely, swaddled in a white sheet billowing in the chill wind. There is no one left to rescue, here. The driver of this vehicle survived, and was uninjured by the crash, yet his life may be transformed forever—he has been arrested and taken away by the police, charged with drunk driving, along with a host of other charges related to the crash. At the first mangled car, firefighters using a “Jaws of Life” tool force unwilling metal to tear and split; medics come near with a long, rigid board to immobilize the accident victim, rescuers crowd around, and on a count of, “One… Two… THREE,” the once-trapped child is placed on the board. The sound of rotors chopping the air comes from the distant right, growing steadily louder and nearer. A Life Flight helicopter lands elegantly in a patch of clearing, safely distant from the wreckage. The crew rushes to load the child into the rear of the craft, which takes to the sky to deliver their important cargo to a team of trauma specialists who will strive to create at least one happy ending to the disaster that this morning has witnessed. Everything that you have just read did actually take place. However, this time—thankfully—no one really got hurt, no one really died. This drama unfolded entirely on the football field at West Greene Middle and Senior High School, with faculty and students filling bleachers to watch a massive exercise that certainly served as a “drill” for the first responders on the scene, but really had an even greater purpose: to educate those watching about the dangers of drunk, distracted, or otherwise-impaired driving. The data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is stunning: every day in America, 28 people die as a result of drunk driving accidents, while someone is injured in a drunk driving crash every 90 seconds. The numbers for “distracted” driving are equally grim: in 2011, at least 23% of all auto collisions involved cell phones; and, if someone’s attention is diverted for just 5 seconds to look at a phone screen while traveling at 55 miles per hour, that person will have traveled the length of an entire football field without looking at the road (www.textinganddrivingsafety.com). The event was staged to coincide with the school’s prom, when there is no more urgent time to make students aware, according to Assistant Principal, Jed Hamberger. “If we can save just one or two kids from having this happen to them in real life,” he states, “then it’s well worth it.”

Center Twp. VFD on the “scene” at West Greene Middle - Senior High School

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“Udderly Moovelous” Day Camp “S

ummertime,” wrote beloved American composer, George Gershwin, “and the livin’ is easy…” That lyric can be extra-true for kids! Who out there can’t remember watching every second of the clock tick by as the school year neared an end, cleaning out desks, putting away books, waiting for that final 3 O’clock bell to announce three months of freedom? And what freedom it was! Free to run around outside, free to go swimming (when there weren’t enormous storm clouds hanging low in the sky, of course), free to hang out with friends, play games, watch cartoons… And then you realized that you’d kind of… done everything, and now what? The Penn State Cooperative Extension office in Greene County, by way of the 4-H County Council and Greene County 4-H Development Fund, has the perfect solution to that bout of summertime boredom that can set in: the “Udderly Moovelous” Day Camp! Open to Greene County youth ages 8 to 12, the camp takes place on Wednesday, June 25, from 8am to 5pm. This year’s event is happening at the Spring House Dairy Farm in Eighty-Four, PA, but transportation to-and-from is no problem: participants are meeting up at the 4-H building at the Greene County Fairgrounds, and will be taken to the farm, then back to the Fairgrounds to meet their rides at 5pm. The day will begin with registration and a chance for day-campers to get acquainted, with fun activities at the fairground before boarding the bus to the farm. Says Extension 4-H Educator, Chris Becker, “This is an awesome experience for young people to meet other young people,” calling it a “Fun day to explore, and a way to introduce kids who have had no experience with 4-H to learn more, together.” Chris is quick to note, however, that participants do not have to be affiliated with 4-H in order to take advantage of the adventures at Spring House; all they need is to be interested, and willing to have a day of fun. Once they arrive, campers will have a full schedule as they take a guided tour of the dairy farm, find out how the cows spend their days at the free-stall barn, learn to hand-milk a cow, bottle feed a calf, and visit the milking parlor. A picnic lunch will be provided at noon, followed by a trip to the processing room to see how milk is pasteurized, homogenized and bottled. Everyone will get a yummy ice cream cone before heading home, and all of this can be enjoyed for only $10, which includes the bus ride, lunch, and a T-shirt, in addition to a day of fun and memories. Unique to the Greene County program, the 4-H Teen Council plans the day camps, which have been ongoing for nearly a decade. The Teen Council is comprised of 4-H members eager to, “gain experience as young leaders,” says Chris, and will be available as camp counselors during the Spring House visit. Registration for the “Udderly Moovelous” Day Camp is due by Wednesday, June 4, and size is limited to 40 campers. The $10 fee can be mailed to the Greene County 4-H headquarters, 26 West High Street, Room 1, Waynesburg, PA 15370-1324. When registering, be sure to provide your camper’s name, gender, birth date, T-shirt size, and any special dietary needs, as well as your name, address, phone number, and any additional emergency contact information that might be needed. Checks should be made payable to “Greene Co 4-H Development Fund.” For more information or answers to questions, the office can be reached at 724-627-3745, or by email at greeneext@psu.edu.

GreeneScene by Chris Becker

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HELP HOMELESS VETERANS T

he Rices Landing American Legion Riders are holding a benefit ride, with proceeds going to help homeless veterans. The ride will take place on Saturday, June 21, leaving from the Jefferson Volunteer Fire Department, and ending at the Rices Landing American Legion. Registration is from 9am-11am, ride begins at 11am. Dinner will be served from noon to 5pm. An auction and 50/50 drawing will be held, with music by Hit and Run. FMI or to donate, call Sandi at 724710-6653, or slhogue1966@hotmail.com.

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of Be Sh st ow !!

11th

Photo Contest

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he GreeneSaver is a proud sponsor, for the 11th consecutive year, of the annual Waynesburg Sheep & Fiber Festival Photo Contest & Exhibit. The 2014 exhibit was on display at the Pennsylvania Welcome Center at Kirby for a few weeks prior to the festival, which was staged at the Greene County Fairgrounds earlier this month. “While the quantity of entries was down a bit this year, the quality of many of the photos entered made for some tough decisions for the judges,” said Mary Briggs, coordinator of the contest & exhibit. Winners in each category receive monetary awards of $20 for 1st, $15 for 2nd, $10 for 3rd, and $5 for 4th place, plus commemorative ribbons. In addition, a Best of Show rosette and People’s Choice rosette were awarded. Following are the winners in each category: Animal: 1st Place to Cathy Butcher for Robin’s Work. Cathy also captured 3rd; 2nd & 4th place went to Ann Newman. Honorable mentions were presented to Andrea Semenoff and Trisha Sanner People: Elizabeth Rice received a clean sweep with 1st – 4th place in the people category. Scenery: 1st Place went to Alan Butcher for Greenbank and he took 2nd place as well. 3rd place went to Elizabeth Rice and 4th to Trisha Sanner Still Life: 1st place and the Judges Bet in Show award went to Cathy Butcher for Echinachea. Cathy also received 2nd place in Still Life, and 3rd & 4th went to Andrea Semenoff. Youth: 1st place was awarded to Deidra Dayak for Winter in PA; and Francis Gilbert received the 2nd – 4th place awards.

Animal - 1st Place

People - 1st Place

Waynesburg resident Cathy Butcher’s 1st place picture in the Still Life category, Echinachea, was also named Best of Show

Peoples choice winner Photo by Cathy Butcher of Waynesburg, PA, titled Robin’s Work

Photo by Elizabeth Rice of Hookstown, PA; titled Brianna

Scenery - 1st Place

Youth - 1st Place

Photo by Alan Butcher of Waynesburg, PA, titled Greenbank

Photo by Deidra Dayak of Washington, PA, titled Winter in PA

MAY / JUNE

2014 • GreeneSaver

Photo by Judy Gillogly of Carmichaels, PA, titled Smiling Barn

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GreeneSaver •

MAY / JUNE

2014

May/June 2014 - GreeneSaver  

The new GreeneSaver is here! This month, learn more about Greensboro pottery, try out a great, unique barbeque recipe in "What's Cooking," r...

May/June 2014 - GreeneSaver  

The new GreeneSaver is here! This month, learn more about Greensboro pottery, try out a great, unique barbeque recipe in "What's Cooking," r...

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