Page 1

MARCH / APRIL

2014 • GreeneSaver

1


EMPTY BOWLS

Fundraiser Luncheon E

Bledsoe Production, LTD W

ith so much emphasis placed on Marcellus shale wells and techniques in recent years, it can be easy to forget that there are thousands of older “shallow” wells that produce oil and natural gas that are still in operation in our region. When these types of wells fall into disrepair, or simply need regular servicing, it can present quite a challenge, according to Brad Bledsoe, owner of Bledsoe Production, Ltd. “Usually the owner of the well doesn’t have the equipment or the manpower to service the well,” he says. For eighteen years, Bledsoe’s family has “specialized in shallow wells servicing,” says Brad, who took over the operation two years ago, transforming it into “Bledsoe Production, Ltd.” As a field servicing company (of which Penergy Corporation is the parent company), Bledsoe and staff can perform any needed repairs, bring wells into compliance with Department of Environmental Protection standards, and can also do “well tending” to make sure that wells operate at peak capacity on an ongoing basis. Let Bledsoe Production’s 100-plus years of combined field experience get your well up to speed!

mpty Bowls Greene County invites you to join your neighbors for a luncheon and fundraiser to help fight hunger, presented by the Waynesburg University Bonner Scholars. The event will take place on Sunday, April 6 from 12 to 3pm, at Building 9 of the Greene County Fairgrounds. Participants will be invited to select from a variety of handcrafted ceramic bowls, made by Waynesburg University students and the local Art Beat, and will also enjoy delicious, hearty soups by Dan Wagner, Greene County Career and Technology Center’s Culinary Arts Instructor, and other local chefs. All of this, and a donation to the Weekend Food Program, is included in the $20 cost. In addition, there will be an opportunity to bid on local artisans’ beautifully handcrafted items during the silent auction, which will also benefit the local Greene County school districts’ Weekend Food Program. Tickets can be purchased at Art Beat, and at the Greene County Community Foundation on High Street. For more information, contact Steven Snow at sno3316@student.waynesburg.edu.

GreeneScene by Jessie Belding

2

GreeneSaver •

MARCH / APRIL

2014


Cowie Named Top 100 in Pennsylvania

C

indy Cowie, CEO of Southwest Regional Medical Center, was recently named to the Pennsylvania Business Central’s Top 100 People of 2013. The list, which has been published since 1991, is compiled by the editorial staff of the Pennsylvania Business Central newspaper from a list of nominated businesspeople.  “We are very pleased with the record number of nominations submitted this year for our annual Top 100 people edition,” said Publisher David Wells.  According to the Pennsylvania Business Center, the nominees include top executives from some of the most successful companies along with business people from all levels who have made a major impact in their community and business to business world throughout the past year.  Recipients are selected based on several factors including the impact they have had on the business community, from job creation and building improvements to fiscal growth or community involvement.  “I am truly honored to be selected among this prestigious group of individuals,” shared Cowie. During Cowie’s tenure, the hospital has enhanced and added many new programs including the Center for Recovery and Wellness behavioral health services, the SRMC Wound Care and Hyperbaric Center, private rooms for patients, an enhanced emergency department and InstaCare Urgent Care.  Technology enhancements include a new CT scanner and digital mammography.    In the course of her career, Cowie has climbed from her humble beginnings as a Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) to the leadership position she holds today as Chief Executive Officer.  She has served in this capacity since 2007.  She holds a Bachelor of Science degree from Waynesburg University where she has also served as a clinical instructor.  She is a past president of Sigma Theta Tau honor society and was the recipient of the sorority’s nursing practice award in 2004.  Cowie is very active in the community and has served as chairperson for both the Greene County MAGIC Diabetes Coalition and Lungs at Work.  She is also a member of RegionalCare Hospital Partner’s Corporate Compliance Committee and is a guest lecturer at Waynesburg University. She and her husband Jim live in Washington and are active members of their church.  They have four grown children and a granddaughter.  They enjoy traveling in their motor home with their dog to see different parts of the country.

Dr. Cathleen A. Lizza, Optometrist T

he convenience of doing business in downtown Waynesburg includes the cozy offices of Dr. Cathleen A. Lizza, Optometrist, at 74 West High Street. For a generation of repeat customers, a visit with Dr. Lizza is time spent with a friend “My practice is very personable and I pay attention to details. I’ve made many good friends over the past 26 years. I have seen many of my children patients grow into parents, and now I’m seeing their children,” Dr. Lizza will tell you with a smile. “Waynesburg is a wonderful town to practice in,” she continues. “I enjoy the L-R: Dr. Cathleen Lizza, Dee Kesner, Tine Ruble atmosphere. The people are friendly and were very helpful to me from day one.” “Day one” was in September of 1987, when Dr. Lizza opened for business and customers began arriving, pleased with being able to include glasses and eye exams as part of their downtown shopping day, sandwiched between classes, scheduled around lunchtimes, on the way home from work… “We’ve always tried to support local businesses and local school districts,” Dr. Lizza said. “I was raised in Fayette County and went to California University of Pennsylvania. I graduated optometry school in Philadelphia in 1983, and opened practices in Waynesburg, Hopwood, and Connellsville. We work with local ophthalmologists in postoperative cataract care, and make all necessary referrals.” The extensive line of eyeglasses and frames includes designer frames, invisible bifocals and transition lenses. Wearers will appreciate the thinner, lighter lenses for higher prescriptions. Contact lenses are instock, and come in daily wear, astigmatism, tinted and bifocals. Exams are available for all age groups, as well as for cataract and diabetic patients. Dr. Lizza accepts most insurance plans.

MARCH / APRIL

2014 • GreeneSaver

3


“I

Roman’s Acupuncture & Herbal Clinic

believe that everything happens for a reason. If I hadn’t been so sick when I was young, my life might not have turned out the way it has.” This pragmatic philosophy from Stacy Roman not only encouraged the creation and development of her successful business—it helped shape her life. From around the age of 12, she experienced near-constant colds and flu-like symptoms, chronic fatigue and a low white blood cell count. Stacy’s “root condition” was unknown, and could not be diagnosed by the legion of doctors she and her parents visited. When the consensus of the medical practitioners fell along the lines of, “We don’t know what’s causing this, and we don’t know how to fix it. Try something else,” though she didn’t realize it at the time, Stacy’s destiny was being formed. Her open-minded parents sought the help of an acupuncturist, and Stacy experienced a nearly-miraculous recovery of all symptoms. The experience made a lasting impact, and ignited a passion for healing that has made Roman’s Acupuncture & Herbal Clinic a major center for “alternative medicine” therapies throughout southwestern Pennsylvania and northern West Virginia, and draws clients from as far away as Maryland and Ohio to take advantage of the unique abilities of Stacy and her staff. Stacy’s fifteen-plus years of experience in health care have earned her a variety of credentials, including being a licensed massage therapist and a licensed acupuncturist. She has received a Health Sciences degree, a Master of Oriental Medicine degree, is certified in Injection Therapy, and is a member of the American Pregnancy Association, specializing in infertility. The word “clinic” often conjures up images of sterile whiteness, harsh fluorescent lights buzzing on the ceiling, uncomfortable chairs, and an overall atmosphere of unpleasantness; Roman’s Acupuncture & Herbal Clinic is as far from this idea as east is from west. Aromas of medicinal herbs and essential oils greet a visitor from the first moment, with soft music playing in the background. The Eastern décor is lovely and soothing, and the entire place exudes an intangible vibration that seems to say, “Welcome; let us take care of you for a while…” And there are many ways this “caretaking” can take place. In use for, literally, millennia, Acupuncture works by helping to regulate the flow of a body’s natural energy by stimulating precise points under the skin with special needles no thicker than a human hair. These needles, which are used only once and then discarded to insure sterility, are so thin that they do not even cut the skin to penetrate it as, for example, a hypodermic needle must do; rather, they spread apart the skin cells to allow the needle to do its work. Effective for treatment of chronic pain, high blood pressure, weight loss, stress, infertility and much more, acupuncture is a safe, effective technique, appropriate for all ages. For those among us who may have reservations about needles, Roman’s has recently begun using an exciting new technology, “Light Photon-Cold Laser” therapy. This device uses a low level laser light to target acupuncture trigger points, similar to regular acupuncture, but with no needles. It can also be used for broad coverage of tissue with infrared or red light photons to reduce pain and stimulate healing, help relieve a host of skin conditions, and much more. Mild Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (MHBOT), also a specialty at Roman’s, is a medical treatment in which a person is exposed to increased atmospheric pressure inside an inflatable chamber. The increase in pressure allows more oxygen to reach the cells in the body, which has many healing and therapeutic benefits. MHBOT accelerates cellular renewal, decreases swelling and inflammation, and increases the body’s ability to fight infections. Used to treat a variety of conditions, the increase in cellular oxygen can be especially beneficial for cancer or stroke patients, and for those diagnosed with autism. In addition to the many methods that help alleviate the chronic ailments noted above, Stacy also offers many custom-designed weight loss programs, using a variety of therapies that can fit any lifestyle or budget. This brief overview is just a small sample of the various treatments available at Roman’s. There are also detoxifying foot baths, which use ionized water to remove toxins and heavy metals from the body through the feet; advanced allergy therapeutics, an infrared sauna, massage therapy, yoga classes, and much more. To learn more about the wide range of activities and treatments available at Roman’s Acupuncture & Herbal Clinic, call 304-322-0093, or visit www.romansacupuncture.com.

4

GreeneSaver •

MARCH / APRIL

2014


Miss Greene County

QUEENS CROWNED

Pictured, from l. to r., are Teen Miss Amanda Frampton, Young Miss Bryn Patton, Commissioner Archie Trader, Recreation Director Jake Blaker, Junior Miss Remmey Lohr, Commissioner Chuck Morris, Petite Miss Bailey Barnyak and Tiny Miss Alexis Hooper.

T

hree local girls were crowned Miss Greene County in their age divisions during the 24th annual Miss Greene County Pageant, held last month, in the auditorium of Waynesburg Central High School in Waynesburg. The three queens crowned were: Petite Miss, Bailey Barnyak, 6, of Carmichaels; Junior Miss, Remmey Lohr, 11, of Carmichaels; and Young Miss, Bryn Patton, 12, of Waynesburg. Each of the three queens received a trophy, crown, sash and bouquet, and a $100 prize. Two 2013 queens – Tiny Miss Alexis Hooper, 4, of Jefferson and Teen Miss Amanda Frampton, 16, of New Freeport – will continue their reign and represent the county as 2014 queens. A total of 11 contestants competed in this year’s pageant, which had the theme, “Somewhere Over the Rainbow.” The contestant age categories were: Tiny Miss, 2 to 4 years; Petite Miss, 5 to 7 years; Junior Miss, 8 to 11 years; Young Miss, 12 to 14 years; and Teen Miss, 15 to 17 years. In the Petite Miss division, Barnyak also won the photogenic, sportswear, talent and formalwear awards. Runner-up was Bailey Smith, 6, of Carmichaels. Veronica Lasko, 7, of Rogersville also participated in the Petite Miss division. In the Junior Miss division, Lohr also won the sportswear, talent and formalwear awards. Runner-up Valentina Bruno, 9, of Waynesburg won the photogenic award. In the Young Miss division, Patton also won the photogenic, sportswear and talent awards. Runner-up Delaney Lohr, 12, of Carmichaels won the formalwear award. Contestant Morgan Voithofer, 14, of Carmichaels won the interview award. Other Young Miss contestants included Rory Black, 12, of Carmichaels; Juliana Fowler, 12, of Waynesburg; and Megan Pecjak, 12, of Waynesburg. Patton also received the Director’s Award for raising the most money in advertising sponsorships among all contestants. She received a trophy and will receive a $300 prize. Judges for the pageant were Melessie Clark, 2013 Miss Steeltown and 2012 National American Miss Pennsylvania Teen; Alyssa Gallagher, 2012 National American Miss Pennsylvania Junior Teen; Annie Rosellini, 2013 Miss Pennsylvania; Cindy Sanders, a director and coordinator of the Paw Paw district fair pageant and former pageant staff for the West Virginia Association of Fairs and Festivals; and Heather Wells, 2013 Miss Ohio. Assisting in the awards ceremonies were Hooper, Frampton and the other 2013 Miss Greene County queens: Petite Miss Annalise Willis of Mather, Junior Miss Joelle Pahanish of Jefferson and Young Miss Alexis Bamberger of Wind Ridge. Also assisting were Erica Bristor; Stephanie Mitchell, 2013 Miss Rain Day; and Marina Pauline Stefano, 2013 Pennsylvania Bituminous Coal Queen. The videographer of this year’s pageant was Josh Norkevicus, a Waynesburg University student double-majoring in electronic media and digital design. Orders are now being taken for anyone wishing to purchase a DVD of the pageant. The 2014 Miss Greene County Pageant was sponsored by CONSOL Energy, Inc., and the Greene County Commissioners, with additional support from Alpha Natural Resources, Community Bank, Greene County Sheriff Brian Tennant, Hoy’s Construction, Rhodes and Hammers Printing and Wal-Mart. The pageant was presented by the Greene County Department of Recreation. All proceeds from the 2014 Miss Greene County Pageant will benefit Department of Recreation programs, such as Day Camp, which provides free activities for county children every summer. For more information, or to order a pageant DVD, call 724-852-5323.

MARCH / APRIL

2014 • GreeneSaver

WIN A FAN

PACK

5


Have You Hugged An Alpaca Today? L

ippencott Alpacas is open for business and welcomes large and small tour groups (Just $3/person!). Interact up close with over 25 alpacas. They will eat out of your hand while you stroke their necks. Come prepared to receive nose kisses! Lippencott Alpacas, owned and operated by Phil & Lena Galing, is the only alpaca breeding farm in Greene County. In business since 2005, it keeps the farming tradition alive on Lena’s family farm. Lena is the fourth generation living on the farm and the Galings proudly own 25 alpacas. Most are for sale at very reasonable prices with package pricing available. Phil & Lena assist interested people in selecting the perfect alpacas for their lifestyle and provide basic herd-handling information for new owners. They love the alpaca lifestyle. Visit Lippencott Alpacas and talk with them about alpaca ownership! And don’t forget to shop the on-site farm store. “Touching is Believing” at the Farm Store! Alpaca is incredibly soft and several times warmer than wool. You’ll find a variety of sweaters, vests, gloves, scarves, socks and yarns. Some they make on site and some come from other fiber artists and vendors. Among the most popular items are alpaca extreme weather socks. Once you try alpaca, you will never go back to wool. If you’re tired of layering for the cold and not being able to move, add one layer of alpaca and get rid of two layers of whatever else you use now. Stop by and see for yourself. The store is open by chance or appointment throughout the year. If you are interested in learning to knit, improving your knitting skills or just looking for a fun group to be with - join the weekly knitting classes at Lippencott Alpacas. Classes meet on Wednesday from 10:00am-Noon for advanced knitters and 6:30-8:30pm for beginners. Cost is just $10.00 to cover the cost of the instructor. Seating is limited, so sign up early for this great opportunity. Mark your calendars for Lippencott Alpacas annual Open House, on Sep. 27-28, 2014, 1-5pm at the farm. Admission is FREE. Learn about alpacas all day and get your hands into alpaca fiber with instructors who knit, crochet and spin and more! Watch a shearing demonstration, participate in a sweater fashion show, and enjoy a lazy hayride. Buy local wine from Thistlethwaite Winery, apple pies from Anne Cherry, or buy unique items from other local vendors. This year, the Lippencott Alpacas Knitting Herd will raffle a lovely alpaca throw made in squares using yarn shades of green and blue. The kids hay sliding area is always popular, too. Call 724.852.4084 to schedule a visit to Lippencott Alpacas today! 265 Meadowbrook Rd, Waynesburg, PA 15370. Visit us online at www.lippencottalpacas.com.

Golden LivingCenter Waynesburg Earns Top Distinction

G

olden LivingCenter –Waynesburg, located in Greene County, recently announced that it has earned a “deficiency-free” survey from the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and Pennsylvania Department of Health. According to the latest CMS Nursing Home Data Compendium report and compiled statistics, 9.2 percent of 15,671 nursing homes participating in the Medicare and Medicaid programs received a deficiency-free report, accounting for 1,441 nursing homes. “This survey represents a significant accomplishment for our LivingCenter while we continue to work diligently to meet the level of regulatory compliance set out by CMS,” said Jackie Hainer-Weaver, Executive Director. Hainer-Weaver adds, “I’d like to thank our clinical and support staff for all they do to make our LivingCenter a skilled nursing facility that is one of a select few in the country that have received a deficiency-free survey.” “The results of the survey measure and demonstrate how our LivingCenter team has come together to meet the more than 400 requirements set forth by CMS,” said James Palmer, Area Vice-President. “We work together to provide quality care to each and every patient and encourage families to visit our LivingCenter when considering a place for their loved one as there is no substitute for personal experience.” CMS contracts with state health departments to survey skilled nursing facilities between every 12 to 15 months to ensure these healthcare providers are meeting stringent state and federal regulation and clinical standards. The surveys are conducted unannounced any time of day to get a glimpse at the everyday operation of the skilled nursing facility. The survey team completes a comprehensive review of quality and safety including the care of residents, the interaction between residents and staff, and the nursing home environment. Golden LivingCenter –Waynesburg provides quality healthcare for up to 44 Alzheimer’s patients and 64 residents including those needing skilled nursing and rehabilitative care. In a recent press release, Golden LivingCenter –Waynesburg states that it “…is proud to be part of the Waynesburg healthcare community.” For more information about Golden LivingCenter –Waynesburg, call 724-852-2020 or visit www. goldenlivingcenters.com.

6

GreeneSaver •

MARCH / APRIL

2014


Waynesburg Milling Company “O

ur customers are like family, many dealing with us for generations,” says Jeanette Lindsay, who, with husband Don Lindsay, owns and operates Waynesburg Milling Company on S. Washington Street. “Our customers have taught us how to adapt and change. We stock what they need and want. And because of that, we continue to grow and expand.” A significant recent expansion includes the addition of the full line of Purina feeds. Purina has been around since 1894; not quite as long as Waynesburg Milling, but long enough to become perhaps the most well-known name in animal nutrition in the country. Purina is actually owned by Land O’ Lakes, a co-op owned and operated by American farmers. That means a lot to its loyal customers. “We now stock the most popular Purina livestock and pet feeds and we are a Full Line Purina Dealer,” says Don, “That means from elephant feed to horse feed we can get it for you. You want to feed a moose or a zebra? Purina can do that, which means we can do that for you as well,” he adds with a laugh. Though there may not be much demand for zebra food around here, Waynesburg Milling actually has become the region’s best source for exotic feeds and for specialty pet foods and supplies. “In response to customer requests, we expanded our selection to include all natural pet foods,” Jeanette notes, “We have many organic and grain-free options, and they are at lower prices than what you’ll pay elsewhere.” Sometimes, demand keeps the traditions alive, which is why you will always find Waynesburg Milling Company’s very own trademarked Wayco Brand livestock feeds as well – unquestionably the best-known brand in this region since 1945. You’ll never have to worry about that. Another tradition that will have folks flocking to Waynesburg Milling this time of year is seeds, as it is the only remaining source in Greene County where you can buy bulk garden seeds, in addition to packets. So whether you want to buy by the ounce,

the pound or the pod – you can still get your garden seeds any way you like at Waynesburg Milling. Customer demand has definitely been responsible for the ever-expanding selection of original Muck Boots at Waynesburg Milling. Customers come from several counties and two states to find their Muck boots at Waynesburg Milling. “Now we have the Muck Boot Metatarsal also,” Don says. In response to demand from pipe liners and coal miners, the Metatarsal Muck Boots now available at Waynesburg Milling are designed to meet many of the safety requirements for underground work. In addition to the great selection of Original Muck Boots and shoes, Waynesburg Milling has a nice little area of western themed apparel and accessories, and it remains a great source for everything equine including tack and veterinary supplies. Many people come just to shop for gifts and home décor for the country and western look. Another area that continues to expand at Waynesburg Milling is toys! Games and trucks and animals and really neat stuff that you don’t find in common stores today. The pet supply continues to be a very significant part of the business. Dogs, cats, aquatics, ferrets, hamsters, snakes...it’s a long list, and Waynesburg Milling carries the supplies, equipment and feeds for all of them! This historic and ever-evolving Greene County business has become a preferred shopping center for town and country folk alike, and even a tourist destination for out-of-towners. Don, Jeanette and their staff speak with pride about their philosophy. “We just listen to the customers. They know what works and doesn’t work, they know what they want…whether it’s the way Grandpa always did it, or something new and advanced they just read about, they can find both here…that’s how we’ve grown.” Treat yourself to an adventure - because that’s what it is – and visit Waynesburg Milling Company on S. Washington Street.

Staffers Bryan Haines and Mike Teegarden pose with a pair of Metatarsal Muck Boots in front of new Purina product in the warehouse at Waynesburg Milling.

MARCH / APRIL

2014 • GreeneSaver

7


Servant Song Ministries

S

Retreat House & Spirituality Center

ervant Song Ministries Retreat House and Spirituality Center, 720 East Greene Street, Waynesburg, is a unique nonprofit Ecumenical organization, not owned by any individual, denomination, or religious community. Our leadership, staff, and ministry team members come from major Christian denominations. Together we celebrate our unity under the Lordship of Jesus Christ. This group is an allvolunteer team! Formed in February 2005, Servant Song is a Pennsylvania nonprofit organization and an IRS 501(c)(3) charitable organization. Donations are tax-deductible to the full limit of the law. Servant Song offers a variety of programs, retreats, and workshops to nourish one’s body, mind and spirit, most are offered without charge! Donations are always welcome. Additionally, individual privatedirected retreats, and private/group retreats may be scheduled anytime. Spiritual direction is available by appointment. Servant Song extends an open invitation to all Greene County clergy to come for personal spiritual respite without charge. According to co-founder Donna Koller, “In this place, God touches, heals, frees, renews, refreshes, and restores His children—one-by-one! All for the Glory of God!”

8

GreeneSaver •

MARCH / APRIL

2014


Greene Bridge to Be Named for Local Soldier S

tate Rep. Pam Snyder, D-Fayette/Greene/Washington, said the state House of Representatives unanimously passed her bill to name a bridge in Greene County to honor the distinguished 36year Army career of Lt. Col. Cephus Lee Roupe. “Colonel Roupe’s legacy of service and devotion inspired me to introduce House Bill 1972,” Snyder said. “His achievements deserve to be recognized and remembered.” House Bill 1972 would designate the bridge on State Route 18 over Fish Creek in Freeport Township as the Lieutenant Colonel Cephus Lee Roupe Memorial Bridge. Snyder said Roupe, a native of Waynesburg, passed away two years ago after proudly and courageously serving his country in the U.S. Army for 36 years. His untimely death at age 54 came soon after he submitted his retirement papers to the Army. “We lost a good, selfless patriot and soldier two years ago in Colonel Roupe,” Snyder said. “However, his sacrifices and service live on, and countless generations deserve to be reminded of what he did for each and every one of us in service to our nation.” Snyder said Roupe began his Army career as an enlisted man and worked his way to the top. After receiving his aviation wings, Roupe received a direct commission to the Medical Service Corps and became qualified to operate numerous military aircraft. “Colonel Roupe, a Master Army Aviator, was considered perhaps the most experienced Medical Service Corps aviator in the Army,” Snyder said. “Because of his expertise, Colonel Roupe served expertly and proudly, wherever danger lurked.” During his 36 years in the Army, Roupe saw combat duty in both the first and second Iraq wars. He also flew multiple missions in war-torn Bosnia and Afghanistan. “It would be easy to say that Colonel Roupe’s story is a sad one because of his untimely passing,” Snyder said. ”However, that wouldn’t do justice to the man or the spirit of devotion and service that he so exemplified.” House Bill 1972 goes to the state Senate for consideration.

Rt.88 Auto Sales I

n a world where nothing is more constant than change, “staying power” can be a challenge to find. In business for 30 years, Rt. 88 Auto Sales has proven itself as a lasting presence in the community, offering quality used automobiles, and specializing in auto body and collision repair. Building his excellent reputation over three decades, owner David Ross is proud of what Rt. 88 Auto Sales has grown into, saying, “We’re so well known for doing quality work, we don’t usually need to advertise!” A huge part of that quality is the individual, personalized attention that every customer receives. David and his small staff of dedicated professionals take the time to build lasting relationships in sales and service. When it comes to damage or collision repair, David knows how stressful it can be for car owners when a sudden accident takes their cars out of commission, and is eager to make sure that they get back on the road as soon as possible, with expert repairs and friendly help. Experience the difference—call Rt. 88 Auto Sales!

Meet Thistlethwaite Vinyards! J

amie Thistlethwaite is the wine maker, and also the 5th generation to farm the property, but the 1st to plant grapes and produce Pennsylvania table wine. We grow our own weather hardy French hybrid grapes in our five acre vineyard. The family lives on the farm, and can closely monitor and fertilize the fruit the safest way possible. After all—you must grow good grapes to make good wine! We are excited to be able to perform all aspects of wine making and bottling on-site. We have recently purchased new equipment to perform the wine making process, “from vine to wine”, and are also in the process of updating all of our labels, for a whole new look. Thistlethwaite Vineyards tasting room staff is always friendly and knowledgeable, and can find the perfect wine for everyone’s taste. Tell us what you like—dry, sweet, red or white. Tastings are always complimentary, so you can take your time to find your favorite. You can also hold your next special event at the vineyard! We offer packages for any occasion or size, and business meetings are welcome (the winery is even equipped with wi-fi for your convenience!). We also offer private wine tasting for groups, and, with spring and summer approaching, you are always welcome to stop out with your picnic basket. The outdoor wine bar/tasting pavilion is available, or just take a walk on the scenic 200 acre farm. The vineyard is the perfect backdrop for your photo opportunities. You can visit our website, www.thistlegrape.com, or “like” us on Facebook, to learn about special upcoming events, like “Girls Night Out,” and the “Red, White, and Blues Festival, and the always-sold-out Murder Mystery Dinner Theaters from our friends at “Musical Mysteries and More.” Thistlethwaite Vineyards is proud to be Greene County’s first winery, and we’re looking forward to your visit!

MARCH / APRIL

2014 • GreeneSaver

9


T

“HE’S ALIVE 2014”

he musical Easter Passion Play, “He’s Alive!” is back, returning to the Capitol Theater in Wheeling, April 4th through 6th. This inspiring musical celebrates the life, death and resurrection of Jesus

Christ. The 200-plus member cast and crew invite you to come and celebrate this Easter season with them.  Nearly half of this talented group hails from Greene County, Pennsylvania with the remainder representing the tri-state area. Heaven Bound Ministries, the organizing group, was founded in 1999 in Wheeling, WV after an entertaining performance at a mother-daughter banquet by a trio of ladies, Brenda Hetzel, Jeannie Pierce Waychoff and Doris Estep.  Over the years, Heaven Bound has expanded from a trio of singers to this amazing group of vocalists, actors, musicians and crew.  They are also responsible for entertaining Greene County over the last few years with their July 4th concerts at the Greene County Fairgrounds and a special 9/11 tribute concert.  Bus transportation from Waynesburg will be available on Saturday, April 5th.  The bus will leave from the parking lot to the right of Big Lots in Waynesburg at 5:00p.m. for the 7:30 performance.  The cost is $15.00 per person.  Reservations must be made by Monday, March 24th by calling 724-499-5755. Make plans now to watch the scriptures come to life on stage on Friday April 4th and Saturday, April 5th at 7:30pm and Sunday, April 6th at 3:30pm.  Admission is free and seating is on a first come basis.  Doors will open one hour before each performance.  For more information call 304-233-4470 or 724-883-2241. 

Pike Days at Waleski Horse Farm G

reat music and great food certainly go well together, especially in a setting like Waleski Horse Farm in Richeyville during National Pike Days. Barbecued ribs & chicken, roasted corn on the cob, funnel cakes and more…yum. And all that while you enjoy the beautiful scenery, fun, games and fabulous music. The Waleskis do not charge admission to the event, they welcome everyone to their beautiful farm to enjoy live bands on stage and jam sessions all over the grounds throughout the 3-day event, always the 3rd weekend of May. Be prepared to shop; you’ll also find craft vendors all weekend, but you need to get there early on Friday for the flea market and yard sales…it’s tradition. There’s plenty for kids to do - including a jumpy house - and the famous covered wagon train that travels the Pike every year always makes a stop at Waleski’s Horse Farm. If you’re interested in playing music or setting up as a vendor this year, give Bunny a call now at 724-632-3812. Everyone should plan to come enjoy the area’s best pickers, pluckers and strummers, plus great food and fun May 16, 17 & 18 at Waleski Horse Farm (across from CVS) in Richeyville, PA.

Washington Greene County Job Training Agency

GreeneScene

T

he Washington Greene County Job Training Agency (WGCJTA) would like to remind county residents receiving public assistance of the services the agency provides for those looking for work. Established in 1975 to serve economically disadvantaged individuals in Greene and Washington counties, WGCJTA offers the Employment, Advancement, and Retention Network (EARN) program. “The EARN program provides case management, education and training, work activities, job readiness, and drivers education,” Corporate Manager, Terri Taylor said. “A new tool the program is using this year to help job seekers enhance their interviewing skills is called ‘Interview Stream’. Interview Stream is a web-based program that provides virtual interviews that are recorded using a web cam. The job seeker can review the interview answers after the interview and learn from mistakes. This tool makes practicing for interviews more realistic and practical.” The EARN program has been very successful at connecting program participants to employment. Currently, the placement rate is 88% and the job retention rate is 81%. For more information on the EARN program and others offered by the WGCJTA, call 724-6275007 ext. 241, visit www.washingtongreene.org, or stop by the office, located at 4 West High Street, within the Pennsylvania CareerLink office. The office is open Monday through Friday.

10

GreeneSaver •

MARCH / APRIL

2014


S

Specialty Herbal Products

pecialty Herbal Products, which began in the home of owner Brian King, a registered, practicing pharmacist, is in its 21st year of business. Specialty Herbal Products is Greene County’s only health food store and carries a large assortment of vitamins, herbs, organic foods, weight loss, gluten-free, and other specialty and natural products. They also sell locally grown/made products: honey, eggs, candles and soaps, and offer discount cards, an everyday 20% NOW products discount, and a weekly senior discount day (Wednesday). (l-r) Bobbi, Brian, Tamara and Roberta As always, “Quality” is the hallmark of Specialty Herbal, and everything they do centers around it. Quality products begin with quality raw ingredients and a robust quality control protocol at every phase of the manufacturing process, including sophisticated testing procedures and certificates of analysis. Brian reiterates that “people who fail at seeing results with natural medicines do so usually because of one of two reasons: they do not take an adequate dosage of the product for a long enough time; or they use a poor quality product. The result is the same: you never get enough of the active ingredients into your system. Too much of what is sold from chains, internet, and big box stores is commodity grade. Quality usually costs more, but we have some good companies that market their products at reasonably low prices and, with our in-store discounts, we can provide fairly low priced supplements that people can trust.” New items at the store are: Yacon syrup, white mulberry extract, acacia fiber, ubiquinol (the better absorbed form of CoQ10), and various coconut oil products. They added new body detoxifying formulas to their cleansing line, and don’t forget about Specialty Herbal’s extensive tea selection, including green, white, red, and black teas; herbals, such as: bilberry, ginkgo, hibiscus, and red clover; and digestive help teas, such as: chamomile, fennel, ginger, and peppermint. Specialty Herbal Products’ commitment to quality extends not only to the items it carries, but also to the experienced, caring, well-trained staff of Tamara Cerra, Bobbi Cressey, and Roberta King. Their products and dedicated employees are their “Specialty.”

GreeneScene by Jessica Carroll MARCH / APRIL

2014 • GreeneSaver

11


I

The Perfect Arrangement Floral and Gifts

f you think it’s only there for special occasions, The Perfect Arrangement, 694 High Street in Waynesburg, invites you to stop in and discover one of Greene County’s most exciting and – well - FUN stores! Remember the name is The Perfect Arrangement Floral and Gift. It’s true – this florist makes special occasions really stand out, and the gift shop can make any day a special occasion! With a large showroom brimming with gifts and décor for inside and out, it’s a place you need to visit. The shop has been an area favorite for the past nine years, and floral designer, Gwen Wendell, has been with them since the very beginning. Called a “miracle worker” by The Perfect Arrangement owner, Pam Blaker, Gwen’s ability to create beautiful arrangements from a seemingly endless array of materials has earned her a far-reaching reputation. “There are people that call us from all over, because they specifically want Gwen to take care of their arrangements. They know what she is able to do,” adds Pam. Gwen is in good company, too, with new manager Janet Hopkins, a long-time colleague, and skilled designer as well. Janet, who has worked at Perfect Arrangement for some time, is excited to take on the leadership role. “It’s a very special shop – with a much larger selection of gifts and décor than most florists. Because we stock such a nice selection of gifts, as well as live plants, silks, and of course the best fresh flowers, we are able to produce very custom arrangements that deliver the emotion and message you want to send,” Janet says. As winter is on the way out, the shop is filling up with wonderful indoor and outdoor garden décor, too. From garden benches to bird houses and fountains, a stop at this store is the perfect cure for your spring fever. Even more remarkable is the way that The Perfect Arrangement staff can transform personal objects into integral parts of an arrangement or special display. Old lanterns, baskets, even distressed, re-purposed kitchen chairs can have new life breathed into them, creating truly custom pieces that reflect an individual’s sense of style. Whether you have your own items that you would like to have woven into a design, or you are looking for that perfect piece, that’s the beauty of The Perfect Arrangement’s wonderful showroom filled with unique décor and special items. “People often bring in pictures, or fabric swatches so we can customize something just right for their needs,” Gwen says. Another wonderful advantage of The Perfect Arrangement is the corner of the showroom dedicated to sympathy and funerals. So many meaningful ideas that are unique and special ways to share your love during difficult times. The carved stones, wind chimes, lanterns, garden benches, decorative throws…these are just a few of the many choices you’ll find to express your sympathy in a beautiful and lasting way. And the fresh floral arrangements created by this skilled staff make a touching and appropriate tribute. The Perfect Arrangement offers daily delivery to all of Greene County. And remember, it doesn’t have to be a holiday or special occasion to send flowers. You can bring a smile to someone’s face today. It just takes one call. The Perfect Arrangement does it all. 724-627-3191. Or better yet, treat yourself to a store visit, then you’ll be smiling, too.

12

The Perfect Arrangement floral designer, Gwen Wendell

GreeneSaver •

MARCH / APRIL

2014


GreeneScene by Kathy Evans

Safe School Grants for Greene, Washington Counties

S

even school districts in Greene and Washington counties will share in more than $155,000 in Safe Schools Initiative Targeted Grants from the Pennsylvania Department of Education, according to state Sen. Timothy Solobay (D-Washington) and Reps. Brandon Neuman (D-Washington) and Pam Snyder (D-Greene). “I am very pleased that the grants were approved for these districts that are taking the initiative to develop anti-violence programs,” Solobay said. “The schools are working to make sure the classroom environment is safe and conducive to learning.” The school districts receiving the grants include Washington ($25,000), Fort Cherry ($25,000), Ringgold ($23,500), Burgettstown ($6,965), Central Greene ($25,000), Southeastern Greene ($25,000), and Jefferson-Morgan ($25,000). Safe Schools Initiative Targeted Grants can be used to fund anti-violence programs including conflict management and dispute resolution, peer helpers and risk management in addition to developing student codes of conduct and training. “Our schools need to be prepared for all situations, and these grants will help assure that our local schools are a safe environment for our children,” Neuman said. “This helps school administrators develop long-term programs that protect our children.” Snyder said a critical aspect of the grant is that schools have latitude to use it for training to identify at-risk behavior and bullying, and for the purchase of security-related equipment such as metal detectors and lighting. “As we have seen tragedies in other schools, there is no question that there is a wide-array of safetyrelated issues that need to be addressed in our schools,” Snyder said. “These grants will be extremely helpful and will make a difference.” Solobay, who serves as Democratic chair of the Senate Veterans Affairs and Emergency Preparedness Committee, said that the grants may also be used to facilitate the development of emergency plans and preparedness drills.

Hungarian Smokehouse H

o w

many postage stamps would you have to put on an elk in order to mail it? Never mind—we’ll get back to that in a minute. The Hungarian Smokehouse in Carmichaels has been integral to the community for many years, providing processing of deer and other game, and all manner of custom butchering, but that’s only the beginning of the story. As stated on their well-detailed website, www.hungariansmokehouse.com, “We strive to provide quality smoked meats and homemade sausages along with a variety of other services. Homemade kielbasa, hickory smoked bacon, and smoked pork chops are just a few Bill Crick and Melissa Adamson, owners of the Hungarian Smokehouse. of the items that you will find at the Smokehouse, along with beef pepperstick and 10 flavors of the best jerky around.” In addition, the Smokehouse is now moving into its 2nd year of offering smoked ribs and chicken on Fridays and Saturdays, from April to October. Fresh, custom-cut steaks are available to customers from April to October. In addition, their extensive catering service, in operation from January to October, is a great way to bring the Hungarian Smokehouse goodness right to your door for any special event. Plans are also in place to have concession stands at local fairs in the summer. You can keep updated on all of their latest news and events by following them on Facebook, at www.facebook.com/hungariansmokehouse. The store is open year round, though some services are only available at certain times of the year, as noted above; this is because the rush of processing business that takes place during hunting season keeps everyone on their toes, to the point of making it necessary to expand the staff from four employees to as many as thirty! This brings us back to the reason for the original question: the Smokehouse is so well-known, and so good at what they do, that co-owner Melissa Adamson reports that it’s not at all unusual for hunters to send their quarry from all over the country to be processed. Buffalo, caribou, and—you guessed it—elk (and much more) can be shipped, processed, and sent back! Maybe after figuring out postage on the elk, it might be a good idea to find a box for a bear..?

MARCH / APRIL

2014 • GreeneSaver

13


Michael’s Auto Sales T

wenty years and counting. “It started with 3 cars and 2000 square feet…. Now it’s an average of 60 cars with 8500 square feet,” say Mary and Michael Lewis, owners of Michael’s Auto Sales in Carmichaels, PA. A family-owned business specializing in late-model, quality pre-owned cars, Michael’s Auto Sales sells more than 400 cars per year with financing available for everyone. Michael’s Auto Sales is the Tri-county’s largest independent dealer and the only independent dealer with service after the sale. Michael’s Auto Sales has become a one stop shop, offering sales, service, and a body repair shop. For the convenience of their customers, Michael’s even offers “courtesy cars” for those who are having service work performed on their vehicle. Michael Lewis began his automotive career as a body specialist, though according to Mary, “He always dabbled in real estate, too.” In 1994 he recognized a great location and saw an opportunity for the business that is booming at the intersection of Rt. 21 and Ceylon Road today. Though it didn’t look like that in the beginning. “We built the first building in 1994,” Mary explains, “and started the business with just the two of us working.” With amazing energy and ambition, and fast growing demand from their customers, Michael and Mary quickly began to expand the business and found themselves with an increasing need of space. Less than ten years had gone by when they broke ground for a new facility which opened in 2003 with a full service body shop and showroom. The Lewis’ had also constructed a town house complex on Center Street in Carmichaels. They have grown their property rental enterprise from initially one to currently 30 units with plans to expand yet again. An impressive example of “Growing in Greene”, Michael and Mary Lewis continue to make a meaningful contribution to our area’s business economy.

14

GreeneSaver •

MARCH / APRIL

2014


M

McCracken Pharmacy

cCracken Pharmacy is nothing short of an iconic business in Waynesburg and Greene County, PA. Established in 1961 by Jack McCracken, this local drug store has progressed in all the right ways over the years, changing where change was needed while keeping personal service a tradition without change; very much in keeping with the slogan, “Yesterday’s Service, Today’s Technology.” Now under the ownership of long-time pharmacist, Scott Adamson, who began his relationship with McCracken when he served an internship in 1992, the pharmacy changed hands when Jeff McCracken retired last fall. However, Jeff is still a familiar face at the pharmacy, and according to Scott, “He remains my mentor and consultant.” Scott believes, the success and longevity of McCracken Pharmacy is a result of the quality of people who work there. “We’ve been fortunate to be able to maintain a relatively large staff, and to keep a high caliber of people who are consistent, compassionate and just valuable to our customers, I’m proud to work with the people here,” Scott emphasizes. Today that staff includes 22 people working to serve the needs of McCracken’s customers. From parttimer and high school student Janna Fox to Mary Sue Crayne, whose history with McCracken dates back to the early 1980s, it is a crew deserving of Scott’s pride. McCracken Pharmacy has always been a popular destination for locals looking for meaningful internships, too. Like Mt. Morris native Drew Eddy, a 2008 graduate of Waynesburg Central, who earned a BS in biology and is now in Pharmacy School at WVU. “I am very happy to work with people who are both skilled and caring,” says Drew. McCracken operates efficiently because they do not skimp on personScott Adamson inspects a new blister package (close-up in nel. There are four pharmacists on staff: Scott inset) system designed to facilitate and improve accuracy in of course, along with Tammy Bryan, Andrew daily dosing of medications.

MARCH / APRIL

2014 • GreeneSaver

Behm and Mary Sue Crayne; In addition to the technicians and support staff - too many names to mention here - but plenty of familiar faces when you walk through the door of McCracken Pharmacy. All working together to provide that “Yesterday’s Service” you don’t find everywhere. As for “Today’s technology,” McCracken Pharmacy has always been a leader in the latest tools and expertise to deliver accuracy and efficiency in filling prescriptions and serving all needs of customers. That never changes. “We actually have a new computer system coming online this month which will enable easier access and interface with medication therapy programs,” Scott notes. Just as McCracken was among the very first pharmacies to even use computer technology back in the 1960s, and later the most innovative dispensing systems, our local pharmacy today is helping to pioneer new methods of packaging designed to facilitate and improve accuracy in daily dosing of medications. “We are now offering an innovative blister packaging system that clearly labels and separates medicines for daily doses and helps patients and caregivers stay informed and in control,” Scott says. Particularly useful for those who take multiple doses and meds, this new system is easy to follow and being quite well received by many customers, according to Scott. Just one more example of how our iconic “corner drug store” with all the charm of Yesterday’s Service is still a leader in Today’s Technology.

T

he GreeneSaver recently received information from the office of Senator Tim Solobay about an upcoming “Energy Forum For Educators,” scheduled for April 11th at the Western Area Career and Technology Center (WACTC) in Houston, PA, hosted by the Center, and the Tri-County Oil & Gas Expo Committee. The letter said, in part, “There are a variety of options that may or may not require a 4-year degree, and all of them can lead to stable, family-sustaining jobs.” As this is often one of the focal points of “Driving the Future,” we contacted Linda Stettner Fehrman, of Senator Solobay’s offices, to learn more. Linda said that this is the 4th such forum in which the senator has participated. The first one was held at the Greene County branch of the Career and Technology Center, and two more have been held in other areas of the district. “What we’ve done in each instance is to bring in educators,” Linda said, “and we also invite industry representatives from the coal, oil and gas industries.” Making these connections is a vital step in matching capable students with careers for which they may be suited. Linda emphasized that, while many high school students choose to further their education in college—and that many opportunities within the industry do require a post-secondary degree—that there are a number of alternatives for those who would prefer to enter the workforce after high school. Linda shared her experience of meeting a young husband and new father who entered the industry after graduating from high school, who told her that he was especially grateful for his career, because his earning power, alone, meant that his wife could be a stay-at-home mom. She noted that the wave of new technologies being developed means that there is still plenty of room for growth, adding, “As the industry matures, even more job opportunities will open up.” Educational forums are an important part of the process, because they help reach the very people—guidance counselors, principals, teachers, and other education professionals—who help students make important decisions about their direction in life. Making parents aware of the opportunities that abound is just as important (and often more challenging) as raising students’ awareness. For that reason, Parent-Teacher Organization (PTO) representatives and school board members are invited to energy forums, so that they can then help spread the word. As for how students should “aim” themselves if interested in a career in the industry, Linda said that good communications skills are important, because of the numerous instructions that have to be understood and then relayed to others on a regular basis; and that “safety oriented” people are highly soughtafter, because, on the job, “Not only are you responsible for your life, but your actions affect the person next to you.” And what is one of the most serious barriers for students? “The biggest drawback is the inability to pass a drug test,” Linda stated, pointing out the importance, as always, for parents and educators to reinforce to students that they would do well to think of their future when making choices, today. To learn more about the Energy Forum For Educators, call Sen. Solobay’s office at 724-627-9802.

15


Commissioners Help Spread Awareness

Greene County 4-H Rabbit Club Members Win at Pennsylvania State Convention Four members of the Greene County 4-H Rabbit Club recently traveled to Lebanon, PA to compete in the Pennsylvania State Rabbit Convention and Show. The PA Convention is one of the largest held in the U.S. each year.  The youth competed in their respective breed classes in two regular shows and several breed specialty shows and also took part in other activities and competitions during the three day event.  Alexus Grecoe came away with the honor of being named the Pennsylvania Youth Exhibitor of the Year.  In addition, her rabbits came home with an impressive list of titles, including:  Best of Breed and two Best Opposite of Breeds Dutch in the PaSRBA Shows, Best of Breed Dutch and Best Opposite of Breed Dutch in the Chesapeake Dutch Specialty Show. Lindsey Gilbert took home awards for Best of Breed and Best Opposite of Breed Netherland Dwarf.  Cara Longstreth won Best Opposite of Breed Holland Lop and Jenna Longstreth won Best of Breed and two Best Opposites of Breed Dwarf Hotot.  In addition to the titles won, their rabbits had to win numerous preliminary competitions to be eligible to compete for the breed titles.  The convention, held annually by the Pennsylvania State Rabbit Breeders Association, focuses on promoting the rabbit industry, education of the youth involved in the hobby Left to Right:  Cara Longstreth, Lindsey and furthering the interest in raising rabbits for hobby or comGilbert, Jenna Longstreth and Alexus mercial commodity purposes.  Grecoe

And The Winners Are… Time to congratulate your Waynesburg Raiders, victors of the 5th grade championship basketball tournament held recently at McGuffey High School, along with their Head Coach, Scott Litwinovich, and Assistant Coach, Eric Kindervater! Awesome job, guys; “you done good”…

Greene County Commissioners proclaimed the month of March 2014 Intellectual Disabilities Awareness Month during their March 5 agenda meeting. The proclamation offers advocates of developmental disabilities an opportunity to educate the public, policymakers and other system professionals about the challenges that come with intellectual disabilities. The proclamation also recognizes the thousands of service providers that support individuals with intellectual disabilities to lead full and productive lives within society. Commissioners recognized Kevin Cunningham, Jr., of Graysville, an Intellectual & Developmental Disabilities program participant who works part-time for Jacobs Petroleum. The commissioners and IDD staff also presented Cunningham with a special certifiL-R, Commissioner Chuck Morris; IDD consumer Kevin Cuncate acknowledging his achievements in the ningham, Jr., of Graysville; Commissioner Archie Trader; Stacey community, including gaining employment Mason, IDD supports coordinator; Deneen Chulick, IDD direcand completing his program. tor; and Commissioner Blair Zimmerman.

Greensboro to Receive $200K for Fire Hall Project A Greene County community will receive a $200,000 state grant to complete an ambitious community project, state Sen. Tim Solobay and state Rep. Pam Snyder announced recently. The Greensboro Monongahela Township Volunteer Fire Department plans to convert a former church into a multi-purpose community building. As an Elm Street Community, Greensboro was awarded the money from the state Department of Community and Economic Development. “The fire department and its social hall are at the heart of community life in Greensboro,” Solobay said. “This grant will help with the expansion and renovation work that will allow the facility to be used for many important community functions.” The current fire hall, located on Front Street, is old and lacks modern mechanical systems, local officials said.  The grant will help provide additional garage space and a firefighter training facility in addition to a larger emergency shelter for the community. “This is a wonderful upgrade to the community facilities in Greensboro,” Snyder said. “The grant represents smart, local investment, and I salute the fire company and the borough for pursuing it.” The money comes in the form of a Keystone Communities Grant from DCED. “The support of Sen. Solobay and Rep. Snyder have been vital in moving this and other key projects forward in Southeastern Greene,” said Darlene Urban Garrett, Greensboro’s Elm Street Manager. “It makes us very optimistic about the future of this area of Greene County.”

Story Time! Commissioner Blair Zimmerman was recently a guest reader at Springhill-Freeport Elementary School in New Freeport, reading several books to first-grade students as part of “Read Across America.” This ongoing reading event takes place in schools across the country, celebrating the birthday of Theodor Geisel, better known as “Dr. Seuss,” who was born on March 2nd, 1904. 1st row, L-R: Logan Higgins, Devin McCall, Gabe McConville, Chase Henkins, Dawson Fowler. 2nd row, L-R: Haiden Litwinovich, Zach Wilson, Tyler McIe, Cole Kindervater.

16

GreeneSaver •

MARCH / APRIL

2014


Greene County United Way T

hese have been busy times for the Greene County United Way. A few months ago, the American Red Cross, one of 17 United Way “partner agencies,” established a presence at the Greene County office, to provide immediate relief to victims of local disasters, and make programs available to teach the community to be “Red Cross Ready.” In fact, the United Way staff is eagerly preparing for a Red Cross Open House, taking place on March 26 from noon to 8pm, where people can learn more about how the American Red Cross is helping serve the county. Partnering with the Red Cross is only one aspect of how the United Way provides service to the community. Three specific areas have been identified by the United Way that can be emphasized to help provide a higher quality of life for Greene County residents: Education: Helping children and youth achieve their potential through education by improving access to quality, affordable child care and early learning opportunities; partnering with schools and parents to improve graduation rates; and providing after school mentoring programs. Income: Helping families become financially stable and independent by supporting basic needs while increasing financial education; helping hardworking people obtain job training and family-sustaining wages; and increasing affordable housing for families. Health: Helping Greene County residents improve their health by increasing access to critical healthcare services; and reducing substance abuse, child abuse, and domestic violence. Working with partners like American Red Cross, Big Brothers/Big Sisters, Boy Scouts of America, Cornerstone Care, Salvation Army and many others enables Greene County United Way to help others, as does an exciting initiative powered by United Way called “Pennsylvania 2-1-1 Southwest.” As stated on their website, www. pa211sw.org, “Similar to 9-1-1, 2-1-1 is a nationally recognized, easy-to-remember phone number that quickly and effectively connects people in need with resources. Every hour of every day, someone in Southwestern Pennsylvania searches for services, from substance abuse treatment to care for a child or an aging parent. By simply dialing 2-1-1 (or 888-553-5778) our trained Resource Navigators can assess your needs and then match you to the best and closest resources in your community. The 2-1-1 database contains information on over 5,000 health and human service agencies.” The 2-1-1 service is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, free of charge, and all services are confidential. You can help the United Way help others; to learn how to get involved by giving, advocating or volunteering, call 724-852-1009, e-mail unitedway@windBarb Wise and Hayley Finley, of Greene County United Way, stream.net, or go to www.greenecountaking a tour of Chesapeake Energy drilling site. tyunitedway.homestead.com.

MARCH / APRIL

2014 • GreeneSaver

Heidi’s Hair Studio E

xciting things are happening at Heidi’s Hair Studio, and you should be a part of it! Heidi’s features two tanning beds: a 12 minute “bronzing bed,” and a 20 minute “turbo bed”. This means you can do tanning your way, according to the time that you have! If you’re really pressed for time, and want to look your best for a special event, Heidi’s offers spray tanning—the perfect solution for weddings, class reunions, proms; anytime you need to look great and don’t have time for regular tanning. Spray tans typically last for 7 to 10 days, and are a great alternative, now that spring is just around the corner. Heidi’s has been proudly serving the community for 17 years, the last 7 of which have been in the same great location. Now, Heidi is happy to welcome a new addition, stylist Danielle Riggleman, who is excited to bring her experience and sense of style to the Heidi’s Hair Studio family! You deserve to look awesome, and Heidi’s is here to make it happen!

GreeneScene by Tammie Dunlap

17


B

4 Seasons Lawn & Garden & 4 Seasons Rental

eginning their 20th year, 4 Seasons Lawn & Garden, on Rolling Meadows Road in Waynesburg, continues to offer area residents the best choice in lawn & garden equipment - and much more. Customers can find the best prices and quality here with brands like John Deere, Stihl, and Honda Power Equipment. With trusted names like these, 4 Seasons Lawn & Garden can ensure that their customers have the best equipment available. “It’s all about value,” says owner Murray Hoy. “We try to sell brands that last longer, hold their value better, and provide our customers with a more pleasurable experience while using it. We have found that these product lines do all of that and more, we are very proud and committed to the brands we sell.” 2013 was a very busy year at 4 Seasons. The wet summer provided everyone with plenty of grass to mow and maintain, which led many customers to 4 Seasons for new equipment and repairs. “Last year kept us all very busy; there was never a break in the action, we all worked very hard to see that all of our customer’s needs were met,” explains Murray. A good price on equipment is certainly a draw, but it’s not the only reason so many people choose to buy at 4 Seasons Lawn & Garden. “We enjoy a lot of return customers here,” Murray explains, “and I think that’s because we are committed to continue our proven level of excellence in service and superior products. People depend on our shop for service, we have an extensive parts department…and we understand the products and equipment we sell better than anyone.” With expertly trained service technicians in the shop, and Jeremiah & Courtney managing the parts and sales departments, Murray says “Our business is about relationships and my staff is trained to make our customer’s experience here both valuable and enjoyable. Our professional staff is the best, I am very proud of them. People appreciate dealing with someone who has the knowledge and experience to answer their questions, find what they need, and fix their problems. We can do that.” In its third year now, 4 Seasons Rentals continues to grow as more and more people discover all of the useful tools and equipment now offered by this great local resource. The many products available for rent include power tools, masonry and plumbing tools, contractor’s equipment, outdoor power equipment, flooring and carpet tools, scaffolding, even moving needs like appliance dollies or trailers. All of your yard projects are covered as well with both walk behind and ride on mowers, garden tillers, aerators, over seeders, flower bed edger, grass trimmers, hedge trimmers, and many other items to keep your lawn and landscaping looking great. New items include a dump trailer for hauling mulch, gravel and other materials, and John Deere Gators to haul both people and tools where you need them. Right now is the peak booking season for 4 Seasons Rentals’ large selection of tents, perfect for gradu-

18

ation parties, weddings and other events. “You should definitely call now for any spring or summer event,” advises Courtney. 4 Seasons Rentals has several pole type and frame type (wedding) tents that will accommodate both small and large events. If the weather for your party doesn’t cooperate, 4 Seasons has tent sides to keep the rain and wind out. Along with the tents, 4 Seasons Rentals has all the tables, chairs, drink dispensers, coolers, and many other items Courtney Hursey and Jeremiah Allison at 4 Seasons. for your event. The inventory is constantly growing, too. “Some items are always in demand,” notes Jeremiah, “like the Ditch Witch trencher – very popular – and jack hammers, the stump grinder, and scaffolding, too. We have a great selection of power hand tools that sometimes you just need on occasion like quick cut saws or a core drill… and of course all the common items, too, with a seemingly unending list of just the thing you need.” Having a local source for rental items is great for the residents of Waynesburg and the entire Greene County Area, and knowing that quality and expertise comes with it is even better. Murray and his staff have built the 4 Seasons reputation for excellence by selling the highest quality of equipment available and providing fast, accurate service. The same integrity and superior quality defines 4 Seasons Rental Inc. as well.

GreeneSaver •

MARCH / APRIL

2014


Toothman Dental Center S

ince 1984, Dr. Ingrid Toothman has been offering quality dental services at 801 East Greene Street in Waynesburg. The charming brick house office that is Toothman Dental Center remains a familiar place for generations of area families, while the latest technology utilized there continues to provide the highest level of care - and comfort – available today. A recent addition to the staff at Toothman Orthodontist Dr. Carl White is a recent addition to the Toothman Dental Center staff on Dental Center is Dr. East Greene Street in Waynesburg. Carl White, Orthodontist. Dr. White grew up in Parkersburg, WV, where his father was a dentist. He studied biology at Wake Forest, went to WVU for dental school, and trained to become an orthodontist at Harvard. Dr. White explains how orthodontics helps brighten smiles: “The teeth are like little mirrors. Each one, if properly positioned, will reflect the maximum amount of light. If they’re out of place, you will not get optimal light reflection; so I make sure they are properly positioned for maximum light reflection.” The dental hygienists at Toothman Dental Center complete the three step process with cleaning and whitening to give everyone that “brighter smile.” Even those who may not need orthodontic care can benefit from cleaning and whitening. “Over time, your natural enamel wears thinner. The dentin layer underneath is actually a yellow color. The yellow appearance is the dentin showing through. So it is true, that if you are not whitening, you are yellowing,” explains Dr. Toothman, “We can safely whiten your teeth for a brighter smile.” Toothman Dental Center is also the only place in Greene County where you’ll find an on-site denture lab. From beginning to end, the process of making custom dentures is performed right at Toothman Dental, enabling precision, accuracy and f you squint really hard and look at the sign in the window announcing the new cars from Mercury, you’ll see that comfort without long delays. With the denture lab the year is 1985. “Wait a second,” you might say; “that wasn’t too long ago. Why is it a ‘GreeneScene of the Past’?” If on-site, and an experienced staff, Greene County you “do the math, backwards,” though, you soon realize that 1985 happened 29 years ago! It’s OK—sit down and deeparea residents have access to both high quality and breathe; it’ll help relieve the shock… convenience in dentures, with choices to meet indiThis wintry photo, from the Waynesburg Borough collection brought to our attention by Albie vidual needs and budgets. Reinhart, shows the old Fox Auto Sales building on East High St. in Waynesburg. There’s some Another advantage offered by Toothman Deninteresting history, there. According to Ron Fox, “My grandfather, Ollie Fox, my great uncle, tal Center is digital radiography. Digital x-rays reWillis Fox, and my other great uncle, Raymond Fox had the Ford franchise in Mt. Morris, which quire less radiation and are healthier for the patient, they got in 1921. In the early to mid ‘40s, Ollie and Ray moved to Waynesburg, and the workplace and the environment. brought the Ford dealership, and that’s when they moved into that building.” At Toothman Dental Center, truly full service Crisis raised its head in the early days of the old High St. location, oral care is offered by Dr. Ingrid Toothman, DMD because, during World War II, with all of the country’s resources deand her team, Dr. Kotowski, DDS, Dr. White, DDS, voted to military manufacturing, new cars weren’t being proM.M.Sc, and the skilled dental technicians and staff. duced. The company kept afloat by servicing cars already on The latest technology and highest level of care comthe road, and by branching out into the hauling busibined with the comfort you seek – that is what deness. fines Toothman Dental Center in Waynesburg. They constructed and moved into their new facility—next door to the old one in the picture—in 1997, and the move GreeneScene by was an adventure in itself. “We were still Laurie Carson in the old building on Friday,” Ron recalled, “and moved into the new one on Monday. Over that weekend, Bill Hopkins demolished the old building!” And poof! It was gone. So, just right for our Growing in Greene edition, we’re pleased to share this definite “GreeneScene of the Past” with you.

I

MARCH / APRIL

2014 • GreeneSaver

19


Clipper

20

GreeneSaver •

MARCH / APRIL

2014


“Keep On Clipping!”

MARCH / APRIL

2014 • GreeneSaver

21


Conservation District Offers New Water Quality Monitoring Devices T

he Greene County Conservation District is initiating a new project designed to monitor water quality in homes and streams throughout the county, especially those near current or future Marcellus Shale development. The Conservation District is seeking volunteers who live in rural areas of the county and obtain their water from either a well or a spring. Homeowners are encouraged to participate whether they have Marcellus Shale development in their area or not, as participation in the program is an easy way to learn more about the quality of water entering their homes. Project participants will receive, at no cost to them, an electronic monitoring device called a CATTfish. The CATTfish device was created by Carnegie Mellon University and has been successfully used in Washington County. In the home, the easy-to-use device is simply placed in a toilet tank and monitors conductivity and temperature. Unexpected results in these values would alert homeowners to potential water quality problems that would require more comprehensive testing. The Conservation District will host an orientation this spring for participants during which they will receive their monitoring devices and be shown how to use them. Once a month, participants will need to send the data collected by their devices to the Conservation District for inclusion in a county-wide water quality database. The Conservation District will also provide comprehensive water testing where data from CATTfish devices indicate it is appropriate. Additionally, the Conservation District will be placing water quality monitoring devices in streams throughout the county. The District is seeking homeowners who have streams on their property to host these devices. This will involve no work on the part of the homeowner as Conservation District staff would be responsible for installation, periodic data retrieval and maintenance of these devices. Homeowners interested in participating with this project can download a pre-project questionnaire from the Conservation District’s Web site at www.co.greene.pa.us/gccd and e-mail the completed form to Jared D. Zinn, the county watershed specialist, at jzinn@ co.greene.pa.us. For more information, call Jared at 724-852-5278.

22

CATTfish, electronic monitoring device.

GreeneSaver •

MARCH / APRIL

2014


C

Community Bank

ommunity Bank finished its 112th year in fine form. 2013 will go down as a successful and encouraging year for the Bank given the challenges it faced. 2013 actually represents the second best year ever for Community Bank in terms of profit. And it demonstrates the strength of Community Bank. In 2013, Community Bank Wealth Management continued its “Community Bank Royalty Services” seminar series. The Bank hosted four seminars throughout Washington and Greene County and brought in experts to talk about the opportunities and challenges brought on by the Marcellus gas boom. These seminars were well attended and addressed such subjects as re-leasing your property, pipeline rights-ofway, and how to read a royalty check. In a similar vein, Community Bank again hosted the Tri-County Oil & Gas Expo in May at the Washington County fairgrounds. This two day event attracted hundreds of local business owners. Community Bank continues to be an instrumental part of the Tri-County Oil & Gas Expo and worked with the Pa CareerLink to host the Energy Employment Expo at the Greene County Fairgrounds. Over 50 companies took part searching for qualified job applicants. One company attending for the first time was amazed at the quality of qualified candidates, hiring some on the spot and sending others for pre employment testing. Employees of Community Bank again played key roles in our local non-profit and service organizations, helping the United Way, the American Heart Association, the Washington Hospital, Cornerstone Care, the Washington County Community Foundation, the Washington County Chamber of Commerce, the Greene County Community Foundation, the Carmichaels and Greater Waynesburg Area Chambers, King Coal Association, Waynesburg Prosperous and Beautiful, the American Cancer Society and the Relay for Life. This year Community Bank was recognized by the Relay for Life for raising over $8, 800 and again exceeded the Platinum Goal On the banking front, Community Bank was extremely busy as well. Our commercial lending team broke $60,000,000 in new production. Our mortgage lending team broke $40,000,000 in new production. Add in consumer lending and indirect (auto purchasers) lending and we did over $144,000,000 in new loan production in 2013. These production figures are the best ever for Community Bank. On top of this record setting loan production, the Bank increased in deposits and assets. Community Bank averaged $540,751,000 in assets during 2013, an increase over 2012. And the Bank paid record dividends to its many loyal shareholders. So 2013 was an excellent year for Community Bank. Its employees and friends thank the community for supporting Community Bank. We look forward to our 113th year in 2014. Community Bank faces 2014 and the future with confidence and determination. We are fortunate to be located directly in the center of the Marcellus Shale Gas play, which will offer us plenty of opportunities for growth. We will continue the tradition of local independent banks to be safe, sound, sensible, and caring.

Community Bank Launches Charitable Giving Program

C

ommunity Bank announced today a new program under which the Bank will contribute $100 to the charity or church of choice for customers that wish to take out a loan from the Bank. The program is called “Community Bank Cares”. For over 110 years, Community Bank has been active in supporting the communities it serves. The Bank has always contributed to local charities and Community Bank employees participate in innumerable events and organizations.

GreeneScene by Randy Miller

MARCH / APRIL

2014 • GreeneSaver

While company-directed contributions are admirable, the key to “Community Bank Cares” is that the customer makes the choice. “We at Community Bank want to support our customers and we want to strengthen our communities, so what better way than to make charitable donations in honor of our customers. Most people have a deep commitment to their church, or to help the less fortunate, or to protect animals, etc. “Community Bank Cares” allows the customer to direct support to help those they most care about.” explained Pat McCune, President of the Bank. Any type of loan taken out by any borrower qualifies, subject to a few simple limitations. The loan can be a mortgage loan, home equity loan, commercial loan, small business loan, or personal loan. The loan must be made directly to the customer and must be for at least $20,000. The Bank will send the check to any eligible tax exempt charity or church identified by the customer. And, the check will be issued by Community Bank and delivered in honor of the customer. Community Bank is a locally-owned and operated full-service commercial bank. The Bank is 113 years old and operates eleven offices in Greene, Washington, and Allegheny County. You may contact Community Bank by calling 1-888-223-8099 or you may visit Community Bank on the web at www. communitybank.tv.

23


W

Waynesburg Prosperous and Beautiful, Inc.

aynesburg Prosperous & Beautiful (WP&B), a Main Street initiative, is named after an historic 1906 souvenir pictorial directory of Waynesburg touting it as the Biggest and Best Little City in Pennsylvania. It is WP&B’s mission to preserve and revitalize historic downtown Waynesburg, Pennsylvania and to cultivate a heightened public awareness of the educational, cultural and historical opportunities and conveniences in shopping associated with visiting downtown Waynesburg. Much of the work to accomplish this mission is achieved by the efforts of volunteers organized into four focus committees: Organization, which governs the local program and develops a cooperative spirit among key individuals involved in the revitalization efforts; Economic Restructuring, which examines current economic and marketing forces affecting the downtown and works to bring the mix of retail, professional services, and housing that will prosper in the area; Promotion, which strives to develop an image of a vibrant downtown with innovative retail promotions and special events; and Design, which includes building and façade, improvements to and maintenance of public space, appropriate signage and attractive display of merchandise. The results of these committee’s efforts include a host of programs, projects and activities that thousands of local residents, businesses and consumers recognize and enjoy. One such endeavor is the “Buy Local, Buy Greene” campaign. A collaborative effort with other likeminded organizations, the Buy Local, Buy Greene initiative’s purpose is to educate consumers about the impact they can have on their community by spending locally. The mission statement is “Unleashing the power of the Consumers’ Dollar in Greene County.” WP&B continues its use of social media to heighten awareness of Waynesburg’s historic downtown. A Facebook page keeps friends informed with frequently updated news of merchant’s happenings, pictures and comments. Each calendar quarter, WP&B organizes “downtown dialogues” for business owners and stakeholders to come together to keep communication open and cooperation high in the common goal of improving downtown Waynesburg. WP&B is also the organization behind several of Waynesburg’s most popular festivals, including the 50’s Fest & Car Cruise in September, the Sheep & Fiber Festival in May and the merchant’s “Open House” events at the beginning of summer and the holiday shopping season in winter. WP&B’s community endeavor to revitalize our main street area has made significant strides and the organization looks forward to the ongoing challenges as they continue to make historic downtown Waynesburg today’s “Downtown Shopping District”.

GreeneScene by Tammie Dunlap 24

GreeneSaver •

MARCH / APRIL

2014


B

GOING BACK IN TIME

enjamin Franklin once said, “Lost time is never found again”; and, from Albert Einstein, “The only reason for time is so that everything doesn’t happen at once.” Whether a person thinks of time as being rigid or flexible, set-in-stone or a convenient illusion, it doesn’t change the fact that we still want to know, on a regular basis, “Hey, what time is it?” Ancient Egyptians are thought to have been among the first to divide the day into two 12-hour periods, using monolithic obelisks and sun shadows to tell time, while the Chinese, Europeans and Turks later used candles, determining time by how long it took a certain amount of wax to melt. The first mechanical clocks were invented in Europe sometime near the beginning of the 14th century, which marks the earliest origins of this story, actually. Once the technology moved beyond stone obelisks and wax candles, you see, the need for people skilled in repairing these miraculous mechanical clocks was as inevitable as… well, as inevitable as the passing of time, one could say. Jeffrey Baun’s interest in things mechanical began at a young age. “I had a motorized Erector kit when I was 3 or 4 [years old],” he recalls. Not content to build things according to conventional rules, it wasn’t long before he realized he could modify and connect the parts in order to create unique circuits with the kit’s motors. He started learning the art and science of clock repair nearly 40 years ago from his father, Harry, who “Started out as a tinkerer, then became quite accomplished,” according to Jeffrey. Though he now lives in Spraggs (“My wife and I wanted to be away from scads of people, and we wanted space to stretch out and raise horses,” he says), Jeffrey grew up in Pittsburgh, continuing to perfect his craft. He attended West Virginia University and obtained a degree in Mining Engineering, but his true, ongoing passion is the care and servicing of clocks. Of course, it doesn’t take an expert repair person to recognize that there are vast differences between a clock built a hundred years ago, and one manufactured today, but Jeffrey has a unique and detailed insight. “Most of the clocks you buy now are plastic,” he says, “and are kind of disposable. But they can still be quite pricey.” If a contemporary quartz clock fails, or stops keeping accurate time, Jeffrey notes, the whole timekeeping mechanism has to be replaced in most cases. It wasn’t always this way, however, and because there are so many mechanical clocks—both electric and hand-wound—still in operation, and relatively few people who have the knowledge, tools, and patience to keep them running in top condition, Jeffrey stays busy. What makes a clock work poorly, or stop working, altogether? One thing—perhaps not surprisingly— is simply what happens with the passing of time. “People run them into the ground,” Jeffrey says; “It’s like driving a car, but never changing the oil.” Lubrication of the internal parts can wear out and dry up, and dirt and dust particles collected from the air are prime culprits when it comes to mucking up the inner workings of a clock bursting with gears, sprockets, and other small precision parts. There’s no “halfway point” for Jeffrey when it comes to taking care of timepieces. “When we clean clocks, we totally disassemble them,” he asserts; his largest job to date, in terms of sheer size, was restoring a 14-foot tall grandfather clock made by the Herschede Hall Clock Company, in Cincinnati, Ohio. Jeffrey chuckles when he points out that Herschede, the company responsible for creating clocks that were nearly as much works of art as timepieces, expanded their operations to manufacture parking meters in later years, which, he notes, are also timekeeping devices, after a fashion. “They may have been more lucrative,” he observes, “but not as elegant.” The obvious question to ask when it comes to repairing clocks that may be more than a century old is: “Where do you get the parts..?” This doesn’t faze Jeffrey: “I have a machine shop; I have to make a lot of parts for some of the old clocks,” he says, making it sound as easy as pouring a cup of coffee. He admits that some issues can be considerably more challenging to diagnose and repair than others, but he maintains an inner-calm, nevertheless. “I don’t lose my temper—I can’t!” he notes, adding that acts of frustration don’t go over well around delicate clock innards. When asked if it might sometimes be a bit much to deal with, Jeffrey turns resolute. “This is the best job I ever had,” he affirms, “and I hope to die doing it. I have no aspirations of retiring. It’s more fun than just about anything else I’ve ever done.”

MARCH / APRIL

2014 • GreeneSaver

by Regis Whetzel

B

obtown Elementary School’s fifth grade students recently participated in a project entitled “Artist in Residence.”  Through the financial support of the Community Foundation of Greene County and the Pittsburgh Filmmakers, a resident artist from the Pittsburgh Center for the Arts visited Bobtown Elementary School every week during the first semester of the school year and instructed students on the techniques of working with metals. Students learned the process of metal forging as they created individual pieces which eventually were combined to form the “Community Tree.” Students pounded metal with hammers, heated metal with torches, shaped metal with crimping tools, colored metal with glass powder, and arranged metal with overlapping techniques.  The art piece is currently hanging in the school’s front lobby and represents the school community growing as one.  Students also were able to visit the Pittsburgh Center  for the  Arts  where they completed different art projects and attended an art exhibit. This is the second year Bobtown Elementary School participated in the “Artist in Residence” program.  Last year, second grade students designed and created three mosaic glass windows which hang in the school stairways.  Two windows depict mining scenes and the third displays Bobtown Elementary Pictured is one of Bobtown Elementary’s fifth grade classes, led by Mrs. Sheena Donley, standing School’s name with a bulldog mascot. beside the completed copper art piece.  The resident artist, Mrs. Melissa Davenport, is also pictured.

25


26

GreeneSaver •

MARCH / APRIL

2014


MARCH / APRIL

2014 • GreeneSaver

27


Greene County Conservation District

T

he statement, “Greene County is a largely rural area,” would hardly shock or surprise anyone; it’s one of the great things about the county, certainly one of the reasons why people choose to live here. There is space to farm or garden; to raise a few chickens to provide eggs for the breakfast table, or large herds of cattle that help give entire communities a supply of dairy and beef products. The ability to just “stretch out and BE” is important to people who live here, and a vital part of maintaining that way of life is making sure that the natural resources we love, and on which many build their livelihood, are properly taken care of. The importance of each individual’s effort to be a “good steward of the land” cannot be overstated, of course; it’s also good to know that there is a dedicated group of people whose job it is to unify those efforts, create new ways to maintain our resources, and see to it that our little corner of the planet is kept safe from environmental harm. This is where the Greene County Conservation District enters the picture. As stated on their website, (www.co.greene.pa.us/secured/gc2/depts./ed/conserve/conserve.htm), their mission is: “to serve the public trust; promote awareness of conservation practices and their effects; figure prominently to any activities that have an effect on the natural resources of Greene County; offer technical assistance to private landowners and municipalities that request help; and offer first-line assessment of environmental complaints.” The Conservation District offers an astounding number of services, programs and events designed to, “…promote wise usage of these natural resources and ensure their availability for future generations,” including: • A program to assist local municipalities with dirt and gravel road maintenance. • A watershed management/water resources program to restore and protect stream quality, identify “best management” practices, and conduct educational outreach to inform the public. • A farmland preservation program to help slow the loss of prime farmland to nonagricultural uses. • Manure management programs, including resources and workshops to educate farmers about new requirements for written management plans. This list barely scratches the surface of all the ways that the Greene County Conservation District works to maintain our land, water, and air quality. One of the most popular events in which they participate is sending local teams to the PA State “Envirothon”, held annually. The “Envirothon,” which has local, state and national competitions, “…challenges high school students to think critically about the natural world and their role in it,” combining in-class curriculum and outdoor training to help students “learn more about aquatic ecology, forestry, soil & land use, wildlife, and current environmental issues.” The common thread that joins these diverse efforts is the encouragement of community involvement. Jared Zinn, Watershed Specialist, notes that, “Conservation works best when local people work together to manage their resources.” When asked for some specific examples, he says, “Runoff is a huge thing. Anything you can do to reduce or eliminate runoff is a good thing,” and points out that even something as simple as growing grass in areas prone to runoff, or using rain barrels to collect rainwater from gutters can help keep streams and other waterways cleaner. The big picture is always kept in mind, with a clear sense of purpose and intention. “We are a service organization,” stresses District Manager, Lisa Snider, adding, “We are here for Greene County residents.” A big part of that presence is helping landowners be sure that their conservation efforts are in compliance with federal, state and local codes, whether dealing with watershed issues, erosion mitigation, manure management, obtaining permits, or any of a variety of other situations. Solutions can often be simple, notes Lisa, adding that fines can be issued for non-compliance. Funding help may be available for landowners who need assistance paying for proper permitting and building, and grants may be obtainable in certain circumstances. Awareness is the key. As Lisa says, “We can’t write a grant if we don’t have people who are interested.” Lisa and Jared, along with Permitting Specialist, Lindsay Kozlowski, and Agriculture Specialist, Laurel Rush, are eager to be of service to Greene County residents who share their love of the land, water and air that we all need. Lisa summed it up perfectly, saying, “Our biggest challenge is to remind the people in Greene County that we really are here for you.”

28

GreeneSaver •

MARCH / APRIL

2014


CFGC Announces Scholarship Opportunities

T

he Community Foundation of Greene County (CFGC) has announced that they have several scholarship opportunities for Greene County graduating high school seniors this spring. Most applications are due April 1. Eligibility criteria vary for each scholarship. Specific guidelines, application forms and instructions are available through all high school guidance offices, and on the CFGC website www.cfgcpa.org (look under the scholarship tab for “endowed scholarships.” The available scholarships include: For all Greene County graduating senior students (all schools): The Army Spec. Gregory A. Cox Memorial Scholarship – For graduating Greene County senior students planning a career in public safety or other public service (excluding politics) or participating in Reserve Officer Training Corp (ROTC.) The Rocky Doman Memorial – For a graduating Greene County senior standout athlete who exemplifies the qualities of being a team player with a humble spirit. The William H. Davis, Jr. Scholarship – For Greene County residents who are graduating from, or a past graduate of, any Greene County high school to attend the Westmoreland County Community College. For Jefferson-Morgan High School seniors: The Dove Award – A need based scholarship for a graduating student from Jefferson Morgan high school with preference for female students. The R.A. Matteucci Family Scholarship – A need based scholarship for graduating seniors of Jefferson-Morgan High School. For Carmichaels Area High School seniors: The William and Shirley Hanley Memorial Scholarship – For graduating seniors at Carmichaels Area High School and Mapletown High School. An interview is required. The Walter Samek III Memorial Scholarship – To assist graduating seniors of Carmichaels High School to continue post-secondary education. For Mapletown High School seniors: The William and Shirley Hanley Memorial Scholarship – For graduating seniors at Carmichaels Area High School and Mapletown High School. An interview is required. The Darlene Phillips Elementary Education Scholarship – For graduating seniors of Mapletown High School, with preference for students planning to major in elementary education, but will consider other college majors. For West Greene High School seniors: The Thelma S. Hoge Memorial Scholarship – For worthy students of West Greene School District who are pursuing a college education. The Community Foundation of Greene County (CFGC), a private, non-profit 501c3 organization founded in 2000, is the central philanthropic vehicle in Greene County for donations of various types and sizes. CFGC currently manages $3.7 million in assets through nearly 65 different funds. For more information about the Community Foundation contact Bettie Stammerjohn by phone at 724-627-2010, email cfgc@gmail.com, or visit www.cfgcpa.org.

MARCH / APRIL

2014 • GreeneSaver

GreeneScene by Denise Chadwick

29


F

or the past 25 years, Prompt Quality Painting, Inc. has been far more than just a painting company. The dedicated staff is proud to be part of a company of innovation, leading the way into the

future. This is proven by their ability to adapt and transform the company’s techniques and technologies, meeting the needs of a changing world. Prompt Quality Painting has diversified and advanced in their use of “green” coatings, building products, and processes. Their services include painting, remodeling, drywall finishing, decorating, fire/water damage restoration, and historical restoration. They are also certified in mold inspection and remediation, and perform all of these services in residential, commercial, and industrial structures throughout the area. The company name represents owner Timothy Frye’s outlook on

30

Prompt Quality Painting, Inc. how the experience of hiring a contractor should be. “Too many times, people have hired someone who has not completed the job in a timely manner, has failed to show up for work, or has done a shoddy job,” Tim said. “We strive to be the exact opposite of that stereotype. No matter what the situation is, we go above and beyond to make our customers happy.” Regarding the Prompt Quality Painting crew’s expertise, he affirms, “We have a lot of experience working with color, so we understand it. We are able to use various color techniques, such as faux finishing, which can make something look like marble, wood, stone, mossy oak or even wallpaper, using paint. We can help people come up with creative ideas that will look best in their particular living or office space.” Tim continues, “We are proud and honored to have many repeat

customers,” summing up his feelings this way: “Once people see how we complete a job, they want us to come back for all of their other projects. That’s one thing we really enjoy about our business. The ability to form a relationship with the property or business owner and to craft something that you can see them enjoy is amazing.” Well aware of what constitutes the lifeblood of the operation, he notes, “We would like to thank all of our customers for their business,” and business looks to be growing all the time! As Tim concludes, “I have several local employees, all skilled laborers, yet with work demands increasing, we’re looking to hire additional motivated people to add to the staff.” Why not see what Prompt Quality Painting, Inc., can do to improve your space? Call 724-825-8349 to schedule your free estimate today!

GreeneSaver •

MARCH / APRIL

2014


Travel Savers

T

Back row: Jody Pierce-Craig, Samantha Rush, Tom Rohanna. Front row: Nikki Ealy, Christine Shepas, Linda Enia, and Debbie Rohanna

ravel Savers has a 25 year history of helping people get to where they want to go, under the ownership and management of Debbie Rohanna. Debbie and her friendly staff, Jody Pierce-Craig and Samantha Rush, use their expertise in comparing prices to book hotels, car rentals, cruises, vacation packages, group travel, destination weddings and much more for their clients, often with no extra fees. How is it possible that their “footwork” can be done for free? Because the hotels, rental agencies, and other companies for which they’re booking pay service fees once arrangements are confirmed, which means that Debbie, Jody and Samantha can truly provide savings for travelers. While there is a small fee for booking airline reservations, the personal service and attention customers receive is well worth the investment, especially considering the time it can take to search and compare prices oneself. The thought of using a professional travel agent may be intimidating for a first-timer, but Debbie promises that the process is simple and painless. “Stop in sometime and ask questions, or pick up a brochure—it’s free!” she offers, adding, “A typical conversation would consist of the agents asking a few questions, like, ‘When do you want to get away?’ ‘What do you like to do on vacation?’ and ‘Who is traveling with you?’ The agent will then suggest a variety of options with prices, and do all the work in setting up the perfect getaway!” Debbie also points out that even someone who enjoys the process of “searching for the best deal” would do well to do the actual booking with Travel Savers, because it “…assures you have someone to help with any part of your vacation, before, during and after,” noting that she and her staff may have access to special prices and promotions that can save even more money. To help make your next trip easy, call Travel Savers at 724-627-6799, or email tsavers@windstream.net. Located in the same building, Mail Boxes and More is a shipping center for FedEx and UPS. The manager, Linda Enia, can pack and ship your boxes, or accept prepaid boxes for a small fee. They also offer fingerprinting service through Cogent, and carry a small collection of cards. For more information, please call Linda at 724-852-1311. A logistics transportation company, Bethlehem Farms, shares the building under the management of Christine Shepas. Their services include matching the needs of shipments and transportation. For larger moving and shipping needs, contact Bethlehem Farms at bethfarms@windstream. net. A new business in the building is Nikki’s Beauty Salon. Working by appointment only, Nikki’s can be reached at 724-678-0118, or by emailing nikkisbeautysalon1@gmail.com.

GreeneScene

MARCH / APRIL

2014 • GreeneSaver

31


Garden Club Scholarship Available

Greene School Retirees Plan Trip

Town and Country Garden Club of Rices Landing awards a $1,000.00 scholarship each year. The scholarship is good for one academic year and is awarded to a student in one of the five Greene County School Districts. Graduating seniors who are pursuing an education in environmental studies, conservation, ecology, forestry, horticulture, landscape design, education or science are eligible to apply. Qualifying students should contact their respective guidance counselors for application and additional details. The deadline to apply is April 30.

Training for Health Care Workers Provided Domestic Violence Services of Southwestern PA (DVSSP) posts the following important information: “Domestic violence does not discriminate. In addition to married couples and dating partners, domestic violence occurs between blood relatives. DVSSP provides training for health care providers on recognizing signs of elder abuse in patients.” FMI call 724-852-2373 in Greene Co., 724223-5477 in Washington Co., and 724-437-2530 in Fayette Co.

National Library Week Whether you are a job seeker looking for resources to land a new job, a parent looking for free activities for children or a student searching for your next favorite book, Lives Change @ Your Library. The Bowlby Public Library is celebrating National Library Week April 13-20, and offering FINE FREE WEEK to all Greene county citizens. Return those long overdue materials! Also, take advantage of the library’s valuable resources, such as genealogical collections, materials in print and electronic formats, job seeking resources, English as second language and citizenship classes, and many other creative and resourceful programs.

Members Alberta Jones, Mikki Chesney and Irene Jacobs are preparing for the Greene County Association of School Retirees’ (GCASR) sponsored trip on September 8-13 to Mackinac Island, MI. The trip features a tour of the Henry Ford Museum, the Ford Rouge Plant where the popular F-150 pickup is assembled and to Greenfield Village where there is a bridge that once stood at the Ackley Farm in Greene County. The trip also includes a stop at Frankenmuth, MI; Bronner’s Christmas Shop; the Motor City and Soaring Eagle Casino & Resorts. This trip is open to everyone. Total cost of the trip is $850 per person based on double occupancy. Payments can be made in installments. To reserve a place or for more information call 724-499-5254.

What Do You Collect? Conversation around the GreeneSaver the other day somehow landed on what people collect. Shelly collects matchbooks; Chuck has quite a number of Davy Jones figurines on his desk, and though he won’t admit it, Shane has what definitely qualifies as a collection of race T-shirts at home. Ryan spent his youth collecting baseball cards and Chuck (who remains youthful) still collects Magic the Gathering cards. Regis says all he’s collecting these days are tools, which might have something to do with all the DIY days coming at the house he just bought. He does have every issue of Bass Player Magazine though, including one where his own photo shoot was published. Anyway… we began to wonder if our readers might want to join in the conversation. What do you collect? If you have an interesting collection, anything unusual or impressive – let us know about it. Take some pictures, too. We want to hear from you! Call us at 724-627-2040; or send us an email info@greenesaver.com; or stop by our office at 185 Wade Street in Waynesburg (behind Scotty’s Pizza), next to Auto Zone.

Here’s a sign with a great sentiment. GreeneSaver Editor Shelly spotted this one going south on Rt. 18 near Holbrook – obviously at the Valley Chapel Church. If you see a sign that grabs your attention, snap a picture and share with us!

32

Scouting for Food Both the Direct Results/GreeneSaver Office at 185 Wade Street on the east side of town, and the Bowlby Public Library at 311 N. West Street near downtown are collection sites during the month of April for the Boy Scouts’ Scouting for Food program. All kinds of canned fruits, vegetables, and other canned products are welcome, as well as sealed, dry packaged foods such as rice, pasta and cereals. Donation boxes will be placed in the lobby at Direct Results, and at the entrance and in various departments of the library. All donations will benefit our local area food bank.

GreeneSaver •

MARCH / APRIL

2014


S

Southwest Regional Medical Center

outhwest Regional Medical Center hosted an open house on Friday February 28 to showcase the improvements made through the State of Pennsylvania Redevelopment Assistance Capital Program (RACP) matching grant. The total cost of the improvements was $1 million with $500,000 coming from the RACP program and the remaining $500,000 provided by Southwest Regional Medical Center. Over 100 individuals toured the facility’s new all private rooms. Each room on the third floor, including the medical surgical and intermediate care unit, has been updated with fresh paint, new flooring, wireless internet access and new Isogel air support mattresses. Although every patient now has their own room, they are not charged more for this level of care. Also updated was the hospital’s emergency department. The department, which is staffed by board certified physicians, received new paint, wider doorways and other changes, which will enhance the flow for the entire department. The emergency department has grown from serving approximately 12,000 patients in 2005 to approximately 24,000 today. Other featured areas included: • Cardiology Services - Staff discussed a new venous ablation procedure and pacemaker insertion services. • Surgical Services- Patients coming in for surgery now receive their own private post-surgical recovery suite for their family to enjoy during surgery complete with their own television. Patients are then brought to this area after surgery where the surgeon can discuss the procedure with the patient and family. • Hospitalist Services- Jami Boris, MD was on hand to answer questions about her role as a Hospitalist.

Greene County Commissioners Chuck Morris, Archie Trader and Blair Zimmerman; State Representative Pam Snyder and Senator Tim Solobay are recognized by Cindy Cowie, CEO for providing the support needed to complete the RACP renovation project. Pictured from left are Morris, Trader, Zimmerman, Cowie, Snyder and Solobay.

MARCH / APRIL

2014 • GreeneSaver

33


Behm’s Auction and Real Estate Service A

fter more than 75 years in business, Behm’s Auction and Real Estate Services is still a leading provider of auction services in our community and beyond. Based in Greene County, PA, the company conducts various auctions throughout the tri-state area of West Virginia, Ohio and Pennsylvania. Three generations strong with Jim Behm at the helm today, as Behm’s Auction Service continues to offer quality service and a personal relationship with each and every client. Years ago, the average auction was nearly as much a social gathering as a business transaction, and most often consisted of household items or livestock. Today’s auctions offer up a much greater variety of goods and buying power for consumers. Today’s technology enables internet bidding and absentee bids among other ways to access the sale, making selling by auction more lucrative than ever before. Of course, maximizing income while minimizing effort is one of the greatest advantages of selling by auction. Behm’s works directly with individual owners and also with executors, corporations, and bankruptcy attorneys, among many others. Sales may range from a local family relocating or the settlement of an estate to the sale of personal property, real estate, or business liquidations. One of the many reasons that people choose to hire Behm’s Auction and Real Estate Services is that each auction is handled with professional courtesy and personal attention. “I’m often asked why people use our company, and the answer is very simple. We treat each auction as if it were our own. We strive to liquidate their assets, personal property, or real estate in a reasonable amount of time, resulting in the highest value that we can achieve,” explains Jim Behm. With thousands of auctions conducted throughout the tri-state area, Behm’s Auction and Real Estate Services is a familiar name. Most importantly, it is a trusted name in the auction industry. For more information call the office at 724-428-3664 or visit the website at www.behmsauction.com.

GreeneScene

Mickey’s Mens Store G

reene County is fortunate to be home to many businesses that have long been a part of their communities; one of the most respected is Mickey’s Men’s Store. Opened by Mickey Bruno in 1967, Mickey’s originally specialized in dress clothes. While this is still an important part of their repertoire, the area’s changing needs have allowed them to expand into impressive selections of fireretardant (FR) clothing, metatarsal/work boots, and Carhartt outerwear. Many Carhartt items are kept in stock, and Mickey’s will gladly special order to meet their customer’s needs. When Mickey passed away in 2004, he left the business to his children, John and Victoria. Victoria admits that there were challenges in maintaining the business, but all of that changed when the gas and oil industry entered the area several years ago. “We were probably the only store within a hundred miles that stocked FR clothing at the time,” she said, adding gratefully, “Our business probably doubled! If it wasn’t for them [industry workers], we probably wouldn’t be here.” Visit Mickey’s Men’s Store, where traditional service meets modern clothing!

34

GreeneSaver •

MARCH / APRIL

2014


The Power of Camp/ Cornerstone Ministry Center • On average, kids spend 3.5 minutes in meaningful conversation with their parents each week1. • Kids age 8-18 spend an average of 7.5 hours a day using entertainment media2. • Children play outside an average of four minutes a day3. Now, here is another fact that stands in sharp contrast to the points listed above: a week at camp provides kids with more than 10,000 minutes away from the pressures of daily life, in a beautiful, natural setting with trusted adult role models. “The Power of Camp” seeks to connect young people and those who care about them in a lifechanging partnership. Cornerstone Ministry Center of Jefferson, PA is participating in a national campaign launched by Christian Camp and Conference Association (CCCA) to send thousands of kids to camp for a week. The Power of Camp is a national initiative to raise campership dollars, and to help local camps like Cornerstone give kids the best week of their lives. Locally, Cornerstone Ministry Center is working to provide this “experience of a lifetime” for children in grades 2 through 12. In years past, it was necessary for Cornerstone Ministry Center to conduct what might be called a “floating” campsite, as

they had no permanent location. In 2008, CONSOL Energy donated 27 acres of land in Morgan Township, and the dream of a permanent site for Cornerstone began. Vacant land and buildings that once had served as a mine portal were now destined to become a resource for youth and community unlike any other in our area. With countless hours of planning, hard work and the support of many, the dream materialized and the “Power of Camp” came home to Greene County. Last summer, Cornerstone held five weeks of camp, hosting 264 campers in a beautiful, tranquil setting about a mile from Dry Tavern. Judy Virgili, Executive Director of Cornerstone Ministry Center, is eager to educate parents and the public about the unique benefits children receive from a week at the camp, including time to consider their future and who they want to be, and a chance to get a clearer understanding of their purpose in life. In support of this mission the public is encouraged to donate scholarships to help send a child to camp, making this important, faith-based experience available to as many children as possible. “I’ve seen  5 campers grow up and become involved in missions with one of them on an international basis,”  says Judy, adding, “Three of those campers now work at the camp, changing lives, one child at a time.”

1. www.csun.edu/science/health/docs/tv&health.html 2. www.cdc.gov/obesity/childhood/problem.html 3. www.kff.org/entmedia/upload/8010.pdf

MARCH / APRIL

2014 • GreeneSaver

Direct Results, home of the GreeneSaver, is proud and excited to be among the first local businesses joining the effort to send kids to Cornerstone, offering two full scholarships to Judy and her team. Locally owned by Shelly Brown and Pam Blaker, Direct Results Inc. has a history of investing in area youth in many growth and leadership endeavors. “Helping young people develop responsibility and learn life skills, both physical and spiritual, is a goal worth supporting,” said Pam. Shelly concurs, “We believe supporting youth programs is one of the wisest investments we can make. We’ve seen so much energy and labor go into the building of Cornerstone Ministry Center, it’s actually a privilege for us to be able to say we’re now joining hands to continue the effort.”

A full scholarship costs $180 per child, and incremental scholarships may also be given. Contributions from businesses and caring individuals are welcome, and can be mailed to: Cornerstone Ministry Center P.O. Box 378 Carmichaels, PA 15320 To learn more, please contact Judy Virgili or Carolyn Shoup at 724-966-9157, or via e-mail at cbmswpa@windstream.net.

35


Waynesburg Animal Hospital Celebrating 25 Years!!

Animal Care Staff

I

Front row, L-R: Luke the Great Dane; Shannon Cagle, VT; Cindy Collins, CVT; Rachel Monroe, VT; Ruby the Great Dane. Back row, L-R: Becca Russell; Kristina Secilla; Liz Forsyth, RVT. (Not pictured: Cyndi Coll, VT; Jenny Phillips; Rachel Warman)

t’s an important year for Waynesburg Animal Hospital (WAH). In July 1989, Dr. Jennifer (Lewis) Behm watched as Dr. Elmer Marx drove down the WAH driveway on his way to retire in Alaska. Built in 1954, Waynesburg Animal Hospital has been improving the lives of animals for 60 years: 35 years under Dr. Marx, and 25 years under Dr. Behm! “It’s hard to believe that I was only 25 years old when I came to live and work in Greene County,” says Dr. Jennifer. “Now I’ve been here 25 years – it hardly seems possible!” A lot has changed in the world of veterinary medicine over the lifetime of the hospital. It has transitioned from a rural, ambulatory, large animal practice to a modern, full-service companion animal hospital. Dr. Behm still goes on the road to care for animals, but just not as often. “I feel so very fortunate to have begun my practice of veterinary medicine when I did. Before cell phones, before computers – I just worked helping animals - all day, and sometimes all night. On-call 7 days a week, 24 hours a day. When I graduated from veterinary school, I wanted to be like James Herriot, traveling from farm to farm, house to house, treating ‘all creatures great and small.’ And yes, it has been a very demanding lifestyle, but has been worth every minute of it!” Even after 25 years, some things never change at WAH. The love of animals is what motivates all 4 veterinarians and 15 staff members of WAH - and always will! Peg Shaffer has been a part of WAH for over 18 years. Yes, she loves animals, but she also takes immense pride in “helping clients to take care of their pets.” Every client comes in with a story to tell, a life that they share with a pet, or 3, or 10! And Peg knows almost every one of them! According to Behm, “With Peg and the whole, amazing WAH staff working side by side, it is our goal, everyday, to offer each client and animal our time, our patience, our professional knowledge and compassionate veterinary care. By helping their beloved pet, we know that we are making a difference in their lives.” That’s special. For Dr. Jennifer, “The last 25 years at WAH have been the pursuit of a passion, a labor of love – a way of life, for me and my family. I feel grateful everyday to have the opportunity to work with so many amazing people and animals. I can’t wait to see what the next 25 years bring!”

Veterinary Doctors

L-R: Bob Havern, D.V.M., PhD; Jennifer Behm, V.M.D.; Joe Scheffen, D.V.M.; Amy Cink, D.V.M.

Customer Care Representatives

Front row, L-R: Keri Cole holding “Hoss”; Peg Shaffer holding “Andrew” Back Row, L-R: Amy Watt; Trish Ankrom; Cheryl Garnek (Not pictured: Christi Halliday).

36

GreeneSaver •

MARCH / APRIL

2014


S u m m e r C a mp H e lp s G re e n e C o u nt y C h i ld re n G ro w i n C h r i st

S

ign ups have begun for Camp Allegheny Summer Camp. Camp Allegheny sits on 90 beautiful acres about an hour north of Pittsburgh just outside Ellwood City, PA. From June 16 to 21 Camp Allegheny will welcome campers from Greene County communities, ages 6 to 12, while children ages 11 to 14 will enjoy the fun and learning from July 25 to July 30. Campers will enjoy fun physical activities and arts and crafts while creating friendships and making memories that will last a lifetime. Activities will be offered for all ages and interests. With boating, archery, arts and crafts, hiking, sports, music, swimming, organized games and much more there is something for everyone at Camp Allegheny. A nature and science center and various trails are also onsite for the children to enjoy and learn. Children will also participate in daily devotions and Sunday worship. Camp Allegheny focuses on Christian principles and promotes an awareness of God in nature. Camp Allegheny can accommodate a maximum of 250 campers at a time. The children stay in clean, comfortable, larger cabins that feature toilets, showers and a recreational area. Two groups of children stay in each cabin with their counselors. Sheets and blankets will be provided for all children as well. Camp Allegheny L-R: Bryce Ringer, Logan Mowl, Isaac McCarty

MARCH / APRIL

2014 • GreeneSaver

provides each child with three well-balanced meals a day, as well as a snack before bed, and the children can visit the camp’s canteen where nutritious snacks and souvenirs are available for purchase. Camp Allegheny operates a health center to ensure the well-being of all campers. The center is operated by staff members who have received CPR and First Aid training; some staff members possess a Licensed Jordan and Taylor Cline Practical Nursing degree. There is also a physician available in Ellwood City, and the Ellwood City hospital is located less than 15 minutes from the campsite. Camp Allegheny is a safe, child-friendly environment where the campers can learn and grow. All activities are planned with fun in mind, and are designed to encourage growth in a safe and loving environment. Counselors are at least 17 years old and attend a seven-day training course. Counselor and staff training covers a variety of topics from health care, to leading children in a multitude of camp activities. No child at any time will ever be left unsupervised. For more information or to sign up for Camp Allegheny please visit The Salvation Army Center at 131 W. First Street, Waynesburg, or call Sister Audrey Quinn at 724-852-1479.

37


W

Greene County Tourist Promotion Agency

ith the start of spring the perfect time to introduce fresh projects and ideas, the Greene County Tourist Promotion Agency is proud to offer two new products cel-

ebrating Greene County. Delivered earlier this month, the second edition of the White Covered Bridge puzzle again features members of the 140th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. A popular sight at many county festivals and events, the local Civil War re-enactors were an integral part of the first edition of the puzzle. Shot by photographer Karole Wagner of Rices Landing, the sepia-toned photo depicts nine members of the 140th standing shoulder to shoulder in front of the bridge opening. The newest puzzle joins the six others – Carmichaels, Cox Farm, King, Neddie Woods, Scott and Shriver – in the series celebrating the county-owned covered bridges. Puzzles are $20 each, or $100 for the set of seven. Last year, Tourism introduced a series of four postcards and notecards depicting seasonal watercolor portraits of Greene County scenes by local artist Leslie Fehling of Prosperity. Postcards are 50 cents each, or 30 cents each when 10 or more are bought. Notecards are sold as a boxed set of 12 with envelopes and a pen for $15, or are available for $2 apiece. Other keepsake items include Christmas cards and ceramic mugs. The Christmas cards also feature the watercolor work of Fehling, who painted four snow-covered scenes. A boxed set of 20 cards with envelopes and a pen costs $20. The white ceramic tumbler mugs feature four separate photos of county locations, and include silicone lids. Prices are $15 for one mug, $25 for any two or $50 for the set of four. Keepsake items can be purchased in the Tourism office, or through the new “Greene County Gifts” section of the Tourism Web site, www.GoGreeneCounty.org. Also debuting this spring is the brand-new official Greene County Visitors Guide, a 32-page, full-color publication full of information and photos highlighting the county’s prime attractions, events, and businesses and organizations. Entries are broken down into seven categories – Exploring, Agritourism, Recreation, Learning, Staying, Shopping and Dining – and list key contact information, including addresses, phone numbers and web sites. A calendar of annual events is also included. GoGreeneCounty.org mirrors the Visitors Guide in both design and content, thanks to the expert work of graphic artist Alan Laick of Laick Design, who completed both projects. For more information, call the Tourism office at 724-627-8687, or visit www.GoGreeneCounty.org.

38

GreeneSaver •

MARCH / APRIL

2014


W

Barnhart’s Honda

ith over 11,000 square feet under roof, Barnhart’s Honda Suzuki in Ruff Creek, PA is filled to capacity with sheer power and excitement inside. And there’s more to come. “We have some exciting plans for 2014, including the addition of a new line - the most popular ATVs and UTVs in America right now,” says owner Yvonne Barnhart, “And we have new 2014 Honda stock coming in every day. Including some new models The show room is full.” “We’re beyond ready for spring…and we know you are, too,” says sales manager Tim Kirby. “This is the year of the street bike!” he adds with enthusiasm, “I plan to be on my bike every possible day. If this is your year, too, then come see us, we’ve got some very exciting machines and incredible deals right now.” “Anything that is not current year is going out the door at a deep discount. We have a Honda F6B that was our demo last year, between the Honda bonus bucks and Barnhart’s discount, someone will save thousands of dollars on that one. We’ve still got a couple Furys and Shadows with some significant savings. And the new stuff coming in right now is really exciting. Besides the regular Shadows and VT1300 customs, we have the all-new 2014 Valkyrie coming. It’s a brand new model – It is an 1800 now instead of the 1500 – a totally different look. Barnhart’s is also brimming with all new gear and accessories. “We have all the 2014 stuff here, we stock Fly Racing Gear and we can also get other brands - Answer, Moose, MSR Thor. Our spring specials include the ATV wheel and tire kit – buy three get one free. There’s plenty of other deals, too – just come in the showroom and see,” said Kevin Kirby, Parts Manager. Keep checking the website for Open House dates later this spring, most likely in May, and updates on our new line coming soon. You can also follow Barnhart’s on Facebook. “We always invite customers to send us pictures to share on our bulletin board and on Facebook. If you have a ride you’re proud of – send it to us – no matter the make or model,” says Tim, “And if you don’t have one – then you definitely need to come see us!” Barnhart’s is also inviting everyone to participate in “Jumpstart Relay for Life” with a battery recycling program. Bring your old car, motorcycle or ATV batteries to Barnhart’s and for every battery they receive, Barnhart’s will donate a dollar to Greene County’s Relay for Life event, in memory of Vicky Barnhart. “Old batteries can be recycled, so we can be ‘green’ and help the fight against cancer at the same time. We want to donate everything we can raise from old batteries to Relay for Life in memory of my mother,” Yvonne said. So bring your old batteries to Barnhart’s and support the cause. Join Barnhart’s in celebrating life, the spring season and all the new and exciting changes coming in 2014. Remember to Ride Barnharts! www. ridebarnharts.com

GreeneScene

MARCH / APRIL

2014 • GreeneSaver

39


40

GreeneSaver •

MARCH / APRIL

2014

March/April 2014 - Greenesaver  

This month, Pt. 2 of our Growing in Greene feature, plus March Madness trivia, a partying recipe in "What's Cooking," a feature on a local c...

March/April 2014 - Greenesaver  

This month, Pt. 2 of our Growing in Greene feature, plus March Madness trivia, a partying recipe in "What's Cooking," a feature on a local c...

Advertisement