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KC Excavating

ver eight years ago, a son came to his father and said, “Dad, I think we should buy a mini excavator.” The dad looked at him, thinking that perhaps his son was losing his mind. But the more the son explained his reasoning, the more sense it made to the dad. When the son was a small boy, he and the dad would spend a good bit of time at Ross Tractor. The dad always envied the fact that Joe Ross and his son Jody were able to work together and somehow wished that he and his son would someday be able to do the same. Acting on faith and a belief in his son’s abilities as an accomplished equipment operator, the father and son went together and started ‘KC Excavating’,

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fulfilling both the dreams of the father and son, Dave and Karl Cole. The business quickly took off as customers found out what excellent results they received from the quality work and reasonable pricing that Dave and Karl provided. Dave says, “We have been busy ever since, and 75% of our work is repeat business, which says a lot about how we treat our customers and how they are satisfied with our work for them.” “We have been so blessed to be able to serve the good folks in Greene County. We have met so many wonderful people through the years. We very much appreciate all of our customers. Greene County people are just great to work with. Thank you.”

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McCracken Pharmacy

riginally established in 1961 by Jack McCracken, this local drug store has progressed in all the right ways over the years, changing where change was needed while keeping personal service a tradition; very much in keeping with the slogan, “Yesterday’s Service, Today’s Technology.” Long-time pharmacist, Scott Adamson, who began his relationship with McCracken when he served an internship in 1992, purchased the pharmacy in 2013, when Jeff McCracken retired. With the same philosophy of balanced progression and tradition, Scott has continued the work of keeping McCracken Pharmacy at the forefront of technology and modern convenience while maintaining comfort and personal attention to every customer. The year 2016 brought many easy-to-see changes as McCracken Pharmacy underwent a total re-branding, introducing a new logo design, color scheme and complete remodeling of the building’s interior and exterior. Located at the gateway to downtown Waynesburg, the remodeling project enhanced both the McCracken building and the neighborhood around it. With carefully chosen colors and style that represent McCracken’s unique brand of “Yesterday’s Service, Today’s Technology” the look certainly says it all. Scott is quick to point out, however, that the longevity and most valuable asset to McCracken Pharmacy is what you find inside the building – the people. “We’ve been fortunate to be able to maintain a relatively large staff, and to keep a high caliber of people who are consistent and compassionate with our customers, I’m proud to

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2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

work with the people here,” Scott emphasizes. There are four pharmacists on staff, along with many additional techs and support personnel serving McCracken’s customers. That’s how they continue to provide “Yesterday’s Service” you can’t find anywhere else.  As for “Today’s Technology,” McCracken Pharmacy has always been a leader in the latest tools and expertise to deliver accuracy and efficiency in filling prescriptions and serving all needs of customers.  That never changes. Just as McCracken was among the very first pharmacies to even use computer technology back in the 1960s, and later the most innovative dispensing systems, our local pharmacy today is helping to pioneer new methods of packaging designed to facilitate and improve accuracy in daily dosing of medications. “We offer innovative blister and strip packaging systems that clearly label and separate medicines for daily doses and help patients and caregivers stay informed and in control,” Scott explains. Particularly useful for those who take multiple doses and meds, this new system is easy to follow and much appreciated by customers. Just one more example of how our iconic “corner drug store” with all the charm of Yesterday’s Service is still a leader in Today’s Technology.

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UNITY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

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nity Presbyterian Church in Graysville is right out of the 19th century, with a red roof and steeple, freshly painted white walls and old-fashioned colored glass windowpanes. It was built in 1879 and is lovingly maintained by a congregation that goes back 202 years, making it the “Mother Presbyterian Church of Greene County.” According to the historic plaque in Graysville’s Roadside Park, the Presbytery of Washington County organized its first Greene County church at the home of David Gray on August 27, 1814. A log schoolhouse a mile from town was turned into a meeting place and that first generation of followers are buried in Braddock Cemetery, where the log cabin once stood. Today, Unity shows off its modern trappings loudspeakers fill the air with old time religious music on Sunday morning and a brand new electronic sign in front gives words of wisdom and blessings along with church service time – 10 a.m. Sunday, rain, snow or shine. Most of the parishioners were born nearby and can still remember the good old days. Shorty Bissett remembers riding a pony from his home on Hidden Valley Road to the school that is now a private residence, just past the Graysville store on the road to Nineveh. He doesn’t remember the pony’s name but knows his dad bought it from Mr. Orndoff. On the second Sunday in Lent, March 12, Shorty’s daughter Peggy Sue joined the ranks of church elders that go back to when Reverends John Anderson and Joseph Stevenson ordained Francis Braddock, David Gray, Moses Dinsmore and Jacob Richey as elders in David Gray’s living room. While her dad sat beaming, Peggy went to the alter to receive the blessings of her commitment from Pastor David Lowe, then was all smiles as the rest of the congregation of elders, friends and family gathered round to give her hugs. Guest speaker Dustin Hartman of Canonsburg then came to the alter to bring his modern day outreach mission from Washington County to the congregation. “Let’s pray for the students of West Greene – let’s touch their hearts and draw them away from drugs and the material ways. Let’s raise up leaders and volunteers to reach out to the youth.” Dustin is the area director of Young Life, a ministry of young adults, who drives many country miles to be friends

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with high school teens. Dustin’s Greene County team is five Waynesburg University students who help kids find fun, safe things to do while setting the example for the good life choices that are in the gospels just waiting to be understood. Young Life groups and gatherings are having an impact on the kids of West Greene, Dustin explained, because “We’re blessed to have these leaders who give so much of their free time. The kids get together to have fun, then afterwards they have a chance to talk. They can say what does this mean or who is this Jesus guy? We give them the gospel in a way they understand. We’re not waiting for the kids to show up. We’re going to them. They don’t care what you know until they know you care. We also have a Wild Life program for middle schoolers and after church I’m going over to the Graysville Fire Hall and meet with those kids. We’re always looking for places to meet so if your organization has room, let us know.” When the service was over, everyone left with a stone in their pocket, along with a gentle hint from Pastor Lowe and Dustin that prayer can change a heart of stone into warm beating flesh if you let it. For more information about Young Life contact Dustin at dustinRhartman@gmail.com or call 724-678-5957

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Nanny’s Creative Learning Center

n a nurturing environment, focusing on the fine motor skills so important to early childhood development, is where you’ll find Nancy Moore, Owner and Director of Nanny’s Creative Learning Center. Nancy, a graduate of Waynesburg College and native to Greene County, fulfilled the dream of owning her own business beginning 19 years ago. After earning a degree in elementary education she spent several years as acting Director for other local daycares. With experience and an ambition to create the best setting possible, Nancy decided to establish her own daycare business designed to meet the needs of her local community. Her enthusiasm coupled with her devotion to raising these kids like her own is what fuels the program’s curriculum. A relaxed atmosphere incorporating what Nancy calls “old school methods” of handwriting, coloring, and creative activities to introduce science based experiments and math concepts is what makes her program unique. In an age where computers are the mainstream for all activities whether educational or recreational, Nanny’s Creative Learning Center keeps the personal touch an integral part of the learning experience. The learning center is a small pre-k school, daycare and after school facility working with kids from 3-10 years old. It operates Monday-Friday, 7am to 5pm, and offers breakfast, lunch and a snack. The facility is licensed by the state of Penn-

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sylvania and employs five others beside Nancy. In addition to the staff, Waynesburg College students enrolled as nursing and elementary education majors offer their services in guiding creative activities. Experiencing the activity of working with children helps serve as a stepping stone to their careers in community oriented occupations. One of the more unique activities the college students provide is teaching safety and good hygiene using puppetry. Referrals continue to be the learning center’s best advertising. “Many parents share with others that their children who have graduated from our program here go on to become honor students and perform well throughout their educational career. I really feel proud when I hear that, and I credit the outstanding staff we’ve maintained here at the Learning Center,” says Nancy. Nanny’s Creative learning Center at 504 Washington Road, Waynesburg, PA, 15370 is a country setting providing a safe zone for kids to walk/hike, see horses, cows and turkeys and breathe the fresh air. Kids coming from both Washington and Greene counties are afforded an opportunity beyond most pre-school environments today, because Nancy believes in “treating them like they’re my own.”

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4 Seasons Lawn & Garden & 4 Seasons Rentals

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Seasons Lawn & Garden and 4 Seasons Rentals on Rolling Meadows Road in Waynesburg, continue to offer area residents the best choice in lawn & garden equipment sales, service, parts, and rentals. Customers can find the best prices and quality here with top brands like John Deere, Stihl, Simplicity, Honda Power Equipment, and Husqvarna just added recently. With trusted names like these, 4 Seasons Lawn & Garden can ensure that their customers have the best equipment available. “It’s all about value,” says owner Murray Hoy. “We try to sell brands that last longer, hold their value better, and provide our customers with a more pleasurable experience while using it. We have found that these product lines do all of that and more, we are very proud and committed to the brands we sell.” Selling the best products is only part of 4 Season’s winning equation; backing that up with the best service in the area keeps their customers

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coming back. 4 Seasons has always focused on the service department by providing training for our service techs, and upgrading the tools and equipment necessary to increase efficiency and speed up the service process. 4 Seasons not only services the brands they sell, they also offer service for many other brands as well. “We are very proud of our ability to not only get your equipment repaired quickly, but make sure we get it fixed right the first time,” says Murray. A good price on equipment is certainly a draw, and coupled with the superior service described above, it’s easy to see why so many people choose to buy, and buy again, at 4 Seasons Lawn & Garden. “We really do enjoy a lot of return customers here,” Murray explains, “Our business is about relationships and my staff is trained to make our customer’s experience here both valuable and enjoyable. Our professional staff is the best, I am very proud of them. People appreciate dealing with someone who has the

knowledge and experience to answer their questions, find what they need, and fix their problems. We can do that.” There are countless jobs, big and little, that go with every house. When you have the right tools for the job, it makes things much easier. For the times when you don’t have what you need, 4 Seasons Rentals, a sister company of 4 Seasons Lawn & Garden, is just the place to get you equipped and on your way, without the expense of having to purchase something that you may only need to use for one job. If you didn’t know that, you’re not alone: “A lot of people still don’t realize that we rent equipment - renting equipment has definitely become more popular,” Murray affirms, adding, “We have a variety of things that the average person might not have, things like a trencher, log splitter, wood chipper, garden tillers, stump grinder, air nailers, power drills, floor sanders, carpet shampooers, jackhammers,

pressure washers moving equipment, concrete power trowell, saws , trimmers, power tampers and so much more.” Some of the most popular rental items we offer are our tents and event needs. 4 Seasons has a variety of tent sizes and styles to choose from. “We have you covered whether your party is only a few people or a few hundred - we provide the tables and chairs, we deliver and set everything up for you, we have a dance floor, and we now offer all the linens you’ll need, as well,” says rental manager Courtney Hursey, “We have set up for birthdays, graduation parties, retirement parties, weddings - just about any occasion you can think of, and the calendar is already filling up. Call now for any event you have coming this spring, summer or fall.” 4 Seasons Lawn & Garden and 4 Seasons Rentals are both located at 600 Rolling Meadows Road, here in Waynesburg for your convenience. Call 724-627-6153

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2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

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I Love this P l a ce

GRAYSVILLE, PA by Colleen Nelson

Graysville Store has a rich history as a community hub (see related story in our GreeneScene of the Past on Page 13.

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f you want to walk in the moccasins of history, take a drive to Graysville on State Rt. 21, aka Roy Furman Highway. Old well-kept farmhouses, a Mail Pouch barn and even a covered bridge near Rutan make for a scenic drive. But before you climb the hill to Wind Ridge, slow down and look around. This quaint little town at the foot

of the hill was once an outpost on the Western Frontier. Enoch’s Fort is no more. But the cluster of houses surrounding the intersection of two creeks still bears the names of its frontier past. Two pioneer family names - Gray and Harvey – keep popping up. The first post office was officially named Harvey’s in 1820 and Sam Harvey was the

Friday night Bingo at the Graysville VFD

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first post master. But it’s the Gray family that gets bragging rights for putting the Gray in Graysville and theirs is a story worth retelling. Brothers David and Matthew Gray moved west from central Pennsylvania in 1779 and made their land claims in virgin forests that would one day be “one farm east of the town of Graysville” according to local historian Dorothy Hennen. These were dangerous times. For seven years the Grays and other pioneer families left their farms in winter to take refuge in Ft. Jackson, along Ten Mile Creek in east Waynesburg. During the winter of 1791 an ”Indian alert” sent the Grays retreating to Ft. Jackson with their four young children once more. Against his brother’s wishes, Matthew Gray, age 29, went back to check on his livestock and did not return. Brother David found his frozen body less than two miles from Ft. Jackson and that part of the family holdings passed to Matthew’s four year-old son John. Back in that day, frontier farmers were our nation’s first statesmen too. David returned to the wilderness to build a “16 x 16 foot dwelling with a separate kitchen and stable” and farm his 200 acres of land (valued at $820.00 in a 1798 tax record). In 1792 he became Justice of the Peace in

Linda McGowan and the famous Ho Ho Cake at Creekside Kitchen.

Richhill Township and when Greene County was formed in 1796, he was one of the original commissioners, then elected a county associate judge. The trail to Waynesburg became known as Drovers Road as more settlers arrived with their livestock, ready to farm the land. A store was built in 1817 on Ewing Run where three roads converged – west to Wheeling, north to Nineveh and down the valley to Waynesburg and farmers came to town to buy what they could not grow. Graysville remained a sleepy little village for the next sixty-some years, but the gas and oil boom of the 1870s brought sudden change. Some families “struck it rich” and stately homes were built. Drilling rigs popped up on every hill and new hotels, stores and businesses - even a funeral parlor - came to town, according to retired machinist Bob Livingood who lives in a house behind the Graysville store. “My family’s been here for a long time,” Bob admits. According to the Pioneer History of Greene County, this is true – “a man by the name of Livingood was waylaid” on that same stretch of trail that Matthew Gray was ambushed on in 1791. Bob’s father helped put Graysville on the map when he invented the four-wheel drive feature for cars in 1914 and drove them from Graysville to his production plant in Iowa and back in all kinds of weather to prove how well they handled mud, ruts and snow. Bob’s built-from-scratch Model T truck is a tribute to his father’s invention. He and wife Mary still take it for a spin to the Creekside Kitchen when the weather is nice. Today, Graysville is the place where neighbors stop to shop, buy gas, do laundry, and grab a bite to eat. And the neighborhood sleeps easier knowing it has the security of a well-equipped volunteer fire department to call on during emergencies. Some of the old buildings in town have stories of their own to tell. The long white two-story house across the road from Graysville Store is where the Graysville Knights of Pythias did their rituals in the big meeting room upstairs. This organization formed in 1864, during the Civil War to promote friendship and generosity. The Graysville K of P formed in 1914 moved its meetings to East Franklin Grange in the 1960s. Their lodge is now the home of Lawrence and Judy Headley and son John’s Attorney

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at Law sign hangs on one door. The Graysville K of P may have moved to Waynesburg, but Harvey’s Grange still calls Drovers Road home. “We used to hold our grange meetings upstairs at the K of P lodge and we used their stage to put on plays,” Mary Jane Kent of Wind Ridge remembers. “There was an apartment downstairs where Mr. and Mrs. Nelson lived and a room down the hall had a pool table. That’s where I learned to shoot pool,” she added with a grin. Her father, Gross Dinsmore, whose own great-great grandfather was another first commissioner of Greene County, raised fine sheep on Nebo Ridge and was a longtime master of Harvey’s Grange. The grange built a new hall a mile down the road in 1967 and Mary Jane is now the Master. Like the Knights of Pythias, Harvey’s Grange keeps the tradition of friendship and generosity alive, with scholarships to West Greene students, fundraisers to help neighbors in need and fun events to entertain and enrich. When bingo is called at the Jacktown Fair, it’s grangers who do the calling and the money raised goes into that scholarship fund. Graysville Fire Hall, next door to Whipkeys Laundromat and Unity Presbyterian Church is another community hub that serves its neighbors in many good ways. The sign out front tells the world that bingo happens here every Friday night and sometimes the jackpot is more than $1000. The fire hall’s share benefits the community, especially kids, with Christmas presents, winter coats, school supplies, food and the extra necessities of life. Once you pass the historic markers in Roadside Park, a narrow grassy area beside Grays Run, you’re almost out of town. But slow down – that’s Creekside Kitchen on the left and owner Linda McGowan makes everything from scratch seven days a week. “Everything’s real, just like Grandma,” Linda said, holding up a customer favorite – a triple layer Ho Ho chocolate cake. Her menu includes theme weekends and old time favorites like Creamed Turkey Thursday that draws in diners from miles around. And if it’s a fine sunny day there just might be a Model T truck parked out front.

Bob Livingood in his “built from scratch” Model T

Mickey’s Mens Store

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elebrating its 50th Anniversary this year, Mickey’s Mens Store is the second oldest family-run retail store in downtown Waynesburg. Today, owner/manager Victoria Bruno continues this Waynesburg icon founded by her father Mickey Bruno in 1967. When Mickey passed away in 2004, he left the business to Victoria and her brother John, both of whom had done much of their growing Owner/Manager Victoria Bruno smiles wide as Mickey’s Mens Store begins a year-long 50th Anniversary Celebration in 2017. up right there in the store. “I started working here when I was 14 years old,” Victoria flame resistant clothing and high visibility apparel, recalls, as she tells the story of how the business has the things they needed. Even now Metatarsal boots evolved over the years. are the #1 selling style of boot we carry,” she notes. Mickey’s Mens Store first opened its doors Mickey’s Mens Store is popular with all ages in the Fort Jackson building across the street, of- for casual clothes and accessories as well. You’d be fering primarily men’s fine dress clothes and suits. hard pressed to find a better selection of Carhartt In 1980 the business moved to the current location t-shirts for men and women, actually. And the cuson High Street, which was formerly an Army Navy tomers do come in a variety of personalities as well. Store; and the product lines expanded to include “I like being here,” Victoria says with enthusiasm, more work clothing and work boots. That trend “the customers are great, I like working with the continued over the years and Mickey’s became the public and every day brings new people.” “go to” source for popular brands like Levis, CarBrother John retired in January of 2017. Vichartt, Timberland, Wolverine, Carolina and other toria is the sole owner of Mickey’s Mens Store topopular boots and work wear for customers from day, which remains a strong family tradition, with all over southern PA and northern WV. Victoria brother Kerry working part-time also. Changing credits the stores longevity and success to their with the times, offering today’s most popular styles willingness to meet demand of changing times and keeping prices low – that’s what keeps Mickey’s and markets. “When the gas and oil boom came to Mens Store customers coming back. Stop by and Greene County, we expanded our lines to include wish them a happy 50th anniversary!

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MEALS ON WHEELS

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Senior Centers. Tina Raber, id you know that 1 in 6 seniors Supervisor of the Waynesburg struggle with hunSenior Center describes the efger? Help is availfort this way: “These are warm meals from warm hearts.” If a able to seniors in the form of Meals on Wheels. Meals on holiday would happen to fall during the work week, those reWheels exists in every community throughout America ceiving the meals have the opvia a network of more than tion of receiving a frozen meal to be used on the holiday. 5000 independent locally run programs. Each program is Joe Cook and Paul Carlcommitted to helping seniors son are just 2 of the 25 volunlive healthier and more nourteers at the Waynesburg Senior ished lives. The basis of Meals Center that deliver meals. Joe on Wheels is a nutritious meal, has been delivering meals for companionship and a watchful 16 years. “I like reaching out eye on the health and safety of and visiting with people. It’s our seniors. Nationwide there just not a case of handing the are over 2 million volunteers Pictured are drivers Paul Carlson(left) meal to someone and then that use their own cars and and Joe Cook loading a car with meals leaving. We check on them and in insulated containers. gasoline with no compensation provide help such as calling 911 to deliver the meals to those or a family member if necesin need. For those seniors that can go out and sary,” commented Joe. about, senior centers serve the meals. For those Paul Carlson has been volunteering for four that are homebound, the meals are delivered 5 years. “I was looking for something to do and was days a week. encouraged by friends to give this a try. DeliverIn Greene County the Meals on Wheels pro- ing these meals gives me the satisfaction of helpgram is under the auspices of Community Ac- ing others. Sometimes the volunteers are the only tion Southwest and meals have been delivered in people that they see on a daily basis” said Paul. Greene County since 1968. The project is funded, This program could not exist without volunin part, under a contract with the Southwest- teers. Many volunteers go out in pairs with one ern Pennsylvania Area Agency on Aging, Inc. person driving and the other being the “runner” through a grant from the Pennsylvania Depart- that actually goes to the door of the recipient to ment of Aging. Greene County United Way also hand deliver the meal. The goal is to expand the Meals on Wheels program to include the undersupports this program. According to Stacey Stroman, Director of Se- served areas of the county. But in order to do nior Services, “the home delivered meal program that, more volunteers who are willing to travel is exceedingly valuable to the community, provid- into the outlying areas of the county are needed. ing over 44,000 meals per year to homebound In Greene County the senior centers are located Greene County elderly, which are delivered by in Bobtown, Carmichaels, Jefferson, Mt. Morvolunteer drivers. Home delivered meals provide ris, Waynesburg and West Greene. On average, a community-based and community-supported there are approximately 3,700 meals per month system for helping people remain independent in delivered to 190 unduplicated seniors throughtheir homes. It also provides early identification out Greene County. The meals are provided free and outreach to older adults who may be in need of charge, however a $2 donation is encouraged of additional services. This safety program places to help support costs. Last year a total of 271 vola volunteer in the elderly person’s home on a daily unteers provided 20,374 service hours preparing basis Monday through Friday who can assess the and delivering meals and working with the older situation and report any concerns to trained staff adults in the centers. who then provide linkages to needed services.” Anyone interested in learning more about Carmichaels Senior Center is the location Meals on Wheels or wanting to volunteer should where all the meals are made. They are then contact Stacy Stroman at 724-852-2893 or go to transported in insulated containers to the various www.caswg.org.

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Amedisys

here is a CHOICE in your Home Health Care Provider. It’s very important to have a choice in your health care. Just as no two hospitals or physicians are identical in quality and services, no two Home Health care Agencies are exactly the same. So how do you choose when faced with this decision? You, and only you, can insist on excellent care for you and your loved one. Insist on Amedisys Home Health Care. Our Team is uniquely qualified to serve as your at-home care specialists. When you CHOOSE AMEDISYS Home Health, you CHOOSE: • Proven Outcomes: Our skilled nursing, therapy and other clinical teams use best practices to help make a quantifiable difference in our patients’ quality of life. • Care Transitions: Coordinators that come to you in the hospital, physician office, skilled facility or personal care home to answer questions about home health and ensure that the transition home is seamless. • Territory Area - we have a large geographical area that our clinicians can service within 24-48 hours post discharge including Greene, Washington and Fayette Counties. • Patient Engagement and Empowerment: Our programs feature personalized patient goals, caregiver integration and comprehensive patient

education guides to get patients engaged in their own self-care. • 24/7 Access: Nurses standing by 24/7 to help patients. This in turn gives you greater peace of mind for you and your families. • We have a new Medical Director! Dr. Rebecca Plute M.D. - Board Certified in Family Medicine, has been practicing for over 17 years, building a reputation of excellence. Dr. Plute is a lifelong native of Washington County, actively engaging in the community with her family. Since 2001, patients in Washington and Greene Counties have enjoyed her outstanding commitment to high quality care. Remember you have a choice in Home Health Care! You may forget how to pronounce the nameAMEDISYS - but you will never forget the excellent quality care that we provide.

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High Calling Hoops

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igh Calling Hoops is an exciting new opportunity for Greene County youth. Located in the old Perry Elementary School building in Mt. Morris, High Calling Hoops is a basketball training Center operated by Steve McIntire. Steve, a youth basketball coach for many years, felt a drive to do more. The idea of a basketball training center became a reality when the owner of the old Perry School building agreed to make the location available. It was a perfect fit, and the doors opened in February this year. Also the leader of Team Greene Outdoors Ministry, and Pastor of Greene Believers Fellowship Church, Steve found inspiration for the name of the Basketball Training Center in a bible verse, Philippians 3:14- “I press toward the mark for the prize of the high calling of God in Christ Jesus.” “Our goal with High Calling Hoops is to build a solid foundation on and off the court through the message of the Cross,” Steve says. His inspiration is actually born of personal regret. “When I was in high school, I was good at basketball. My senior year I had several scholarship opportunities, but I couldn’t make the grade. And I don’t mean basketball – I had the athletic skill - but I didn’t have the grades. I didn’t take it seriously. I regret to this day goofing off in high school and not concentrating more on my grades…I plan to help others avoid the same mistake,” Steve vows. “At High Calling Hoops, we hope to impress on the kids to give everything their best and to pur-

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sue their God given talents on and off the court; to develop a never quit attitude and face fears head on. It’s more than basketball training, it’s also life training,” he explains. The skills training stresses the fundamentals: ball handling, dribbling, proper foot work, passing and shooting drills and teaching how to maintain a positive attitude while overcoming obstacles. Steve’s credentials include First Aid & CPR certified, FBI Clearance, PA Child Abuse Clearance and Coaches Certification. He is assisted by son, Darton, and Celine Monica, freshman basketball player at La Roche College. Over a dozen local youth signed up in the program’s first three weeks. “I encourage anyone interested in basketball to check out the Facebook page. If you have a child between the ages of 8-18 that loves basketball, give us a try,” he invites.

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Angelia Berardini Farmer’s Insurance

ngelia Berardini, a second-generation insurance agent, decided to open her Farmers Insurance Agency doors in Carmichaels last year, because it feels like home to her. “Greene County is near and dear to my heart. My mother and her family are from here, and I love being here in Greene County, I think it is a beautiful and serene place to be, and I’ve had such great experiences with all of my customers,” she says. Angelia Berardini has built her agency on a principle she believes is important in all areas of life. “The Golden Rule, do unto others as you would have them do unto you, that’s my guideline,” she says. And staff member Melissa Iams Rush fits right in, according to Angelia, “Melissa has tons of office experience, and an insurance background. She is super sociable and great with all of the customers she meets – which is very important in what we do! She is kind, trustworthy, and knows a lot of people from this area. I think it is so important to establish old and new relationships with our customers. Melissa’s character is perfectly aligned with our agency’s goals, she is a great asset.” The family-owned agency focuses primarily on building trusting relationships with its customers. “We do the very best we can from the beginning. There is no actual end, because we never cease in helping our customers. Days, month… years down the road, we want to make sure everyone

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knows what coverages they have and we continue to do policy reviews to make sure it’s what they need,” Angelia explains, “We are here to help. We want all of our customers to feel comfortable enough to refer us to everyMelissa Iams Rush. one they know. It is important to save money and have peace of mind – knowing they are covered in any case. I love to help people, and this is a great way to do so!” Angelia Berardini’s Farmers Agency offers a range of plans and policies - from auto, motorcycle, home, life & business to other needs such as voluntary workplace benefits, rental /landlord property coverage, mobile homes, RV, boats & ATV’s, pet coverage, flood insurance, and more. In her words, “We offer literally every type of coverage except for health insurance, and we can even refer you to our own trusted broker for that!” she says with a smile. Angelia’s Farmers Agency is located at 103 Carmichaels Plaza, Carmichaels, PA 15320. The office is open Monday – Friday from 8:30am to 5:30pm; if you need another time, just call 724-9669323.

Pammy’s Essentials

teeped in family lore, Pammy’s Essentials built-in customer base already, as family, friends was born of tradition in a family living close and neighbors in the community have for years to nature. Pamela McDonald, with the dedi- sought Pam’s products and knowledge. She procated support of her husband, started the vides homemade soaps for friends owning local brand known as Pammy’s Essentials only 6 months businesses and mix ingredients for hair products to ago. However her practice of using natural prod- use on her grandchildren, based on her experience ucts such as lavender, peppermint, coconut, shea helping her grandmother, who was also a beautibutter, bees wax and other organics started long ago cian. as a child in her grandfather’s garden. Pam uses all natural products and seeks out As a child, Pam experienced healing and those with non-GMO ingredients when possible. healthful practices with her family. Growing up, She creates recipes that use all forms of coconut, Pam and her sisters experienced allergies and shea butter, lavender, peppermint and herbs, just to other ailments that many of name a few, for making baths us contend with on a daily salts, creams, soaps and mulbasis. When seeking relief, tiple emollients for daily use. her grandfather, grandmother She’s currently devising a testand mother often sought the ing method to determine the remedies of nature. Her fameffectiveness of an antibacteily was well versed cooking rial soap she makes, based on foods and making remedies a practice performed in the from herbs cultivated in the nursing profession. garden, as well as those found Pam takes great care in the wild. It was just a part of in the products she makes life. These practices continued and claims “a little can go a with her own children and long way”. You can find her grandchildren. products on Facebook under After 25 years as a nurse, Pammy’s Essentials or recently Pam decided to take her pracon Spotify and Amazon. Pam tice of using natural remedies can also be reached by email at for many applications to a sensualpammys@gmail.com. Pamela McDonald with Goliath. commercial level. She had a

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2017


Toothman Dental

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or over 30 years, Dr. Ingrid Toothman has been offering quality dental services at 801 E. Greene St., Waynesburg in the quaint brick house that is Toothman Dental Cen-

Dr. Toothman’s interest in becoming a dentist began early in her life as she worked alongside her father at his dental lab in Pittsburgh. Preparation for her career included obtaining degrees in dental assisting, dental hygiene and Bachelor of Science degrees in the Health Related Professions from the University of Pittsburgh.  From there she was accepted into the University’s Dental School, earning her DMD in 1982.

Dr. Toothman has worked in all phases of dentistry throughout her career—everything from dental lab to dental hygiene, front desk to dental assistant, and the operation of her own dental office. Toothman Dental Center provides quality care using all the latest technology, including digital x-rays which require less radiation, and are healthier for the patient, the workplace and the environment. In addition to exams, cleanings, fillings crowns (caps), and extractions, Toothman Dental Center offers replacement of missing teeth and dentures. The on-site dental laboratory allows for same day repair and reline of dentures, and complete custom dentures – they make them right there. It’s affordable and convenient. Often asked about her last name of Toothman, she laughs and answers:  “My maiden name is Schmidt. I moved here in 1982, and I was already a dentist. Very early upon arriving in Greene County, I met my future husband.  I really wasn’t going to change my name—I was going to be ‘Dr. Schmidt’ for the rest of my career.  But I thought ‘Dr. Toothman’ was better…” Toothman Dental Center always welcomes new patients of all ages and with varying dental needs.  “Give us a call to schedule an appointment and leave your smile to us!”

G ree n e Sce n e of the Pa st Hays Store in Graysville

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hoever built the store in Graysville that hugs the bank of Ewing Run has been lost to time, but there’s no mistaking who the owner is in this old photo from 1870. James Wilson Hays was from a prominent, pioneering Greene County family. His father, the Hon. William Thompson served

in county government and represented Greene County in state legislature. In 1813 Dad bought a printing plant and established the county’s first newspaper, the Messenger. J. W. was born in Waynesburg in 1817 and by 1842 became the editor and owner of the family paper. After a stint in Pittsburgh collecting fees on

the Pennsylvania Canal, JW made it to “Washington City” in 1853 to work in the Post Office Department during President Pierce’s term. But the mercantile life was in his blood and after starting a leather tanning business with his brother-in-law, in 1867 J W Hays “retired” to Graysville to become owner of this store. It has survived many owners who added rooms, gas pumps and other features, and is now known simply as the “Graysville Store”. It’s easy to imagine that big sign in 1870 did double duty as campaign advertisement because J W Hays wasn’t exactly retired - he ran for office while managing his country store and was elected by his neighbors to represent them in the Pennsylvania state senate from the 40th District for the 1876 -78 term. In those early days and for decades afterwards Hays Store was known as the largest general merchandising store in Greene County, according to local historian Susie Crow. “If Graysville doesn’t have it - it couldn’t be found.” Over the next hundred-plus years ownership passed through local families and the store continued to sell everything from notions to nails, hardware and every kind of tool, fencing supplies, boots, yard goods, food, salt blocks, pots and pans, guns and ammunition and of course, penny candy. “We sold everything from bolts to underwear,” onetime owner Ken Baldwin said. “We even sold riding mowers.”

by Colleen Nelson

The “Y” in the road led to a hardware store to the left and a general store to the right. With separate owners for each store and the stores changing hands, the names of the owners became markers in time – Smith & Bryan, Staggers & Blair, Staggers & Kimmel, Staggers, Kimmel & Mitchell, then Mitchell & Baldwin. Twenty-seven years later Ken Baldwin sold the store to Delmer Livingood and went up the road to open Baldwin Custom Meat Shop. When Livingood sold to Roy Shriver, Shriver’s Store became the place to get gas and goodies on the way home from Graysville Elementary School, or before a trip up Breakneck Hill to “Little Washington.” The store sat vacant for a couple of years until new owners Dave and Chris Cipoletti remodeled then reopened it as Graysville Store on Memorial Day, 2004. There’s a deli now, and pizzas and hoagies custom made. The Cipoletti passion for hunting shows – there are stuffed and mounted trophies to be seen, including the squirrel Dave shot at age 12, keeping an eye on customers. If you stop by, plan to spend awhile trying to see everything this store has to offer. It’s the place to go to get those things you forgot to get in town and maybe even something you didn’t know you wanted until you came inside (See a current day picture of Graysville Store in our “I Love this Place” feature on Page 8.

If you have an interesting old photo from the area you’d like to share, just send it to: GreeneScene of the Past, 185 Wade Street, Waynesburg, PA 15370. Or email to: info@greenescene.com with GreeneScene Past in subject line. The GreeneScene Community Magazine can even scan your original in just a few minutes if you bring it to our office. We are particularly interested in photos of people and places in the Greene County area taken between 1950 and 1980, though we welcome previous dates, too.

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Co o l at Sc h o o l

by Shelly Brown

TRIED BY A JURY OF YOUR PEERS

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uzzing with teenage chatter just moments before, a sudden hush fell over the room on the third floor of the Greene County Courthouse, as an 18-year-old Judge called the room to order for the very first session of Greene County Peer Court. It was Wednesday, February 22, 2017. This was not a field trip, a demonstration, mock trial or observation. This was the first convening of a very real court, resulting in the actual sentencing of a juvenile offender in Greene County by a jury of his peers. What promises to be an effective tool in reducing juvenile crime and recidivism, Peer Court is a new program in Greene County’s judicial system, though the concept is not a new one. Peer Court, also known as Youth or Teen Court, is an alternative approach to the traditional juvenile justice system. A youth charged with an offense has the opportunity to forego the hearing and sentencing procedures of juvenile court and agrees to a sentencing forum with a jury of his or her teenage peers. “They’ve been doing it for 20 years in Philadelphia. I’ve seen it done in other places, including Washington County. But it’s important that you structure it so it truly is a “peer” court. The kids on both sides have to be able to relate to each other,” said Judge Jesse J. Cramer, Senior Magisterial District Judge, who introduced the idea to the Greene County Justice system. “Greene County is a perfect area for it, because there’s not as much disparity as you might find in more urban settings,” he added. Judge Cramer, who was appointed to fill the Magisterial District Judge vacancy created in Greene County when Judge Lou Dayich was elected Judge of the Court of Common Pleas, has a long history on the bench with 30 years as a Magisterial

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District Judge in Belle Vernon and currently a Senior Magisterial District Judge. He also has an extensive background working with youth as an athletic director and coach in the Belle Vernon Area School District for 38 years. “As a coach you see how kids get into trouble…how it starts. As a judge you’re always looking for ways to come up with effective sentencing that can get their attention and stand a chance of changing their attitudes and behavior.” “Kids listen to other kids. They’re more concerned with how other kids ‘judge’ them than what a judge on the bench has to say. And kids do judge each other,” Judge Cramer said. Peer Court in Greene County is currently staffed by participants from four of the county high schools, with six students from each. These students were selected by their own teachers for participation. From that group of 24, certain roles are assigned for the actual hearings. These include: “Judge of Understanding” who directs the proceedings, recognizes the speakers and keeps things moving along; the “Student Advocate for the Accused”, who meets in private with the accused and makes a formal statement providing any background information that may shed some light on his or her situation and sentencing ; the “Student Advocate for the Accuser” who makes a general statement as to the severity of the charge and what the possible punishment could be if handled in traditional juvenile court; the “Clerk of the Court” who is the keeper of the court records, including the contract signed by the accused and follow up reports; and there is the “Peer Jury” – the remaining students who question the accused, listen to responses, deliberate and decide on the sentence that will be offered in the form of a contract. The students rotate

through these positions with each new hearing. The “accused” is an actual offender who has been charged and pled in the magistrate’s court and is being given an opportunity to be sentenced by the Peer Court, rather than the Magistrate. The Peer Court program has defined criteria and specified offenses making him or her eligible for this opportunity, including violence in schools, alcohol or tobacco use and bullying along with other minor first summary offenses. At the end of his or her hearing the adjudicated youth is presented with a contract outlining the recommendations that must be met for the disposition of the case to be satisfied. At this point the youth has the option of agreeing and signing the contract or going back to magistrate court to receive sentencing and penalties or fines. The training of the participating students and the proceedings of the Peer Court as well as the execution of the sentences are organized, supervised and implemented by the combined efforts of the directors and staff of Greene County Community Service and Greene County Juvenile Probation Office, in addition to guidance and direction from Judge Cramer. “I see this program as an important part of a comprehensive plan to reach juvenile offenders before they enter the adult system. It’s far cheaper to educate than incarcerate. If the criminal justice system can be proactive and preventative, everyone benefits,” said Bret Moore, Director of Community Service, who also notes the benefits available to the student participants, “Although we have only been working with this group for a short time, I think they are gaining valuable insights into the criminal justice system. On the other hand, those who are adjudicated also seem to be receptive to the results.

They understand that there must be a punishment for their actions, but they also appreciate the fact that there will be no permanent juvenile record.” Director of Juvenile Probations Jenn Rizor shares her enthusiasm: “I believe this to be an amazing program and opportunity for all the youth involved. It has been my experience that adolescents will tune any adult out after a very short time period. However we also know that they are very influenced by their peers, with all the focus on negative peer pressure, this program gives the opportunity for positive peer reactions and influence. It also allows the offending youth an opportunity to be accountable for their actions and learn from them without negatively affecting their future plans and goals.” Following two days of training, the first session of Greene County’s Peer Court included hearings for two juvenile offenders, one an 11-year-old charged with use of tobacco on school property, the other a high school senior, also on a tobacco on school property charge. Both agreed to their proffered contracts, though the sentences dealt by their peers were quite different from each other. The Peer Jury is given in advance a variety of possible penalties, consequences or requirements from which they can choose to construct their sentences. This reporter was impressed watching these teenagers discuss and choose consequences they believed would be most effective at rehabilitation, which seemed to be their priority goal. From writing essays, weekend classes, counseling or performing community service, they sought an effective response. The student participants interviewed were quick to express their enthusiasm for the program, with most citing an “interest in the law” and “a great learning experience” as motivation for participation, some added other personal reasons. Finnegan Dobosh of Carmichaels Area High School said “I wanted the experience to learn, and I wanted a chance to do something that might help keep kids out of juvy.” “This also gives us a chance to see the consequences of crime…helps you make better decisions and not to mess around where you shouldn’t,” said Nathan Brudnock of West Greene. And what do the juvenile offenders themselves think about the experience? How effective will it be in the goal of reducing juvenile recidivism rates in Greene County? It’s too early to tell, though according to Jenn Rizor, parents of both offenders in these first hearings provided very positive feedback. “One mother said to me ‘This is a great program and I was highly impressed by how well the students did, they all took their roles very seriously. I was extremely happy with the outcome and this entire process, it seems to be a great experience for everyone involved’,” Jenn reported. Peer Court will be in session again this month, and reconvene once a month hereafter during the school term. The Greene Scene Community Magazine commends those responsible for the effort, as we anticipate very positive results. We’ll keep you posted.

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Waynesburg Milling Company

favorite shopping destination for locals and out-of-towners, Waynesburg Milling Company on South Washington Street in Waynesburg is preserving the traditions of the past, while moving boldly into the future. Jeanette Lindsay says, “Our staff continues to operate with the same high standards Don and I established when we first took ownership of the store.” Proving the point, current manager Bryan Haines says he considers Waynesburg Milling’s customers his first priority, and often they are his best guide to improving the selection and stock that is ever growing at Waynesburg Milling Company. “We try to meet every customer’s needs, so whenever someone requests an item I don’t have, if I can get it from one of my suppliers, I’ll special order it just for them. And sometimes, that’s how we find a new product line that turns out to be a best seller,” Bryan explains, using Vetericyn, a popular wound care product, as an example. “Someone asked for it, and now we keep the full line in stock, it’s a very popular product.” New products added this year include Sportmix Wholesome Large Breed Dog Food, “Chaffhaye” which is an all-natural Alfalfa Premium Pasture in a bag, and Gold Fields premium dust free extracted straw. Because of their investment in keeping a sol-

id inventory and responding to customer needs, Waynesburg Milling has developed a large and loyal following. Long-time customer Tami Herrod says, “I come here before I go anywhere else… They have it all right here!” It’s true, the tradition of Wayco Livestock feeds and other popular brands (including Purina) remain a staple, yet this business has become so much more than a mill. With spring here, farm and garden supplies are in demand, including the Easy Mole Traps, also popular. Pond supplies are fully stocked and available now. Waynesburg Milling remains the area’s only source of bulk garden seeds, along with all the fertilizers, tools, fencing and spring supplies you would expect to find. They have the popular Muck Brand Boots & Shoes, including those with metatarsal protection. Check out new styles including Edgewater and Muckster II Low, available in assorted colors. It is the area’s true “country store” with an impressive selection of pet supplies and feeds, bird feeders and garden décor, everything equestrian including tack and vet supplies. First time visitors are surprised to see the assortment of country-themed gifts and home décor items in stock, truly unique toys, jewelry and apparel. Look for Spring Clearance pricing right now!

Waynesburg Milling Company can proudly claim one of the longest histories of any business in the area, having first received public mention in a newspaper article from July of 1886, highlighting the “New Process” milling technique used there that was capable of turning 600 bushels of wheat per day into flour. When the mill was sold in 1898, new machinery was installed which increased the capacity to 4500 bushels of wheat per day. In the 1940s, the mill’s flour production ended to concentrate on producing its own trademark brand of Wayco Feeds. The brand is still going strong to this day, though production is done off-site, as the original Waynesburg Milling facility was lost to a fire in 2001.

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BOWLBY BITS

Movie Night –Apr. 12, Disney’s “Hidden Figures”, 5:30pm. FREE popcorn & beverages! Creative Crafting for Adults – 1st Thurs. (5 PM) and 2nd Sat. (10 AM): This month (Apr. 6 & 8) Cost of materials $20. Pre-registration requested. T.O.P.S. - weight management support group meets every Sat., 9:30-11:30am. After Hours Spring Fling Scavenger Hunt – Apr. 7, 4-8pm, afternoon pf spring like scavenger hunt, crafts and snacks. Please Pre Register. Lego Club – Apr. 1 & 15, 11am. All ages Lego building Bowlby Book Club – Apr. 10, 6pm. Discussion on “Each Vagabond by Name” by Margo Orlando Littell. Coding Camp – Children ages 5-8 learn core coding concepts as they create their own interactive stories and games using PBS KIDS characters. 2 weeks remaining. April meetings are 4/6 & 4/20, 5-6pm. Call to register. Genealogy Workshops - 4/6 “The Basics of Genealogy Research” 4/13 “How to Make A Family Tree” 4/20 “Domestic Resources” and 4/27 “Immigration Resources” 5:30-6:30pm each session. After-After Hours, presented by Teen Advisory Group (TAG), Apr. 7, 8-10pm, for teens aged 13-18. Suggested $2 donation at the door. Please pre-register. Spring Story Time – Story Times offered through May 12. For all ages from babies to young adults; call for schedule. Poetry Reading and Awards – April 13, 5:30 PM- winners from Poetry Contest announced. Free test prep for adults studying for SAT, GED, Civil Service exams, Drivers Licensing and Life skills, and for basic reading and math skills. Free after school tutoring for school-age children. Call to schedule appointments. Color Outside the Lines - adult coloring group meets every Wed., 11am-1pm or 6-8pm. Brainfuse - Free online tutoring database, with one-onone tutoring available daily 2-11pm. Writing lab, study guides, and skill building resources available 24/7. Access using your library card at www.evakbowlby.org. Freegal & Freading - Enjoy free music, videos and books and magazines online. Library patrons can stream or download with mobile apps, visit www.evakbowlby.org. Rocket Languages - 15 online Language courses are available through your library website, with your library card. Or download mobile app, visit www.evakbowlby. org. State & Federal Tax Forms available at the library. Call or stop in Eva K. Bowlby Public Library for more info or to register for any of the above events. 724-627-9776 • 311 N. West St., Waynesburg, PA 15370

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GreeneScene Magazine •

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C&S Tire Pros

Curt Price.

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C&S Tire’s newly remodeled waiting area includes free wi-fi, coffee and snacks, a big screen TV, fireplace and dedicated kid’s room, too.

here’s something old and something definitely new at C&S Tire Pros on 1080 E High St. Waynesburg. The front and side yard of the stately old brick house next door has been paved and leads into three new bays, owner Curt Price’s latest effort to be Growing in Greene. “We just finished the connection between the two buildings, closed in the front porch and now we have a new waiting room, too,” Curt said, coming back inside and taking his place at the counter of the original tire shop. Behind him is the doorway that leads to that house next door, where customers can relax while getting new tires, brakes, inspections done or headlights and batteries replaced. It’s a place to sit in what was once the living room suite and enjoy the comfort of free wi-fi, coffee and snacks, a big screen TV and an adjoining room for kids, with tools and toys and bean bag chairs. “Now we have six bays instead of just three for our techs to use and our services are expanding. We do just about anything except rebuilds and custom muffler work and we’ll be doing alignments soon, now that we have room for the equipment,” Curt said. “When I took

Dowsing Demo Guest speaker at Town & Country Garden Club’s February meeting, James Harbaugh, conservationist and restorationist, demonstrated the use of a willow branch to locate water and a metal dowsing rod to locate subterranean metal, pipes, and electric wires. Harbaugh exhibited a three-step pine stepstool he made, which, when flipped converts into a chair and other examples of his unique carpentry. James was born in Waynesburg and raised in Rice’s Landing, graduated from Penn State with a major in liberal arts and psychology. As an occupation he chose the building trades and has constructed many homes and home additions.

Garden Club Scholarship Applications for the Town & Country Garden Club’s 2017 annual scholarship are available to any graduating senior at Carmichaels Area, Central Greene, Jefferson-Morgan, Southeastern Greene or West Greene High School. Graduating seniors who are pursuing an education in environmental studies, conservation, ecology,

forestry, horticulture, floriculture, landscape design, science, or education can apply. The $1,000 scholarship is awarded in May for one academic year. Applicants should contact their respective guidance counselor for an application and additional details. The deadline to apply is Friday, April 28, 2017.

Flag Distribution Greene County Veterans Affairs has announced May 5th as the pick-up day for organizations receiving flags. Organization representatives can pick up flags on May 5th at the Ben Franklin Bldg/Alley, downtown Waynes-

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2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

burg) from 8:30am – noon. A separate distribution will he held for cemeteries receiving flags. Cemetery representatives are asked to pick-up flags May 8th -12th, at the Greene County VA Office on High Street, 8:30am – 4:30pm. FMI Call the VA at 724-852-5275.

over the business from my dad in 2006, the house came up for sale the next year and I bought it. I knew someday I wanted to expand. Last year we started working on it in 2016 now we’re almost done.” C&S – the family logo for Curt’s mom and dad Curt and Sharon Price who went into the tire business in 1982 across the street from Hinerman’s on Greene Street - is still what everybody calls the shop. When Curt franchised with Tire Pros in 2012, services and discounts expanded and so did the name. Stop by and learn more about the new Customer Rewards program that turns every dollar spent into points that can be cashed in on future purchases. C&S offers a wide range of national name brand tires and gives free national reimbursement coupons for roadside emergencies and free tire rotations, something recommended every 3000-5000 miles on Greene County roads. For more information and a list of all the services offered at C&S Tire Pros, go online to TirePros.com.

CAP Winter Training Civil Air Patrol Greene County Composite Squadron 606 attended Winter Training the weekend of FEB17, 18 - 19, held annually at the Somerset, PA County Airport. The event was attended by almost 100 members, with ten Corporate Vans and six Aircraft. Six members from the Greene County Squadron attended, three cadets and three Seniors, they trained in Ground Team Skills, Public Information Skills, Mission Scanner

Skills, Safety Skills, Mission Radio Skills, and Mission Staff Skills. They will bring these skills back to the local Greene County Squadron and share the knowledge with the other members that were not able to attend. The event included searching for a lost aircraft and ground team training and mission base training. For more info on CAP in Greene County call 724-627-8545.

Feeding the Bees Robert Griggle of West Finley posts this picture of the bees enjoying the sugar water he put out during the unseasonably warm weather we experienced in February that brought the bees out before the blooms.

Admin. Professional’s Day Luncheon The Waynesburg Chamber invites local businesses to treat most valuable employees or the whole staff to a special luncheon on April 26. The event is held at the First Baptist Church Fellowship Hall in Waynesburg. Enjoy a milk chocolate fountain with marshmallows, pretzels, strawberries and pineapple. A served lunch, prepared by Back Bay Catering includes vegetable

lasagna with vodka sauce, Italian salad, rolls, beverage and for dessert a white chocolate raspberry cake. Vendors, Chinese auction and doorprizes, also. Cost is $20 per person, limited to the first 100 reservations, which must be received by Friday, April 21. Call 724-627-5927 or Email info@ waynesburgchamber.com.

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Chuck Carnahan Agency

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Jonni Parson, Christy Alltop, Chuck Carnahan and Miranda Chapman pictured here.

huck Carnahan State Farm Agency has its roots in a place you might not expect - the United States Army 25th Infantry Division. This is where Mr. Carnahan would start his long career of “helping people,” because that is the driving force that led him to join the Army at 18 years old, and then later in life to start his own insurance agency. This still holds true today, as Chuck Carnahan State Farm Agency’s motto is, “We’re here to help life go right.” After his service to our country, Chuck came home and earned a Bachelor’s degree in finance from California University, and spent the next 10+ years as an investment advisor. Though he may not have realized it at the time, that experience would help Chuck to better serve his future State Farm customers and help him build an agency that was able to qualify last year for one of State Farm’s most elite recognition programs. In 2016 Chuck Carnahan State Farm Agency earned the highest honor given by State Farm; an honor that is estimated to be held by only 2% of all State Farm agents - the prestigious Chairmen’s Circle Award. In addition to recognizing an agent’s outstanding sales ability, this top award honors agents who align their business with the long-term direction of the company and who act as advocates for their customers. Only a select few agents within State Farm receive this honor annually as there are strict qualifying criteria in addition to sales goals that must be met. And the recognition doesn’t stop there. Chuck Carnahan State Farm Agency also maintains Bronze status in the State Farm Honor Club, and has consistently qualified for State Farm’s Ambassador Travel Award since 2011. When you listen to Chuck Carnahan talk about these accomplishments and his agency, one phrase is continuously echoed in his dialogue – Teamwork.

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“This is definitely not all about me,” Chuck readily admits, “One of the key factors in our agency’s success is our dedicated and highly experienced team. I couldn’t do it without them.” In addition to Chuck, the team at the Waynesburg office includes Christy Alltop, Miranda Chapman and Jonni Parson, all three fully licensed in both West Virginia and Pennsylvania. Continuing in his modest way, Chuck also contributes the agency’s success to the community. “We are very grateful for the community here in Waynesburg and Greene County and all of the support they have given us since we began here in 2011. We have developed really close and good-working relationships with our customers and the community, just as our predecessors did,” he says. The State Farm Agency now owned by Chuck Carnahan has a 40+ year history of developing relationships by helping families and businesses in Greene County and surrounding areas. With 100+ different products and solutions available to its customers, Chuck Carnahan State Farm Agency can provide virtually all insurance needs. From auto, home, life and health, business and special needs, to investments and banking options, Chuck Carnahan State Farm Agency has something valuable to offer to each of its customers. “All of our products and coverages are designed help families protect the people and things they value most. Our job is to educate our customers… to help them know and understand their options and make wise decisions,” Chuck says. A multitude of products for every circumstance, an extremely experienced team, and a strong commitment to help people - this is what makes Chuck Carnahan’s agency stand apart from others. “Call for quote, we’re ready to help you, too,” Chuck invites.

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

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Washington Health System Greene

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ver the past 18 months there have been many positive changes and capital investments made at the WHS Greene facility. These changes, along with the dedicated efforts of the team members at WHSGreene have increased the quality, safety and efficiency of services provided to those who depend on WHS-Greene for their healthcare needs. Some of these improvements include upgrading the phone and computer systems, new furniture and patient beds, a cooling tower, water treatment system, air handler, emergency power expansion and more. In January, Washington Health System announced the latest capital investment for the Greene County Facility - an upgraded MRI department. This $2 million investment includes a new facility to house the MRI department and a new Siemens Aera MRI, which will replace the 13-yearold existing machine currently in use. This renovation and upgrade, which began in mid-December, is nearly complete and will provide state of the art MRI imaging capabilities along with many other patient benefits. John Ireland, Director of Radiology for Washington Health System says “The new MRI is in a new building that is open and spacious in design. Some of the benefits patients will receive with the new MRI unit are increased comfort, shorter exam times and improved image quality. Since the MRI is an ‘open bore’ design, patients will experience

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greater comfort and feel less confined. For those ments from Washington Health System,” said Shei- tem provides health care services at more than 40 off-site locations throughout three counties. In patients who are claustrophobic or anxious, this la Stewart, Chairperson for GCMHF. “We appreciate the support of GCMHF. With addition to its flagship 260 licensed bed hospital will be a great benefit. In addition, the new MRI can scan patients that weigh up to 550 lbs. vs. the the installation of this new MRI unit, the commu- in Washington, Pa., WHS operates Washington nity here can be confident they have access to state Health System Greene, a community centered 49300 lb. weight limit of the existing MRI unit.” Shorter exam times also enhance patient of the art MRI imaging services. The Diagnostic bed hospital, in Waynesburg. Washington Health comfort and reduce the risk of patient movement Imaging team that is made up of experienced MRI System’s integrated system of care also consists of during the exam. “Patient movement degrades the Technologists and board certified Radiologists, diagnostic centers, outpatient care facilities, the quality of the exam and can reduce diagnostic ac- now have the equipment they need to provide great WHS Wilfred R. Cameron Wellness Center and Greenbriar Treatment Center all seamlessly workcuracy,” Ireland explains, “With the new machine, patient care,” Ireland confirms. Employing more than 2,300 highly trained ing together to provide excellent patient-and-famradiologists who interpret the MRI exams will have high quality images to review, allowing them to medical professionals, Washington Health Sys- ily-centered care. provide the ordering physician the best information they need to treat the patient. The new MRI environment and MRI unit will also enhance MRI staff efficiency and allow them to spend more time focused on the patient.” The new building is already in place and installation of the MRI is currently underway. Plans are to “officially open” the new MRI suite at Washington Health System-Greene in April, 2017. Greene County Memorial Hospital Foundation made a generous donation of $450K that helped fund the project. “The Greene County Memorial Hospital Foundation was pleased to make this donation because we knew this was something our community needed. We look forward to continued improve- The “open bore” design of the new Siemens Aera MRI will enhance patient comfort and quality of exam. The new facility and machine are scheduled to be in service at WHS-Greene on in April 10, 2017.

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Community Bank Report by Barron P. McCune Jr., President & CEO.

ommunity Bank had another good year in 2016, continuing its tradition of excellence as it enters its 116th year. With its devotion to outstanding customer service and an abundance of dedicated, talented people, the Bank set several records. We sure were busy. Our commercial lenders closed $79.2 million in loans while our credit department disbursed another $129.8 million pursuant to existing commercial lines of credit. Mortgage production was near a record at $48.3 million. Consumer loans had a good year with $70.3 million in production, which included $53.2 million in indirect auto loans. All in all, new loan disbursements put $197.8 million out the door in 2016. All of this money went to helping our customers build their dreams and support their families. Local people also trusted us with their deposits, which grew to a new record of approximately $725 million. On another front, we are improving our physical plant with the construction of our new “Ralph J. Sommers, Jr. Operations Center.” This 22,000 square foot facility is ahead of schedule and will be occupied during the summer of 2017. This carefully designed building will allow almost all of our administrative operations to be housed together for the first time in the history of Community Bank. This will lead to greater efficiencies and collaboration, not to mention room to grow. 2016 was also the year when we embraced social media. With so much going on, our LinkedIn and Facebook pages were full of exciting news and important tips for local businesses and residents.

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2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

Also in 2016, we continued our popular “Community Bank Cares” charitable giving program. Pursuant to CB Cares, for every loan we make (subject to certain terms and conditions), we ask the customer to identify a charity or church of their choosing. The Bank then makes a $100 contribution in honor of the customer. It is always an inspiration to learn of our customer’s passions and devotions. Community Bank Cares now has made over $130,000 in contributions to an astounding number of charities and churches. For this program and other endeavors, Community Bank received a prestigious philanthropy award this year. And our COO Pat O’Brien and his wife Chris were honored in Pittsburgh for their charitable service. Many of our other employees could be honored as well for their tireless commitment to charitable, church, and community causes. On the investor side, our stock, which trades on NASDAQ as “CBFV”, had a good year, appreciating about 10.5%. Our dividend, paid quarterly, was increased and now returns approximately 3.4% to our shareholders. It was an interesting year, with our Bank being subjected to “national” scrutiny by the financial industry and investment community. Regulations stemming from Dodd-Frank and the Patriot Act have been compliance challenges for community banks. These regulations also have been financial burdens that put a strain on our financial results. But we held up pretty well. It seems there is always a need for a sensible, independent local bank devoted to delivering outstanding personal service to

Artist rendition of the new Ralph J. Sommers Operation Center

Community Bank presented a donation to the Carmichaels 250th Birthday Celebration Committee.

our local communities. So as we start into 2017, there is considerable momentum at Community Bank. Our Bank is strong and secure and our people are active in pursuing opportunities and serving our customers. I again think of how fortunate we are to have such an outstanding independent commercial bank to help grow Southwestern Pennsylvania.

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Greene: Earth and Sky Taking a walk on the wild side at Enlow Fork

By Pete Zapadka

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et’s get right to a very important point: This is one place you don’t pick the flowers. That would be frowned upon by other enthusiasts, and perhaps even draw some stern admonishments. Keep your hands at your side and take in visually this arresting floral display. It is dramatic outdoor eye candy that serves as a potent tonic for any frenzied human mind. So if you savor extraordinary and sometimes rare spring wildflowers, and want to join other aficionados who can help to identify each vernal blossom, then Enlow Fork is the place to be. The proper name of the small stream is the Enlow Fork of Wheeling Creek, and it flows though a bucolic valley at the border between Greene and Washington counties. Here, the Enlow Fork wildflower walk, sponsored each spring for more than four decades by the Wheeling Creek Watershed Conservancy, stands as one of the more visual annual gatherings anywhere in Greene County. The event will be held Sunday, April 30, at the usual spot – at end of a scenic rural road called Smokey Row in state Game Lands 302 northwest of Wind Ridge. The day starts early with birdwatchers surveying the feathered scene, but things ramp up with guided wildflower walks at 10 a.m. The easy trail follows an old road through the state Game Lands, eventually reaching an old bridge over the stream that leads participants into Washington County. Among the stunning visuals are several varieties of trillium, spring beauties, coltsfoot, blue-eyed Marys, Dutchman’s breeches and squirrel corn, larkspur, Solomon’s seal, and perhaps some fire pinks, twin leaf, trout lilies, wild ginger and jack-in-the-pulpit, among other

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A young woman examines a stand of blue-eyed Marys, a flower that grows in abundance at Enlow Fork.

surprises. There will be phlox, wild geraniums and, oh yes, the highly invasive garlic mustard (this is the one flower you’re encouraged to pull from the ground). Intrigued? It’s enjoyable to the point of thrilling to be among these flowers on the guided hikes, but take the advice of this old retired sage journalist who has been down the long road: Some of the greatest scenery can be enjoyed by going the other way. That is, after the guided walk, take your own stroll back along the road on which you arrived. Smokey Row has a lot to show. Certainly it’s the same bumpy trail on which you entered by car, but for all the glorious blooms you saw then, undoubtedly you missed hundreds more. So after the guided tour, lace up your boots in the parking lot, then walk away from the open field and along the road that sits in Enlow Fork’s floodplain. There is a likelihood of mud and standing water, but by the time you reach the curve in the road, things get plenty interesting. Soon, you’ll see spreads of Enlow Fork’s classic resident, the blue-eyed Marys. Nearby are the dainty Virginia bluebells that dance in the spring breeze. On a hill to the right just before the intersection with Raymer

Road is the prize: an embankment of vibrant red trilliums. These captivating blooms will hang mostly above the admirer in a spot that’s perfect for photos. Often, the Sun’s rays illuminate the petals from behind. Simply stunning. The walls of the small valley are resplendent with great white trillium – aka Trillium grandiflorum – such an abundance you’ll easily lose count. A small tributary of Enlow Fork offers rushing water and, in some locations, even some small waterfalls that can mesmerize. Beyond Raymer Road, there is a larger waterfall on the right that offers some picturesque rock overhangs and multiple spots where the stream drops instantly. Have your camera ready. It is an absolute shame to pass through this bounty of nature and see its glory only from the window a car. This year, don’t be afraid to go the other way. If you don’t want to go alone, look for me. I’ll be there; I never miss this part of Enlow Fork. After all, someone long ago told me to take a hike. This is one I’m delighted to take. To learn more about the Enlow Fork wildflower walk, go to http://enlowfork.tripod.com/. Pete Zapadka is a Greene County property owner and a retired local news editor at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. He can be reached at pzapadka@yahoo.com.

A red trillium glows in the morning sun on the hillside below Raymer Road in Enlow Fork. GreeneScene Magazine •

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2017


EMPTY BOWLS

By Linda Moon

collection of 4-5 gourmet soups prepared by Greene County Career & Technology Center’s renown Culinary Arts Department are offered, along with other foods, breads, desserts and drinks donated by local organizations. For the price of an empty bowl, diners enjoy the all-you-can-eat buffet, and when you’ve emptied your bowl – you get to take it home with you! In addition to the meal, a Chinese auction and silent auction offer the opportunity to win gift cards WU Bonner Students enjoy an evening of creating “Empty Bowls” and baskets and other merchandise donated by local merchants. All the he last thing you might expect to see on funds raised are channeled to the Greene County a Friday night at a college campus is stuCommunity Foundation (CFGC) for support of the dents heading to a classroom. Yet that’s weekend food program. what 25 of Waynesburg University’s BonCFGC Director Bettie Stammerjohn says the ner Scholars were doing as they prepared for their weekend food program came into being as the reannual “Empty Bowls” fundraiser. sult of much research and planning. “The role that Empty Bowls is a project that funds a weekthe Foundation plays is to identify in the commuend food program operated through the Greene nity needs that aren’t being fulfilled. And hungry County Community Foundation. The students and children definitely meet that need,” she explains. the foundation’s Director Bettie Stammerjohn work School performance, behavioral issues and as partners to help reduce hunger and improve nusleepiness are all indicators of poor nutrition. Chiltrition among Greene County youth. The weekend dren are referred to the program by the school food program is a creative way to supply nutritious nurse, guidance counselor, teachers and food serfood to children from all five Greene County School vice directors. A letter is sent home to the parents Districts who might otherwise not have adequate asking for permission to enroll their child in the food over the weekends. We’ll tell you more about program. Everything is very confidential, meanthat later, but first let’s talk about those ambitious ing that only the schools know who from their own students and how their “Empty Bowls” help out. district is in the program. Bettie Stammerjohn On a Friday night inside the art room at Benisn’t even informed. She is only given the number edum Hall, the students have gathered to actually of children that have been accepted into the promake the bowls that will be used in the project. gram. More than 150 Greene County children were There is a detailed process in the making of these served by the program last year. bowls. It all starts with 500 lbs. of clay donated by The Bonner Scholars’ Empty Bowls project Standard Ceramics in Carnegie PA. That mass of has been partnering with the Community Foundaclay is split into small chunks about the size of a loaf tion for four years. “I don’t know what we would of bread dough. The clay is then “wedged” which is do without the support of the Empty Bowls project. essentially the same thing as kneading bread. FolLast year the Empty Bowls project raised $6135 all lowing the wedging process, the clay is then flatof which goes directly to the schools, for this protened by putting it through rollers. Once flattened gram. There are no administrative fees taken out it is cut into strips, and put around “molds” which of any of the money received by the Foundation are basically ordinary soup bowls. The clay can be for this project,” Bettie said. Other organizations molded on the inside of the soup bowl which makes and individuals donate money for this effort to a small bowl, or it can be molded on the outside help raise the amount needed to meet the annual which results in a larger bowl. Once the clay is set, expenses – around $25,000 total. The money is disthe new bowl is put into a kiln and fired. After the tributed among all five school districts in Greene firing process it is glazed and fired again. The finCounty, based on each individual district’s projecished bowl is food safe, microwave safe and dishtion of how many students will be in the program. washer safe. The children are given a bag of shelf-stable Kenny Knouse, Amanda Groft and Sydney items such as: cereal and cereal bars, fruit juice, Green have all been involved in Empty Bowls for applesauce, peanut butter, pudding, fruit cups and three years and serve as leaders of the project. pasta cups. It is all food that an elementary child “Empty Bowls is a great fundraiser for students of can eat on his or her own. all backgrounds to get involved in helping people “This project is a no brainer. It eases the burin the community and it’s fun to do” said Kenny, den on the family, and it helps the children learn a junior history major. Amanda, a junior Nursing better and that is the ultimate goal,” Bettie says. major added, “I believe in helping with hunger isFor more information on The Empty Bowls sues. No child should go hungry.” Sydney Green, project contact Adrienne Thar, the Bonner Cooranother junior nursing major, was in charge of flatdinator at Waynesburg University at 724-852-3460 tening the clay through the rollers. “It’s a really or atharp@waynesburg.edu. Tickets for the April worthwhile project and I enjoy making the bowls” 2nd event are available in advance for $15 at the she said with a big smile on her face. Community Foundation, 108 E. High St., WaynesThe actual “Empty Bowls” event is an opportuburg, or for $20 at the door. For more info on the nity for everyone else to help out in the effort. That’s Weekend Food Program, call Bettie Stammerjohn when the all the bowls are taken to the PA National at 724-852-2010. Guard Readiness Center for a very special banquet from 11am – 2pm on April 2nd, 2017. A delicious

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MARCH / APRIL

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

David Balint Candidate for Magisterial District 13-3-01

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reene County native and local business owner, David Balint, has announced his candidacy for the Democratic and Republican nomination for the position of Magisterial District Judge 13-3-01 for the May primary. The Magisterial District Judge in District 13-3-01 is elected to serve the following municipalities: The Townships of Aleppo, Center, Freeport, Gilmore, Gray, Jackson, Morris, Perry, Richhill, Springhill, Washington, Wayne, Whiteley, and the Borough of Waynesburg. David Balint is the only candidate that is certified by the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania Minor Judiciary Education Board. Balint completed the course and took the examination prior to announcing his candidacy. A candidate must take this course and pass the examination prior to taking office. “It was important to me the community know how committed I am to serving the district. It would be more than just a job to me and taking the course ahead of time gave me the opportunity to truly understand the office and how to effectively administer the duties of a Magisterial District Judge,” David said.

Public service is nothing new to David Balint. He has held the position as elected Greene County Controller since 2008. Active in the community, David is a member of the Waynesburg Area Chamber of Commerce and Waynesburg-Franklin Township Volunteer Fire Department. He has served on numerous boards including the Corner Cupboard Food Bank, Waynesburg Zoning Board, Bowlby Public Library, and is former treasurer and trustee of Washington Street United Methodist Church. David is also a member of the American Institute of Public Accountants, Waynesburg Sportsmans’ Club, National Rifle Association, and the Waynesburg Moose Lodge. “I would be honored and humbled to be elected by my community to serve in this capacity. District 13-3-01 has always been my home and I would like to make a positive impact for our community,” David said. David Balint is a graduate of Waynesburg Central High School and Waynesburg University. He is currently the elected Greene County Controller and owner of David Balint CPA. David resides in Waynesburg with his wife Kayla, and their two children, Beau and Bryce.

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D. Moore & Son Monuments

eet Todd Moore - veteran with 28 years of both active and reserve duty, including a recent assignment to the National Military Command Center at the Pentagon; a prior logistics officer and multilevel military commander; current commander of Waynesburg American Legion and local business owner. D. Moore & Son Monuments is a family influenced business that started 40 years ago with Todd’s father. Jerry Moore was a caretaker of cemeteries. Responsibilities included maintenance and care of monuments, grave markers and plaques that adorned the family plots. Todd’s experience learning these skills became the inspiration for D. Moore & Son Monuments. His continued service to our country and his military brotherhood has also influenced Todd’s business. He works with the National Cemetery Administration to maintain existing monuments, plaques and markers identifying and memorializing our fallen heroes in National Cemeteries throughout the country. He is equally committed to providing these same services to our local public and private cemeteries and memorials. D. Moore & Son was recently sought out by Belz, a 100-year-old company in Long Island, NY, to partner on a contract with the Houston National Cemetery. Todd attributes much of his success to his past experience and relationships. “We bring a great deal of experience with several years in the craft and, when needed, we partner with others who share exceptional skills and dedication to the

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industry,” he explains. D. Moore & Son also serves individual families, organizations, townships and cities to help memorialize people and events. Services include cleaning and restoration of existing markers, plaques and The Gettysburg Address in monuments and production and Bronze, at the Knoxville Tennesinstallation of new see National Cemetery, designed, created and placed by D. Moore monuments. Both & Son Monuments. domestic and international granite and bronze are available. They also offer a “Create Your Own Monument” design app on the D. Moore & Son website. “It features thousands of choices. It’s easy to use, and you can access it from anywhere at any time,” Todd explains, as he recalls a recent order from a client currently residing in California who is pre-planning his burial in the local area. “He designed and placed his order online.” The retail storefront, established 10 years ago is at 311 Washington Road, Waynesburg, PA, 15370. Online visit www.mooremonument.com; phone: 724-627-6542.

Community Foundation of Greene County Scholarships

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he Community Foundation of Greene County (CFGC) has announced that they have a number of scholarship opportunities for Greene County graduating high school seniors this spring. Applications are due April 3 unless otherwise noted. Eligibility criteria vary for each scholarship so students should carefully review the specific guidelines for each scholarship. Application guidelines and forms are available on the CFGC website at http:// cfgcpa.org/endowed.html. The CFGC Application for College Scholarships form will be used for the following scholarships. Applicants can apply for as many of the scholarships for which they are eligible using the one form, including any essays, letters of recommendations for a specific scholarship, along with one copy of the required documents. The following scholarship applications must be submitted to the CFGC Office at PO Box 768, Waynesburg, PA 15370 by April 3 (unless otherwise noted). (NEW) The Victor and Anna Mae Wancheck Beghini Scholarship - For graduating seniors at Mapletown High School planning to attend a four-year college or university with a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and/or Math) major. Two (1) $3,000 scholarships will be awarded. The Army Spec. Gregory A. Cox Memorial Scholarship – For a graduating Greene County senior student planning a career in public safety or other public service (a list of types of careers/ majors is on the website) with preference for a student participating in ROTC. One (1) $1,000 scholarship is available. The Rocky Doman Memorial Scholarship – For a graduating Greene County senior standout athlete who exemplifies the qualities of being a team player with a humble spirit. Two (2) $1,000 scholarship are available. The Dove Award – A need based scholarship for a graduating student from Jefferson Morgan high school with preference for female students. One $1,500 scholarship is available. (NEW) The Enstrom Family Scholarship For graduating seniors at Jefferson-Morgan High School planning to attend California University of Pennsylvania. Applicants must have a grade point average (GPA) between 2.0 and 3.5. One $500 scholarship will be awarded. The Jesse Benson Finnegan Scholarship – For students graduating from the Greene County Career & Technology Center with first preference for students in the Electrical Occupations program. One (1) $1,000 is available The William and Shirley Hanley Memorial Scholarship – For graduating seniors at Carmichaels Area High School and Mapletown High School. An interview is required which will be held on Saturday, April 29th between 8:30 a.m.1:00 p.m. at the CFGC office. Two $1,000 scholar-

ships are available to be used for books. Russell A. Guthrie Memorial Scholarship - For senior students graduating from Jefferson-Morgan High School to attend either a technical school or a four-year college or university. One (1) $500 scholarship is available. The R.A. Matteucci Family Scholarship – A need based scholarship for graduating seniors of Jefferson-Morgan High School. Two $1,000 scholarships are available. The Darlene Phillips Memorial Scholarship – For graduating seniors of Mapletown High School. While there is a preference for students planning to major in elementary education, other applications will also be considered. One $1,000 scholarship is available. The William H. Davis, Jr. Scholarship – For Greene County residents who are graduating seniors, or have graduated from a Greene County high school who are planning to attend or are attending Westmoreland County Community College. Applications are due in the CFGC office by April 3, June 1, August 1, or November 1. Three $1,000 scholarships are available. The following scholarships must be submitted to the school guidance counselors’ office. Please note the due date for each. The Thelma S. Hoge Memorial Scholarship – For worthy students of West Greene School District who are pursuing a college education. Applications are submitted to the West Greene High School Guidance office by April 15. Two $2,500 scholarships are available. The Walter Samek III Memorial Scholarship – For graduating seniors of Carmichaels High School to continue post-secondary education. Applications are submitted to the Carmichaels Area High School Guidance office by April 15. One $500 scholarship is available. The following post-secondary scholarship is for non-traditional students who have already graduated from high school, or received a GED, and have decided to further their education. The Stealth Scholarship - For non-traditional students at least 22 years of age or older, who are living or working in Greene County who plan to pursue a post-secondary course of education (two-year or four-year degree) at an accredited college, university, community college, or trade/ technical school. Maximum scholarship is $2,500. There is no specific deadline for the Stealth Scholarship applications. The Community Foundation of Greene County (CFGC), a private, non-profit 501(c) (3) organization founded in 2000, is the central philanthropic vehicle in Greene County for donations of various types and sizes. CFGC currently manages $4 million in assets through more than 70 different funds. For more information about the Community Foundation contact Bettie Stammerjohn by phone at 724-627-2010, email cfgc@ gmail.com, or visit www.cfgcpa.org.

GreeneScene Magazine •

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2017


The Perfect Arrangement Floral & Country Gift Shop

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f you think it’s only there for special occasions, The Perfect Arrangement Floral and Country Gift Shop invites you to stop in and discover one of Greene County’s most exciting and – well, FUN stores! Remember the name is The Perfect Arrangement Floral and Country Gift Shop. It’s true – this florist makes special occasions really stand out, because flowers are always a great choice. The Country Gift Shop can make any day a special occasion! With a large showroom brimming with gifts and décor for inside and out, it’s a place you need to visit. SO MUCH HAS CHANGED! Just this spring, the showroom has been completely changed out with new and different merchandise and new product lines…some new people are on board also. Floral Designer Dory Daniels Eddy has brought her energy, talents and experience to The Perfect Arrangement, and is playing a big role in the many exciting changes you’ll discover on your next visit to the Country Gift Shop at The Perfect Arrangement. “I love making old things new, and we’ve really been doing some great “picking” recently, bringing home our finds and giving them new life as country décor for your home,” Dory says. She’s also introduced a new line of Bath & Body products and candles to the store. “We now have Michel Design Works – a very popular line of high quality lotions, creams, soaps and candles that are luscious, good for you AND still affordable,” Dory exclaims, “They

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are wonderful, and we are expanding and getting in more inventory each week…people are buying it up as soon as they try it. Come in and sample!” Other new product lines under consideration are the Kettle Kitchen collection of jams, jellies and foods from Pennsylvania Amish country of Lancaster, and a special whimsical and fun line of greeting cards perfectly suited to a country gift shop. Already in the show room are many rustic and resurrected items that the artistic staff at The Perfect Arrangement has customized into unique and charming décor right there in their own design shop. Old mantels, pedestals, crates, ladders, even old kitchen chairs can have new life breathed into them, creating truly custom pieces that reflect an individual’s sense of style. “Whether you have your own items that you’d like to have woven into a design, or you are looking for that perfect piece, that’s the beauty of this combination floral and gift shop – it’s like no other,“ says Floral Manager Janet Hopkins. “People often bring in pictures or fabric swatches so we can customize something just right for their space,” adds Designer Gwen Wendell, whose ability to create beautiful arrangements from a seemingly endless array of materials has earned her a far-reaching reputation. The Country Gift Shop is like a whole new store that compliments The Perfect Arrangement Floral Shop… together providing the most unique experience like no other florist you know. “With Mother’s Day approaching, we’ve already planned some special choices you can order for your moth-

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

er that combine a gift of our new lotions and soaps with fresh flowers in a unique presentation – she gets both!” Dory says. Another wonderful advantage of The Perfect Arrangement is the corner of the showroom dedicated to sympathy and funerals, with so many meaningful ideas and special ways to share your love during difficult times. The carved stones, wind chimes, lanterns are just a few of the many choices you’ll find to express your sympathy in a beautiful and lasting way while the fresh floral arrangements created by this skilled staff always make a touching and appropriate tribute. “The best way to order is to call directly to the Perfect Arrangement, so we can make it just the way you want it, or help you figure out what’s best,” advises Janet. The Perfect Arrangement offers daily delivery to all of Greene County and beyond. And remember, it doesn’t have to be a holiday or special occasion to send flowers. You can bring a smile to someone’s face today. It just takes one call. The Perfect Arrangement does it all. 724-6273191. Or better yet, treat yourself with a visit to the Country Gift Shop, then you’ll be smiling, too.

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STARS/Specialized Therapy and Related Services

re you concerned about your infant or toddler’s development? Has your pediatrician recommended an evaluation for your child? Early Intervention (EI) services can help infants and toddlers with disabilities and delays to learn many key skills to catch up in their development, and help nurture a supportive environment for the entire family. According to research, learning and development are at their highest rate in the preschool years. Early Intervention (EI) is intended for infants and toddlers who have a developmental delay or disability. Eligibility is determined by evaluating the child (with parents’ consent) to see if the little one does, in fact, have a delay in development or a disability. Eligible children can receive EI services from birth through their third birthday at no cost to the family Specialized Therapy and Related Services, LLC (STARS), a provider of EI services in Greene and Fayette counties, can provide experienced therapists that work with your family to provide a comprehensive delivery of services to best meet the child’s and family’s needs. Their team of licensed, professional, Physical, Occupational, Speech Language Therapists, Teachers of Specialized Instruction and Behavioral Teachers can provide EI services to you and your family in your home/natural environment (childcare center, any requested community setting or home of an extended family member). The STARS team will help families and children learn the basic and brand-new skills that typically develop the first three years of life.

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Valerie Kerr-Lapana and Kristie Pekar-Rohrer, co-owners of STARS.

• Physical (reaching, rolling, crawling, walking) • Cognitive (thinking, learning, problem solving) • Communication (talking, listening, understanding) • Social/Emotional (playing, feeling secure and happy) • Self-help (eating and dressing) Parents don’t have to wait for a referral to EI, if you are concerned about your child’s development, you may contact the human services department in your county and ask to have a developmental evaluation for your child. If your child is determined eligible, EI services provided through STARS can provide vital support so that your child can continue to thrive and grow. For additional information about STARS, please call 724-319-2043 or via email at admin@ stars4ourkids.com.

Rt. 21 Homes

tep inside any of the new modular homes on display at Route 21 Homes in Carmichaels and prepare to gasp in delight. “We go for the WOW factor,” veteran sales specialist Debbie Lukacs said, smiling broadly as she showcased, Vanna White style, the beautiful “barn door” beverage center that is the centerpiece for entertaining in one spacious home. “This is what people want now – LED fireplaces, stainless steel farm sinks, fancy kitchens and bathrooms and plenty of room for entertaining. And that’s what we have. You have to see it to believe it.” So check your calendar – Rt. 21 Home’s once a year Open House sale spectacular is coming right up March 30-April 2 and the phone in Debbie’s office is already ringing. “They’re asking ‘When’s your Open House?’ because it’s our biggest sale of the year. We’ll have lenders on hand to answer questions and provide pre-approvals for financing. We offer discounts, special package deals and a chance to meet subcontractors for foundation work and landscaping. These are beautiful homes.” Over the years this Open House has become a sure sign of spring, with food on the grill, plenty of refreshments and a chance to meet all the people that prospective homeowners need to know. As a one-time-only bonus, those buying double-wide and modular homes will get central air conditioning, gutters and downspouts as part of the package, owner and managing partner Jerry Smith said. “Most of our homeowners have their lots waiting, but we also have spaces for rent at Route 21 Estates and Jefferson Estates. We’re expanding Rt. 21 Estates for 37 additional homes.” Route 21 Estates is across the street from Route 21 Homes on 2118 E Furman Highway and residents have easy access to the park’s Laundromat, storage units and car wash. In recent years, manufactured homes have broken free of the rectangular look, adding dormers, custom roof pitches and guest suites, along with options for decks and full foundations. Singlewide homes offer choices in roof pitch and windows and the interiors have kept up with the times as well, with cathedral ceilings, custom kitchens and open living areas for relaxing. And the best part of “Turn Key Homes” is you turn the key and you’re home. During the Open House, there are 18 new homes and their keys, just waiting to be taken home or relocated to a rental lot with everything you need in a waiting community. If you don’t find your dream home on the lot, you may also choose to custom design your home, and Rt. 21 Home’s will have it built and delivered in record time. Manufactured housing offers the same quality of workmanship and attention to detail as those built onsite, but the real selling point is the cost savings and speed of installation. The year that it usually takes to build conventionally means weather slow downs and the chance of rain, snow and wind damage before the structure is under roof, Jerry pointed out. “With our homes it’s closer to eight weeks start to finish and the cost savings is between 25-50 percent.” Rt. 21 Homes has the bragging rights of buy-

Debbie Lukacs and Jerry Smith.

Debbie shows off a beverage center, which can be on display or hidden by classic barn style doors. Just one of the unique and rich features home buyers can find in the selections available at Rt. 21 Homes.

ing close to home also – with three lines all made here in Pennsylvania; and the manufacturers, Colony Homes, Penn West Modular and Commodore Homes are all recognized nationally for quality of construction. Modular units are pre-built to come together as a tight fitting ‘puzzle’ and all construction work is governed by HUD and DCED regulations. Houses are factory tested for fitness before they are delivered and “we can customize floor plan, colors, carpeting, fixtures, counter tops, window style layout, doors, countertops…you name it,” Debbie said. With 40 years of community trust leading to consistent customer referrals year after year, Rt.21 Homes is ranked among the Top Ten Highest Annual Sales Volume dealers for all three manufacturers they represent. This year’s spring Open House will you a chance to see why. And there is definitely plenty to see. “I decorate these display houses like they were my own and I love the way they look,” Debbie said, standing at the island in the spacious kitchen of another home that opens into a beautiful dining area that leaves plenty of room for guests to mingle. “Just wait until you see the new four by six foot ceramic shower!”

GreeneScene Magazine •

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2017


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2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

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Spo rt Sh or t s

Barnhart’s

Honda - Polaris

by Jason Tennant

Greene County Wrestling Postseason Recap

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hile this past wrestling season didn’t a spot on the State podium. He didn’t stop there feature a lot of TEAM success, as though, winning two more bouts to come all the only Waynesburg qualified for the way back through the consolation bracket and take postseason, there was still plenty of 3rd place in the state at 195 pounds! success for several in the individual Now on to Class AA…. postseason. The great numbers of AA wresAs a team, Waynesburg earned tlers the county has taken to the PIAA the 4th seed in the WPIAL Team Southwest Regional or even to HerTournament, which came with the shey dipped a bit this year. perk of serving as a host site for the West Greene, who has qualified first two rounds. Unfortunately after at least two to the Regional Tournadefeating Butler, 41-29 in the first ment for at least the last seven years, round, the Raiders were eliminated by failed to qualify anyone this year. KoFranklin Regional with a 38-20 Quarlin Walker at 152 pounds, took 3rd terfinal loss. place in Section 2-AA, and was the Waynesburg’s individual numPioneers only representative even at bers were impressive in Class AAA the WPIAL Championships. though as nine Raiders advanced to Mapletown had two at the WPIthe WPIAL Championships! WaynesAL Championships, and both qualiburg had four Section 4-AAA Chamfied for the Regional Tournament as pions – Caleb Morris (132-pounds), well as Gavin Uphold (195 pounds) Trey Howard (145), Kyle Homet took 6th in the WPIAL and Seth Kolin Walker (170), and Colin McCracken (195), Shubert (152) finished 7th. Neither who along with Connor Main (220) advanced into the Regional Quarterand Tim Swiger (285), all reached the finals. WPIAL Quarterfinals. Jefferson-Morgan’s Josh Agnew Swiger, pulled off the biggest upqualified for Regions with a 5th place set in the WPIAL’s Round of 16 when finish in the WPIAL at 120 pounds. he upset 4th seeded Cory Dodson of The Rockets’ Aaron Mylan just missed Albert Gallatin, 5-2. Swiger was the out on that trip to IUP when he came only wrestler in the tournament to up one win shy at the WPIALs and start in a pigtail and reach the quartook 8th at 138 pounds. terfinals! Agnew was of course joined by In addition to the 6 quarterfiGavin Teasdale at the Southwest Renalists, Waynesburg was also repregional as Teasdale’s extraordinary sented at the WPIAL Championships high school career continues to be the by Ryan Braun (126), Colby Morris bright spot in AA for Greene County. (138), and Caleb Stephenson (152). Teasdale was the only AA wresUnfortunately, none of the three tler from the county in Hershey and made it past the first round. he did not disappoint. Teasdale had a The Raiders would advance four total of 13 postseason opponents and Gavin Teasdale to the WPIAL Semifinals with Mcdominated them all. He recorded 7 Cracken, Homet, Howard, and Caleb technical falls, 3 first-period falls, and Morris, who was crowned the WPIAL Champion two major decisions. He also won a bout by forfeit. at 132 pounds! Homet was a runner-up at 170 Teasdale’s two closest bouts were a 20-8 major depounds and McCracken took 3rd at 195 pounds. cision over Burrell’s Dillan Jeffrey in the WPIAL Those three advanced to the PIAA Championships finals and a 13-5 major decision over Austin Clain Hershey! baugh of Bermudian Springs in the State Finals. It was a rough first day in Hershey as the RaidThe 126-pound title won by Teasdale this year ers went a combined 1-5 in six bouts, eliminating was his third state title and his career high school both Morris and Homet. The only win that day be- record currently stands at 122-0! longed to McCracken in the Pigtail round. Of the three county wrestlers that qualified for After a loss in the first round though, Mc- Hershey this year, only McCracken will graduate. Cracken caught fire. He won 3 straight elimination That should mean several wrestlers vying for a spot bouts, even avenging a WPIAL Semifinal loss to on that state podium again next year. Eli Grape of Upper St. Clair, to guarantee himself

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Barnhart’s Showroom is fairly bursting with a great inventory of Polaris and Honda excitement.

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t’s bright, bold and definitely BIG! Barnhart’s Honda Polaris Dealership, just off I-79 in Ruff Creek, PA, is over 11,000 sq. ft. of sheer power and excitement inside. With both Honda and Polaris, Barnhart’s has the ultimate ride for everyone, for work or play, for fun or serious competition, for cruising on the highway or touring the tough terrain off road. “Polaris has the leading side-by-sides on the market,” said Craig Greenwood, Service Manager and co-owner with Yvonne Barnhart. “We’ve been riding, racing and working on them for years,” he adds, “And it amazes me how the side-by-side market continues to grow in general, more and more people enjoying the ride, and the ways to accessorize these things are unlimited.” Find the entire 2017 off-road line-up including Polaris Sportsman, Razors & Rangers at Barnhart’s. For those who like to ride red, your favorite Honda is waiting. The fabulous CRF Family has the perfect off-road bike for every age and stage of rider, the family of Pioneer side-by-sides gets better every year. “The Pioneer 1000 Limited Edition is so far above its class that ATV.com named it the 2016 UTV of the year,” notes Sales Manager Edward Balazick. If your way is the highway, check Barnhart’s line up of Honda Cruisers, street and sport bikes. Right now, there are some serious discounts on all non-current year bikes. “You can have a brand new machine for thousands of dollars off MSRP,” says Edward. Barnhart’s was happy to welcome Edward Balazick to the staff last November, with his extensive background in racing and riding and selling motor vehicles, and more importantly his philosophy about how to do business. “I like a dealership where they treat customers with integrity. Here they are straight forward and up front, no double talk. And one reason they’ve been in business so long is because it’s not all about the sale – it’s about the experience every customer has before, during and after the sale. When you treat people right AND make sure they’re getting the best bottom line – you both win,” Edward says. And he knows what he’s talking about. He may have just joined the staff last year, but Edward’s relation-

Sales Manager Edward Balazick welcomes the challenge, “I will make sure you get what you want AND it’s a really good deal.”

Edward Balazick at Willow Springs International Raceway while working with California Super Bike School.

ship with Barnhart’s goes way back. “My very first motorcycle came from here when I was 6 years old…a 1986 Honda Z50,” he says with a smile. Edward started riding young and kept it up. This Jefferson-Morgan graduate entered the U.S. Navy which took him to southern California, where he spent the next 15 years. He built a successful career in automotive sales at one of the largest Subaru dealerships in the country. And…he continued to ride. Edward also worked as a Head Corner Coach for California Super Bike School, renowned for its advanced rider training and coaching, with 65 World and National Championships claimed by former students. Just last fall, Edward decided to return to his native Pennsylvania and found the position at Barnhart’s a natural fit. Whether you’re shopping for a new machine or just want to fancy up what you’ve got, this is the place. With Barnhart’s commitment to straight deals and the best bottom line, you can’t go wrong. Mark your calendar now for the Spring Open House on May 19 & 20 for even more great incentives, prizes, food and fun.

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2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

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Lady Pioneers Make History

Champion Waynesburg Red! West Greene Girls Basketball just completed an historic season. The Lady Pioneers became the first team in program history to reach the WPIAL Semifinals and the PIAA State Playoffs! This team’s 19 wins tied the school record and their signature win came on February 24th with a 51-37 WPIAL Quarterfinal win over Rochester. Unfortunately the win only set up heartbreaking losses in their final Congratulations to the Waynesburg Red 2nd/3rd grade boys basketball two games. team, winners of the Beth Center Instructional Basketball League 2017 ChamWest Greene played the eventual pionship Game on Sunday March 5, 2017. Coaches in back row are (L-R): JerWPIAL Champion Winchester-Thuremy Ricciuti; George Taylor; Gerald Baker; Stan Dean. Players (L-R) : CJ Corston tougher than any Class 1A oppowin, Jacob Rockwell, Kory Taylor, Jarius Baker, Dominic George, Jack Ricciuti, nent had all year and even led in the Jackson Dean, Hayden Fields. fourth quarter, but ultimately suffered

a 55-50 loss. In their first ever PIAA playoff game, 231 miles away in Bradford, West Greene started out on fire, jumping out to a 12-0 lead on District 9 Runner-up Otto-Eldred. The Pioneers led for more than three quarters, but Otto-Eldred finally caught up and went on to win, 61-57, ending the Pioneers’ season. “This season was a really big step for our program and our community which supports us everywhere we go,” said head coach Jordan Watson. “We have a great group coming back and will be looking to get that first state playoff WIN next year.”

Yellow Jacket Journalism Awards

Award winning publishers of the Yellow Jacket: From top, L-R: Junior Shon Meade, seniors Tyler Wolfe, Brendan Keany, Kimmi Baston, junior Mitch Kendra, sophomores Luke Goodling, Teghan Simonton, Mattie Winowitch, senior Jacob Meyer, President Douglas Lee, Mrs. Kathryn Lee.

The Yellow Jacket newspaper, a student-run news publication at Waynesburg University, recently earned a record number of awards from two prestigious journalism organizations. For the year 2016, The Yellow Jacket has accrued 16 awards, breaking the previous year’s record of nine awards. Between staff, group and individual awards, the newspaper was named as a finalist for 11 awards from the Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ), a national organization of journalism professionals. The Pennsylvania NewsMedia Association (PNA) awarded the Yellow Jacket a total of five awards, announcing one first place award, one second place award, and three honorable mentions for Waynesburg. The SPJ Mark of Excellence competition assesses college newspapers by dividing entrants into small schools (1-9,999 students) and large schools (10,000+ students) for some categories. Seven Yellow Jacket staff members were named finalists among small schools in categories including General News, In-Depth Reporting, Sports Writing, Feature Writing

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and others for a total of 10 awards. The Yellow Jacket was also named a finalist for the Best All-Around Non-Daily Newspaper award, which assesses all non-daily newspapers regardless of school size. “Any time a student wins an award from SPJ, it’s a reminder that the curriculum and program we have for journalism students at Waynesburg is really preparing students for the real world,” said Dr. Brandon Szuminsky, faculty advisor for the Yellow Jacket and instructor of communication. “To win such prestigious awards only further reinforces that students are getting a great education and still enjoying all the benefits of a small-school setting.” The finalists for these Mark of Excellence awards were selected from among entrants across SPJ Region 4, which includes Michigan, Ohio, West Virginia and western Pennsylvania. A group of students will travel to the SPJ Region 4 Spring Conference in Detroit, Michigan, at the end of March to learn how the newspaper placed. First-place winners in each category will move on to the national SPJ competition. “We set a record last year with five SPJ awards, two of them being first place,” said Kimmi Baston, executive editor of the Yellow Jacket. “Even before finding out our placement, to have surpassed our record by so much is such an amazing accomplishment for the entire Yellow Jacket staff.” SPJ presents the Mark of Excellence Awards annually, honoring the best in student journalism. The awards offer categories for print, radio, television and online collegiate journalism. Waynesburg University’s previous record number of Mark of Excellence Awards was five. In addition to collecting 11 awards from SPJ, the Yellow Jacket received five Student Keystone Press awards from the PNA in Division II, which includes four-year colleges and universities with enrollment

under 10,000. In the General News category, senior Jacob Meyer earned second place for his story “Thomas More women’s basketball stripped of 2014-15 title.” Senior Kyle Dawson earned first place in the Sports Story category for his story “From fringe to spotlight.” The Yellow Jacket earned honorable mentions in General News (“Dreams will live on” by senior Kimmi Baston), Ongoing News Coverage (“Community addresses ongoing drug use and overdose problem” by senior Kimmi Baston, sophomores Teghan Simoton and Mattie Winowitch and 2016 graduate Anthony Conn) and Sports Story (“NCAA sanctions baseball team for practice violations” by Kimmi Baston). “We’re being compared to schools with great journalism programs all across the state, and we’re more than measuring up,” said Baston. “I’m incredibly proud of the individuals whose hard work and countless hours earned them this recognition.” The Student Keystone Press Awards contest recognizes high school and college journalism that provides relevance, integrity and initiative in serving readers. “Winning awards like these is great for resumes and bragging rights, but more importantly they’re a testament to the high quality education that students can get in the Department of Communication,” said Szuminsky. “We believe we’re doing what we say we will when it comes to providing students with real benefits, and this is outside validation and support for that idea.”

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Dr. Cathleen A. Lizza Optometrist

he convenience of doing business in downtown Waynesburg includes the cozy offices of Dr. Cathleen A. Lizza, Optometrist, at 74 West High Street. For a generation of repeat customers, a visit with Dr. Lizza is time spent with a friend “My practice is very personable and I pay attention to details. I’ve made many good friends over the past 30 years. I have seen many of my children patients grow into parents, and now I’m seeing their children,” Dr. Lizza will tell you with a smile. “Waynesburg is a wonderful town to practice in,” she continues. “I enjoy the atmosphere. The people are friendly and were very helpful to me from day one.” “Day one” was in September of 1987, when Dr. Lizza opened for business and customers began arriving, pleased with being able to include glasses and eye exams as part of their downtown shopping day, sandwiched between classes, scheduled around lunchtimes, on the way home from work… “We’ve always tried to support local businesses and local school districts,” Dr. Lizza said. “I was raised in Fayette County and went to California University of Pennsylvania. I graduated optometry school in Philadelphia in 1983, and opened practices in Waynesburg, Hopwood, and Connellsville. We work with local ophthalmologists in postoperative cataract care, and make all necessary referrals.” The extensive line of eyeglasses and frames includes designer frames, invisible bifocals and transition lenses. Wearers will appreciate the thinner, lighter lenses for higher prescriptions. Contact lenses are in-stock, and come in daily wear, astigmatism, tinted and bifocals. Exams are available for all age groups, as well as for cataract and diabetic patients. Dr. Lizza accepts most insurance plans. GreeneScene Magazine •

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Rumbaugh Back In Action

t Rumbaugh Back In Action Chiropractic, we are passionate about helping as many people as possible achieve true health and wellness. We know that chiropractic care cannot only help alleviate physical pain, but also helps a person maintain wellness. Chiropractic is the beginning of true health care – not just sick care. Dr. Rumbaugh and Dr. McCort have been serving Greene County and your surrounding areas for over 28 years. We are a community based practice that understands your needs with convenient office hours to accommodate your busy schedule. Dr. Rumbaugh, a 2ND generation Chiropractor, shares his enthusiasm, “I grew up with

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chiropractic and experienced firsthand the many benefits that could be achieved by chiropractic care. I knew I wanted to be a hands-on health care provider and Chiropractic fit the mold for me. It provided me the opportunity to treat patients naturally, to help them feel better and return to their normal activities. I enjoy the diversity of treating patients of all ability levels and helping them achieve their goals.” Dr. McCort, who grew up in Greene County and attended Jefferson- Morgan High School, is equally passionate about his profession. “I am continually updating my education to learn new techniques and expand my ability to more efficiently treat my patients. I love my job and feel very fortunate to be able to provide quality Chiropractic Care and help people get better faster.”

Behm’s Auction and Real Estate Services

fter more than 75 owners and also with executors, years in business, corporations, and bankruptcy Behm’s Auction and attorneys, among many others. Real Estate Services Sales may range from a local is still a leading provider of aucfamily relocating or the settletion services in our community ment of an estate to the sale of and beyond. Based in Greene personal property, real estate, County, PA, the company conor business liquidations. One ducts various auctions throughof the many reasons that people out the tri-state area of West choose to hire Behm’s Auction Virginia, Ohio and Pennsylvaand Real Estate Services is that nia. Three generations strong each auction is handled with with Jim Behm at the helm toprofessional courtesy and perday, Behm’s Auction Service sonal attention. “I’m often asked continues to offer quality serwhy people use our company, vice and a personal relationship and the answer is very simple. with each and every client. We treat each auction as if it Years ago, the average aucwere our own. We strive to liqtion was nearly as much a social uidate their assets, personal gathering as a business transacproperty, or real estate in a reaAuctioneer Jim Behm brings top dollar. tion, and most often consisted sonable amount of time, resultof household items or livestock. ing in the highest value that we Today’s auctions offer up a much greater variety of can achieve,” explains Jim Behm. With thousands goods and buying power for consumers. Today’s of auctions conducted throughout the tri-state area, technology enables internet bidding and absentee Behm’s Auction and Real Estate Services is a familbids among other ways to access the sale, making iar name. Most importantly, it is a trusted name in selling by auction more lucrative than ever before. the auction industry. For more information call the Of course, maximizing income while minimizing office at 724-428-3664 or visit the website at www. effort is one of the greatest advantages of selling behmsauction.com. by auction. Behm’s works directly with individual

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Greene County United Way Greene County United Way is working to advance the common good by focusing on the building blocks for a good life for all in our community with important issues such as Education, Income and Health. The goal is to create long-lasting changes that prevent problems from happening in the first place. Thanks to the generosity of many, Greene County United Way is working hard to achieve the 2017 goal of $175,000, which will help thousands of individuals in the community. The grant process to the 17 partner agencies is in full swing this time of year. With raising only 80% of the goal to date, funding these programs will be a challenge.

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Your generous donation will help fund programs provided to 2nd Sam 9, Big Brothers Big Sisters, Bowlby Library, Boy Scouts, Catholic Charities, Community Action Southwest, Corner Cupboard Food Bank, Cornerstone Care, Flenniken Library, Girl Scouts, Greater Waynesburg Christian Outreach, Greene Arc, Domestic Violence and the Salvation Army.   To learn more, please contact the Greene County United Way office at 724-852-1009 or visit our website at www.greenecountyunitedway.homestead.com   Donations can be mailed to 748 East High Street, Waynesburg PA 15370

GreeneScene Magazine •

MARCH / APRIL

2017

Mar Apr GreeneScene 2017  

It's here! Part 2 of our Growing in Greene Segment. More companies, contests and stories all related to communities in Greene County. Make s...

Mar Apr GreeneScene 2017  

It's here! Part 2 of our Growing in Greene Segment. More companies, contests and stories all related to communities in Greene County. Make s...

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