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GreeneScene by Lori Barnhart

Cornerstone Care Cornerstone Care will be hosting a Mother’s Day Paint and Pop on Saturday, April 30th at the First Baptist Church in Waynesburg to raise funds for the Smile for Life Oral Health Outreach Project. Ticket cost is $40 for adults and $25 for children 5-12. Tickets may be purchased by calling 724-8332170 or online at www.CornerstoneCareEvents. com “This will be a fun event that parents can participate in along with their children. The kids will be painting their own picture that they can give as a gift on Mother’s Day. And while they are busy designing their Mother’s Day cards, the adults will be busy creating their own painting,” said Donna Simpson, Outreach Department Manager. Space is limited, so everyone should order their tickets early. The fundraiser benefits Cornerstone Care’s Smile for Life program. The program provides classroom based oral health education and mobile dental services to Head Start programs and school Districts in southwestern PA. “Tooth decay is the most prevalent chronic disease among children, even though it is largely preventable’, Simpson said. Oral health is not only vital to maintaining good overall health; it can also have an effect on children’s confidence and their ability to concentrate in school. Cornerstone Care’s Smile for Life Program was created to ensure that children learn at an early age the importance of healthy teeth and gums and to provide the tools needed to prevent

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The picture that adults will paint during Paint & Pop

decay. The Smile for Life is made possible through fundraising efforts and the generous contributions of multiple agencies.

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teps Inside, Inc. formed 15 years ago from a group of people with drug, alcohol or gambling problems who could come together to share their struggles, socialize and support each other. In this environment, they could strive for sobriety and find supportive companionship from others who understand. Three years later the group purchased a house at 1790 Morris Street in Waynesburg - a place to gather, and also a meeting place they could offer to local 12-step programs (such as Alcoholics Anonymous, Narcotics Anonymous, Overeaters Anonymous, Gamblers Anonymous and their companion groups like Alanon). Although not formally affiliated with Steps Inside, these programs share common goals and offer strategic help and support. Being able to accomplish the purchase and renovation of the house gave inspiration and motivation for even greater ideas. The Steps Inside Community Recovery in Rural Communities Committee formed when the Steps Inside members began discussing the drug and alcohol problems in the community. The committee attacked the situation thoughtfully, collecting data and working diligently to educate the public about what they had learned. It sought resources to help those plagued by drug and alcohol problems and to find ways to prevent others from becoming addicted. The group also spoke with the local law enforcement and judicial system about how to take back our communities from drug and alcohol addiction. Rising from these efforts to find ways to help those in recovery be successful, came the Cum-

berland Oxford House and The Bird Sisters Oxford House, two residential group sober living facilities for men and women in recovery. Both are located in Waynesburg. At these houses residents hold each other responsible for contributing an equal share of the upkeep and expenses for the household. It is not a rehabilitation facility. It is a place where those in recovery can live in a clean and sober environment with others who understand what they are experiencing and can support each other. There is zero tolerance for drugs and alcohol in these residences. In addition to its work helping to establish these recovery houses, offering a place for 12step groups to meet, and being a social outlet for members, Steps Inside also does community outreach. They have played a significant role in the emergence of the recent Town Hall Meetings in Greene County, designed to help empower and inform the public about how we can work to gain ground in this battle against. They also offer information about clean and sober living and the various available 12-step programs at a variety of local events and public venues. Even small efforts such as collecting helpful items for personal hygiene, and gloves, scarves, hats, and small toys that they distribute to those in need each year at Christmas. Steps Inside hopes to put a face to addiction and show how it affects people from all walks of life and all ages. Those people may be your doctor, neighbor, lawyer or friend. Anyone who would like to find out more about Steps Inside, Inc. may call 724-852-5395.

Mr. Waynesburg contestants, front row: Chase Owens and Greg Yost, 2nd Row: Zachary Eisiminger, Jack Fudula, Nathan Hinerman, Kevin Lin, Jacob Tretinik, Braxton McCollum, Zackary Yenchik, Brady Hogue and Reid Griffin. Not pictured: Cole Garrett, Andrew Cain and Jeremy Mackey.

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Greene County United Way Greene County United Way is working to advance the common good by focusing on the building blocks for a good life for all in our community with important issues such as Education, Income and Health. The goal is to create long-lasting changes that prevent problems from happening in the first place. Thanks to the generosity of many, Greene County United Way is working hard to achieve the 2016 goal of $200,000, which will help thousands of individuals in the community. The grant process to the 17 partner agencies is in full swing this time of year. With raising only 80% of the goal to date, funding these programs will be a challenge.

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Your generous donation will help fund programs provided to 2nd Sam 9, Big Brothers Big Sisters, Bowlby Library, Boy Scouts, Catholic Charities, Community Action Southwest, Corner Cupboard Food Bank, Cornerstone Care, Flenniken Library, Girl Scouts, Greater Waynesburg Christian Outreach, Greene Arc, Domestic Violence and the Salvation Army.   To learn more, please contact the Greene County United Way office at 724-852-1009 or visit our website at www.greenecountyunitedway.homestead.com   Donations can be mailed to 748 East High Street, Waynesburg PA 15370

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I Love this P l a ce

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by Tara Kinsell

One of the Oldest Towns in Greene County

efferson is among the oldest established towns in Greene County, actually settled in the 1770s. Although it was named for Jefferson, and is now known simply as Jefferson, that wasn’t always the case. Around the turn of the 19th century, the eastern end of Jefferson was actually known as Hamilton , for Alexander Hamilton, and the western end as Jefferson. This was the result of an argument between two of its settlers who supported opposing political parties. That changed in 1827 when it was incorporated as a borough solely under the name of Jefferson. The town has a storied history, including being host to a stop on the famous Underground Railroad in the form of the Thomas Hughes House. This home was built in 1814 by slaves of Thomas Hughes. For many years, in the banks behind the house, Hughes’ slaves would mine coal. They were among the first people do so in Greene County. Hughes would later free them and eventually began utilizing his residence to help others escape to freedom. The house was once part of the Greene County Historical Society’s holdings and later served as a satellite of the county’s library system. Today, it is once again a private residence. During the 1800s the town held a grain mill, five saloons, a wagon maker shop, cooper and saddle shops and several tanneries. It was a bustling place with its own newspapers, The Jefferson News and the Jeffersonian. The latter is the name of the Jefferson-Morgan High School yearbook today. On the educational front, Jefferson once had its own college. The Monongahela College was founded in 1867 by the Baptists of Southwestern Pennsylvania. The college closed some 30 years later, but in 1909, the building became home to the Jefferson High School, and remained such until the new Jefferson-Morgan School building was built in 1955. The old college building was razed in 1956. Once upon a time, there were even fair grounds in the town of Jefferson. In fact, there is

still an area of the town commonly referred to as “the fairgrounds.” The Greene County Department of Parks and Pools holds one of its day camps at the location. The baseball fields located there have played home to the Greene Valley Youth softball and baseball teams for decades. A gentleman named Wes Knisley became widely known as a photographic historian of sorts for the town. Several of the late Mr. Knisely’s photographs may be quite familiar to our readers, as they still hang on the walls of the popular eatery, Laverne’s Restaurant, just south of Jefferson on Route 188. Knisley’s foster son, Jasper, whom he raised, was kind enough to share with us the scrapbooks kept by the man he knew as dad. Jasper also shared his own memories of a more recent period in Jefferson. Currently aged in his 40s, Jasper recalls the experience of his youth and teen years growing up during the 1970s & 80s in Jefferson, where he continues to live on the main street, Jefferson Road, aka Route 188. “When we were kids you didn’t have cell phones and the video games like they do today. After the Saturday morning cartoons ended, around 10 am, you were out the door and you were gone all day,” Jasper recalled. “We played pickup games of football every Sunday and we had a lot of kids that played.” Jasper said it was a nice place to grow up where everyone knew everyone else and you didn’t dare do something wrong because your parents would

Looking north on Route 188, also known as Jefferson Road, in 1960 one sees Sahady Used Car Sales and the Esso service station at the corner of Route 188 and Pine Street.

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JEFFERSON, PA

know before you got home. A f t e r school the kids would gather at J&J’s Store for snacks, and if they were lucky enough to have any quarters, games of pool or pinball. Currently, there is a gas station on one end of town and a plant that manufactures wine barrels on the other. There are still two saloons in town and a market. The bank that operated when Jasper was a youngster is long gone, replaced by an antique store. Like J&J’s, restaurants have come and gone. The town houses multiple cemeteries and churches and a funeral home. Behind the local fire department is an RV park that helped greatly when those coming here to work in the gas industry needed to find housing. At one time those fire grounds held an annual celebration that included a carnival that was as big of a draw for kids in the Jefferson area as the King Coal Show is Carmichaels. Although Route 188, where the fire department is located, is a bustling road today, it was once a safe place to travel by bicycle, Jasper reflected. “If you needed a ride somewhere it was called a bicycle. We would ride in packs. I remember my first bike cost $128 and I used to take car wax and wax it,” he said. “Basically it was my transportation. I saved the money to pay for it so no wonder I waxed it and took care of it.” A call home cost 35 cents back then and it was made via a pay phone. “Technology has changed everything,” he said. “It was much simpler back then.” He remembered a time when it wasn’t unusual

for a student to build a stock for their hunting rifle in shop class. He said that would obviously never happen today. “We even made crossbows in shop. We paid so much for the kit and we would go out where the softball field is behind the school to shoot them. It was very different then,” Jasper said. There is obviously still a lot to love about this place. That is why generation-after-generation of the same families, like Jasper, continue to call Jefferson home.

The Monongahela College in Jefferson later served as the Jefferson High School until 1955 when the Jefferson-Morgan High School opened its doors. The college building was torn down the following year in 1956.

The Jefferson Fair Association operated from 1907-1912. It held its first fair in Jefferson on Oct. 10-11, 1907. Over the July 4, 1908 holiday a racing program was held there. Roughly 9,000 attended the fair in its second year of existence. Racing became the emphasis until 1912 and no fairs appear to be recorded after that year at Jefferson. GreeneSaver •

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Fox Ford

of Waynesburg

Aerial view of Fox Ford dealership prior to the construction in 2001

Since 1921, the Fox family has been engaged in the automotive industry. For three generations, the focus on hard work and commitment to the community has remained. The Great Depression had the dealership relying on used car sales, the fabrication of auto parts, selling gasoline, and owning a trucking business; it was clear their diligence and dedication helped them survive. And survive they did. Not only survive, but grow and continue to build on their strengths and the needs of the market they served. Over the years the Fox automotive legacy has grown, with improvements and expansions that include a completely new, modern and convenient dealership building and service shop, and the more recent addition of the Quick Lane facility. Yet through this progress, the philosophy has never changed; or perhaps, it is that philosophy that enabled the progress. The Fox family and staff have remained true to their commitment to deliver exceptional service to their customers and maintain the comfort and trust of buying from a small town family dealership.” The fascinating history of Fox Auto Sales,

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from the humble beginnings as a used car lot and tractor dealership in Mt. Morris, through the depression and the war years when automotive production was banned, to the gasoline crisis and oil embargos of the late 20th century, on to the advent of the internet and online shopping.…the whole story is shared on the FoxFordWaynesburg.com website. Oh yes, while its history is cherished, Fox Ford is also on the cutting edge of convenience for its customers. The website also offers a completely up-to-date inventory of vehicles with the pictures, information and facts you need to streamline your new car or truck shopping experience. Of course, if you’d rather stroll through the expansive lot at Fox Ford, come on. With hundreds of late model, dependable pre-owned vehicles and a huge selection of America’s #1 brand Ford trucks, cars, vans and SUVs, all waiting for you to touch and feel and drive, you’ll love the experience. Fair pricing, superior service and the earned trust of this community has made Fox Ford your dealership of choice. Enjoy it.

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Local Reverend’s Inspiring Story

t is intriguing how one was struck with the need to preman’s journey in life can serve the life lessons in her fambe thrown into reverse by ily history. a single event, when two “My husband was ill and opposite paths appear end up I started thinking back and on a collision course. decided somebody in this famSuch is the story of Lawily needs to write down what rence “H.B.” Clesson Jewell. The happened…to tell this story. H.B. stands for Hell Bent, as he The more I wrote the more I rewas referred to by members of membered,” she said. “I wanted the Spring Creek Wild Boys, a to preserve those memories.” The Reverend & Mrs. Larry Jewel gang of which he was a leader. Without revealing too much Now, this isn’t a gang in the modern sense of the of the book, (you’ll want to read the whole story) word. Think more on the gangs of the wild west, we’ll share the incident that triggered H.B.’s change akin to those of Jesse James and the like. to give you an idea of the character of this account. This month we have chosen to ‘shine a light’ In an offhand comment, H.B. told another on a recently released book, “Hell Bent...Plucked as young man that for two cents he would go to the a Brand from the Burning,” written by the daugh- church to see for himself what was going on in ter of H.B., Erna “Jane” Jewell Ross of Jefferson; an there. exciting account of the unlikely conversion of Hell “He reached in his pocket and gave me the Bent to Reverend Larry Clesson Jewel. money, so I had to go or break my word, although “The peace and calm of the village of Youngs- I had no real desire to do so,” wrote Larry in his ville, in Warren County, Pennsylvania, was shat- journal. tered by the sound of windows being shot out by And so began part two of Larry’s life, as a pasa young hoodlum racing through town on his stal- tor of the people – which eventually led to a charge lion, leading his gang,” Jane wrote, “People rushed in Greene County, at the Fairdale Free Methodist to take refuge in their homes as the shots rang out.” Church on Nemacolin Road. The church building, That “hoodlum” was Jane’s father, a man she along with the log cabin the family would purchase grew up knowing as a stalwart in the communities on Kovalchek’s Road in Khedive, still stands. in which her family lived while he was serving as To hear more of the story of Reverend Larry a pastor in the Free Methodist Church. Jane also Clesson Jewell and his family, you can purchase a knew, however, both from his teaching at the pul- copy of “Hell Bent...Plucked as a Brand from the pit and often told family stories, that this powerful Burning” by contacting Jane through email at ejanpastor had a past. A past with wild ways that could eross15344@gmail.com, or by phone at 724-966have led him down the road to destruction, were it 7068. not for the saving grace that he found. She set out to write the whole story of her father’s life as an inspiration to others, that they too might find their way to God. “As the five Spring Creek Wild Boys raced their horses through the tiny town, they caused havoc of all kinds, disrupting the lives of the community,” Jane wrote, “They were foul-mouthed, vulgar, loud and dirty, throwing their cigarette butts and trash as they went.” Her father, by all accounts she said, was the ring leader and worst of them all. Jane said she began the book several years ago when things had slowed down in her life. Her father was long past, her husband was ill, and Jane Author Jane Ross of Jefferson, PA

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G ree n e Sce n e of the Pa st

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by Tara Kinsell

Revolutionary War Soldier’s Home Stands Test of Time

n conjunction with our I Love This Place feature on Jefferson, we are happy to share the historic home of Gill and Patty Sanchez as our Greene Scene of the Past. The Sanchez’s are the proud owners of the William Cree House on Havers Hill Road in Jefferson. William fought in the Revolutionary War, earning a bounty land warrant for the farm on which the house is located. Bounty land warrants were grants of free land issued to veterans in return for military service from the time of the Revolutionary War through 1855. Although all the original acreage was not retained with the house, there are still 11.2 acres of the land with it. The main portion of the home was built in 1792, making it one of the oldest houses in Greene County, if not the oldest. An 1874 log cabin was moved and attached to the house in 1974. The structure made the National Register of Historic Places when its then owners, Richard and Barbara Yeager, made application. The application details the historical accu-

racy of the interior and talks about the 1782 spring house and Cree family cemetery on the property. It has been restored and updated with a gourmet kitchen but retains the feel of 18th century homes with such items as hand forged Rat-

William Cree House in early 1900’s.

tail hinges, soapstone countertops and farm sink, original walk-in fireplace with wrought iron swing arm, according to the application description. The house includes perennial gardens, two ponds, and a variety of trees, including walnut, chestnut, maple,

and oak. All of this combines for a beautiful home and property. We thank Gill and Patty for sharing a historic photo of the home circa 1900 and one of it in its current glory.

William Cree House today.

If you have an interesting old photo from the area you’d like to share, just send it to: GreeneScene of the Past, 185 Wade Street, Waynesburg, PA 15370. Or email to: info@greenesaver.com with GreeneScene Past in subject line. The GreeneSaver can even scan your original in just a few minutes if you bring it to our office. We are particularly interested in photos of people and places in the Greene County area taken between 1950 and 1980, though we welcome previous dates, too.

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Gateway Senior Housing Gateway Senior Housing will soon be welcoming senior citizens who are downsizing or looking for more affordable rent. This beautiful 52-unit apartment style housing is designed specifically for seniors 62 and older. A new 4-story building with elevators, Gateway, at 330 Nazer Street, is conveniently located near beautiful downtown Waynesburg, with everything you need to live a more enjoyable lifestyle. Apartment amenities include Energy Star rated windows and appliances (including a dishwasher), walk-in closet, central heating & air, carpeting in living and bedrooms. The Building amenities include a wellness center, two laundry rooms,

computer room and a large community room with outside veranda. Rates range from $124 to $560 a month, which includes water, sewage and trash. Rates depend on annual income of all assets (income limits apply), with most seniors paying $436 for a one bedroom and $516 for a two bedroom. Residents of Gateway Senior will be offered supportive services. This project was made possible with the help of Pirhl, Waynesburg Prosperous and Beautiful, Community Bank, Greene County Housing Team, First Federal of Green County, Waynesburg Borough, PHFA, Accessible Dreams, SWPA AAA, FHL Bank Pittsburgh, Boston Financial and the Greene County Commissioners.

Dr. Cathleen A. Lizza, Optometrist The convenience of doing business in downtown Waynesburg includes the cozy offices of Dr. Cathleen A. Lizza, Optometrist, at 74 West High Street. For a generation of repeat customers, a visit with Dr. Lizza is time spent with a friend “My practice is very personable and I pay attention to details. I’ve made many good friends over the past 26 years. I have seen many of my children patients grow into parents, and now I’m seeing their children,” Dr. Lizza will tell you with a smile. “Waynesburg is a wonderful town to practice in,” she continues. “I enjoy the atmosphere. The people are friendly and were very helpful to me from day one.” “Day one” was in September of 1987, when Dr. Lizza opened for business and customers began arriving, pleased with being able to include glasses and eye exams as part of their downtown shopping day, sandwiched between classes, scheduled around lunchtimes, on the way home from work… “We’ve always tried to support local businesses and local school districts,” Dr. Lizza said. “I was raised in Fayette County and went to California University of Pennsylvania. I graduated optometry school in Philadelphia in 1983, and opened practices in Waynesburg, Hopwood, and Connellsville. We work with local ophthalmologists in postoperative cataract care, and make all necessary referrals.” The extensive line of eyeglasses and frames includes designer frames, invisible bifocals and transition lenses. Wearers will appreciate the thinner, lighter lenses for higher prescriptions. Contact lenses are instock, and come in daily wear, astigmatism, tinted and bifocals. Exams are available for all age groups, as well as for cataract and diabetic patients. Dr. Lizza accepts most insurance plans.

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Tri-State Health Care Chiropractic Care Can Help

Doctors of chiropractic are trained and licensed to treat the entire neuromusculoskeletal system. Some doctors of chiropractic have specialized training in sports medicine and can provide advice for golfers to help them decrease the stresses and strains placed on their bodies. Doctors of chiropractic can address other health concerns, such as shoulder, knee, arm and wrist pain that could affect your game. Many avid golfers contort their bodies into oddly twisted postures, generating a great deal of torque. Couple this motion with a bent-over stance, repeat 120 times over three or four hours, add the fatigue that comes with several miles of walking, and you’ve got a good workout-and a recipe for potential lower-back trouble.

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“Most golfers go until they get hurt, then look for help,” Says Dr. Houston . “Back pain is a warning sign that there is an underlying problem responsible for a symptom that will likely get worse. Doctors of chiropractic look for the cause of the symptom and help reduce the likelihood of future injury.” Our patients needs are our number one priority. It is our goal to provide each patient with effective care, and to make that care both affordable and convenient.  Tri-State Health Care understands the demands of juggling both work and family schedules.  We offer early mornings, evenings, and Saturday appointments to make our availability fir your schedule.

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Come One, Come All to the Greatest Show on Earth

This elephant is a favorite in the collection of Rev. Dr. Donald Wilson. He purchased it when the Ames Department Store was in Waynesburg and it moves in a lifelike manner.

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ev. Dr. Donald Wilson has a passion that began when he was just a boy of 7 or 8. It began near his childhood home, at a special place called Flowers Field in the community known as Morrisville, near Waynesburg, Pa. “I was in first or second grade. I can remember. I remember Flowers Field, behind where Ron Lewis Automotive is today,” Don says as he sees it all in his mind’s eye. What he is actually remembering is a spectacle that would imprint upon his very heart. The circus had come to town, and with it, the most majestic creature young Donald had ever seen, the elephant. Since that time, his appreciation for these majestic giants has inspired quite a collection of elephants of various sizes, along with many other trappings of the circus world. As you enter the Wilson home you are greeted by one of the largest elephants in his collection, positioned just outside the house. Inside Don’s man cave is a train display with circus tents that reflect his favorites, all custom made by hand to look just like the actual circuses they represent. Beneath the train table is a box of various circus banners and posters. There are circus magazines on the shelves in his office. And, if one looks around in the Wilson home, a touch of the circus seems to be visible in most, if not all, rooms. Don tells the story of his family trip to see the Mills Brothers Circus when he was in junior high school in Waynesburg. The family was late arriving, so circus workers quickly set up chairs for them. “We got great seats on folding chairs right up front. I thought, ‘Oh my gosh,’ as the elephants did a promenade in front of my dad, brother, my mom and me,” he said. “In circus performances now, they keep considerable distance.” The experience

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only solidified Don’s preoccupation with the great animals. A fascination that has never waived. As an adult, and after attending seminary, Don was serving in Bloomville, NY, and went into a nearby town to take some mail to the post office there. “I saw a circus setting up behind it in a vacant lot. An older gentleman came walking out in a flannel shirt, overalls and hat, chewing on a straw,” Don said, noting that he had unwittingly edged closer to the scene. “I was wearing my collar, and he looked at me, and said, ‘I own this thing.’ He told me to come back that afternoon and be his guest.” Don said he skipped lunch and returned; much to his surprise, the gentleman was standing outside the big top waiting for him. “He said to me, ‘I’m so glad you came,’ and he took me to an honored spot in front of the center ring. They had a huge heard of elephants,” Don recalls. “Then we had dinner together afterwards. He really sparked my big interest in the circus.” That show was the Von Brothers Circus. “I was intrigued. I’ve always been intrigued by the elephants. They are so huge but so graceful and so intelligent. They used to seem frightening because they were so big,” Don said. Another experience back in his home town served to feed Don’s obsession, and led him to take a bit more active role in the circus business, as well as a membership in Big Top for Life with the Circus Fans Association of America. “We had come back to Waynesburg just for a visit, and the Kelly Miller Circus had set up by the airport. We went to see them and I talked to David Rawls, the principal owner at the time,” Don said. He hoped Rawls would agree to bring Kelly Miller to West Middlesex, Pa, where the Wilson Family was living

The big top of the Kelly Miller Circus is part of the circus train display in the home of Rev. Dr. Donald Wilson.

at the time, to do a fundraising engagement for an all-sports banquet. What ended up happening was an opportunity presented to Don to bring the Carson and Barnes Circus to town (Carson and Barnes was the parent company of Kelly Miller). The occasion came with very short notice when Carson and Barnes had a sudden cancellation just three weeks prior to a show date. Don jumped into action spreading the word and securing a location. The circus came to West Middlesex, and the show went off without a hitch. “It is a good clean, family show that is modestly priced,” Don said. “And there is nothing like seeing the elephants help to raise the big top,” he adds with a smile. When the Wilsons finally moved back to Greene County several years ago, and became involved with the Greene County Historical Society, Don once again saw the opportunity to host the circus – as a fundraiser for GCHS. The Kelly Miller Circus now performs every spring at the Greene County Fairgrounds, presented by GCHS. This year’s event is Monday, May 23, with two shows, 4:30pm & 7:30pm. Having the opportunity to ride elephants at various points in his life is probably Don’s most special circus-related experience. However, there is another that will stay with him. “The last year we were visiting in West Middlesex, I was at the circus, sitting with the mayor and beside us was a busload of special needs kids. The clowns played to those kids and they loved it. I looked over and the mayor was crying,” Don recalls the moment. “He said to me, ‘If we don’t make a penny on this, it is worth it.’ And it was true, it was.” And, for Rev. Dr. Donald Wilson, it will always be.

Don Wilson takes a ride on a Kelly Miller Circus elephant.

Rev. Dr. Donald Wilson shares some of his many circus posters. GreeneSaver •

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Patsy’s Lake P

atsy’s Lake is a wellstocked, spring-fed, extra-deep lake that covers 10 acres, and features a wealth of trout, bass, catfish, and others. But for Vicky Polando, it’s more than just a space to spend a happy day of fishing—it’s a part of the family. “Patsy’s Lake was owned by my mom and dad, Patsy and Rose Carbonara, since 1953,” Vicky recalls. “They both got sick, and closed it down in the early ‘80s. My husband, Mike, and I were both working, so we just left it closed.” In 2010, Vicky and Mike re-opened the lake, located near Uniontown, PA, bringing this much-loved area getaway spot back to life. “Some of the people that used to come, their children and grandchildren are now coming,” Vicky muses. Business isn’t limited to the locals, however. “We have people that come from as far as Cranberry to the north and Waynesburg from the south! They come with their family; they bring food, and make a whole day of it!” Patsy’s family-friendly atmosphere means that everyone can have a good time. “We’ve had children as young as five years old,” Vicky notes. “Last year, there was a little girl that came fishing with her dad and uncle, and she had a ‘Little Princess’ fishing

rod. She caught the most beautiful trout! She was so excited! And then there was a boy who caught his first fish, and it was just a little bluegill, but you should have seen the smile on his face!” Patsy’s also offers night fishing, with some primitive (no electric or water hook-ups) camping sites available for those who want to extend their fun. Open fires are not permitted, due to the risk to nearby fields, but grills are welcome for those who want to enjoy their catch as soon as the fishing is done. In addition, there are handicapped-accessible fishing areas, beautiful surroundings, and, if you happen to be fishing on a particularly cool day, you just might be invited in for a nice, hot bowl of chili!

Community Action Southwest

Join an exciting dynamic and diverse social service agency who changes the lives of others. Community Action Southwest (CAS) has an array of job opportunities that attract and appeal to those that want to get involved in their communities by way of helping others. Community Action Southwest serves as the catalyst to mobilize resources of the entire community to enable families and individuals in Southwestern PA to attain the skills, knowledge, motivation and opportunities to become self- sufficient through an array of job opportunities with excellent benefits. CAS has immediate employment FT and PT opportunities for degreed

and non-degreed applicants in areas such as – • Early Childhood Services – Teacher, Teacher Assistant, Cooks, Caseworkers • Nutrition Services- Health Professionals • Family Economic Success- Self-Sufficiency Caseworkers • Try-Again Homes- Foster Care Caseworkers, Truancy Prevention Advocates, • After School Mentor, Visitation Case Aides Visit our website to learn more about us, CAS would be honored to have you join our team of caring staff who truly impact the lives they touch each and every day.

GreeneScene by Grace Bradmon

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Closing the Chapter on Huffman Electronics

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by Tara Kinsell

t was the end of an era on March 12 when the doors to the Radio Shack, aka Huffman Electronics, in Waynesburg were locked one last time. I had the opportunity to visit with Charlie Huffman in those final hours to reminisce about the business. His business partner, and sister, Caroline, joined us by speaker phone. Those old enough to have shopped at the store when it was located in the Greene Plaza saw the beginnings of the Huffman family’s involvement with Radio Shack. A young Charlie started working there The grand opening of the Huffman Electronics Radio Shack location in Morrisville/Dotysburg. At left, John Loper of WANB Radio broadcasted live. Next to when he was a high school student. Loper, from left two Radio Shack representatives, Caroline, Charlie, Charlotte “Bill Iams actually started the and Charles Huffman, Sr. and a third Radio Shack representative. store in the plaza behind the McDonalds. It later moved to where “We had the only ones out there for a little Sears Optical is out by Big Lots. I started working for him in 1981,” Charlie said. “In early spring of 1982 he while,” Charlie said, noting that eventually knockdecided to sell it. I was just 21 at the time.” Iams had offs of the tiny, remote-controlled cars were everyenough faith in his young protégé to offer to sell the where. “When we first got them we couldn’t keep them in stock.” business to him. Perhaps more than anything, the store has “My dad said, ‘If you want to try it we can go to the bank to get a loan.’ Caroline, was teaching at been a place of “demystifying electronics for people,” the time and I asked her if she wanted to do this as Charlie said. Radio Shack provided products and ina partner,” Charlie remembers. Caroline said yes and formation for the do-it-yourselfer from make-yourthus began more than 30 years of the Huffman fam- own transistor radio kits to make-your-own burglar ily being the go-to people for all things electronic in alarms. Among the remnants of the stock still on the shelves on the final day, were fuses, wiring, and variGreene County. “We moved to this location (the Central Plaza ous connectors reminiscent of those days. Above all else, Caroline said the store was about behind Sheetz) in August 1988. We had some of the first personal computers to come out in the late 80s. family, the people of Greene County, and the employCell phones were big and we always sold remote ees, like Steve Caldwell, who was with the store for 21 control vehicles and toys,” Charlie said, when asked years. “Everybody knew him and loved him. He was a really good worker for us. I wouldn’t have traded a about the hot items. When Charlie recalled the old Radio Shack minute of it, seeing people and getting to know peobattery club it brought back a distinct memory. You ple,” she said. It was a “complete family effort from could go in and get a free battery with your club card. mom and dad helping to get the whole thing started,” As a kid it was always fun to pick up a square 9-volt Charlie added. “We just had a blast, being able to battery. If you are too young to know this, the buttons work with family.” Even though it was located in a small market on the end of a 9-volt battery, when placed against one’s tongue, would give you a slight jolt. It also left a area, Huffman Electronics’s Radio Shack was quite distinct taste, as someone I mentioned it to reminded successful in the Radio Shack family also – being selected more than once from all stores nationwide me. In addition to free batteries there were give- to receive the Top Gun Award, recognizing superior aways of flashlights and beach balls through the performance. Answering machines, landline phones of evyears, Charlie recalls. “Oh my, that would have been in the mid 70s,” ery shape, and 1,000s of satellite dishes when they was Caroline’s response when asked about the Citi- were the size of a Mini Cooper passed through those zen Band (CB) Radio craze. “But in the last couple of doors. Although Charlie said they had begun to think years, with the boom in the gas industry, they sold like it was the 70s again.” In the field they need to be about selling, especially after the loss of their bein constant contact and it [CB] works where there is loved sister, Charlotte, a constant behind the counter through the years, the decision was taken out no cell phone reception, Charlie added. “Funny how that came full circle. My dad al- of his hands, he said. “We would have liked to sell, ways said the pendulum eventually swings back the but Radio Shack is in transition after being bought other way,” he said. “Base CB’s were huge at one time by General Wireless,” he explained, noting that the where people would talk from their homes, and of buyer would have to come from within that corporacourse the ham radios that let people talk to others tion. “It really tied our hands for allowing the store to from state-to-state and even in other parts of the stay in Greene County.” When he learned the entire world.” These items they quit selling more than a de- Central Plaza was being sold for the future expansion cade ago, but you never know, the pendulum always of Sheetz, it solidified the family’s decision to close the business. swings back… “I was ready to retire and decided we’ll just call It was hard for Charlie and Caroline to name that single item that stood out as the top seller of all it a day,” he said. And a sad day it was for audiophiles over the years, but Zip Zaps certainly make the cut in Greene County. We wish the Huffman family a happy and well-deserved retirement. near the top of the list.

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GROWING IN GREENE TRIVIA WINNER Mary Rohrer of Mather, PA

PICTURE PUZZLE WINNER

Jennifer Turco of Carmichaels, PA Last Month’s Picture Puzzle Answer: Pot of Gold

Winner of a FREE MONTH MEMBERSHIP TO ANYTIME FITNESS

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The Perfect Arrangement

L – R Janet Bowman, Manager & Florist and Gwen Wendell, Florist

If you think it’s only there for special occasions, The Perfect Arrangement, 694 High Street in Waynesburg, invites you to stop in and discover one of Greene County’s most exciting and – well FUN stores! Remember the name is The Perfect Arrangement Floral and Gift. It’s true – this florist makes special occasions really stand out, because flowers are always a great choice. The gift shop as well can make any day a special occasion! With a large showroom brimming with gifts and décor for inside and out, it’s a place you need to visit. New spring supply of hand crafted items just arrived in the showroom last week. Country décor and crafts, many Amish made items including bird houses and benches to which the Perfect Arrangement adds some color and floral – perfectly custom – you won’t see this anywhere else. That’s one of the advantages of buying at The Perfect Arrangement – the talented designers who can make a piece unique. Floral designer, Gwen Wendell, has been with the Perfect Arrangement since the very beginning. Called a “miracle worker” by many, Gwen’s ability to create beautiful arrangements from a seemingly endless array of materials has earned her a farreaching reputation. There are people who call us from all over, because they specifically want Gwen to take care of their arrangements. They know what’s she’s able to do,” says manager Janet Hopkins, a long-time colleague of Gwen’s, and skilled designer as well. “It’s a very special shop – with a much larger selection of gift and décor than most florists. Because we stock such a nice selection of gifts, as well as live plants, silks, and of course the best fresh flowers, we are able to produce very custom arrangements that deliver the emotion and message you want to send,” Janet says. One thing customers really enjoy is the way that The Perfect Arrangement staff can transform personal objects into integral parts of an arrangement or special displays. Old lanterns, baskets,

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even distressed, re-purposed kitchen chairs can have new life breathed into them, creating truly custom pieces that reflect an individual’s sense of style. Whether you have your own items that you would like to have woven into a design, or you are looking for that perfect piece, that’s the beauty of Perfect Arrangement’s wonderful showroom filled with unique décor and special items. “People often bring in pictures or fabric swatches so we can customize something just right for their needs,” Gwen says. Another wonderful advantage of The Perfect Arrangement is the corner of the showroom dedicated to sympathy and funerals, with so many meaningful ideas and special ways to share your love during difficult times. The carved stones, wind chimes, lanterns are just a few of the many choices you’ll find to express your sympathy in a beautiful and lasting way while the fresh floral arrangements created by this skilled staff always make a touching and appropriate tribute. The best way to make your order is to call directly to the Perfect Arrangement, so they can make it just the way you want it, or help you figure out what’s best. Call 724-627-3191. Locally owned and operated, the shop has grown into an area favorite over the past ten years. As a florist, the Perfect Arrangement staff knows this community, because we are a part of it. We are a part of your celebrations, and we’re there to help through the hard times, too. We enjoy serving the needs of our local civic organizations, schools, offices, businesses and residents. The Perfect Arrangement offers daily delivery to all of Greene County and beyond. And remember, it doesn’t have to be a holiday or special occasion to send flowers. You can bring a smile to someone’s face today. It just takes one call. The Perfect Arrangement does it all. 724-627-3191. Or better yet, treat yourself to a store visit, then you’ll be smiling, too. Summer Hours are Mon-Fri 9am -5pm and Saturday’s 9am – Noon.

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Southeastern Greene Students Create Art Installation Projects

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tudents in the fifth grade at Bobtown Elementary and Mapletown Junior/ Senior High School art and family consumer sciences classes worked with artists in residency from the Pennsylvania Filmmakers/Pittsburgh Center for the Arts (PF/PCA) in creating art installation projects to be displayed in district schools. Bobtown students worked with PF/PCA Resident Artist/ Ceramicist Becky Keck in the completion of two ceramic art pieces. Keck is also with the Monon Center in Greensboro. Students working with Keck Bobtown Elementary fifth grade students. used a grid scale to design individual tiles that when placed toMapletown Junior Senior High students had gether form one large image. The tiles were then kiln fired and numbered according to the grids the opportunity to create a broken tile mosaic before the 7 1/2 ft. by 4 1/2 ft. piece, displaying design. Students participated in an activity that a giant bulldog, was hung in the hallway on the required them to create both unique designs and top floor of the Bobtown Elementary. The second school images. Students worked with PF/PCA piece is a colorful, individually designed assort- Resident Artist Laura Jean McLaughlin who used ment of tiles that will be put together to form a the student ideas to create a one-of-a-kind mural. quilt-like design. When installed, it will hang in Students were responsible for all aspects of the project from cutting tile to grouting and installthe hallway outside of the fifth grade classrooms. ing the mural in the high school cafeteria. The artists in residencies of Keck and McLauglin are supported in part by the Arts in Education Partnership of the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts. Additional support for the Mapletown Jr/Sr High School residency project was provided by the Monon Center with a grant from the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation. Additional support for the residency project at Bobtown Elementary School was provided by the Community Foundation of Greene County. Mapletown Junior Senior High students.

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Greene County Tourist Promotion Agency The arrival of spring means new activities and projects are in full bloom at the Greene County Tourist Promotion Agency. Production on the 2016 Greene County Visitors Guide is underway and should be wrapped up before the busy event season kicks off in full. The 36-page, full-color guide highlights attractions, businesses and organizations, along with a calendar of annual events. This year, the publication was designed by JoAnne Marshall, the new Tourism secretary who joined the office last November. Marshall was hired after longtime secretary Candace Tustin left to become the executive director of Corner Cupboard Food Bank. “Losing Candace was very sad, but we were really lucky to find JoAnne and bounce back,” said Elizabeth Menhart, tourism director. “JoAnne really blended in seamlessly and brings years of marketing, graphic design and photography experience that have been invaluable to us as we continue to change and grow.” The official Greene County map will also be reprinted this year, and plans are being developed for new brochures, signage projects and a website facelift. All of the collateral materials will continue to have a similar design using the “It’s Right Here” campaign. “We are in the second year of the campaign,” Menhart said. “Now that we’ve unveiled the new look and imagery, it’s time to go further and start applying those same visuals to our other marketing pieces. The repetition and frequency allows us to create a more

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consistent, streamlined message.” The campaign – developed with Crowe’s Nest Creative of Waynesburg – features seasonal photos and videos of local people enjoying Greene County’s attractions, events and businesses, all with the tagline “It’s Right Here.” The ads also encourage visitors to “enjoy the simple thrill of a day well spent.” As Tourism works to promote Greene County as a whole, many individual businesses and organizations are finding the value in their membership. Numbers remain high, with more than 120 members for the year so far. An exclusive membership benefit that Tourism offers is its Grants program, which received a major overhaul for 2016. This year, changes included implementing quarterly cycles and deadlines. This ensures a more equitable, efficient and competitive process for all members, who can apply for assistance with special events, projects and marketing activities. The next deadline is May 2. Information about grants and membership may be found on the “Member Access” area of the Tourism website. And with spring comes a little spring cleaning. The Tourism office is excited to announce that many of its keepsake gift items – including the famous covered bridge puzzles – are being discounted effective April 1 to clear inventory and bring in new items later this year. For more information, or to order any gifts, call Greene County Tourism at 724-627-8687, or visit www.GoGreeneCounty.org.

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Route 21 Homes

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f new home ownership seems unreachable to you, the folks at Route 21 Homes in Carmichaels may just have the answer. Manufactured housing provides equal quality to traditional construction, enhanced by both cost and time savings - significant savings. That’s your answer. “If you hire a traditional contractor to build your home starting from the ground up you are typically looking at close to year’s time,” said Eric Smith of Route 21. “With a manufactured home, from start to finish it is closer to 3 - 3 1/2 months. The cost savings is between 25 to 50 percent less.” Weather can really slow the traditional building process and even damage the interior work if it hits before it is under roof. The speed and efficiency that is available with manufactured housing eliminates those worries. Though so much is prefabricated in ideal warehouse conditions, you don’t lose style and individuality with the process. The options for customizing and making a manufactured home your very own is still “pretty limitless,” according to Eric. One can select a two-story, cape or ranch style house among other styles, and various floor plans to choose from within each. “They’ve come a long way, even in just the last 10 years,” Eric explains. “You can select different roof pitches, dormers…you can add guest suites, decks, and even a full basement for example.” You can feel good about buying local, too, because the homes sold by Route 21 Homes are all manufactured right here in Pennsylvania. Colony, Pennwest and Commodore are among the best in the industry nationwide, all located in Pennsylvania. Colony, Commodore and PennWest recognized Rt. 21 Homes in Greene County for being among the Top Ten Highest Annual Sales Volume achievers for the three manufacturers’ division. Manufactured housing continues to grow and become the alternative for more and more homeowners because of the advantages we’ve already mentioned, and the sheer simplicity of it. The structure and its elements pre-built and come together like a tight fitting puzzle. Each one goes through a “build test” before leaving the factory to make sure everything is perfect, and all work is governed by HUD and DCED regulations. Customizing your new home to fit your personality is no problem. Starting with a full range of color options and then moving on to your choice of various fixtures, window styles, doors, countertops and more. You get to select your preferences throughout your new home. “There is a fall show every year over a weekend to introduce the new features, new colors and new flooring options,” Eric said. At Route 21’s Annual Open House event, po-

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tential buyers have the opportunity to tour display homes to see for themselves what is available. This year’s open house will take place from April 7th through April 10th. “We can assist customers in every aspect of buying their dream home from the foundation to the financing,” Eric said. “I try to put myself in the customer’s shoes. I ask myself, ‘How would I want to be treated?’ and take care to treat them all that way. We all do. That’s why this place has been around for 37 years now.” Eric said that same philosophy goes into the Route 21 Estates, the company’s manufactured home community, located just across the street from Route 21 Homes, and its more recently acquired Jefferson Estates (formerly Reesman’s), near Jefferson. Both offer affordable housing options with double and single-wide mobile homes.

Eric said upgrades began in 2013 and continuing efforts have made noticeable differences and improved the environment in both locations. Plans are in place to expand Route 21 Estates with 35-40 new spaces toward Ceylon Road. Residents there have the added bonus of the laundromat, storage units, and car wash, also owned by Route 21 Homes. “We recently added three turnkey homes at Jefferson Estates; two brand new double-wides and one single-wide. It is a beautiful park in a nice country setting,” Eric added. “Investing in quality homes situated in a pleasant setting pays off by attracting good tennants. Whether we’re making safe & affordable housing available to local residents by maintaining our parks, or helping property owners select and purchase their new dream home, we really have a satisfying job here,” he adds.

Cindy Rose, manager of Route 21 Estates.

From left, Tom Christopher, Eric Smith, Debbie Lukacs, and Scott Smith show off some of the sales awards earned by Route 21 Homes.

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Odyssey of the Mind Team Donates to Engineering Club

A Clean Sweep at Chili Cook-Off Rita Gionfriddo of Greensboro was the big winner at the 7th annual chili competition, held March 5 at the Greensboro Fire Hall. Rita walked away with both the Judges and the People’s Choice awards that handmade by stained glass artists Karen Calvert and Beth Day. Rita’s winning chili recipe included steak, sausage, pepperoni, two kinds of beans, cheese, and her mother’s secret ingredient--potatoes. The chili competition is a fundraiser of the Nathanael Greene Community Development Corporation.

EQT Contributes $85,000 for Education EQT Corporation has contributed $85,000 to the Community Foundation of Greene County’s Educational Improvement Fund through the Pennsylvania Educational Improvement Tax Credit (EITC) program. “We are so pleased to work with EQT to support public school curriculum projects which benefit our Greene County students,” said Bettie Stammerjohn, Executive Director of the Community Foundation of Greene County. “This contribution will help provide new and existing programs that help students succeed in school.” The Educational Improvement Fund supports innovative educational programs in public schools by providing equipment for the EMT class at Carmichaels Area High School, an outdoor classroom at Mapletown High School, and artist in residency and technology programs at Bobtown Elementary School, to name a few. “EQT is committed to expandFrom left, Ellen Rossi, EQT Foundation Manager, presents a check for ing educational initiatives in Greene $85,000 to Bettie Stammerjohn, Executive Director of the Community County. Through our giving efforts, Foundation of Greene County for the Education Improvement Fund. like EITC, we are helping to make differences in Greene County, parcredit for a single-year gift, up to a maximum of ticularly for children,” said Ellen Rossi, EQT Foundation Manager. “We are so pleased to $750,000 in credits per taxable year. School districts in Greene County may submit once again partner with the Community Foundation on helping bring new and innovative programs grant proposals to the foundation for consideration into the classroom that will help students achieve a of an EITC Educational Fund Improvement Award. Criteria and an application can be found on the higher level of learning.” Businesses receive Pennsylvania tax credits CFGC webpage at www.cfgcpa.org/schoolgrants. for its contributions, a 90 percent tax credit if the html. To learn more about the CFGC, visit the webbusiness makes a two-year gift, or a 75 percent tax page or phone 724-627-2010.

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Pictured: West Greene High School’s engineering team and their instructor are presented with a check for $500 by Marcia Sonneborn (former OM Coach) of the West Greene World Finalist Odyssey of the Mind team. From left, Eric Hooper, Rodney Parson, Dan Salai, Eric Armstrong (engineering instructor), Sonneborn, Patrick Hughes and Tyler Whipkey. Not pictured are engineering club members Chris Engle-Young and Dawn Anna Trout.

The West Greene Odyssey of the Mind team – consisting of Ian Coote, Peter Coote, Kara Curry, Katie Hutchison, Jacob Salai, Mikayla Sonneborn, Justin Ziefel and coaches Connie Curry and Marcia Sonneborn – recently donated funds they raised to assist the West Greene High School’s engineering club in their upcoming BotsIQ competition. The Odyssey of the Mind team raised the funds with the help of their parents during their years of competition. While representing West Greene in the competition, the World Finalist Odyssey of the Mind Team placed 17th out of 56 teams from around the world, second place at the State Competition, and first place at Regionals in 2005. The $500 dollar check was presented to the students during their engineering class by Marcia Sonneborn and Carol Salai. Parents of the Odyssey of the Mind team members believe West Greene’s Engineering Club is a “great fit” for their donation, and hope that the West Greene Engineering Team will have increased success at this year’s competition.

The BotsIQ team members come from the advanced engineering class, taught by West Greene’s science teacher Eric Armstrong, which is part of the science department’s daily curriculum. The school also offers an engineering club that meets once a month during the activity period. The advanced engineering course is available to students in grades nine through 12 who are proficient in algebra, and express an interest in a STEM-related field. The engineering club often engages in other projects and challenges such as the WVU Pumpkin Drop, the Chain Reaction Contraption contest, the construction of an underwater remotely operated vehicle, and the design and construction of the trout tank now located in the school lobby. This is West Greene’s fourth year participating in the BotsIQ event. Last year, the team finished third at prelims and competed in five rounds at finals — their best finish to date. The 2016 BotsIQ event competition is now underway with finals on April 8/9 at California University of Pennsylvania.

Waste Management Supports Scholarship Program The Community Foundation of Greene County (CFGC) has received a $5,000 contribution from Waste Management. The contribution will be used to support the CFGC Educational Improvement Tax Credit Program (EITC) K-12 Scholarship Fund which provides scholarship assistance for Greene County children who opt to attend parochial or private schools. “Waste Management is pleased to provide this support that will help Greene County children attend a school of their choice,” said Erika Deyarmin, Public Affairs Coordinator for Waste Management. To receive an EITC K-12 Scholarship, a child must be school age and enrolled in an approved private or parochial K-12 school. Household income must not exceed $75,000 with an additional $15,000 allowed for each dependent child. Applica-

tions are due August 20. “It is wonderful that Waste Management has chosen to support the EITC K-12 scholarships in our community,” said Bettie Stammerjohn, Executive Director of the Community Foundation of Greene County. “The program has helped so many families be able to afford private school alternatives.” More information on the EITC program, and the Community Foundation of Greene County may be found at www.cfgcpa.org, or call 724-627-2010. Pictured from left, Bettie Stammerjohn, Executive Director of the Community Foundation of Greene County receives a check for $5,000 for the Greene County EITC K-12 Scholarship Fund from Erika Deyarmin, Public Affairs Coordinator, Waste Management. GreeneSaver •

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Rumbaugh Back In Action Chiropractic Rumbaugh Back In Action Chiropractic serves Waynesburg and its surrounding communities for all of your Chiropractic Needs. Our office, located at 35 N. Porter Street, Waynesburg is Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration certified to provide CDL/DOT, drug testing, breath and alcohol testing, and school bus physicals. New patients are currently being accepted and walk-ins are welcome. Phone 724-852-1624 to schedule an appointment. • Services available to our patients include: • Manual manipulation • Activator Manipulation • Pro Adjuster • Lumbar / Cervical Traction • Ultrasound / Muscle Stimulation Dr. A. Jay Rumbaugh comes from a long line of chiropractors. His father, Dr. Ronald Rumbaugh, is in active practice in Connellsville. Three of his five siblings also followed in their father’s footsteps.

An uncle, four cousins, and, most recently, a nephew, have entered the field of chiropractic medicine. Dr. A. Jay Rumbaugh has been practicing chiropractic in Waynesburg for 28 years. A graduate of Frazier High School, California University of Pennsylvania and Penn State Fayette, he earned his Doctor of Chiropractic Medicine in 1988 from Palmer College of Chiropractic in Davenport, Iowa. Dr. Michael McCort practiced chiropractic for 5 years in St. Louis, Missouri before returning home to Greene County 8 years ago with his wife and children. A graduate of Jefferson-Morgan High School, Dr. McCort attended West Virginia Wesleyan College where he played football and baseball. It was there that he became interested in health care while going through the rehabilitative process for a knee injury. Dr. McCort went on to California University of Pennsylvania, where he played baseball, before attending Logan College of Chiropractic in St. Louis.

GreeneScene by Mike Belding

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Barnhart’s Honda It’s bright, bold and definitely BIG! Barnhart’s Honda Polaris Dealership, just off I-79 in Ruff Creek, PA, is over 11,000 square feet of sheer power and excitement inside with more fun for motorcycle, ATV & Side-by Side riders than ever before. With both Honda and Polaris, Barnhart’s has the ultimate ride for everyone, for work or play, for fun or serious competition, for cruising on the highway or touring the tough terrain off road. “Polaris has the leading side-by-sides on the market,” said Craig Greenwood, Service Manager and co-owner with Yvonne Barnhart. “Even before we became an official dealership for Polaris, we’ve been riding, racing and working on them,” he adds, “And it amazes me how the side-by-side market continues to grow in general, more and more people all the time enjoying the benefits of just recreational riding…and the ways to accessorize these things are unlimited. People are really into them.” You can find the entire 2016 off-road line-up including Polaris Sportsman, Razers & Rangers. For those who like to ride red, your favorite Honda is waiting at Barnhart’s. The fabulous CRF Family has the perfect off-road bike for every age and stage of rider and the new Pioneer line is a whole new class of SXS. “The one in most demand

right now is the 1000 Class, and even according to Honda, nothing compares to this flagship model, either in the Honda lineup or in the industry,” says sales manager Tim Kirby. “It has the first and only 6 speed fully automatic dual clutch transmission, so you get power and performance.” If your way is the highway, Barnhart’s line up of Honda Cruisers and street bikes is beautiful. And right now, there are some serious discounts on all non-current year bikes. “You can have a brand new machine for thousands of dollars off MSRP,” says Tim. Of course, a great inventory of vehicles isn’t the only thing you’ll find at Barnhart’s. The parts and accessories center is very popular with customers. “It’s like walking into a super store with all the gear, apparel and fun stuff right at your fingertips,” says Parts Manager Kevin Kirby. And Barnhart’s service center is designed for ultimate customer convenience with separate entrance and unloading area. Craig is a Red Level Honda Technician, the highest level of training certification offered by Honda. His knowledge and experience play a significant role in maintaining the customer loyalty this company values so highly. Barnhart’s is also an authorized Polaris parts & accessories source, with certified Polaris Technicians. “We have built this business on repeat customers, and it feels good to continue the tradition of service that my father, Greg Barnhart, began nearly 40 years ago,” says General Manager Yvonne Barnhart, Craig’s wife, and the daughter of Vicky and Greg Barnhart, who founded the business in 1977. Though both Greg and Vicky are no longer living, this family business has continued to operate successfully in this highly competitive industry. “We’re still a ‘shop’ here at Barn-hart’s,” Craig explains, “We’re not a ‘Super Store’ where the sale is their main focus. The sale is just the beginning of our relationship with our customers, our real focus is making sure you continue to have fun, be safe and ride for The Sport Utility Vehicle that outclasses the rest – 2016 Honda a long, long time. Our service after the sale Pioneer 1000

SAVE THE DATE – Barnhart’s 2016 Open House is May 6 & 7 – mark your calendars and come for discounts, prizes, free stuff, food and fun! makes that possible.” Another key ingredient in bringing in new customers to Barnhart’s is their best bottom line effort. According to Sales Manager Tim Kirby, the term “Straight Deals” is more than a promotional slogan. “When we price a machine, there are no hidden fees. We also use the term ‘out-the-door’ meaning that’s the total amount of money you’re going to spend to get that bike or ATV out the

door… you can ride on that number. When you compare that number, we can compete with anyone.” See the latest line-up of Polaris off-road vehicles and Honda motorcyles, SXS and ATVS at Barnhart’s in Ruff Creek PA… where the tradition of excellence and service continues while you still get the best bottom line. That’s why everyone wants to Ride Barnharts!

Get huge savings on brand new non-current street bikes – including this firey red Honda Fury. Over $3,000 off!

Just one row in the Polaris SXS line-up you’ll find at Barnhart’s in Ruff Creek

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Coo l at S c h ool by Tara Kinsell

West Greene Grad Honored

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hen one looks at the achievements of 2012 West Greene High School graduate, Moiya McTier, it is easy to see why she is the perfect fit for our Cool at School feature. As a high school student, Moiya was the valedictorian of her class. She directed the school play in her senior year. She was a member of the band and the track and field team. As her former principal, Scott Sakai said, “Moiya was one of those good students,” the kind of student a principal doesn’t often see in his or her office. Imagine having to flip a coin to decide if you would choose Harvard University, or not. When Moiya graduated from West Greene she had a choice between three large Ivy League schools, having been accepted at Princeton, Yale and Harvard and a smaller one, Williams College. The coin flip was between Harvard and Williams. “I visited Williams and I fell in love with it but I decided to take a chance. I told myself if Harvard came up that is where I would go,” Moiya said. When the coin actually said Harvard she was determined to see it through, even though she had never visited the school and was sure she was going to hate it there. Fortunately, that has not been the case. Instead, she has thrived there in her dual major of Astrophysics and Folklore & Mythology. Recently, she became the recipient of the 2016 Chambliss Astronomy Achievement Student Award. This award is granted every year by the American Astronomical Society (AAS) to recognize exemplary research by undergraduate and graduate students. Moiya’s research involves determining exoplanet habitability using orbital eccentricity. Orbital eccentricity is the difference between a planet’s farthest and closest approach to its parent star divided by the sum of said distances. The work came from her senior thesis that stems from a science fiction novel set on the planet she studied. This isn’t Moiya’s only foray into writing. She also maintains

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a blog and is published in the Harvard newspaper. If you think the disciplines in her dual major seem like odd choices when placed side-by-side, you aren’t alone. Moiya has heard it before. Folklore was her first choice, even though her mother “didn’t think she could find a job in it,” she said with a laugh. Part way through the astronomy class she realized she liked it and the dual major was conceived. She has become a role model at Harvard for others who find themselves wanting to study vastly different subjects, she said. “Make your own path. Don’t let being the first steer you away from doing something,” she said. “I can make the path easier by being the first. Others are pursuing weird double majors here became they heard I did.” Next year Moiya will be heading to graduate school, most likely in New York. She hopes to make a career as a museum director or curator where she can teach other kids about science, she said. The desire to teach is one that amuses her. Growing up with a college professor mother, Rose McTier, who formerly taught at Waynesburg University, Moiya didn’t have a desire to teach. “I grew up not wanting to be a teacher,” she said. “Even now, I wouldn’t want to teach in a conventional classroom setting, but a museum seemed like the next logical step.” Remembering her years at West Greene, Moiya said she was fortunate to have the influence of gifted instructor Jackie Slogan. If she were to share her own wisdom with students at her alma mater, especially young girls, it would be to “never doubt yourself,” she said. “First and foremost, never doubt your ability to do something in the STEM (Science Technology Engineering and Math) field. If you think there is someone or something trying to stop you from doing what you are trying to do; you are probably right,” Moiya said. “If you think you can, you can.” GreeneSaver •

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Scholarships Applications Available in Greene Garden Club Scholarship Applications for the $1,000 Town & Country Garden Club Scholarship are available to any graduating senior in the five Greene County school districts. Graduating seniors who are pursuing an education in environmental studies, conservation, ecology, forestry, landscape design, science, or education may apply. The scholarship will be awarded in May for one academic year. Applicants should contact their respective school guidance counselor for more information. Chamber of Commerce Scholarship The 26th Annual Waynesburg Area Chamber of Commerce Scholarship applications are now being accepted for graduating seniors in the Class of 2016. The $1,500 scholarship will be awarded at the chamber’s monthly general membership luncheon on May 25. The winner will also receive a laptop, compliments of PCsquared in Waynesburg. The scholarship is open to any Greene County student graduating in 2016, who has been accepted to a college or technical school as an incoming freshman this fall and has maintained a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or better while in high school. Applicants are required to write an essay and furnish a listing of their school activities and local community involvement. Applications are available on the chamber website at www.waynesburgchamber.com. Completed applications must be submitted by 4pm on April 15. FMI: contact the chamber office at 724-627-5926, or email to info@waynesburgchamber.com. Community Foundation Scholarships The Community Foundation of Greene County (CFGC) has announced several scholarship opportunities for Greene County graduating high school seniors this spring. Applications are due April 1, unless otherwise noted. Eligibilitycriteria varies by scholarship so students should carefully review the specific guidelines for each. Application guidelines and forms are available on the CFGC website at http://cfgcpa.org/endowed.html. A new process for applying is in effect for 2016 whereby students may apply for nine of the scholarships using a single application form, including any essays, letters of recommendation for a specific

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scholarship, along with one copy of the required documents. Available scholarships include: The Army Specialist Gregory A. Cox Memorial Scholarship for a graduating Greene County senior student planning a career in public safety or other public service, excluding politics, with preference for a student participating in ROTC. One $1,000 scholarship is available. The Rocky Doman Memorial Scholarship for a graduating Greene County senior standout athlete who exemplifies the qualities of being a team player with a humble spirit. Two $1,000 scholarships are available. The Jesse Benson Finnegan Scholarship for students graduating from the Greene County Career and Technology Center with first preference for students in the electrical occupations program. One $1,000 scholarship is available. The William and Shirley Hanley Memorial Scholarship for graduating seniors at Carmichaels Area High School and Mapletown High School. An interview is required. Two $1,000 scholarships are available. The Darlene Phillips Elementary Education Scholarship for graduating seniors of the Mapletown High School, with preference for students planning to major in elementary education, but will consider other college majors. One $1,000 scholarship is available. The Dove Award, a need based scholarship for graduating student from Jefferson-Morgan High School with preference given to female students. One $1,500 scholarship is available. The R. A. Matteucci Family Scholarship, a need based scholarship for graduating seniors from Jefferson-Morgan High School. Two $1,000 scholarships are available. The William H. Davis, Jr. Scholarship for Greene County residents who are graduating seniors or who have graduated from a Greene County High School who are planning to attend or are attending Westmoreland County Community College. Applications are due in the CFGC office by April 1 or June 1. Four $500 scholarships are available.

The following scholarships must be submitted to the office of the guidance counselor at the graduating senior’s respective school. Please note the due date for each. The Thelma S. Hoge Memorial Scholarship for worthy students of the West Greene School District who are pursuing a college education. Applications are to be submitted to the guidance office by April 15. Two $2,500 scholarships are available. The Gregory and Mary Lou Niverth Scholarship for a senior student graduating from Jefferson-Morgan High School to attend a four-year accredited non-profit college or university within Pennsylvania. Applications are to be submitted to the guidance office by April 11. One $1,000 scholarship is available. The Walter Samek III Memorial Scholarship for a graduating senior of the Carmichaels Area High School to continue post-secondary education. Applications are to be submitted to the guidance office by April 15. One $500 scholarship is available. The following scholarships are available for non-traditional students who have already graduated from high school, or received a GED, and have

decided to further their education. The Stealth Scholarship for non-traditional students at least 22 years of age, or older who are living or working in Greene County who plan to pursue a post-secondary course of education (twoyear or four-year degree) at an accredited college or university, community college, or trade/technical school. There is no specific deadline to make application. The maximum scholarship available is $2,500. Conservation Leadership School Scholarship A full scholarship to the 2016 Conservation Leadership School is being offered by the Greene County Conservation District to a Greene County student age 14-18 who have completed at least their freshman year of high school. The conservation leadership school will be hosted by Penn State’s School of Forest Resources, Conservational Leadership School, during two sessions this summer at the Stone Valley Recreation Area in University Park. It is a one-week residential program for students who are interested in learning more about the environment through exploration of natural habitats and hands-on educational and recreational activities. This year’s session will focus on “People and Water.” The winning student may select to attend the June 26-July 2 session or the July 10-16 session. Students spend the chosen week in an outdoor classroom exploring forests, fields, streams and lakes, and have the opportunity to go canoeing, hiking, bird watching, and fishing, among other recreational activities. Subjects also include aquatic habitat enhancement, home water analysis, huntertrapper education, team-building, and green initiatives, recycling and composting. To apply, students must submit a typed essay of 500-1,000 words, briefly detailing the their background, explaining why he or she would be the best recipient, and their future plans. All essays must include a name, address and phone number, and must be received by the Greene County Conservation District, 22 W. High St., Suite 204, Waynesburg, Pa. 15370 by April 15. Essays may also be faxed to 724-852-5341 or emailed to Jared Zinn at jzinn@co.greene.pa.us with “Conservation Leadership” in the subject line. For more information, contact the conservation district at 724-852-5278.

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Waynesburg Milling Company A favorite shopping destination for locals and out-of-towners, Waynesburg Milling Company on South Washington Street in Waynesburg is preserving the traditions of the past, while moving boldly into the future—with plenty of help. As owner Jeanette Lindsay says, “Our staff continues to operate with the same high standards Don and I established when we first took ownership of the store.” Proving the point, current manager Bryan Haines says he considers Waynesburg Milling’s customers his first priority, and often they are his best guide to improving the selection and stock that is ever growing at Waynesburg Milling Company. “We try to meet every customer’s needs, so whenever someone requests an item I don’t have, if I can get it from one of my suppliers, I’ll special order it just for them. And sometimes, that’s how we find a new product line that turns out to be a best seller,” Bryan explains, using Vetericyn, a popular wound care product, as an example. “Someone asked for it, and now

we keep the full line in stock, it’s a very popular product.” With the spring season upon us, other popular offerings at the Mill these days include Easy Mole Traps, back in stock and the Wild Delight Bird Feed. Also pond supplies are fully stocked and available now. Waynesburg Milling remains the area’s only source of bulk garden seeds, along with all the fertilizers, tools, fencing and spring supplies you would expect to find Waynesburg Milling also carries the popular Muck Brand Boots & Shoes, including those with metatarsal protection. Select styles are on clearance right now – including the “Jobber” and the “Daily” garden shoes. It is the area’s true “country store” with an impressive selection of pet supplies and feeds (including Purina), bird feeders and garden décor, everything equestrian including tack and vet supplies. First time visitors are surprised to see the assortment of country-themed gifts and home décor items in stock, truly unique toys, jewelry and apparel.

Waynesburg Milling Company can proudly claim one of the longest histories of any business in the area, having first received public mention in a newspaper article from July of 1886, highlighting the “New Process” milling technique used there that was capable of turning 600 bushels of wheat per day into flour. When the mill was sold in 1898, new machinery was installed which increased the capacity to 4500 bushels of wheat per day. In the 1940s, the mill’s flour production ended to concentrate on producing its own trademark brand of Wayco Feeds. The brand is still going strong to this day, though production is done off-site, as the original Waynesburg Milling facility was lost to a fire in 2001.

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Alan Advanced Eye Centers With 168 years of combined experience Dr. David Alan, Dr. Michael Magiske and the Alan Advanced Eye Center team are committed to providing advanced eye care in a professional and comfortable environment. Alan Advanced Eye Centers is a full-service eye and vision care provider that takes both eye emergencies, as well as scheduled appointments. Patients throughout the area come to Alan Advanced Eye Centers because they know they will receive the personal attention and professional care that is our foundation. Dedicated to keeping patients comfortable and well-informed at all times, they explain every exam and procedure and answer all of a patient’s questions. Additionally, they work with vision and medical insurance providers to ensure good eye health and vision care for all patients. The GreeneSaver joins his many friends and customers in bidding farewell to Tom Young, who passed away Feb 28, 2016. Tom was a regular at our place - at our many places as we moved over the years. Tom followed and kept our windows and walks clean, and helped us with many other projects as the GreeneSaver and Direct Results have grown the business. To honor Tom, we share the sentiments of many in the words of one, with these excerpts from a tribute written by his friend Trish Eddy: “The man we all know as the ‘window washer’ was a whole lot more. Tom often inspired me with his hard work and willingness to daily walk three miles into Waynesburg to wash windows, shovel sidewalks, or any other job that was asked of him. His hard work and dedication to this community will always be remembered by many… As most of us know, Tom lived in a small trailer outside Eastview where he had an ongoing yard sale of “treasures” that folks would drop off to him. Tom was always willing and appreciative to receive these items as he would then offer deals to all who stopped to buy an item…. I truly believe that God sent Tom to our community to show folks who judge people by their appearance instead of their hard work and kindness. If you were a person or business that supported Tom and his effort to make his way in

The primary eye care service includes a complete eye exam that analyzes eye health and vision function. Dr. Alan and his team of optometry professionals also provide testing for glaucoma, cataracts, macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy.  They also have on site a large assortment of name brand frames including Caviar, Gucci, and Salvatore Verragamo among others.  Contacts are also available including tinted, toric and bifocal, as well as 30 day extended wear contacts. Their one-on-one approach to optometry makes Dr. Alan and the Alan Advanced Eye Centers staff the eye and vision care providers of choice in a two-county area. Alan Advanced Eye Centers’ Greene County office is located at 1159 Morris Street, Waynesburg. Contact 724-852-1212 or visit http://alanadvancedeyecenters.com.

this world by hard work, bless you... I am certain Heaven has the cleanest windows it has ever had. Till we meet again. Trish” GreeneSaver •

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Application Assistance The staff of State Rep. Pam Snyder will offer assistance filling out the property tax/rent rebate paperwork for eligible Pennsylvanians 65+, widows & widowers 50+, and people with disabilities who are 18+. The income limit is $35,000 a year for homeowners and $15,000 annually for renters. However, half of Social Security income is excluded, and no one is disqualified solely because

of Social Security cost-of-living adjustments. Bring your 2015 income information, paid tax receipts, or a completed rent certificate to one of the following scheduled events: March 30 at Jefferson Senior Ctr., March 31 at Monongahela Township Community Ctr., April 7 at Masontown Senior Ctr. The deadline to apply for the rebate for 2015 is June 30. FMI: 724-966-8953.

Empty Bowls Waynesburg University Bonner Scholars, in partnership with Greene County Community Foundation, will present its 3rd Annual Greene County Empty Bowls event on April 3, 11am 2pm at the National Guard Readiness Center, 500 Evergreen Drive in Waynesburg. Proceeds will benefit the Greene County Weekend Food Program. Attendees will receive unlimited soup and bread, and a handmade ceramic bowl (made by local artists, University students and local school children. The Greene County Weekend Food Program

(Weekend Backpack Program) provides meals for school age children who otherwise do not have access to healthy meals on the weekends. Bags include canned soups, granola bars, and other food items that can easily be prepared by children. The event will also have a Silent Auction and Chinese Auction, pottery demonstrations, and information about the hunger in Greene County including its prevalence and impact on children. Tickets are $15 in advance and $20 at the door. FMI: Sydney Green at sydmor96@gmail.com or 724-322-1792.

Summer Camps The Salvation Army’s Camp Allegheny is now accepting applications for campers at Camp Allegheny Adventure Camp and Camp Allegheny Sports Camp. Adventure Camp is June 27 July 2 for ages 6-12. Sports Camp is July 26-Aug. 2 for ages 11-14. Both camps are focused on Christian principles and promote an awareness of God in nature and the importance of building a relationship with him. The week-long camps include swimming, crafts, sports, hiking, and more. Campers

stay in cabins with meals and snacks provided. Transportation to camp, located north of Pittsburgh (just outside of Ellwood City) is provided free of charge for Greene County campers. Learn more at www.CampAllegheny.SalvationArmyPA. org. To register, visit the Greene County Salvation Army, at 131 W. First St. in Waynesburg with your child’s birth certificate and insurance card. FMI: Sister Audrey Quinn at 724-852-1479 or email Audrey.Quinn@USE.SalvationArmy.org.

Intellectual Disabilities Awareness Month

Desert Blooms in Israel Guest speaker at the February meeting of Town & Country Garden Club, Jeannine Kiger, displayed several items brought back from a healing mission trip to Israel, a country which has been defined as semi-arid. Rain only falls between November and April with uneven distribution. To reduce water consumption for agriculture, water saving is critical.  The country has eight major and several small-to-medium-sized companies producing irrigation and filtration equipment. Flowers are Israel’s leading agricultural export.  The expertise of the farmers backed by private and government research and development and field surface supervisors, contribute to the high quality and wide variety of flowers (over 100). These include cut flowers such as roses, zypsophilia, carnations, solidago, limonium, gerbers, anemones, and ornamental plants. In recent years, production of flowers has risen to around 1.4 billion a year. Kiger has been on mission trips to Israel, Chile, and Columbia. Her business Outstanding Bodywork Therapy is located in Waynesburg, Pa. She is an Integrative Health Practitioner and Soft Tissue Manipulation Expert.

GCCTC Students Tour WCCC Tech Center Students from Greene County Career & Technology Center recently had the opportunity to tour the Westmoreland County Community College Advanced Technology Center in Mount Pleasant, where they learned about the college’s advanced manufacturing and industrial technology programs. Students, William Luckey, Luke Pecjak, Serena Owens, Maryjo Brownlee, Cody Nelson, and Walker Smith are enrolled in the WCCC Academy for High School Students taking a college-level AutoCAD class at WCCC Greene in Waynesburg. “Giving our Greene County students the opportunity to take high-tech, college level courses…before they graduate from high school gives them a tremendous advantage,” said instructor Larry Frank, who also serves as the coordinator for WCCC Greene. “It allows them to earn college credits toward their post-secondary academic goals, ultimately getting them educated, expe-

rienced, and into the local workforce sooner.” The students, from Waynesburg Central, Jefferson-Morgan, Carmichaels and Mapletown high schools, especially enjoyed the Machine Technology and Welding program areas and the opportunity to test their welding skills on the virtual welder, according to Frank. For more information about WCCC Greene and the Academy for high school students, contact Frank at 724-627-3464. Pictured from left, Larry Frank, instructor; William Luckey; Luke Pecjak; Serena Owens; MaryJo Brownlee; Cody Nelson; and Walker Smith.

Conservation District Poster Contest March was declared Intellectual Disabilities Awareness Month in Greene County by proclamation of the county commissioners. The proclamation offers advocates of those with developmental disabilities an opportunity to educate the public, policymakers, and other system professionals about the challenges that come with having an intellectual disability. It also recognizes the thousands of service providers that support those with intellectual disabilities

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and their care providers that help them to lead a full and productive life in society. At the Commissioner’s meeting, Jeffrey Hodge, a program participant, was also recognized for his outstanding work at Washington ARC Human Services. Pictured, from left, Commissioner Dave Coder; Jeffrey’s parents, Rev. John and Konita Hodge; Jeffrey; Deneen Chulik, IDD Director; Commissioner Archie Trader; and Helen Heinz, Jeffrey’s residential manager.

All Greene County public, private and home-schooled students in kindergarten through 12th grade are invited to participate in the Greene County Conservation District’s poster contest. Posters will be judged in five grade categories: K-1st, 2nd-3rd, 4th-6th, 7th-9th, and 10th-12th. The top three entrants in each category will receive cash prizes, with first place winning $100, second place winning $75 and third place winning $50. The first place poster from each category will advance to the statewide poster contest later this year. The theme for the contest is “We All Need

Trees.” Posters may be completed in school or at home but must be the work of the individual student. Entries will be judged on their conservation message, visual effectiveness, originality, and universal appeal. More information for students, parents and teachers is available at www.nacdnet.org/education/we-all-need-trees, or by contacting the conservation district at 724-852-5278. Entries are due by April 15 to the Greene County Conservation District, 22 W. High St., Suite 204, Waynesburg, Pa. 15370.

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Greene County Historical Society Annual Dinner Dance Back by popular demand, the Swingin’ Bopcats Band will perform at the 2016 GCHS Annual Dinner Dance on April 2.

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o begin the museum’s 45th season, the Greene County Historical Society will be hosting its 6th Annual Dinner Dance. The event showcases what the Greene County Historical Society has planned for the coming year. It is also an opportunity for the board, staff, and volunteers to meet with the public and join together as they enjoy great food and excellent music. Speaking of music, this year, as in years past, the Swingin’ Bopcats, a classic 18-piece big band, playing the best music of the 1940’s and beyond, will be performing throughout the evening. Thistlethwaite Vineyards will also be at the event, offering tastings and sales. A 50/50 raffle and large Chinese auction will add to the fun. Last year, there were over 25 differ-

ent baskets with prizes and products from various businesses in the community. There will also be a display of artifacts showcasing the Gilded Age (1870-1900) in Greene County. This display will be a preview of the first main hall exhibit of this year. The 6th Annual Dinner Dance is Saturday, April 2nd, from 6:00-10:00pm at the National Guard Readiness Center, behind Waynesburg Airport, at 500 EverGreene Drive, Waynesburg, PA 15370. Tickets are $40 per person, and a full table can be reserved for parties of six or more. To make a reservation, contact the museum office at 724627-3204 or gchsalexandra@gmail.com or visit us at www.greenecountyhistory.org/events/dinnerdance.

Toothman Dental For over 30 years, Dr. Ingrid Toothman has been offering quality dental services at 801 E. Greene St., Waynesburg in the quaint brick house that is Toothman Dental Center. Dr. Toothman’s interest in becoming a dentist began early in her life as she worked alongside her father at his dental lab in Pittsburgh. Preparation for her career included obtaining degrees in dental assisting, dental hygiene and Bachelor of Science degrees in the Health Related Professions from the University of Pittsburgh.   From there she was accepted into the University’s Dental School, earning her DMD in 1982. Dr. Toothman has worked in all phases of dentistry throughout her career—everything from dental lab to dental hygiene, front desk to dental assistant, to running her own dental office.  Toothman Dental Center strives to provide quality care using all the latest technology, including digital x-rays which require less radiation, and are healthier for the patient, the workplace and the

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environment. Often asked about her last name of Toothman, she laughs and answers: “My maiden name is Schmidt. I moved here in 1982, and I was already a dentist. Very early upon arriving in Greene County, I met my future husband.  I really wasn’t going to change my name—I was going to be ‘Dr. Schmidt’ for the rest of my career.  But I thought ‘Dr. Toothman’ was better…” Dr. Toothman is always accepting new patients of all ages and with varying dental needs.  “Give us a call to schedule an appointment and leave your smile to us!” GreeneSaver •

MARCH / APRIL 2016


Spo r t Sh o rt s Teasdale and Bowlen Take Gold and Silver at States

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Gavin Teasdale

he last time we spoke with Jefferson-Morgan sophomore wrestler, Gavin Teasdale, he told us his plan was to win another state title. He did just that and in convincing fashion. The sophomore pinned seven of nine opponents on his way to Hershey for 2016. His gold medal win over Boiling Springs High School wrestler Kollin Myers at 113 pounds brought Gavin’s record to 82-0. Gavin left no questions in the win, beating Myers 23-8 in 3:30.

Billy Bowlen

Teammate Billy Bowlen, a Carmichaels Area senior who wrestles on the Jefferson-Morgan team, walked away from Hershey with a silver medal at 195 pounds. Billy got to Hershey by winning his third WPIAL title to become just the fourth wrestler from Jefferson-Morgan to win three WPIAL titles. Not a bad way to cap off his high school wrestling career. Billy will continue his wrestling career at the collegiate level with a commitment to the Seton Hill Griffins.

Marissa Kalsey Wins Seventh All-American Title

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here are two things left for Waynesburg Central graduate and collegiate pole vaulter Marissa Kalsey to accomplish before she graduates from Westminster College. First is to win an eighth All-American title at the 2016 NCAA Division III Outdoor Track and Field Championships. Earlier this month she won her seventh All-American title by finishing third at the NCAA Division III Indoor Track & Field championships. The second, and final goal for her collegiate career is to vault to a national record height.

by Tara Kinsell

Father & Son Share Love of Target Shooting

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Tristan Cole shows off a quail he shot during a once-ina-lifetime opportunity to participate on the Brotherhood Outdoors television series.

ather and son clay target shooting team, Dave and Tristan Cole have come a long way in a very short time. The duo recently landed on the Brotherhood Outdoors television series that provides a platform for talented hunters and fisherman through exciting hunting and fishing adventures in North America. A product of the Union Sportsmen’s Alliance, the show offers union members the chance to participate in a once-in-a-lifetime hunting or fishing experience. Tristan and Dave were part of a Georgia Quail hunt with the show’s hosts. It was an amazing experience for the father and son, Dave said. He shared the journey that got them there, beginning with Tristan’s involvement in scholastic target shooting. “I’m president of our union, UWUA (Utility Workers Union off America) Local 666. About four years ago we got a flyer for a union shoot,” said Dave Cole, who decided to bring his young son, Tristan. Dave’s friend, Doug Hinerman, joined them with his sons’, Nathan and Aaron. “We were the only team with three youths on it,” Dave said. Tristan, Nathan and Aaron are members of

the Huntinghills Hawkeyes so they weren’t novices coming into this shoot. However, Tristan had only joined the Hawkeyes in 2011. Organizers of the union shoot didn’t expect much from the team, feeling it might be too taxing on the boys to shoot so many rounds. What they didn’t realize is the amount of work the kids do as part of the Hawkeyes or the time they had spent shooting with their fathers. Not only did they complete the rounds but they did so in convincing fashion, winning the highest overall award for the event. A year later, at just 12-years old, Tristan was part of the state championship Hawkeyes scoring as the high overall shooter for his division. The year after that the team of the Coles and Hinermans took first place for Class A at the IUPAT Northern Ohio Sporting Clays Shoot. Dave said he is very proud of his son’s accomplishments at such a young age. At 13 he grabbed the high overall individual, high overall youth and a member of the high overall team for Western Pennsylvania. The year was capped off with Tristan taking fifth place overall at the national championship for scholastic clay target shooting.

Marissa Kalsey Tristan Cole; Daniel Lee Martin, host of the Brotherhood Outdoors television series; and Dave Cole share a moment.

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4 Seasons Lawn & Garden and 4 Seasons Rentals

The 4 Seasons Staff includes, front L-R: Jack Hoy, Jeremiah Allison, Murray Hoy, Josh Patton. In back of Gator, L-R: Kurtis Patterson, Bobby Russel and Courtney Hursey.

4 Seasons Lawn & Garden and 4 Seasons Rentals on Rolling Meadows Road in Waynesburg, continue to offer area residents the best choice in lawn & garden equipment sales, service, parts, and rentals. Customers can find the best prices and quality here with brands like John Deere, Simplicity, Stihl, and Honda Power Equipment. With trusted names like these, 4 Seasons Lawn & Garden can ensure that their customers have the best equipment available. “It’s all about value,” says owner Murray Hoy. “We try to sell brands that last longer, hold their value better, and provide our customers with a more pleasurable experience while using it. We have found that these product lines do all of that and more, we are very proud and committed to the brands we sell.” Selling the best products is only part of 4 Season’s winning equation; backing that up with the best service in the area keeps their customers coming back. This year, 4 Seasons has focused on the service department by investing in continuing training over the winter months, adding service techs, and upgrading and purchasing new tools and equipment to increase efficiency and speed up the service process. 4 Seasons not only servic-

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es the brands they sell, they also offer service for many other brands as well. “We are very proud of our ability to not only get your equipment repaired quickly, but make sure we get it fixed right the first time,” says Murray. A good price on equipment is certainly a draw, and coupled with the superior service described above, it’s easy to see why so many people choose to buy, and buy again, at 4 Seasons Lawn & Garden. “We really do enjoy a lot of return customers here,” Murray explains, “Our business is about relationships and my staff is trained to make our customer’s experience here both valuable and enjoyable. Our professional staff is the best, I am very proud of them. People appreciate dealing with someone who has the knowledge and experience to answer their questions, find what they need, and fix their problems. We can do that.” There are countless jobs, big and little, that go with every house. When you have the right tools for the job, it makes things much easier. For the times when you don’t have what you need, 4 Seasons Rentals, a sister company of 4 Seasons Lawn & Garden, is just the place to get you equipped and on your way, without the expense of having to purchase something that you may only need to use for

one job. If you didn’t know that, you’re not alone: “A lot of people still don’t realize that we rent equipment - renting equipment has definitely become more popular,” Murray affirms, adding, “We have a variety of things that the average person might not have, things like air compressors and nailers, floor sanders, carpet shampooers, jackhammers, pressure washers—all of that and more.” The most popular rental items offered are the tents and event needs. 4 Seasons has a variety of tent sizes and styles to choose from. “We have you covered whether your party is only a few people or a few hundred - we provide the tables and chairs, we deliver and set everything up for you, we have a dance floor, and we now offer all the linens you’ll need, too,” says rental manager Courtney Hursey, “We have set up for birthdays, graduation parties, retirement parties, weddings - just about any occasion you can think of, and the calendar is already filling up. Call now for any event you have coming this spring, summer or fall.” 4 Seasons Lawn & Garden and 4 Seasons Rentals are both located at 600 Rolling Meadows Road, here in Waynesburg for your convenience. Call 724-627-6153 GreeneSaver •

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MARCH / APRIL 2016

Mar Apr Greenesaver 2016  

Growing In Greene part 2! Get the scoop on many more local businesses. Find out a little history of Jefferson, PA and don't forget to enter...

Mar Apr Greenesaver 2016  

Growing In Greene part 2! Get the scoop on many more local businesses. Find out a little history of Jefferson, PA and don't forget to enter...

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