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GreeneScene by Julie Murphy

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Patsy’s Lake P

atsy’s Lake is a well-stocked, spring-fed, extra-deep lake that covers 10 acres, and features a wealth of trout, bass, catfish, and others. But for Vicky Polando, it’s more than just a space to spend a happy day of fishing—it’s a part of the family. “Patsy’s Lake was owned by my mom and dad, Patsy and Rose Carbonara, since 1953,” Vicky recalls. “They both got sick, and closed it down in the early ‘80s. My husband, Mike, and I were both working, so we just left it closed.” In 2010, Vicky and Mike re-opened the lake, located near Uniontown, PA, bringing this much-loved area getaway spot back to life. “Some of the people that used to come, their children and grandchildren are now coming,” Vicky muses. Business isn’t limited to the locals, however. “We have people that come from as far as Cranberry to the north and Waynesburg from the south! They come with their family; they bring food, and make a whole day of it!”

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Patsy’s family-friendly atmosphere means that everyone can have a good time. “We’ve had children as young as five years old,” Vicky notes. “Last year, there was a little girl that came fishing with her dad and uncle, and she had a ‘Little Princess’ fishing rod. She caught the most beautiful trout! She was so excited! And then there was a boy who caught his first fish, and it was just a little bluegill, but you should have seen the smile on his face!” Patsy’s also offers night fishing, with some primitive (no electric or water hook-ups) camping sites available for those who want to extend their fun. Open fires are not permitted, due to the risk to nearby fields, but grills are welcome for those who want to enjoy their catch as soon as the fishing is done. In addition, there are handicapped-accessible fishing areas, beautiful surroundings, and, if you happen to be fishing on a particularly cool day, you just might be invited in for a nice, hot bowl of chili!

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Specialty Herbal Products S

pecialty Herbal Products, which began in the home of owner Brian King, a registered, practicing pharmacist, is in its 22nd year of business. Specialty Herbal Products is Greene County’s only health food store and carries a large assortment of vitamins, herbs, organic foods, weight loss, gluten-free, and other specialty and natural products. They also sell locally grown/ made products: honey, eggs, candles and soaps, and offer discount cards, an everyday 20% NOW products discount, and a weekly senior discount day (Wednesday). As always, “Quality” is the hallmark of Specialty Herbal, and everything they do centers around it. Quality products begin with quality raw ingredients and a robust quality control protocol at every phase of the manufacturing process, including sophisticated testing procedures and certificates of analysis. Recently, as many of you know,

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the New York Attorney General’s office had several “big box” stores stop the sale of certain herbal products because of mislabeling. Testing was done that showed the contents on the label did not agree with what was actually in the bottle. Unlabeled fillers and contamination with other materials were also evident. Specialty Herbal only uses good, top quality companies that people can trust. New items at the store are: kale, pea, rice, and mixed greens protein powders; coconut products, such as: oil, jam, sugar, raw butter, soap, lotion, and shampoo; and new high-potency probiotics. Specialty Herbal also has almond, coconut, and flax flour; a variety of nuts and seeds; body care products containing magnesium; and multi-vitamins for men, women, teens, and children. Specialty Herbal Products’ experienced, dedicated, caring, and well-trained staff of Tamara Cerra, Bobbi Cressey, and Roberta King, along with their products, are their “Specialties.”

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VOTE

David J. Russo, Esq. GREENE COUNTY JUDGE Paid for by the candidate.

The Importance of the Judge’s Election T

he position of Judge of the Court of Common Pleas is unlike most elected positions. Generally speaking, voters elect representatives to represent their interest to other representatives, the community and the government. We vote and elect a person based on their ideals, opinions and policies. So when choosing Congressmen, Commissioners, Township Supervisors and other representatives it’s traditional that voters cast their ballots on a person’s disposition, name recognition and even party affiliation. The Position of Judge of the Court of Common Pleas is part of a completely different branch of government, the Judiciary. A common pleas judge must research and find applicable law, interpret the law and prior cases which pertain to the that specific law, and then apply the principals which flow from its prior application to the case before the Court. It is the responsibility of a judge to do legal analysis and proper application of the law which changes the qualities that voters and electors must consider when choosing a judge. Every official for a public position should be elected on his

by Dave Russo

morals, virtues and character, but a Common Pleas judge must also be selected on his ability to do complex legal analysis, experience in Courtroom litigation and critical decision making skills. A Common Pleas Judge must also be willing to work countless hours in the pursuit of jurisprudence and the application of the appropriate law to each case. The Judge of the Court of Common Pleas will make decisions that will affect the community as a whole and each individual by themselves. Without the proper experience, ability and decision making skills a Judge’s rulings would be disastrous for the public and devastating for the individual. It is this specific reason that such attention and consideration should be given to the candidate each person votes for. I am running for Judge of the Court of Common Pleas of Greene County because serving as the Judge of Greene County is what I want to do with my life and I am dedicated to fulfilling the responsibilities that are required by the position. When I was in law

school I received a temporary license to practice law. I worked for the District Attorney’s office as a prosecutor in the Lima Municipal Court. I gained experience prosecuting criminal offenses, protecting women from domestic violence, guilty pleas and other litigation for the District Attorney’s office. It was during my experience as a prosecutor when I first decided that I wanted to be a Judge. As a prosecutor I worked in front of different Judges on many cases and I grew a great deal of respect and admiration for the Judiciary I worked with. I am asking the voters of Greene County to elect me for Judge because I feel I am the most qualified person for the position. My qualifications to sit as Judge in Greene County come from not only my experience as a prosecutor and a defense attorney but also in a ledger of my daily work. I attended Ohio Northern University in Ada, Ohio. After law school, I dedicated every available hour to passing my first bar exam, which I did. The bar exam is a measure of an attorney’s ability to identify legal issues and apply legal analysis to cases. The same legal analysis a Judge must be able to perform every day. I am currently an Attorney in Waynesburg Pennsylvania and have been for over a decade now. I opened my office on High Street and I practice more than 8 different areas of law. I am a General Practitioner and I specialized as a trial attorney. I have litigated hundreds of cases in 9 different counties, and I have tried dozens of jury trials in Pennsylvania. I have practiced before more Judges than I can recall and I have learned Courtroom procedure and etiquette from many of them. As a trial attorney I have developed strong decision making skills that are inherent to a competent judicial candidate. I am well qualified in both civil and criminal litigation and fully understand the duties of a Judge. My experiences prosecuting cases as well as defending them have taught me the role a Judge should fulfill in the Courtroom. Although at times I litigate minor magistrate disputes the majority of my practice and experience takes place in the Court of Common Pleas. I am intimately familiar with Courtroom practice and procedure, which would be required of any Judge to be successful at his or her job. My family and I moved to Greene County because this is where I was raised as a child and Greene County has always felt like home to me. My wife Jana and I have been married for 14 years and we live on a farm in Holbrook with our five children. I believe that family is the foundation of a strong community and I have devoted myself to being a faithful husband and loving father. I’m asking the people of Greene County to elect me as their Judge because I have the experience, skills and values to serve my community effectively and honorably, and the ability to perform the duties of Judge of Greene County.

Dave and his wife, Jana, with their children.

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Toothman Dental

or over 30 years, Dr. Ingrid Toothman has been offering quality dental services at 801 East Greene Street in Waynesburg. The charming brick house office that is Toothman Dental Center remains a familiar place for generations of area families, while the latest technology utilized there continues to provide the highest level of care and comfort available today. Toothman Dental Center offers an on-site dental lab, which enables precision, accuracy and comfort without long delays. This means same-day service for repairs and relines of dentures. Digital radiography is another advantage; digital xrays require less radiation, and are healthier for the patient, the workplace, and the environment. As for Dr. Toothman herself, a case could be made that she has dentistry in her DNA. “My parents were German immigrants; they came to the United States in 1952,” she says. Her father had started dental training in Germany, and, Ingrid remembers, “He always had a small dental lab in our home. In fact, one of my earliest childhood memories is my hair being caught in the motor of a lathe in the dental lab!” Her father went on to open a dental lab near Pittsburgh that provided service for over a hundred dentists in the area. Ingrid received her first training there. “I learned first how to make dentures; sometimes I had to fill in for other employees,” she recalls. This experience fueled her passion for becoming a dentist. “After 6 semesters of undergrad, receiving dental assisting, dental hygiene, and Bachelor of Science degrees in the health related professions, I applied to dental school and was accepted. I like to think that I know every aspect of the dental profession, since I’ve worked in every single capacity there is, from lab technician to front desk, to dental assistant to dental hygienist. I have done it all, I have seen most everything, and being a dentist is the best thing that ever happened to me,” Dr. Toothman affirms enthusiastically. She laughs as she answers a final, most important question: “My maiden name is Schmidt. I moved here in 1982, and I was already a dentist. Very early upon arriving in Greene County, I met my future husband. I really wasn’t going to change my name—I was going to be ‘Dr. Schmidt’ for the rest of my career. But I thought ‘Dr. Toothman’ was better…” The old saying goes, “Be true to your teeth, or they will be false to you!” At Toothman Dental Center, Dr. Toothman, DMD, Dr. Dale Kotowski, DDS, and the skilled dental technicians and staff are eager to help you do just that!

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Roberts Orthotics & Prosthetics

fter working for 20 years in the orthotics and prosthetics industry, Jeff Roberts had a well established career and enjoyed his profession. So much so, that when his employer laid him off in a company-wide downsizing he knew what he needed to do. Instead of searching for another job, Jeff decided to go into business for himself. “I never really had the opportunity to pursue my dream of having my own business until being laid off; but I knew this business, and I knew how much it meant to me to work with people and make a difference in their lives.” That was motivation enough, as he recalls the decision to open his own office over fifteen years ago. Roberts Orthotics & Prosthetics, Inc. opened in 2000 at Central Plaza in Waynesburg, and Jeff began putting his extensive experience and knowledge of the orthotics and prosthetics business to work for the people of Greene County and surrounding area. Roberts Orthotics & Prosthetics, Inc. offers custom-fitted braces for a wide range of disabilities and injuries; as well as custom designed and fitted artificial limbs for both upper and lower extremities. “People come right here and we measure and work with them until the fit is perfect,” Jeff explains. If individuals are unable to come to the office, Jeff will also make a house call to provide the patient with the care they need from the comfort of their home.

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“We work closely with our patients and their health-care providers to meet both their specific needs and individual preferences. We provide oneon-one personal care and believe in providing our patients with the opportunity to live their lives without limitation.” Open 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday-Friday and Saturdays by appointment, Roberts Orthotics & Prosthetics, Inc. is also a very convenient choice. They accept most major insurances and handle all your billing needs. For more information please phone our office at 724-627-4600 (toll free 1-866333-5462) or visit our website at www.robertsprosthetics.com. GreeneSaver •

MARCH / APRIL 2015


Beulah Baptist Church

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or well over 150 years, a joyful noise has been coming from the direction of Graysville, home to the Beulah Baptist church. “The church was started by Bob Rush in 1843 in a barn on the Rush farm,” says Pastor Harry Hill, who leads the Beulah Baptist flock today. “In 1900 they moved into a building on Beulah Ridge Road, and in 1903 they built the church that now exists. The little house sitting beside the church was the original church from 1900.” Standing as a testament to the longevity and history of Beulah Baptist, Pastor Hill is glad to note, “The building that they built in 1903 is still in existence. It was renovated in 1995—that’s when I became the pastor up there—by a group called the World Changers, from the south. They’re a group of young people from various churches and denominations. They get together and train to go to different parts of the states and do mission projects. They not only work on churches—they work on low income houses, they paint, put roofs on, put siding on, and there’s no cost to the owners except the materials.” The congregation added new siding in 1999, keeping the building going strong, secure and in good repair. The church wasn’t always in such a “happy space,” however, as Pastor Hill’s first experience there in 1995 demonstrates. “They were going to close the doors, and they asked me to go up and help them with the administration of closing the church. I went up, I was supposed to be there for three months, and I’ve been there ever since.” A native of this area, Pastor Hill and his family had recently moved back to Greensboro after living in Nantucket, Massachusetts for several years, where, in addition to his ministry work, he worked as a heavy equipment mechanic. A licensed minister for 20 years, Pastor Hill’s previous experiences had mostly been in-home mission work and bible studies. “I never thought I was called to be a pastor; I went up there more or less as an evangelist, but God just kept me there,” he recalls. Over the past two decades, Pastor Hill has guided the church with care and intention. “Our mission is to reach the world one person at a time, one soul at a time, and give them the hope that we have through Christ Jesus.” In addition to various outreach and missions efforts, he says, “We have

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a college at the church, Beulah Land College of Theology. It started in 2006 as a satellite campus of North Carolina College, and we are on our own, now. We started the college so that anybody that has a desire for biblical education can afford it—all they do is purchase their books and materials.” Excitement is building for an upcoming week long special event at the church. “The 29th of this month, we have a community spiritual renewal service for a week. We call it the ‘Preparation Week for Easter.’ A lot of people have lost the true meaning of Easter,” Pastor Hill explains, “so we go from Palm Sunday to Easter Sunday, renewing that spirit.” The nightly services, which take place at 7pm daily, will feature a variety of different special speakers and musical guests. Those who attend every night’s service will be entered in a drawing for a valuable door prize. Contemplating the ongoing direction of Beulah Baptist Church, Pastor Hill muses, “Moving into the future, I, personally, am not concerned about the size of the congregation. My main concern is the spiritual level of the congregation. If the church continues to grow spiritually, that would be great— then I have succeeded in the mission that God had put me there for. You never know how good a leader you are until you’re not here anymore. If the work falls apart, then you were a poor leader, but if the work continues, it means you’ve created leaders to carry on. We’re planting seeds today for a better tomorrow.”

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ongratulations to Greene County’s newest sports heroes! Waynesburg Central’s A. C. Headlee and Jefferson-Morgan’s Gavin Teasdale recently took top honors, winning in their respective weight classes in the recent PIAA Wrestling Tournament, held at the Giant Center in Hershey, PA. In a dramatic tie-breaker match, A. C. (senior) defeated Latrobe’s Luke Pletcher in the final overtime period, winning the 126-pound Class AAA title. Gavin (freshman) won the 106-pound Class AA gold medal with a victory over Chestnut Ridge’s Aaron Burkett. Way to go, A. C. and Gavin! Keep bringing home that gold!

Senior, A. C. Headlee takes home another win.

Freshman, Gavin Teasdale (bottom) closing in on an opponent at the Giant Center in Hershey.

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Mather, PA By Regis Whetzel Perhaps the best way to tell the story of a town is to start with how it came to be. For a place such as Mather, this is definitely the case. The history of this small village, located just outside of Jefferson, does much to define it, even today. In an extensive written history, resident Cheryl Kuharcik brings Mather’s early days to life, stating, “The village of Mather owes its existence to the Picklands-Mather Company, which chose to build it as a model mining town to house its workers at the Mather Collieries. The company began developing a mine on the north bank of Ten-Mile Creek with excavation for the shafts beginning on August 9, 1917, on what had formerly been known as the Moredock farm.” As work was being done on the mine, the town was also being constructed. “Three streets of two-story frame houses with cellars and good tile foundations were built facing public roads,” writes Cheryl. “The original town was known as a ‘model town’ for several reasons. At this time, coal company towns were generally composed of row houses, packed tightly together along narrow streets. Little thought was given to the citizens of the town other than the amount of labor that could be gained from its male members. ‘Coal patches’ were not considered ideal environments in which to raise a family. In contrast, the village of Mather was designed and built with the goal of providing a good, simple life for its inhabitants.” Anyone who has visited or lived in most “patch towns” knows how identical the houses can appear; by contrast, in Mather, “No two houses in any one block were designed exactly the same, nor were any two painted the same color.” Mather homes featured large lawns and pleasant landscaping, with the coal company even offering monthly prizes for the “best kept lawn in town.” Equal attention was paid to the town’s amenities. “When the town was first built, it included a post office, a movie theater, a drugstore and a company store selling everything from meat to tools to dry goods. A recreation hall was also constructed having a six-alley bowling alley, six pool tables, and a barbershop on the first floor (along with a public telephone—the first in the area), and a dance floor on the second story,” notes Cheryl. Other functional features included a bandstand, a public school,

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tennis courts and a church. Filtered, chlorinated public water was also available to the early residents, by way of two large reservoir tanks above the town that took water from Ten-Mile Creek, made it safe to drink, and then fed water to all homes that had connections. Considering how many unique things this happy little town had to offer, it is unfortunate that the thing that leaps to mind for many as the defining moment in Mather’s history—the thing that brought attention from sources as far away as the New York Times and Los Angeles Times—is what came to be known as the “Mather Mine Disaster.” On May 19, 1926, at 4:07 pm, the day and night shifts at the mine were in the process of trading places. As Cheryl vividly describes, “A long roar shook the corridors of the mine. Thirty seconds later, another blast, twice as strong as the first, was felt. The convulsion of the earth in the village sent women and children running to the mine yard. Over a mile away, at an airshaft servicing the mine, a 1,000-foot column of black smoke billowed into the sky.” Although the Mather mine had every safety feature available in the day, and a recent inspection had given it a clean bill of health, none of this prevented the massive blasts, caused by the ignition of coal dust that had accumulated during an interruption in air circulation, according to the official state investigation that followed the disaster. In the end, 25% of the male population of Mather was lost to the explosion, leaving behind 94 widows and 498 children. The final death toll was 195; 193 on-site, and 2 at the hospital, afterward. So powerful was the blast that 30 mine cars which were located two miles from the mineshaft were destroyed, and 100 of the homes in town were damaged. Mine operations resumed by August, and the Mather mine continued production until its closure in October of 1964, after employing a total of 10,000—14,000 miners, and producing 33,000,000 tons of coal over 45 years. As is the case with many small towns and villages where a main employer has shut its doors, Mather of today is not the hub of activity that it was when the mine was in operation, but it still has a special place in the hearts of those who live there. “We just like living here,” says Cheryl Kuharcik in a recent interview. 24 years have passed since she wrote the town history that provided much of the source information for this article. A resident of the Mather area since 1985, Cheryl and her husband, Larry, have deep roots there. “My husband was a miner for 33 years,” she remembers, “and his dad was a miner, and my maternal grandfather was a miner. As a matter of fact, my grandfather on my father’s side, his first job was cleaning up the Mather mine when it reopened after the explosion, so I’ve always had an interest.” Most of the original houses are still intact, Cheryl notes, and while most of the businesses in Mather have gone the way of the Mather mine, “There’s a little restaurant at one end of town, and another restaurant at the other end,” she points out. Residents enjoy a newly-renovated playground and athletic fields, featuring a baseball diamond complete with dugouts, and a tennis court. The playground is fenced for added security, and offers a reclaimed rubber play surface to help avoid scraped knees and elbows. The residential streets are wide and lined with trees, and while some of the houses are more careworn than they once were, most are still neatly kept, recalling the days of the “best kept lawn” contests. A walk through Mather can still easily call to mind a vision of how the

place must have looked in its heyday. Certainly, Mather has changed in recent decades; the roads rumble from trucks and heavy machinery being transported to and from well sites, and the bustle that created this town early in the 20th century has long since passed into memory. Still, Mather carries on, and remains a special place to many of those who call it home, whether lifelong residents, or relative newcomers. The GreeneSaver offers special thanks to Chris Bailey, Laverne Thistlewaite, and, of course, Cheryl Kuharcik for their contributions to this story. The framed pictures featured here are part of a large collection of photos of Mather and the Jefferson area that “regulars” will recognize as hanging on the wall of Laverne’s Restaurant. If you have stories or photos from time spent in Mather, whether you live there, used to live there, or just visited, we’d love to hear from you! For one more look at Mather, be sure to check out this month’s GreeneScene of the Past on page 28!

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Behm’s Auction

fter more than 75 years in business, Behm’s Auction and Real Estate Services is still a leading provider of auction services in our community and beyond. Based in Greene County, PA, the company conducts various auctions throughout the tri-state area of West Virginia, Ohio and Pennsylvania. Three generations strong with Jim Behm at the helm today, Behm’s Auction Service continues to offer quality service and a personal relationship with each and every client. Years ago, the average auction was nearly as much a social gathering as a business transaction, and most often consisted of household items or livestock. Today’s auctions offer up a much greater variety of goods and buying power for consumers. Today’s technology enables internet bidding and absentee bids among other ways to access the sale, making selling by auction more lucrative than ever before. Of course, maximizing income while minimizing effort is one of the greatest advantages of selling by auction. Behm’s works directly with individual owners and also with executors, corporations, and bankruptcy attorneys, among many others. Sales may range from a local family relocating or the settlement of an estate to the sale of personal property, real estate, or business liquidations. One of the many reasons that people choose to hire Behm’s Auction and Real Estate Services is that each auction is handled with professional courtesy and personal attention. “I’m often asked why peo-

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Auctioneer Jim Behm in action at a recent sale.

ple use our company, and the answer is very simple. We treat each auction as if it were our own. We strive to liquidate their assets, personal property, or real estate in a reasonable amount of time, resulting in the highest value that we can achieve,” explains Jim Behm. With thousands of auctions conducted throughout the tri-state area, Behm’s Auction and Real Estate Services is a familiar name. Most importantly, it is a trusted name in the auction industry. For more information call the office at 724-428-3664 or visit the website at www.behmsauction.com.

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4 Seasons Lawn & Garden C

elebrating 20 years in business, 4 Seasons Lawn & Garden, on Rolling Meadows Road in Waynesburg, continues to offer area residents the best choice in lawn & garden equipment - and much more. Customers can find the best prices and quality here with brands like John Deere, Stihl, Honda Power Equipment and now Simplicity mowers and tractors. With trusted names like these, 4 Seasons Lawn & Garden can ensure that their customers have the best equipment available. “It’s all about value,” says owner Murray Hoy. “We try to sell brands that last longer, hold their value better, and provide our customers with a more pleasurable experience while using it. We have found that these product lines do all of that and more, we are very proud and committed to the brands we sell.” 2014 was a very busy year at 4 Seasons. The wet summer provided everyone with plenty of grass to mow and maintain, which led many customers to 4 Seasons for new equipment and repairs. “Last year kept us all very busy; there was never a break in the action, we all worked very hard to see that all of our customer’s needs were met,” explains Murray. The John Deere Gator line has also been a big part of our growth as well and John Deere has been a leader in this market since the beginning. With

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the ever expanding lineup John Deere has something to fulfill everyone’s needs and 4 Seasons provides the parts and service to back it up. A good price on equipment is certainly a draw, but it’s not the only reason so many people choose to buy at 4 Seasons Lawn & Garden. “We enjoy a lot of return customers here,” Murray explains, “and I think that’s because we are committed to continue our proven level of excellence in service and superior products. People depend on our shop for service, we have an extensive parts department…and we understand the products and equipment we sell better than anyone.” With expertly trained service technicians in the shop, and Jeremiah & Courtney managing the parts and sales departments, Murray says “Our business is about relationships and my staff is trained to make our customer’s experience here both valuable and enjoyable. Our professional staff is the best, I am very proud of them. People appreciate dealing with someone who has the knowledge and experience to answer their questions, find what they need, and fix their problems. We can do that.” 4 Seasons Lawn & Garden is located on Rolling Meadows Road, where you’ll also find 4 Seasons Rentals…your source for a huge selection of rental equipment, tools, party tents and more. The capable staff at 4 Seasons Lawn & Garden gather ‘round a Gator (L to R) Jack Hoy, Ron Davis, Mason Long, Murray Hoy, Jeremiah Allison, Courtney Hursey.

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Morris Machinery H

aving your own business can be a challenge under the best of circumstances; building that business from the ground up is clearly not for the faint of heart. The Morris family, though, has spent the last 17 years turning what started as a small used farm equipment business into a multiline, full-service agricultural machinery dealer. “We’ve been in business since 1998, family owned and family run,” says owner, Rick Morris. “We do sales and service of agricultural retail— tractors, loaders, backhoes, and we also sell a lot of haymaking equipment.” In addition, Morris Machinery offers service on all makes and models of tractors, making it a one-stop destination for all types of farm equipment needs. Specializing in the “big toys,” Rick’s sister (and business manager), Rita notes, “We don’t do anything with ‘lawn and garden’ equipment; we sell new and used farm machinery, and all of the implements that go along with that.” Rick echoes her sentiment, and adds, “Groundskeeping for farms, bush-hogs and finish

mowers, roto-tillers—we sell, basically, anything that has to do with agriculture or the upkeep of a farm.” In the late 1990s, Rick began his enterprise by buying and selling used tractors with his father, H. L. Morris, as the Sales Director. His success in that endeavor led to expansion and carrying several brands of new equipment, including Branson, Sitrex, Kodiak, TYM, and others. To add to customers’ convenience, Morris Machinery offers several financing options. Keeping an eye toward the future, Rick offers a glimpse of things to come. “We’re definitely expanding, adding a whole new area for our inventory. We’ve taken on a couple of new product lines, and we plan on expanding that. We also plan to put in a new office, and, hopefully by the end of this year we’ll be able to expand our workshop area.” From the very beginning to the present day, Morris Machinery is certainly a business that is Growing in Greene!

Fun with Flowers

Expert advice on arranging at home.

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Douglas Education Center

EC’s CDL Program is a 210-hour certificate program designed to provide short-term training for long-term success. Interested students should contact DEC’s Admissions Department to begin the enrollment process at 724-684-DOUG. DEC’s CDL Program, which is currently enrolling, prepares, trains and develops new drivers with the knowledge and skills to prepare to take the Class “A” CDL with tanker endorsement examination. Students develop marketable skills, such as proper shifting techniques on different manual transmissions, safe driving techniques on highway, rural and intercity roads, backing maneuvers, and proper pre-trip inspection techniques. They are also taught how to effectively read maps in relation to a commercial vehicle, accurately complete drivers’ daily log books and create viable trip routes. Upon successfully obtaining their drivers’ permits, students will receive hands-on driving time in a commercial vehicle and will become skilled with manual transmission shifting at DEC’s training facility before heading out on the road. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics projects a 11 percent growth for heavy and tractor-trailer drivers through the year 2022. “The transportation industry is experiencing a significant skills gap, and we need to act aggressively to address this issue,” said Jeffrey D. Imbrescia, Chief Executive Officer / President at DEC. “There is no question that trucking companies need more qualified drivers to ensure their continued success, and the continued success of our economy. We believe this program will play a key role in helping to fill that need. This is a win-win for employers and Pennsylvania’s working families.” For more information about DEC’s Commercial Driver’s License Program, please visit www.dec. edu.

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hat to do with a Grocery Store Bouquet” was the title of the presentation by Chris Holt at the February meeting of the Town and Country Garden Club. Holt is a public program presenter for Phipps where she received her Flower Arranging Certification. She is also a Master Gardener. The focus of the program was the use of every-day items (tea cup, mug, canning jar, purse, small wooden crate, watering can, basket, and strainer) as containers for regular flowers, such as the multi-mix grocery store bouquet. Holt demonstrated the proper use of the oasis, which is placed in the bottom of the container to provide water and support to the stems of the flowers. She also demonstrated the correct way to cut 2 inches from the bottom of a stem with a knife or scissors. Using the rose as an example, a cut is made under water on an angle in order to expose a larger area for the stem to draw water. It is important to mix into the water the small packet of Fresh Flower Nutrients and Water Clarifier that accompanies the bouquet. The water should be cool or tepid as warm water will force bloom. Each member brought an arrangement to be critiqued by Holt. This workshop was in anticipation of the club’s flower show on August 1st, which is open to the public.

Holt was accompanied to the meeting by John Steel and George “Bly” Blystone who exhibited metalcraft work forged at the Foundry in Rices Landing. Steel is the president of the Pittsburgh Area blacksmiths’ Association’; Blystone is the caretaker at the Foundry. Holt attends the Hammer In at the Foundry every April as a blacksmith artist. The Foundry was built in 1900 as the W. A. Young Foundry and Machine Shop. The Curator Emeritus of the Smithsonian Institute considers it to be one of the finest historic finds of its type in the nation. The Steel Industry Heritage in Homestead is working with grants and architects to refurbish it as a working museum. GreeneSaver •

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County of Greene Department of Economic Development

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n our lifetime, it has never been more important to create jobs. The County’s Department of Economic Development, located at the ground level of the Fort Jackson County Building at 49 South Washington Street in Waynesburg, is prepared and glad to assist you in your site search, land development, business start-up, expansion, and entrepreneurship efforts. Our department is prepared to partner, to provide resources and access to capital for a seamless process. The Department staff provides access to site information, capital and workforce training and will assist you via an array of services which include: countywide aerial photography; property and utility information; research; business loan programs; tax abatement; permitting assistance; consistent administration of the Greene County Subdivision and Land Development Ordinance; land use planning and zoning; subdivision of property; commercial land development review; financial assistance; water resources planning; housing; infrastructure; and grant writing and administration services. The Economic Development department also provides advocacy for many needs and coordination of services with our 26 municipalities and strives to assist residents to become and to remain good stewards of the air, water and land of this beautiful county - the Cornerstone of the Keystone State. We partner with The Greene County Industrial Development Authority, Southwest Corner Workforce Investment Board (WIB), Tri-County Oil and Gas Energy Alliance, Waynesburg University’s Center for Research and Economic Development, Southwest Training Services, Waynesburg Chamber of Commerce, Greene County Tourism, Greene Alliance for Development, The Redevelopment Authority of the County of Greene, and our municipalities. Working together to advance the economy of Greene County is a critical component for success. To access more resources and to reach beyond our boundaries for opportunities for growth regionally, we partner with Southwestern Pennsylvania Commission and The Allegheny Conference on Community Development and Affiliates. Ms. Robbie M. Matesic is the Executive Director of the Department of Economic Development. Here to help are Lisa Snider, Greene County Conservation District Manager; Jeremy Kelly, Planning & Business Development Manager; David Craft, GIS and Mapping Specialist; Richard Davis, Housing Rehabilitation Specialist; Mary Jane Kent, Program Support and Mimi Ritenour, Fiscal Officer. The Department of Economic Development today incorporates: • Greene County Planning Commission Brent Burnett, Chairman. Meets first Monday of every month at 7:00 PM. • Greene County Conservation District Board of Directors Bradley Eisiminger, Chairman. Meets third Tuesday of every month at 10:00 AM. • Greene County Farmland Preservation Board of Directors William A. Cree III, Chairman. Meets third Wednesday of every month at 1:00 PM Sept - April and 6:00 PM May - August • Tax Abatement Review Board John Mariner, Chairman. Meets second Friday of every other month at 8:00 AM. • Greene County Industrial Development Authority Joseph Simatic, Chairman. Meets second Wednesday of each month at 8:30 AM. The department welcomes constituents to call or to stop by with questions or concerns. The department office is open Monday through Friday from 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM. The office phone is 724-852-5300, fax is 724-852-2944. Visit our website: www.co.greene.pa.us.

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ast month’s Driving the Future examined how the growth of the oil and gas industry in the area has impacted some local businesses, with a focus on those who provide special clothing for workers, and an automobile dealer that has seen its service department expand considerably, providing repairs and maintenance for some of the endless array of trucks that have become such a fixture on area roads. As important as these things are, there are other needs that are even more fundamental to a person’s health and security: food and shelter. When out-of-town workers are stationed on local job sites, having a comfortable place to stay and good food to eat are ways to bring a little bit of home to a strange place. What this means for Greene County and surrounding areas in practical terms is that hotels and restaurants whose business may have been flagging only a short time ago are, in many cases, now booming. Chris Bailey fits the dictionary definition of an “entrepreneur,” and has experience in both feeding and housing people. Chris is the owner of Amelia’s Restaurant in Mather, and also rents several apartments in the area, and is therefore well suited to address the issues. “Everybody has profited from this, whether they know it or not,” Chris says. Due to the influx of well workers and pipeliners, she notes, “The economy has increased in the hospitality industry, overall, in the last three years.” She has experienced growth, not only in terms of guests at her restaurant, but also by providing on-site food catering. “All of the fast food restaurants have made a lot more money, too,” she adds, pointing out that many local service-oriented businesses have even Kritter Kuts & Kennels also offers a variety of expanded their hours specifically to benefit those appointment-only dog grooming services. Small in the industry. dogs, large dogs and everything in-between can Laverne Thistlewaite, owner of Laverne’s, a benefit from a trip to their professional groompopular Jefferson eatery, echoes Chris’ feelings. ing salon. Depending on the needs of your dog’s “We’ve been here for 30 years,” she says, “and busiskin and coat, it could receive a spa day experiness has had a nice increase in the last six months ence including a bath with shampoo and conditioner, a mud bath, or a hot oil treatment. Following their bath, they will be brushed, dried and trimmed to your desired style preference. If you don’t get your dog’s fur trimmed, a bath, brush, and nails treatment is perfect for dogs that seem to shed non-stop or get too odorous, too often. Bows, scarves, nail polish and scents are all finishing touches that can be added to their grooming experience. Kritter Kuts & Kennels can be found digitally on Facebook or at www.kritterkutsandkennels. com. Call Clay or Julie today at 724.966.5497 to schedule your pet’s next vacation or grooming.

Kritter Kuts & Kennel

Your four-legged friend’s home away from home

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ritter Kuts & Kennels has been caring for the pets of Greene County and the surrounding area for over twenty years. Family owned and operated, at Kritter Kuts & Kennels your pet’s well-being is the main priority. Whether you require boarding or grooming, you can trust in knowing that owners Clay and Julie Murphy, who live on site, are there to make your pet comfortable while you are away. Their climate controlled canine facility has both indoor/outdoor runs and a fenced play yard, while feline friends will enjoy their own private kitty condo in a separate room. Regardless if your pet’s stay is overnight, a few days or several weeks, you can rest assured that your pet will be safe, comfortable and well cared for at this state licensed and inspected facility. Current vaccinations for rabies, bordetella, and distemper as well as a valid state license are required for dogs. Cats must have rabies and feline leukemia vaccinations current throughout their stay.

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or so. Things were really slowing down before that.” As a landlord, Chris Bailey has noticed a clear trend regarding housing in the area. “Rents have increased for the last three to four years,” she points out. “Usually in a college town, rents are higher; that wasn’t the case here, but when the pipeline and gas well workers came in, it went up. What used to rent for $250 a month now rents for $500 to $600 a month.” Of course, many workers prefer to stay in a hotel, rather than make the commitment to renting. In the last few years, new hotels have seemed to spring forth from the earth all over Greene and Fayette counties, their construction essentially demanded by the constant flow of workers who stay for extended periods. The Hampton Inn in Waynesburg has been in operation for two years, and has had high occupancy from day one. “We cater to that industry,” says General Manager, Shane Welter. “It represents the largest portion of our business, and the largest portion of the market, to be quite honest.” Shane gives examples of the special operating procedures the Hampton has put in place to provide maximum service and convenience to oil and gas workers. Providing breakfast earlier than it would normally be offered, hosting Manager’s Receptions in the afternoon, and having a boot wash station at the hotel’s rear entrance are just a few of the amenities unique to serving the industry. Once guests get to their rooms, “We have over 110 channels on our TVs, and we have 40” TVs instead of 25” TVs, because we know that these guys are going to be here long term, and they’re going to want to be watching some serious TV,” Shane notes. Having a wide variety of high definition and sports channels is another operating choice purposely made to serve tired workers. All of these conversations lead to the same conclusion: for anyone who ever thought about either opening a restaurant, investing in rental property, or franchising a hotel, there may be no time like the present.

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Lou Dayich for Judge O

n Tuesday, May 19th, Greene County voters will have a chance to elect a Judge for the Court of Common Pleas. District Judge Lou Dayich believes he is the best candidate to fill this position. Dayich believes that his more than 25 years of experience in the judicial system make him well qualified for the work at the Court of Common Pleas, and now is the right time for an experienced judge. Dayich graduated from Waynesburg Central High School in 1980, then earned his bachelor’s degree in political science from Washington and Jefferson College in 1984. Dayich worked his way through law school at the University of Pittsburgh mostly by selling hot dogs from the back of a 1949 Chevy truck that he called “Sweet Lou’s,” a nickname he picked up while playing football at W & J. He also established “Sweet Lou’s Hot Dogs” on High Street in Waynesburg, which he declared, with his wry sense of humor, “World Headquarters.” He says that he “is not afraid to work hard and has always felt blessed to have grown up in this community.” Unlike many of his high school friends who left Greene County for college and never returned, Dayich did come back, a decision that he says he, “has never regretted.” The affable and beaming Dayich stated, “Greene County is my home, and it seemed natural to come back and practice law here in the place that I grew up. My dad always said that, as an American, we have all kind of incredible rights and freedoms, but you don’t always get them without a good lawyer.” District Judge Dayich passed the bar exam in

the fall of 1987 and “jumped in with both feet,” trying criminal cases and practicing as a trial attorney until 1999. Judge Dayich has served as a District Judge since 2000, and has received the nomination of both parties in 3 prior elections as District Judge. In the current election, Judge Dayich has already been endorsed by the Pennsylvania State Police, F.O.P. Lodge Number 47. He says, “I am particularly proud to have the endorsement of the Pennsylvania State Police. These are the men and women that are out there every day keeping us safe, and I see them day in and day out in court. I think that I got their endorsement because they know that I listen to both sides, that I know the law, and that they will get a decision that is fair and right based on both the letter and the spirit of the law.” Dayich has also been endorsed by the Pennsylvania State Corrections Officers Association. In a letter dated March 9, 2015, the PSCOA said to Dayich, “Your commitment to fight crime and work with law enforcement makes you uniquely qualified to serve as Judge.” Dayich’s own friends have described him this way: “Lou has never made an enemy, and, moreover, he has a deep love for all the people of Greene County, regardless of wealth, status, or education. Lou keeps his own counsel and he marches to the beat of his own drum. He never seeks personal gain in his dealings with others, nor shows bias or favor in any situation.  Adding to that his astute knowledge of the law, he possesses the perfect profile of a fair, honest, and wise judge.”

Lou with his mother, Loretta, who is active in the Social Service League and his sister Karina.

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CONSOL Energy Supports Greene County EITC Projects

Local Bulls Make Good!

Congratulations to Matt DeJohn and the entire crew at Buckin’ B Cattle Company, of Lippencott, PA, for some fantastic recent results! In January of 2015, Buckin’ B was named “Producer of the Year” for 2014 by the Southern Extreme Bull Riding Association (SEBRA)! This marks the 7th time Buckin’ B has been awarded this honor. Buckin’ B also took home the “Stock Contractor of the Year” award, and Clementine was named “Bucking Bull of the Year” for 2014. In New York City’s Madison Square Garden, Buckin B bull “Clementine” was showcased in the CBS Sports Network coverage of the Professional Bull Riders Monster Energy Buck Off in January, and “Mr. U” was marked “High Bull” on the Friday night portion of this three day event. At the SEBRA National Finals, also held in January, Mr. U was “High Mark Bull” in short round on Friday’s competition, and Clementine was “High Mark Bull” on Saturday, and also won “Buckin’ Bull of the Finals” in that meet. Way to go, Buckin’ B! Greene County is proud of you, and that’s no bull! At left, Matt DeJohn, owner of Buckin B Cattle Co., accepts one of several awards, this one Bucking Bull of the Finals event, from SEBRA President Chan Canter, for the performance of Buckin’ B bull Clementine, who went on claim the 2014 Bucking Bull of the title as well. The 6-year old crossbred bull is pictured below, right after having tossed professional bull rider Josh Faircloth at the 2013 National Finals.

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CONSOL Energy Inc. recently made an $80,000 contribution to the Community Foundation of Greene County (CFGC) Educational Improvement Fund. The contribution was made through the Pennsylvania Educational Improvement Tax Credit (EITC) program. The Educational Improvement Fund provides grants for innovative educational programs in the public schools. “CONSOL Energy is committed to educational initiatives that improve academic achievement and contribute to individual success,” said Tommy Johnson, Vice President Public & Government Relations. “We are proud to once again partner with Bettie Stammerjohn (L) and Jessica Kearns (R), External the Community Foundation of Greene Relations Specialist, CONSOL Energy. County to support innovative projects that will strengthen curriculum and enrich communities across the county.” CONSOL Energy, both a coal and natural gas producer, has been headquartered in Appalachia for nearly 150 years. The Greene County Educational Improvement Fund was established in 2005 when the Foundation was approved by the Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development’s EITC program. “The Educational Improvement Fund supports a wide range of projects in Greene County schools,” said Bettie Stammerjohn, Executive Director of CFGC. “Because of CONSOL’s support we have been able to support the Greene County Envirothon, partner with Westmoreland County Community College to teach Greene County high schools about careers in the natural gas industry, provide technology updates and art programs in Southeastern Greene and West Greene school districts. Those are just a few of the projects supported with EITC contributions.” For more information on the EITC program call the Community Foundation at 724-627-2010, or email us at cfgcpa@gmail.com.

BOWLBY bits

he Bowlby Public Library is celebrating National Library Week April 12-18, and offering fine free week to all Greene County citizens. Return those long overdue materials! Also, take advantage of the library’s valuable resources, such as genealogical collections, materials in print and electronic formats, job seeking resources, English as a second language and citizenship classes, and many other creative and resourceful programs. During National Library Week, Bowlby will be kicking off a 5-week Creative Writing Workshop that is free to all interested youth and adult writers. Ms. Abigail Hancher, an English & Creative Writing senior at Waynesburg University, will be assisting would-be writers with projects beginning on April 14 at 5:30 pm. Other meeting times for this workshop will be April 16, 21 & 23, May 5, 7, 12, 14, 19 & 21. You can pre-register for the workshop by calling the library at 724-627-9776. The Eva K. Bowlby Public Library is offering “Gardening on a Budget” on Wednesday, April 15, from 6:30-7:30 pm. One of the Greene County Master Gardeners will be at the library leading this session on informative ways to save money, yet have a thriving and productive garden. Please call the library to register at 724-627-9776. The Bowlby Public Library is hosting a Poetry Reading & Awards Ceremony on Thursday, April 16, at 5:30 pm. Please

join us for an evening of poetry; winners from the Poetry Contest (held in March) will be announced, and participants are invited to read their original work. Light refreshments will be served. The Bowlby Public Library is offering free S.A.T. Preparation classes to help students planning to take the S.A.T. this spring. The course consists of three Saturday sessions on April 11th, 18th & 25th from 10:00 am ‘til 2:00 pm, and will cover math, language arts, and writing. If you have a scientific calculator, bring it with you along with a bagged lunch. Pre-registration is required! Call today at 724-627-9776 to sign up to learn what to expect or to improve your score on the S.A.T.! It’s an After Hours Girls Night In party at the Bowlby Public Library on Friday, April 10th, from 4:00 pm ‘til 8:00 pm There will be lots of girly fun that includes manicures, pedicures, hairdos, craft time, snack time and a special Disney version of Jeopardy! Calling all girly girls to come hang out! This includes moms, grandmas, aunts, & cousins, too! Call to reserve your spot at the library at 724-627-9776. Finally, don’t miss Movie Night @ Your Library on Wednesday, April 22nd! Promptly beginning at 5:30 pm Disney’s “Into the Woods” will be previewed in the Conference Room. There is limited seating so call ahead to reserve your spot at 724-627-9776.

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Community Bank “A

2014 Best Year Ever!

fter 113 years, Community Bank delivered its best year ever in 2014”, according to Pat McCune, its President & CEO. Mr. McCune explained that Community Bank not only had its best year ever in terms of performance by a wide variety of measures, but the Bank merged with First Federal Savings Bank. “This”, said McCune, “was the single most important and promising thing Community Bank has accomplished in its long and meaningful life”. Last Spring, Community Bank and First Federal Savings Bank announced a definitive agreement whereby First Federal would merge with and into Community Bank. Both Banks are long-time local institutions with nearly identical missions and cultures, as well as overlapping service areas. “We at Community Bank have worked with the people of First Federal, including their CEO Pat O’Brien, over the years in a variety of community and industry endeavors”, explained McCune. “Although we were competitors, they had become our friends. We admired their independent spirit and competitive energy. We also knew their directors and, again, realized that they could bring wisdom and experience to our board room.” Both CEOs and their directors were determined to maintain a strong, local, independent bank in the Pittsburgh region. Both Banks had been doing an excellent job of serving their communities. The respective directors and senior managers saw no reason to sell to a larger, out-of-area bank that would fail to deliver on the insight and service that defines local banks. “We all decided that we could do a better job by banding together and maintaining local control,” both CEOs believed. The transaction closed on October 31. Pat O’Brien, the former President & CEO of First Federal, joined Community Bank as its Senior Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer. Mr. O’Brien explained, “First Federal recognized that Community Bank stood for the same devotion to customer service that defines us and other local, independent banks. First Federal has a deep commitment to our local communities, and we wanted to partner with a bank that shared our passion. Community Bank was such a bank”. “Now”, says O’Brien, “Community Bank has more offices, serving more people, with better technology, and a wider array of products. We can now offer the best business services, residential mortgages, insurance products, and

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(L to R) Barron “Pat” McCune, President and CEO, Ralph J. Sommers, Jr., Chairman and Patrick G. O’Brien, Senior Executive Vice President and COO.

wealth management. It simply is a stronger, bigger, better Bank”. Community Bank adopted a new tag line, referring to itself as the “Better Business Bank”. This is done to remind our customers that the Bank offers a better way of doing things. In particular, Community Bank has developed an expertise serving the local business community with loans and deposit products. Community Bank tries to help our local business people succeed, and maintains a business resource center at its “Community Bank Business Alliance” web page. The Bank can now also offer insurance products. As part of the merger, Community Bank welcomed the insurance professionals at Exchange Underwriters, a full service agency in Canonsburg. The Community Bank Business Alliance now includes Exchange Underwriters. Mr. McCune commented that 2014 was the best year for Community Bank even without the merger. Community Bank itself achieved all types of milestones. Through its “Community Bank Cares” charitable giving program, Community Bank made some $33,000 donations to charities and churches designated by Community Bank customers. The Bank’s holding company, CB Financial Services, Inc., recorded its second best year ever despite the considerable expense of the merger. “What a year!” said McCune, “We were able to bring on talented people, grow the Bank to $850,000,000, register with the SEC, begin trading on NASDAQ, start offering insurance products, and achieve solid financial performance.” In considering the merger, Mr. McCune revealed, “I would much rather be working with them than against them”. It is evident that the combined Community Bank can’t wait for 2015 and beyond.

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Waynesburg University C.S.I.

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aynesburg University will host its tenth annual Crime Scene Investigation summer camp Sunday, June 21, through Friday, June 26, on the campus of Waynesburg University. Participants will gain valuable insight into the field of forensic science through experiential learning and strategically planned activities. All workshops are interconnected through a series of evidence and crime scenes, designed with a hands-on approach to learning. Students will learn how to properly collect, preserve and analyze evidence. During this six-day, five-night experience, students are given the opportunity to study with experts in forensic science as well as professionals from various fields including state and federal agencies. This year, camp topics will include scene processing, burial remains excavation, surveillance and search warrant execution, forensic analysis of biological evidence and questioned documents analysis. Participants of the camp will train with special agents from the Federal Bureau of Investigation Biometric Center of Excellence, Pennsylvania State Police Forensic Services, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF), as well as representatives from Council Bluffs, Iowa, Police Department. The camp will enable students to enhance their knowledge and understanding of forensic topics, as well as allow them to make valuable connections with professionals and fellow peers in the field.

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“The camp affords participating students a chance to experience the realities of the professions in which they have found some interest,” said Michael Cipoletti, camp director, director of the Forensic Science Program and assistant professor of forensic science at Waynesburg University. “Students’ perspectives are typically formed from popular television shows or books; this camp gives them the ability to work with real professionals, ask them what their jobs are like and how they got to where they are.” Individuals entering 11th grade, 12th grade or who are spring 2015 high school graduates are eligible to attend the camp. Participating Waynesburg University faculty include: • Mike Cipoletti, camp director, director of the Forensic Science Program and assistant professor of forensic science at Waynesburg University, previously worked for the Pennsylvania State Police Crime Lab. He served as a forensic scientist and lab system quality specialist in chemistry and drug identification. • John Mcllwain, camp advisor and adjunct instructor of criminal justice at Waynesburg University, has taught for 16 years. He began his professional career as a U.S. Army Military Police Officer in Germany. Mcllwain left the military in 1977 and became a Special Agent with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms. He conducted investigations of the Federal Firearms Laws for 11 years. • Faith Musko, camp advisor and instructor of forensic science at Waynesburg University, is a former toxicologist and forensic

chemist with AIT Laboratories in Indianapolis, Ind. She is a member of the American Academy of Forensic Scientists, the American Chemical Society and the Society of Forensic Toxicologists. • Adam Jack, camp co-creator, chair of the Department of Criminal Justice and Social Sciences and assistant professor of forensic science at Waynesburg University, is a former forensic detective with the Westmoreland County District Attorney’s Office and police officer in Rostraver Township, Pa. He is a Certified Senior Crime Scene Analyst through the International Association for Identification and has testified as an expert in Crime Scene Investigation and fingerprints. • Marietta Wright, camp workshop presenter and assistant professor of biology at Waynesburg University, previously conducted molecular biology research in type I diabetes at the University of Pittsburgh. Her main areas of interest are cell and molecular biology, genetics, DNA profiling and scientific teaching. • James Tanda, camp advisor and instructor of criminal justice at Waynesburg University, brings a wealth of experience to the program. Prior to joining the University, James worked as a Special Agent with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms for 27 years and has also served as a Contracted Explosives Specialist with the U.S. Government. To register, visit csicamp.waynesburg.edu or call 724-2257393.

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Clipper

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“Keep On Clipping!”

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C&S Tire Pros M

any area residents know that C&S Tire Pros has spent the last 33 years building its reputation as a full service tire and automotive repair facility, able to provide any tire brand at competitive prices, and top quality, name-brand parts installed by ASE Certified technicians, to get you back on the road quickly and safely. What some may not know is that C&S also provides a remarkable array of truck accessories. “We do lift kits, tonneau covers, full bumper replacements—if you can bolt it on a truck, we can do it,” says owner, Curt Price.

C&S also offers spray-in bedliners, which add utility and value to any truck. “The biggest advantage is that, with a drop-in bedliner, they accumulate moisture between the truck bed and the liner, and it’ll start rusting your bed; whereas a spray-in liner bonds directly to the bed.” While Curt admits that a spray-in liner costs more than a drop-in liner, he considers it an investment well worth the cost: “It lasts longer, things don’t slide around in the bed of your truck, and it actually protects your bed as opposed to doing the opposite,” he notes, adding, “It also increases the value of your truck for resale.”

Bridging Rural and Urban Youth Through Art

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lans for the Bridging Arts Program are rapidly evolving as project coordinator, Valerie Herrero, seeks out local Greene County youth to participate. The program will utilize a series of art workshops taught by Herrero and local artists to expose youth to a variety of artistic mediums including watercolor, drawing, clay, sculpture, and silk screen printing. Participants will use art as a vehicle to explore various themes including rural and urban communities, self-discovery, cultural perspectives, creative problem solving, and teamwork. In June, participants will travel to Pittsburgh to work with peers at Assemble and visit the Andy Warhol Museum. The Bridging Arts Program starts on Saturday, April 11th, and will conclude on Sunday, July 12th. The program is free of charge and includes six art workshops in Greensboro and two field trips to Pittsburgh in June. All Greene County youth between the ages of 14 and 17 are encouraged to sign up soon, as space is limited.

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Dave Coder

ave Coder announced that he is seeking the Democratic nomination for Greene County Commissioner in the upcoming May Primary Election. “I am excited to start my campaign for County Commissioner, to help move Greene County forward,” Dave said. “Having served the interests of Greene County at all levels of government, I am glad to again have an opportunity to have a positive impact on people’s lives as County Commissioner.” “Continuing the work of saving coal jobs and creating economic development is my passion, and I believe I will bring a record of results to the county that will help all of our citizens.” “I am encouraged by the great response I have received from friends and neighbors across Greene County,” Dave concluded. Serving as Greene County Commissioner from 1996 to 2010, Dave received the Governer’s

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As all bridges are designed to connect and provide a passage between two lands, the Bridging Arts Program was created with the mission of bridging youth from different communities within the Southwestern Pennsylvania and Pittsburgh region through art and cultural exposure. The program is focused on identifying and resolving pressing community issues, making measurable changes within the community, and encouraging economic, cultural, and educational development. Funding for the Bridging Rural and Urban Youth through Art project was provided by the Futures Fund, the 2013 Forever Greene Fund of the Community Foundation of Greene County, and the Nathanael Greene Development Corporation. For more information about the Bridging Arts Program and to sign up, please visit www.bridgingartsprogram.org or email Valerie Herrero at vherrero.1925@gmail.com .

Award for Local Government Excellence, and served as President of the County Commissioner’s Association of Pennsylvania. He also served as Chairman of the Southwestern Commission, the 10 county regional transportation planning commission in Southwestern PA. He received valuable experience working as Deputy District Director for Congressman Mark S. Critz and as Chief of Staff for State Representative Pam Snyder. Dave is a 4 year veteran of the United States Coast Guard. He graduated from Mapletown High School and has a Bachelor of Science degree in business administration from Waynesburg University. Dave also serves as a member of the Pennsylvania Democratic State Committee and is on the executive board of the Greene County Democratic Committee. Dave and his wife, Cindy, have two daughters, Mallory and Chelsea. GreeneSaver •

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Dry Tavern Auto Sales

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t’s easy to find an inexpensive car, as long as you’re not particular about its history or condition. It’s also easy to find a car that looks great, runs like a dream, and has a pedigree that can be traced to the day it rolled off the assembly line, if you don’t mind digging deep into your pockets to make it yours. Dry Tavern Auto Sales works every day to give its customers the best of both worlds—quality, pre-owned automobiles, at affordable prices, providing good value and a good ride. General Manager, Steven Dulik, has a 20 year history in auto dealership. He, along with his wife (and office manager), Danielle, and owner, Jack Andrews, are out to make buying a car a simple, happy experience, so drivers can stop worrying and start enjoying the open road. “We have financing available, with a new ‘Guaranteed Credit Approval’ program. No matter your past credit situaSteven Dulick, General Manager of Dry tion, we have the ability to help you,” Steven exclaims. “CusTavern Auto Sales tomers can even complete an online credit application at our website, www.drytavern.com, and be pre-approved prior to coming in.” Warranties are also available, and Steven and his crew work hard to make sure that every vehicle on their lot is in top running condition, and ready to go home with you. “I have a 60-point certified checklist for all of our cars, and they have to pass that prior to sale,” Steven notes. Inventory is large, to offer maximum choice to drivers. “Currently, we have about 35 to 40 cars in stock, in a wide range of prices. In fact, I just sold a van for $650,” he says. To maintain quality control, Steven notes, “All of our cars are local trades. I don’t buy anything from the auctions, unless it’s something specific or rare. I buy from several new car dealers that take vehicles in as trades, and I also buy from private individuals.” Looking to the future, Steven says, “We have the ability to service vehicles, and we’re growing, there. That’s the next phase—to grow the service end of our dealership. Growth and customer satisfaction are key to Dry Tavern Auto Sales’ success. “Hours are 9 to 5, Monday through Friday, 9 to 2 Saturday,” Steven says, “but I’m not opposed to meeting people by appointment, thereafter. All they have to do is call my cell number, 724-833-1472, to arrange something after normal hours.”

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Greene County Tourism Promotion Agency

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his spring, the Greene County Tourism Promotion Agency is proud to debut its new marketing campaign, “It’s Right Here.” Developed with Crowe’s Nest Creative of Waynesburg, the new campaign features photos and video of local people enjoying Greene County’s attractions, events and businesses, all with the tagline “It’s Right Here.” The ads also encourage visitors to “enjoy the simple thrill of a day well spent.” The campaign will be changed seasonally, with different ads running in the spring, summer and fall. Thirty-second commercials will begin running this spring on Comcast, as well as on the Tourism Web site, www.GoGreeneCounty.org, and on social media channels. Crowe’s Nest has also developed several longer-form videos for each season that can be viewed online. “We are so thrilled to unveil our new marketing campaign and our new print, broadcast and digital advertising,” said Elizabeth Menhart, tourism director. “The Crowes have worked so diligently over the past year producing gorgeous photos and videos, and they tied it all together brilliantly with the ‘It’s Right Here’ tagline. The new campaign just fits us so perfectly and was exactly what we were looking for.” The Crowes’ work will be heavily featured in the 2015 Greene County Visitors Guide, which will be published this spring. The 36-page, full-color guide highlights attractions, businesses and organizations in seven

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categories – Exploring, Agritourism, Recreation, Learning, Staying, Shopping and Dining. A calendar of annual events is also included. The publication was designed by Alan Laick of Laick Design. In the past few months, the Tourism office has also debuted the second edition of a covered bridge puzzle and, for the first time, Greene County crocks. Shot by photographer Karole Wagner of Rices Landing, the photo for the second edition of the Cox Farm Covered Bridge puzzle was taken shortly after the bridge was restored in 2013. The newest puzzle joins the six others – Carmichaels, King, Scott, Shriver, White and Woods – in the series celebrating the county-owned covered bridges. Puzzles are $20 each, or $100 for the set of seven. The Greene County crocks are the newest keepsake items available for purchase. Handmade by Jim and Linda Winegar of Winegar Pottery, the crocks feature an image of the Greene County Courthouse drawn by local artist Colleen Nelson. The crocks come in two sizes, small and large, with the small working great as a pencil holder, and the large a perfect size to hold kitchen utensils. Small crocks are $15, and the large are $30. In addition to the crocks and puzzles, an assortment of keepsake items is available for sale either in the Tourism office, or through the “Greene County Gifts” section of the Tourism Web site. For more information on these and other projects, call Greene County Tourism at 724-627-8687, or visit www.GoGreeneCounty.org.

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Lippencott Alpacas “I

CELEBRATING 10 YEARS OF RAISING ALPACAS!

t tickles when an alpaca eats out of your hand,” Lena warns everyone who visits her alpacas. Several people agree and laugh after the tickling begins. Folding the alpaca fleece back to reveal the skin and the lovely, clean fleece is an amazing experience for all ages. As the cameras start clicking and visitors experience the thrill of hugging and stroking the alpacas, everyone is in awe of their gentle nature. Sometimes an alpaca may feel relaxed enough to sit down and allow everyone to sit around with them. It makes for quite the photo-op! Lippencott Alpacas is a visitor friendly farm and welcomes all groups large and small. A nominal fee of $3.00 per person is charged for groups. Make sure you call for a reservation (724.852.4084) to get the most out of your farm visit. Memories are made at Lippencott Alpaca Farm! Lena and Philip Galing own the only alpaca breeding farm in Greene County. Lena is the fourth generation to continue the farming experience on her family farm. They currently own 22 alpacas with six mothers expecting crias (babies) in mid July. They sell alpacas to those interested in owning these magnificent creatures and they offer special pricing and package deals. All sales include professional, individualized, and hands-on instruction on alpaca rearing and herd management. They go out of their way to ensure new owners have a successful and enjoyable experience. If interested, call them to arrange a farm visit! Each year Lippencott Alpacas hosts a FREE weekend open house. This year it is September 26-27 from 1:00 to 5:00 each day. Learn about alpacas throughout the day. Get your hands into alpaca fiber with instructors who knit, crochet and spin and more! Participate in a variety of fiber related activities for any age. Enjoy a lazy hayride to the highest point on the farm and take in the majestic Southwestern Pennsylvania countryside. Buy children’s books from local Greene County author, “Uncle Dave”. His next book, “Cotton Candy” (the pink alpaca) will be available for sale. Eat a tasty hotdog from Moore’s Hotdogs or sample wine from Thistlethwaite Vineyards. Tasty homemade apple pies, candies & ice cream are available along with unique items from other local vendors. This year, the Lippencott Alpacas Knitting Herd will raffle off a handmade knitted alpaca throw made of knitted squares with intermediate cable and pattern designs using shades of green, blue, raspberry, heather and white – Stunning! A kids hay-sliding area is always popular. Watch for surprises throughout the day! “Touching is Believing” is the focus in the Farm Store. Alpaca naturally wicks away moisture and tends to be softer and stronger than many other natural fibers. This makes alpaca very luxurious and comfortable to wear. It is similar in price and comfort to cashmere. Lippencott Alpacas makes their own extreme weather toboggan hats right in their store. Perhaps you will be lucky enough to see their circular

knitting machine in action. It whirls and twirls, knitting a hat in under 90 seconds! Hats are available in natural white & rose gray plus dyed colors in green, blue, red and black. Also available are place mats/ stadium seats made from their own alpaca fiber. See the many natural colors and unique designs. This year they offer a large variety of yarn made from their alpacas. Some of the yarn is embellished with shades of firestar, bamboo and tencel for truly stunning results. A variety of dyed alpaca yarn is also available. It is a fiber Artist’s paradise! Their store also includes a large variety of alpaca sweaters; sport vests; socks for all occasions; gloves, mittens, scarves and other accessory items; and a number of handmade items knitted by members of Lippencott Alpaca Knitting Herd. For one of-a-kind gifts a visit to Lippencott Alpacas Farm Store where you can “shop till you drop” is a must! For a truly unique experience visit Lippencott Alpacas alpaca farm and Farm Store located near the Village of Lippencott (or shall I say, “alpaca heaven?”) just off I-79 at the Ruff Creek exit in Greene County, PA. You won’t be disappointed!

“Celestial Light” is one of the recent crias (baby alpacas) born at Lippencott Alpacas this year.

GreeneScene by Jessica Carroll

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GreeneScene of the Past

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xtending the theme of this month’s installment of “I Love This Place!” dealing with Mather, our Greene Scene of the Past is actually a painting of the old Mather mine, by Howard L. Fogg. Howard was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1917, and began sketching trains at age four. Through his diverse life, he studied to be a cartoonist, ended up as a train engineer, and became a fighter pilot after being drafted into the Army in 1941. A chance meeting in 1945 with Duncan Fraser, President of the American Locomotive Company, changed Howard’s life. Duncan hired him to be an official artist for the company, creating numerous train-related paintings for use in books, posters, and commissioned artworks from a variety of railroad companies and private individuals. Often referred to as the “Dean of American Railroad Artists,” the painting featured here would have been done in or around 1956, part of a series commissioned by then-P&LE Railroad president, John Barriger, III. They were used in postcards, calendars and art prints, and were also assembled in book form under the titles “Road to the Future” and “Along the Right of Way.” Howard Fogg continued to paint until his death in 1996. Appropriately, his ashes were scattered along a set of Union Pacific railroad tracks in Sherman Hill, Wyoming by his sons, Richard, Peter, and Howard III.

If you have an interesting old photo from the area you’d like to share, just send it to: GreeneScene of the Past, 185 Wade Street, Waynesburg, PA 15370. Or email to: info@greenesaver.com with GreeneScene Past in subject line. The GreeneSaver can even scan your original in just a few minutes if you bring it to our office. We are particularly interested in photos of people and places in the Greene County area taken between 1950 and 1980, though we welcome previous dates, too.

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Senior LIFE Helps Seniors Live at Home L

ike most of us about this time of year, Hazel Jacobs has spring fever. She looks forward to the warm sun, walking her dog, and the new life that each spring seems to bring. That Hazel has the strength and stamina to do this is a testament to her commitment and hard work, and to Senior LIFE, a home and communitybased program that provides health and personal care services for seniors so that they can remain in their home. Senior LIFE is part of a national program for seniors. The program is fully funded by Medicare and Medicaid. Participants in the LIFE Program receive a complete care plan that addresses their individual needs. Some of the services include physicians and specialists, nursing care, physical, occupational and speech therapy, medical equipment, home and personal care, medications, meals, activities and socialization. Services are provided both in the senior’s home and at the Senior LIFE Center. All participants receive transportation to and from the LIFE Center and to doctor’s appointments, plus the peace of mind of having an on-call nurse 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Hazel enjoys living in the comfortable surroundings of her own home and coming to the Se-

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nior CARE Center on Sugar Run Road in Waynesburg several times a week. Before coming to Senior LIFE, Hazel had difficulty getting around due to the effects of diabetes, COPD and hypertension. She’s thankful for the physical and occupational therapy that she receives at Senior LIFE. “Senior LIFE helps me stay active,” she says. “The therapy keeps me strong so I don’t fall and can get around better. I love doing the various exercises and talking to other people who are in a similar situation as I am in.” Hazel says that coming to Senior LIFE has also given her the opportunity to get out of the house, enjoy meals and activities, and make new friends. “The people at Senior LIFE are great,” she says. The best part of Senior LIFE is that there is NO charge for any of the services for seniors who meet the qualifications. To qualify for services at no cost, participants must be 55 years or older, live in Greene, Washington or Fayette Counties, and meet certain medical and financial guidelines. To see if you or a loved one qualifies for the LIFE Program, call today at 724 852-2273 or visit the website at www.seniorlifewashington.com.

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A

4 Seasons Rentals

fter a walloping winter, warm weather is on the way! Flowers and trees are budding, grass is starting to turn green, snow has finally melted… Which means, of course, that soon weeds will be threatening to overtake the flowers and grass, the trees need to be trimmed; and, with all of the snow gone, suddenly you can’t help but be reminded that your shingles have definitely seen better days. Then there are all of the cracks in your sidewalk from the freezing and thawing, the nasty looking old tiles in your entryway that are begging to be replaced, and the wood floors that were once gleaming and beautiful, now scuffed and dull. There are countless jobs, big and little, that go with every house and yard. When you have the right tools for the job, it makes things much easier. For the times when you don’t have what you need, 4 Seasons Rental in Waynesburg is just the place to get you equipped and on your way, without the expense of having to purchase something that you may only need to use once a year. If you didn’t know that, you’re not alone: “A lot of people still don’t realize that we rent equipment,” says 4 Seasons Rental Manager, Courtney Hursey. The ever-expanding wave of do-it-yourselfers has not only been good for business, but has also expanded the inventory. “Renting equipment has definitely become more popular,” Courtney affirms, adding, “We have a variety of things that the average person might not have, things like air compressors and nailers, floor sanders, carpet shampooers, jackhammers, pressure washers—all of that and more.” Indeed, that list is only the beginning. From tile saws that help you make perfect cuts, to concrete saws that make quick work of removing that cracked cement in the sidewalk, Courtney and the 4 Seasons Rental crew can help you make it happen. What about all of those yard projects? No problem! “We have a lawn tractor and trimmers that we rent, a Ditch Witch, a large tow-behind chipper, a John Deere Gator for hauling and towing and more. If a customer needs to have the equipment delivered, we can deliver it, too,” Courtney notes. Their dedication to service continues with making sure that everyone who rents equipment is made aware of how it operates, with the staff happy to answer any questions to ensure the safety of the user, and proper use of the tool. Another great thing about warm weather returning is all of the fun outdoor events that often accompany spring and summer. For family reunions or class reunions, weddings or graduation parties, or any special outdoor happening, 4 Seasons Rental has you covered with their extensive “Event Rental” section. “We have tents, tables, chairs; even a dance floor!” Courtney exclaims. “We come out and set everything up, and take it all down when the event is over.” What could be better than knowing that all of those details are taken care of, so you can just relax and enjoy the day? Whether it’s a special event, or a special project around the house, Courtney Hursey sums it up perfectly when she says, “We can cover it all!” 4 Seasons Rental is located with 4 Seasons Lawn & Garden at 600 Rolling Meadows Road in Waynesburg.

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4 Seasons Rental has a large selection of party tents in various sizes and style available, as well as tables, chairs and other party needs. Set-up and take down is included with rental.

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Greene County Food Security Partnership N

o one likes to imagine that some of their neighbors might be going through their days without knowing for sure where their next meal will originate, yet, sadly, this is sometimes the case in Greene County. The Greene County Food Security Partnership (GCFSP) is working tirelessly to change this, and they could use your help. “Hunger is a serious issue in Greene County,” says an outline of the situation from the Partnership’s Internet site, www.greenefoodpartnership.org, which goes on to quote startling figures from a study prepared by the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank. “5,818 persons, or 16.3% of the total population is in poverty. This includes 22.1% of children 18 years old and under, and 10.1% of all seniors age 65 and over.” This means that over 2000 area children— above the national average—don’t have access to a full and healthy diet. “Children in foodinsecure households are approximately twice as likely to suffer poor health, and one third more likely to be hospitalized,” says a report by the Partnership, which adds, “Seniors who don’t have access to adequate nutrition develop more illnesses needing more medical attention and hospital stays.” The GCFSP is using three distinct strategies to engage and educate the community, and grow cooperation to help address issues of food security. First, by developing a collaborative network of organizations, churches, businesses, agencies and schools, people who may be isolated within the community can be better reached to help address their needs and make them aware of available options. Utilizing digital media and print resources to help distribute information, as well as conducting outreach programs within the county are all efforts the GCFSP is using to build a healthier, more well-informed community. Second, the Summer Food Service Program was specifically designed to address the needs of children whose food insecurity is es-

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pecially prevalent during the summer months when school lunch programs aren’t available. Currently overseen by the Carmichaels, West Greene and Central Greene School Districts, the Summer Food Service Program distributed 13,000 meals in 2010, and 25,000 meals to more than 1,000 kids in 2011. The program consistently strives to increase the number of summer feeding sites, working on creative ways to reach out to all Greene County children who would benefit. Closely related to the Summer Food Program, the Weekend Food Program also serves to help fill the gap on weekends and holidays. This program provides items to help cover two breakfasts, two lunches and two dinners for students in local elementary schools who are enrolled in the program. Over upcoming weeks, the GCFSP is hosting “Saute and Save,” a series of free workshops including healthy food demonstrations and information on gardening, home budgeting, couponing, and eating healthy on a budget. On April 22nd, Penn State Extension Master Gardener, Cheryl Brendel, will host “Greene Growing;” April 29th will feature Tiffany Huffman, Community Action Southwest Caseworker, presenting “Stretching Your Dollar.” On May 6th, Andrea Austin, home couponer, will offer “Clip & Save—Couponing for Beginners;” and Alka Rombhia, SWRMC Dietitian, and Bethany Dawson, WIC Associate Director will present “Eat Well, Be Well.” All sessions will be held from 9:30— 11:30am at the Corner Cupboard Food Bank, 881 Rolling Meadows Road, in Waynesburg. Childcare will be provided upon request, and those who attend all four sessions will be entered for a chance to win prizes. The registration deadline is April 17th. To register, contact Stacey Dikun at 724-852-5276. To donate a gift of food or money, or to learn more about any of the programs that the GCFSP has to offer, visit www.greenefoodpartnership.org, or call 724-627-2010.

Mickey’s Mens Store G

reene County is fortunate to be home to many businesses that have long been a part of their communities; one of the most respected is Mickey’s Men’s Store. Opened by Mickey Bruno in 1967, Mickey’s originally specialized in dress clothes. While this is still a small part of their repertoire, the area’s changing needs have allowed them to expand into impressive selections of fireretardant (FR) clothing, metatarsal/work boots, and Carhartt outerwear. Many Carhartt items are kept in stock, and Mickey’s will gladly special order to meet their customer’s needs. When Mickey passed away in 2004, he left the business to his children, John and Victoria. Victoria admits that there were challenges in maintaining the business, but all of that changed when the gas and oil industry entered the area several years ago. “We were probably the only store within a hundred miles that stocked FR clothing at the time,” she said, adding gratefully, “Our business probably doubled! If it wasn’t for them [industry workers], we probably wouldn’t be here.” Visit Mickey’s Men’s Store, where traditional service meets modern clothing!

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I

Barnhart’s

11,000 Square Feet of Solid Excitement! Barnhart’s Honda Polaris

t’s bright, bold and definitely BIG! Barnhart’s Honda Polaris Dealership, just off I-79 in Ruff Creek, PA, is over 11,000 square feet of sheer power and excitement inside with more fun for motorcycle, ATV & Side-by Side riders than ever before. Spring of 2014 brought a brand new addition to Barnhart’s with the introduction of their new Polaris line. Barnhart’s is now the area’s official Polaris dealer,

Barnhart’s Honda Polaris has a great line up of Polaris side-by-sides and atvs and the hottest Hondas on the road – and off. Come to Ruff Creek and see for yourself!

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where you can find the entire 2014 off-road line-up including Polaris Sportsman, Razers & Rangers. “Polaris has the leading side-by-sides on the market,” said Craig Greenwood, Service Manager and co-owner with Yvonne Barnhart. “Even before we became an official dealership for Polaris, we’ve been riding, racing and working on them,” he adds, “And it amazes me how the side-by-side market continues to grow in general, more and more people all the time enjoying the benefits of just recreational riding…and the ways to accessorize these things are unlimited. People are really into them.” Barnhart’s showroom has the latest models of the most exciting Polaris and Honda machines you can ride - whether you’re putting it to work on the job site or farm, challenging the competition or just having fun with the family, there a model made for you!. Of course, a great inventory of vehicles isn’t the only thing you’ll find at Barnhart’s. The parts and accessories center is very popular with customers. “It’s like walking into a super store with all the gear, apparel and fun stuff right at your fingertips,” says Parts Manager Kevin Kirby. And Barnhart’s service center is designed for ultimate customer convenience with separate entrance and unloading area. Craig is a Red Level Honda Technician, the highest level of training certification offered by Honda. His knowledge and experience play a significant role in maintaining the customer loyalty this company values so highly. Barnhart’s is of course now also an authorized Polaris parts & accessories source, and technicians are in the process of Polaris service training and certification. “We have built this business on repeat customers, and it feels good to continue the tradition of service that my father, Greg Barnhart, began nearly 40 years ago,” says General Manager Yvonne Barnhart, Craig’s wife, and the daughter of Vicky and Greg Barnhart, who founded the business in 1977. Though both Greg and Vicky are no longer living, this family business has continued to operate successfully in this highly competitive industry. “We’re still a ‘shop’ here at Barnhart’s,” Craig explains, “We’re not a ‘Super Store’ where the sale is their main focus. The sale is just the beginning of our relationship with our customers, our real focus is making sure you continue to have fun, be safe and ride for a long, long time. Our service after the sale makes that possible.” Another key ingredient in bringing in new customers to Barnhart’s is their best bottom line effort. According to Sales Manager Tim Kirby, the term “Straight Deals” is more than a promotional slogan. “When we price a machine, there are no hidden fees. We also use the term ‘out-the-door’ meaning that’s the total amount of money you’re going to spend to get that bike or ATV out the door… you can ride on that number. When you compare that number, we can compete with anyone.” See the latest line-up of Polaris off-road vehicles and Honda motorcyles and ATVS at Barnhart’s in Ruff Creek PA… where the tradition of excellence and service continues while you still get the best bottom line. That’s why everyone wants to Ride Barnharts!

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need to Manage your manure?

If you pasture any livestock or apply manure to your land, this is for you!

I

f you own any livestock that pasture at your place, or if you use any manure to fertilize your garden or fields, you need to read on. The Greene County Conservation District is hosting FREE Manure Management Plan Writing Workshops in Waynesburg: in the morning on Thursday, April 16, 9:30am-noon and also on Monday evening April 20, 6:30-9:00pm. Any farm in Pennsylvania that applies manure to the land - whether you fork it on there, spread it with a machine, or let your livestock drop it directly in the pasture - is required by the PA Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) to have a written manure management plan, regardless of size of the property or the operation. This is really nothing new; these requirements have been around for over 30 years, beginning with the passing of the Clean Water Act in 1972. Wherever livestock (cattle, horses, goats, swine, fowl etc.) graze on grass, in any size field, large or small, is considered “land applied manure”. Most of these pastures will also have “Animal Concentration Areas” (ACAs) which is where animals congregate and release lots of manure. The importance of a written manure management plan becomes even more evident when you see these areas.

The good news is, it’s nothing to fear, and it doesn’t cost anything. For the past few years, the Greene County Conservation District has sponsored these FREE workshops, to help local gardeners, farmers and livestock owners write a plan and come into compliance with these regulations. Most of the time, it is relatively simple and they will walk you through the process. Remember, this is not just for Dairy Farmers or beef cattle operations. You may have a horse or two that runs pasture at your place – this is for you. If your kids have a 4-H project with goats or sheep that are pastured and dropping manure on the land – this is for you. If you haul in horse manure from your neighbor’s place and spread it on your cornfield or vegetable garden – this is for you. Realistically, anytime you apply any manure to your ground, you need to have a management plan. “The DEP’s goal is not to go out policing people about this, what they really want to do is educate everyone about the impact of livestock on the land, and help people manage it properly,” said Karlie Wright, agricultural technician with Greene County Conservation District. While the workshop is free, REGISTRATION IS REQUESTED. For more information, call Karlie at 724-852-5278.

JA Careers in energy program

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ONSOL Energy employees are helping Junior Achievement (JA) introduce students at West Greene Middle School to the energy industry this spring. The JA Careers in Energy Program was developed locally with the objective to educate middle and early high school students in different types of energy resources, the economic and environmental impact of each, and careers in the industry. CONSOL Energy is a Pittsburgh based company that produces natural gas and coal. “One of the ways CONSOL Energy gives back to the community is through our commitment to education,” commented Tommy Johnson, vice president of government affairs and public relations. “We want to do our part to help students gain the skills they will need to explore career opportunities in the energy industry and to reach their goals as confident, successful members of the community.” Students and their classroom mentors from CONSOL started in the seven session program in February and they will continue throughout the remainder of March with three additional classroom mentors. “With energy prevalent in our area and particularly within our school district, we welcome the opportunity to continue our ongoing partnership with CONSOL to include the exploration of careers

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related to energy,” said Thelma Sazell, the Superintendent of Schools at West Greene School District. JA concentrates on teaching students lessons in work readiness, financial literacy and entrepreneurship. With the localized JA Careers in Energy program, students will receive a better insight into the energy industry from those who have already pursued careers in the field. “Through this partnership with CONSOL Energy, and a number of other local and national energy companies, our JA Careers in Energy program helps our young people understand the opportunities available for them in the energy industry as well as the supporting industries.” said Dennis Gilfoyle, President and CEO of JA, “ It’s also helping to ensure these industries have an educated and prepared workforce here locally to pull from and most importantly that it’s our kids filling these well paying jobs for generations to come. By providing financial and volunteer support to implement these programs, our industry partners are demonstrating their commitment to education and the future success of our young people and our region.” For more information about Junior Achievement and JA Careers In Energy please visit jawesternpa.org or Dani Stump, Manager of STEM Initiatives, at 412-208-4747. GreeneSaver •

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Boat Float The Legion Club of Fredericktown announces their Inaugural “Boat Float” canoe/kayak race on May 9th. The route will be from the launch on Beagle Club Road in Jefferson, and continue down the Lower Ten Mile Creek to the park in Fredericktown. Entry fees are $20 for those who pre-register on the selected dates (April 15th and April 29th from 5pm to 9pm), $25 to those who register on the day of the race. Pre-registration will be held upstairs at the Fredericktown Legion Hall; day-of registration will take place at the starting line. Participants must provide their own boats, paddles and life vests. All profits collected will go to Operation Comfort Warriors. For more information, call Tom Colbert at 724-366-7925, or visit www.legion.org/troops/operationcomfort.

Support Groups for Domestic Violence Victims

Easter Egg Hunt! Mon View Park in Greensboro will be the site of an Easter egg hunt, skate and other Easter-related activities – including a visit from the Easter Bunny – Saturday, March 28. Admission for the day’s events is $7 per child. Adult admission is free when accompanying a child. Sponsored by First Federal Savings & Loan of Greene County, Noble Energy, Waynesburg Animal Hospital and the Greene County Commissioners, and presented by the Greene County Department of Recreation, the event begins at 1 pm with an Easter basket decorating contest. Baskets should be decorated ahead of time and ready to be judged. During the contest, from 1 to 1:30 pm, Buffo, the World’s Strongest Clown, will perform. At 1:30 pm, Easter basket judging will begin, and prizes will be awarded for first, second and third-place winners in five different age categories. Also at 1:30 pm, the Easter egg hunt will begin in the park, and a special prize will be given to the child who finds a Department of Recreation coin hidden in one of the eggs. From 2 to 4 pm, the park’s roller rink will host an Easter-themed skate.

New York, New York!

Whether a partner is verbally abusive or physically abusive, it is still abuse. Do not live your life in fear. The violence will not just go away. Domestic Violence Services of Southwestern PA offers a confidential support group where you can talk with others about abuse. Support groups are held in Greensboro’s own Mary Shine posts that two rooms are still available for an upcoming group trip Greene, Fayette and Washington counties. For more information, call 724-852-2463 in Greene, 724to New York City, taking place May 1st—3rd. Lodging will be at the Times Square Hotel in Manhat439-9500 in Fayette, or 724-223-9190 in Washington. tan. Pickup will be in Greensboro, Carmichaels, Waynesburg and Morgantown, WV, starting at 6am in Greensboro. Price for a double room is $550/person, triple is $430/person, and quad is $375/person. This also covers transportation, taxes and baggage handling. FMI, contact shine201027@yahoo. com, or call 724-943-4462.

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Scholarships Announced T

he Community Foundation of Greene County (CFGC) has announced that they have several scholarship opportunities for Greene County graduating high school seniors this spring. Applications are due April 1 (unless otherwise noted). Eligibility criteria vary for each scholarship so students should contact their guidance counselor for specific guidelines and application forms. Application guidelines and forms are also available on the CFGC website at www.cfgcpa.org. The following scholarship applications must be submitted to the CFGC Office at PO Box 768, Waynesburg, PA 15370 by April 1 (unless otherwise noted). The Army Spec. Gregory A. Cox Memorial Scholarship – For a graduating Greene County senior student planning a career in public safety or other public service (excluding politics) with preference for a student participating in ROTC. One $1,000 scholarship is available. The Rocky Doman Memorial – For a graduating Greene County senior standout athlete who exemplifies the qualities of being a team player with a humble spirit. One $1,000 scholarship is available. The William and Shirley Hanley Memorial Scholarship – For graduating seniors at Carmichaels Area High School and Mapletown High School. An interview is required. Two $1,000 scholarships are available. The Dove Award – A need based scholarship for a graduating student from Jefferson Morgan high school with preference for female students. One $1,500 scholarship is available. The R.A. Matteucci Family Scholarship – A need based scholarship for graduating seniors of JeffersonMorgan High School. Two $1,000 scholarships are

available. The Darlene Phillips Elementary Education Scholarship – For graduating seniors of Mapletown High School, with preference for students planning to major in elementary education, but will consider other college majors. One $1,000 scholarship is available. The Thelma S. Hoge Memorial Scholarship – For worthy students of West Greene School District who are pursuing a college education. Applications are submitted to the high school guidance office by April 15. Two $2,500 scholarships are available. The Walter Samek III Memorial Scholarship – For graduating seniors of Carmichaels High School to continue post-secondary education. Applications are submitted to the high school guidance office by April 15. One $500 scholarship is available. The William H. Davis, Jr. Scholarship – For Greene County residents who are graduating seniors, or have graduated from a Greene County high school who are planning to attend or are attending Westmoreland County Community College. Applications are due in the CFGC office by June 1. Four $500 scholarships are available. The Stealth Scholarship - For non-traditional students at least 22 years of age or older, who are living or working in Greene County who plan to pursue a post-secondary course of education (two-year or fouryear degree) at an accredited college, university, community college, or trade/technical school. Maximum scholarship is $2,500. There is no specific deadline for the Stealth Scholarship applications. For more information about the Community Foundation contact Bettie Stammerjohn by phone at 724-627-2010, email cfgc@gmail.com, or visit www. cfgcpa.org.

Greene County Realty A

nyone who has ever had to buy or sell a house knows that it’s no easy game. With a thousand details to keep straight, rules and regulations to maintain, and a mountain of paperwork that all has to be to-the-letter perfect, it takes a unique set of specialized skills to keep buying or selling a dream home from turning into a disastrous deal. Gwen Nicholson and Associate Broker, Cheryl Semonick of Greene County Realty have over two decades combined experience working specifically within this area, which gives them a commanding set of insights on the inner workings of local real estate. Born and raised in Carmichaels, Gwen’s history in the area also gives her a deep understanding of the demands of the regional market. “We are a full service real estate company,” Gwen notes. In addition to fulfilling the roles of a typical Realtor, she adds, “We offer rental management, and I am also a Pennsylvania State Certified Residential Appraiser, one of only two in the county, which sets us apart from other agents and agencies. My appraisal work is for residential properties, farm, vacant land, and small rental properties, up to four units,” she explains, adding, “I typically work for individuals, lenders and attorneys for various reasons to help determine the fair market value of real estate as of a given time.” Those who want to rent a property can take advantage of Greene County Realty’s rental man-

agement services. While many of these clients live out of the area, and are unable to be effective landlords because of this, the service could also be perfect, Gwen says, for those who “just don’t have the time to be hands-on, or they’re not available to show the property, or to handle the problems with tenants as they come up. We’re basically a ‘go-between’ between the client and the tenants.” Gwen and Cheryl may be best known to area residents from their longstanding work with the J.K. Willison agency. “We had both been agents there,” says Gwen, “and then I took over as Broker of Record when Mr. Willison stepped down.” In November of 2013, Gwen and Cheryl drew on their years of experience, stepping out boldly to create their own agency. Thus Greene County Realty was born, and proudly celebrates its first year in business. “We try and do things a little bit differently,” Gwen shares. “We help people find financing through different sources, such as working with a couple of different banks, and we have a mortgage broker we work with often. We go above and beyond—folks who have a hard time financing, we try and find a program that would fit their needs, and be able to put them into a house.” Gwen points out that, because available housing inventory is currently low, it could be an excellent time for anyone considering selling a house to move forward. “When a home does become available, if it’s priced right and the condition is good, it does tend to sell quickly,” she says. As for what the future holds as the organization moves through its second year, Gwen shares her vision: “We’re holding steady, and hoping to keep branching out through Greene County. We’re starting to get into a little bit of the surrounding areas, also, such as southern Washington and western Fayette Counties.” Offering personal attention and expert care, Greene County Realty provides clients with “big town” services and features, while offering small town friendliness and service.

GreeneScene by Robin Teagarden

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Jeff Grimes Q&A Up Close And Personal: Q&A With Jeff Grimes What do you like most about living in Greene County? The people. Greene County was a great place to grow up. The people are genuine and hard-working. The friends I made growing up here are unlike any other. They are people you can count on in a time of need and the kind of people you can catch up with easily after years apart. After being away at college, and then law school for seven years, I learned that not every place is like Greene County, and I looked forward to returning home. In your spare time, if any, what activities do you enjoy? My family and I enjoy all sorts of activities. We live out in the country and spend a lot of time outside enjoying nature. I have two young boys, so between swimming, playing in the dirt, or riding quads, it’s never dull. I also really enjoy following the local high school sports teams. I participated in football, wrestling, baseball and track all through school so I always enjoy keeping up with what all the local teams are up to. We are also active in our church, Valley Chapel United Methodist Church in Holbrook. It’s the church I grew up in and now I get the benefit of seeing my sons grow up in the same church. Why do you want to become Greene County’s next judge?   I want to become Greene County’s next judge because I believe in this county. Growing up I witnessed my father in the job. I watched how seriously he took it and how much respect he gave the job. Later, working for the Courts, and for the last several years practicing law in the Courts, have both given me a deep appreciation for the role of judges in our county and society. It has also impressed upon me how important it is to have judges who are fair, competent and not under any outside influences.

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McCracken Pharmacy

cCracken Pharmacy is nothing short of an iconic business in Waynesburg and Greene County, PA. Established in 1961 by Jack McCracken, this local drug store has progressed in all the right ways over the years, changing where change was needed while keeping personal service a tradition without change; very much in keeping with the slogan, “Yesterday’s Service, Today’s Technology.” Now under the ownership of long-time pharmacist, Scott Adamson, who began his relationship with McCracken when he served an internship in 1992, the pharmacy changed hands when Jeff McCracken retired in the fall of 2013. However, Jeff is still a familiar face at the pharmacy, and according to Scott, “He remains my mentor and consultant.” Scott believes, the success and longevity of McCracken Pharmacy is a result of the quality of people who work there. “We’ve been fortunate to be able to maintain a relatively large staff, and to keep a high caliber of people who are consistent, compassionate and just valuable to our customers, I’m proud to work with the people here,” Scott emphasizes. Today that staff includes 22 people working to serve the needs of McCracken’s customers. From part-timer and college student Janna Fox to Mary Sue Crayne, whose history with McCracken dates back to the early 1980s, it is a crew deserving of Scott’s pride. McCracken Pharmacy has always been a popular destination for locals looking for meaningful internships, too. Like Mt. Morris native Drew Eddy, a 2008 graduate of Waynesburg Central, who earned a BS in biology and is now in Pharmacy School at WVU. “I am very happy to work with people who are both skilled and caring,” says Drew.

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McCracken operates efficiently because they do not skimp on personnel. There are four pharmacists on staff: Scott of course, along with Tammy Bryan, Andrew Behm and Mary Sue Crayne; In addition to the technicians and support staff - too many names to mention here - but plenty of familiar faces when you walk through the door of McCracken Pharmacy. All working together to provide that “Yesterday’s Service” you don’t find everywhere. As for “Today’s technology,” McCracken Pharmacy has always been a leader in the latest tools and expertise to deliver accuracy and efficiency in filling prescriptions and serving all needs of customers. That never changes. “We actually have a new computer system coming online this month which will enable easier access and interface with medication therapy programs,” Scott notes. Just as McCracken was among the very first pharmacies to even use computer technology back in the 1960s, and later the most innovative dispensing systems, our local pharmacy today is helping to pioneer new methods of packaging designed to facilitate and improve accuracy in daily dosing of medications. “We are now offering an innovative blister packaging system that clearly labels and separates medicines for daily doses and helps patients and caregivers stay informed and in control,” Scott says. Particularly useful for those who take multiple doses and meds, this new system is easy to follow and being quite well received by many customers, according to Scott. Just one more example of how our iconic “corner drug store” with all the charm of Yesterday’s Service is still a leader in Today’s Technology.

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Interim Healthcare I

Waynesburg Milling Company

nterim HealthCare®, founded in 1966, is the leading home care, hospice and medical staffing company. Interim’s more than 300 independently owned and operated franchise locations provide a variety of home health, senior care, hospice, palliative care, pediatric care and healthcare staffing services. Franchisees employ nurses, therapists, aides, companions and other healthcare professionals who provide 25 million hours of home care service to 190,000 people each year.

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he past year has carried some life-changing events for one of the area’s most loved businesses, Waynesburg Milling Company. When Jeanette Blair Lindsay and Don Lindsay purchased the operation in 1992, they became the third generation of Blair family owners. Combined with the efforts of Janice Blair-Martin and Mary Jane Blair, they carried on a family legacy that began in 1928. When Don Lindsay passed away in June of last year, it would be tempting to make a comment such as, “It marked the end of an era.” His absence is clearly felt among the staff and customers. Janice notes, “We’ve continued to run the business as usual—as usual as could be expected—with Bryan Haines stepping into Don’s position; we know that Don would be happy and his presence will always be guiding us.” The company can proudly claim one of the longest histories of any business in the area, having first received public mention in a newspaper article from July of 1886, highlighting the “New Process” milling technique used there that was capable of turning 600 bushels of wheat per day into flour. When the mill was sold in 1898, new machinery was installed which increased the capacity to 4500 bushels of wheat per day. In the 1940s, the mill’s flour production ended to concentrate on producing its own trademark brand of Wayco Feeds. The brand is still going strong to this day, though production is done off-site, as the original Waynesburg Milling facility was lost to a fire in 2001. Still at the same location, Waynesburg Milling Company legacy continues today with more in the store than ever before. It remains the area’s only source of bulk garden seeds and along with all the fertilizers, tools, fencing and spring supplies you would expect to find, Waynesburg Milling also stocks popular Muck Brand Boots & Shoes, including those with metatarsal protection. It is the area’s true “country store” with an impressive selection of pet supplies and feeds (including Purina), bird feeders and garden décor, everything equestrian including tack and vet supplies. First time visitors are surprised to see the assortment of country-themed gifts and home décor items in stock, truly unique toys, jewelry and apparel. A favorite shopping destination for locals and out-of-towners, Waynesburg Milling Company on South Washington Street in Waynesburg is preserving the traditions of the past, while moving boldly into the future—with plenty of help. As Jeanette says, “Our staff has really come through for us during a difficult time this past year.  They know how pull together – and they know how to continue providing good service…that’s what our customers count on.”

MARCH/ APRIL 2015

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GreeneScene by Mike Belding

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Mar Apr Greenesaver 2015  

The March - April issue continues the Growing In Greene stories about our local businesses and the success of buying local. As always we hav...

Mar Apr Greenesaver 2015  

The March - April issue continues the Growing In Greene stories about our local businesses and the success of buying local. As always we hav...

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