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JACKTOWN PARADE

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he legendary Jacktown Fair will be held July 19-23, celebrating 151 years. Fair activities actually begin with a worship service at 10am on Sunday, July 17 and the Queen Competition at 7pm that evening at the fairgrounds in Wind Ridge. This historic fair is still presented each year by the Richhill Agricultural Society, originally named The Richhill Agricultural, Mechanical, and Manufacturing Association in its charter formed July 6, 1866. The first Jacksonville Fair (as it was initially named) occurred on October 3 & 4 of that same year. The 151st Annual Jacktown Fair really kicks off with the parade on Tuesday, July 19, at 6:30pm, through Wind Ridge, Pennsylvania. You can be a part of the nation’s oldest continuous fair by being in the Jacktown Fair Parade! The parade will feature the reigning 2015 Jacktown Fair Queen Marissa Rode, daughter of Jeff

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and Shelia of Jollytown, and Jveronica Lasko, 9 year old daughter of Michael Lasko and Tracey Stewart of Sycamore, the 2015 Jacktown Fair Princess. Additionally the contestants vying for this year’s Fair Queen and Princess titles will be in attendance. Several state and local dignitaries are also expected to participate. The parade will have two float contests. The Mini Float Contest with prizes of $40, $30, $20, and $10. This is a float constructed on a child’s wagon, a wheel barrow, garden or small cart. It can be hand pulled or pulled by a lawn size tractor. This fun competition premiered last year in addition to the normal Float Contest for which winning entries will receive $100, $75, $50, and $25. Both float contests will utilize this year’s fair theme “We Have Good Things Growing.” Float entries are judged on attractiveness, design, workmanship, use of the theme, originality and other elements. Any individual or group wishing to enter a float or entry corresponding to this year’s theme is encouraged to do so. The Jacktown Fair Board invites all interested bands, businesses, churches, fire companies, groups, organizations and individuals to participate in the parade. If you have an interesting, entertaining, showy or unusual item; your entry will be welcomed. Classic cars, clowns, fire equipment, horses, regional/local queens and princesses are also invited. To enter, contact Parade Chair Marcia Sonneborn as soon as possible, so the parade’s line can be constructed. Your date of entry will be taken in to consideration when forming the parade line. Call 724-428-4344 or email marciasonne@windstream.net.

BOWLBY BITS Summer Hours through Labor Day are Mon-Thur 10am-7pm; Fri & Sat 9:30am-3:30pm. Closed on July 4. Robotics Program - Learn how to use & program a Finch Robot. Two sessions (3-5pm or 5-7pm) on the following Mondays: July 11, 18 & 25; August 1, 8 & 15. Pre-registration REQUIRED. On Your Mark, Get Set...Read! - Summer Reading Programs for all ages July 5 – Aug 12. Subjects include: Larger than Life, Fueling Your Engine, Motion Commotion, Sports Fanatic, Mind Benders, & Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff. Also weekly Fit for Life sessions with demos in Hapkido, Dance, Club Cardio, Yoga and many other activities ages during the six weeks of summer programming. Library Night at the Washington Wild Things for Summer Reading Club participants is August 10. Deadline to order tickets is July 29. Lions and Tigers and Bears...Oh My! Annual trip to the Pittsburgh Zoo & Aquarium, Sat., Aug. 13; $14 per person includes bus transportation (children under 2 free). Departing from the library at 8:30am, return at 4:30pm. Bowlby Book Club – Mon., July 11, 6pm, discussion: A Breath Away: Life’s Final Chapter by local author J. Judson Lacko Teen Advisory Group (TAG) After-After Hours Fri., July 15, 8-10pm, for teens 13-18. Suggested $2 donation at the door; please preregister. FREE Computer Classes for beginners of all ages include instruction on using smart phones and tablets (July 14), PCs (July 21) and learning MS Word (July 28). All classes are 5:30-6:30pm Brainfuse free online tutoring with lessons and activities in science, math, and writing to help students avoid the “summer slide”. Look for Summer Skills Camp in the Study column of the HelpNow homepage on the library’s databases & resources webpage at www.evakbowlby.org. “Color Outside the Lines” Adult coloring every Wed., 11am-1pm or 5-7pm. For more info or to register for any of the above, visit or call the Bowlby Library at 724.627.9776.

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FARMER’S MARKETS PROVIDE FRESH OPPORTUNITIES market this year. Seed2Sprout teaches children how to grow their own garden from seeds. These special activities and forums have been made possible by financial support from EQT. Stop by, learn something, purchase some fresh items and treat yourself to a lunch, also provided by several vendors.

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aynesburg Farmer’s Market and Forum Presented by Waynesburg Prosperous & Beautiful Wednesdays from 10 am to 2 pm The Waynesburg Farmers’ Market provides an opportunity for area residents to purchase fresh, locally grown fruits, vegetables, flowers, and herbs directly from the farmers and gardeners who grow them. The market also features baked goods, locally produced meats, and eggs. Special to this market are 15-minute instructional forums offered multiple times during each market. From recycling to canning to healthy eating and composting, these instructional sessions provide a wide-range of topics. Various children’s activities, such as the Seed2Sprout Program are also part of the

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Greensboro Farmer’s Market Saturdays from 9 am to noon. Stop by the Greensboro Farmers’ Market on Saturday mornings from mid-May to midOctober for fresh produce and baked goods. The market is located near the Greensboro-Mon Township Fire Department in the former Holy Faith Church parking lot (Stoney Hill Road, Greensboro). FMI, contact 724-3242279.

anchor vendor for this year will be Joe’s Farm Market of Richeyville, offering fresh fruits and vegetables each month. FMI, contact 724-3771777. For the markets offered in Greene County, farmers market vouchers are available to Greene County residents 60 years of age or older. Income guidelines: one-person household, $21,978; two-person household, $29,637; three-person household, $37,296. Vouchers will be distributed at Greene County food pantries during the month of July. Vouchers will be available at other times by appointment only. Please call Tina at 724-627-63676 or Bridget at 724-966-2290 to schedule an appointment. The “Buy Local, Buy Greene” initiative continues to encourage spending in Greene County businesses and to educate consumers on the power of buying locally. Farmers markets are a great example of the many benefits buying locally provides (see interesting facts at right). You can learn more about the initiative and how you as a consumer can join with a pledge to shop locally by visiting www.waynesburgpaorg/buylocal, or contacting Lindsey Biddle at 724-627-9054.

Fredericktown Farmer’s Market This farmer’s market kicked off on June 27 and will be held subsequently on July 25, Aug. 29, and Sept. 26 from 4 pm to 1. Civic Economics. The Andersonville study of retail economics, Oct. 2004) 7 pm at the community square 2. Pennsylvania Downtown Center • www.padowntown.org on Front Street in Frederick3. Buy Fresh Buy Local, Food Routes, www.foodroutes.org town. Vendors are welcome. 4. Civic Economics study on Grand Rapids, Michigan – Sept. 2008 5. AIBA Economic Impact case study – Dec. 2002 If you make it, bake it, grow 6. http://www.ncsu.edu/project/nc10percent/index.php it, or sew it, bring it to Freder7. www.sba.gov icktown’s Farmer’s Market. The

Interesting Facts About the Impact of Shopping Locally $100 spent at a local business = $68 in revenue for the local community, chain stores only produce $43 for the local economy.1 Non profits receive on average 350% more support from local businesses then non-locally owned businesses.2 The average food travels 1,300 miles from farm to table and can spend seven to fourteen days in transit before arriving at a supermarket. By supporting local farmers, you are guaranteeing yourself fresh food while positively impacting your community.3 A 10% shift in market share from chains to locals could result in: Nearly $140 million in new economic activity, over 1600 new jobs, and providing over $50 million in new wages.4 Local merchants spend a much larger portion of total revenue on local labor to run the enterprise and sell the merchandise.5 Shopping locally helps to maintain downtown’s character and create a vibrant community. Contrary to popular belief, many small retailers are actually LOWER priced than their big box competitors. North Carolina had launched a 10% campaign where residents and businesses pledged to spend 10% of their weekly food budget at local sources. The result was an impact of nearly $14 million dollars reported. Small Businesses provide nearly 70% of all net new jobs in the country. Just by pledging to spend a small portion of money (even $5 or $10) at a local small business, you can have a huge impact in your community.7

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Pool and Day Camp Season Underway being transported to Wana B Park for the entire camp day. Programming for all day camps is provided through a donation from the Greene County Memorial Hospital Foundation with a focus on the STEM fields - science, technology, engineering and mathematics and healthy food and lifestyle. “The Greene County Memorial Hospital Foundation is pleased to be able to collaborate with the The new interactive kiddie pool for children ages 8 and under is a big hit at Parks and Recreation DepartWana B Park. ment in order to provide such an outstanding program,” said Sheila he 2016 summer swimming season start- Stewart, Greene County Memorial Hospital Founed with a bang as record numbers have dation president. flocked to Wana B Park to enjoy its new STEM programming started on the first day kiddie pool area. More than 100 patrons of camp. Campers experience interactive, simple visited the Wana B Park Pool on Father’s Day alone, discussion that explains the theme of each lesson according to staff. and improves campers strategizing and problemThe warm weather has also driven guests to solving skills. The children achieve this by conductthe other county pools, located at Mon View Park ing various experiments that help them experience and in Waynesburg at the Aquatic Center across science in a fun way. from the fairgrounds. Also returning, the Monon Center will proWith the summer swimming season also vide hands-on art experiences. Penn State Coopcomes the annual Greene County Day Camp for erative Extension will provide a nutrition program children ages 5 to 15 years old. The free six-week focusing on healthy food and lifestyle and include camp kicked off on June 20 and will conclude July discussions on the importance of fruits, vegetables 29. There is a nominal fee of $2 per camp day for and water in our daily lives, and fighting food borne campers who wish to swim. bacteria. Campers will grow vegetable plants and Camp is held from 10 am to 3 pm Monday sample different fruits and vegetables during the through Friday. In addition to camp sites at Wana program. B Park, Mon View Park, and the Lions Club Park Age appropriate field trips for campers who in Waynesburg, it is also offered at Ryerson Station meet attendance and behavior requirements will be State Park in Wind Ridge. held the final week of camp. Although pre-registration was held for the Campers will have a variety of other activicamp, campers can register at any time during the ties scheduled for them, including arts and crafts, six-week program. games and additional educational programs. Pick-up and drop-off locations for the camps Daily lunch for campers will be provided are available at Bobtown Elementary School, Jef- through a partnership with the Greater Pittsburgh ferson Twp. Park in Jefferson, Nemacolin Fire Hall Community Food Bank and the Community Founand the Morris Township Community Center in dation of Greene County. The Carmichaels Area, Nineveh. Central Greene and West Greene School Districts The Bobtown campers will be bussed to Mon will prepare the meals daily as part of the Greene View Park, Jefferson and Nemacolin campers will County Summer Food Program, an initiative fundbe bussed to Wana B Park and Nineveh Campers ed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and adwill be bussed to Ryerson.  ministered by the state Department of Education.  Previously, Jefferson held their programs at Day Camp will not be held July 4, due to the the park site, however this year Jefferson will serve Independence Day holiday. For more information, as a pick-up/drop-off location with those campers call the Department of Recreation at 724-852-5323.

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I

No Rest

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for a

ven before the school year let out, Hayden Demniak, 15, of Carmichaels, like so many 4H’ers, was already starting to show his lambs. Within two weeks of that final day of classes in what was his freshman year, Hayden had his first big win of 2016, the grand champion at the Mountain State Preview Show in Petersburg, W.Va. “We won grand champion lightweight, grand champion heavy weight and the grand champion overall,” Hayden said. “We’ve been really busy so far this summer. We’ve shown in Fayette County, Bedford, Guernsey in Ohio, and we are going back to Bedford again next week I believe. I’ve been busy as can be.” The Mountain State Show is one of his favorites. “The people are so kind in West Virginia. It is unreal. I’ve won the past two years now and they say, ‘Hey, come back next year and come to these other shows down here.’ I always give money back to keep the show going.” Hayden received $500 for the grand champion win there. “We do that with a lot of shows to pay it forward. Without these shows a lot of kids wouldn’t have an opportunity like this,” Hayden said. “It’s not just for me (that he donates part of his winnings back). It is for every 4H’er that does it. It’s certainly a fun hobby.”

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Champion By Tara Kinsell

Although this isn’t a full-time occupation for the young man who has been doing this since grade school, showing lambs is very much a business. These early competitions help Hayden make decisions about which lambs he will continue to show and where.

D.A.R.E.

n an effort to help combat the very serious and growing substance abuse problem in Greene County, the Greene County Sheriff ’s Office has entered into an agreement with the five county school districts; West Greene, Central Greene, Jefferson Morgan, Carmichaels Area and Southeastern Greene to offer the D.A.R.E. Program (Drug Abuse Resistance and Education) at each school. “Our drug problem is out of control and there is no singular way to solve it. The approach instead needs to be multifaceted, and one of the major components needs to be prevention,” said Greene County Sherriff Brian Tennant. “My hope and belief is that this D.A.R.E. program will help to address that aspect of it.” Tennant said he found the school boards and superintendents of the five schools were more than receptive to the idea of implementing D.A.R.E. at their schools and were very helpful with getting it started. D.A.R.E., according to its website, is about more than just teaching children to resist drugs. D.A.R.E. envisions a world in which students everywhere are empowered to respect others, to choose to lead lives free from violence, in addition to avoiding substance abuse, and other dangerous behaviors. D.A.R.E. teaches kids from kindergarten on how to make better decisions. “We are all excited to get this program up

“I don’t breed. We have been getting our lambs for the last couple of years from Terry Knudson of Viking Club Lambs,” Hayden said. “He has been very good to us.” He’s come a long way from the little boy who started showing lambs to where he is today, viewing what he does as more of a business and less of a hobby. “I’ve learned a lot about marketing, sales and public speaking. I do a lot of speaking. I spoke on the radio for 4H and I tell you what; it really does help,” he said. That is all in addition to his knowledge of how to choose a lamb wisely. “They have certain characteristics you look for when they are really little babies. Most of the time they will carry them through.”

and running and think it will be of great benefit in helping Greene County address our growing opioid addiction problem,” Tennant said. The Greene County D.A.R.E. program will be taught to students beginning in late elementary school, fourth or fifth grade, by a certified D.A.R.E. officer from the Sheriffs Office, according to Tennant. Officers assigned to teach the D.A.R.E. program must undergo 80-hours of training. The program is offered in all 50 states and 49 other countries via science-based, age appropriate curricula, written by a national panel of curriculum and prevention experts. Tennant said the hope is to have a deputy trained, the program set up and scheduled at each of the school by the start of the 2016-17 school year. The minimum cost of the program is $1.29/ student with the costs being waived by D.A.R.E. for the first year. Based on average class populations, this will be a cost of less than $500 annually, this total includes students in all schools. “The cost of this program is very low, but we still hope to reach out to some of our local businesses to help support the program.” Sheriff Brian Tennant said. If you would wish to help support the efforts of the D.A.R.E. program, please contact the Sheriffs Office at 724-627-7207.

Those that come from well-known blood lines can be “unbelievably expensive,” he said. “It is insane. You kind of have to pick animals that aren’t so expensive and it’s really hard to compete with people who are paying $10,000 to $20,000 for a lamb.” Winning doesn’t just depend on the animal. He said it takes a lot of hard work and care to get a title, especially when you are competing against people with deep pockets. “You are starting out with something good and you have to make it something great. I’ve been lucky,” he said, crediting supportive parents, fans, and breeder, Knudson for his successes. “Win or lose, at the end of the day I am always happy with what I do,” he added. GreeneScene Magazine •

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WAY TO GO WG GIRLS! T

By Tara Kinsell

here was an electricity in the air each time the West Greene Pioneer Softball Team took the field for the 2016 season. The players, coaches and fans believed that this team could go all the way to the state championship game, and it did. By the time it reached there, other Greene County teams had long since left the race for the title. Their fans then became Pioneer fans for the run of the PIAA bracket and right on up to the final game where the Pioneers squared off for the Class A title against Williams Valley. Before a sea of yellow shirts at Penn State University’s Beard Field, “our” Pioneers proved equals to the team from Schuylkill

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County right up to the last at-bat. As a spectator, these teams were as evenly matched as it comes with only slight exception. The Pioneers are a very young team with only one senior member; short stop/pitcher Bailey Bennington. It was the first state championship game appearance for West Greene softball. The closest a Pioneer team came, prior to this, was in the 1993 season. That team made it to within one game of the championship. Inversely, this was the second run at the PIAA Class A Championship Game for the Vikings. It would end with a second state title for the team in four years time. The previous state title came in 2013. Five members of the starting lineup that faced West Greene consisted of seniors who were on that 2013 state championship team. Youth and playoff experience aside, both teams proved to be big hitters throughout the regular season and all the way to that championship matchup. Despite this fact, the ace pitchers who took the mound for the

Pioneers and Vikings on June 16 didn’t give up those big hits, making it a pitching duel to the end. It was sophomore pitcher, Madison Renner, for the Pioneers against senior pitcher, Tianna Yanoscak of the Vikings with very closely matched statistics throughout. In the end it came down to just one run to end the season with the West Greene Pioneers as the state runner-up in Class A. Make no mistake, reaching a state title game is not a feat to be taken lightly. Only one Greene County softball team has earned a state title, the 1998 Carmichaels Mikes. “I really wanted to see them do it,” said Dr. Megan Bandish Shirley, a key player on that Mikes state championship team. Megan sent a message to West Greene Coach Billy Simms to share with his team prior to the June 16 game, “Take it all girls! It is overdue for another Greene County girls’ team to bring it home,” Megan told them. At some point, even the best major league team loses a game. And, when it comes down to high school championships there isn’t a series for a state title. You get one shot against an opponent, one and done, at least for that year. If one is a betting person, odds are good that the Pioneers will get another shot at that state championship. These ladies will only get better with time and we have it on good authority a group of fine ballplayers are entering their freshman year at West Greene this fall. We will be cheering them on.

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Meet The Bailey Bennington - Senior

Pitcher / Short Stop Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Roy Bennington

Brianna Goodwin - Freshman

First Base Parents: Mr. & Mrs. David Goodwin

Brittany Bonnema - Freshman Outfield Parent: Mr. Jason Bonnema

Infield Parents: Mr. & Mrs. David Goodwin

Jessica Orndoff - Freshman

Kaitlyn Rizor - Freshman

Outfield Parent: Ms. Tina Orndoff

Second Base / Pitcher Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Jeff Rizor

Lexie Mooney - Sophomore

First Base Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Heath Mooney

Linzee Stover - Sophomore

Mackenzie Thomas - Freshman

Marissa Rode - Junior

McKenna Lampe - Freshman

Morgan Stover - Senior

Outfield Parent: Mr. & Mrs. Heath Thomas

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Emily Goodwin - Junior

Second Base / Outfield Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Jeffrey Rode

Center Field / Pitcher Parents: Mr. & Mrs. John Lampe

Left Field Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Jeff Stover

Manager Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Jeff Stover

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Team! Gina Mankey - Sophomore

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Third Base Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Tim Mankey

Haleigh Thomas - Freshman

Outfield Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Heath Thomas

Hunter Fredericks - Freshman

Mackenzie Carpenter - Freshman

Manager Parent: Ms. Tabetha Fredericks

Right Field Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Jason Carpenter

Madison Lampe - Freshman

Third Base / Catcher Parents: Mr. & Mrs. John Lampe

Madison Renner - Sophomore

Sage Vliet - Junior

Shelby Morris - Junior

Savannah Pettit - Freshman

Third Base / Pitcher Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Travis Vliet

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Catcher Parent: Ms. Jodi Lahew

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Pticher / Short Stop Parents: Mr. & Mrs. John Renner

Outfield / Catcher Parent: Mrs. Nicole Jones

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P I O N E E R S

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PIONEERS Hunter Fredericks, Manager Sommer Howard, Manager Morgan Stover, Manager #2 Kaitlyn Rizor #4 Madison Lampe #5 Emily Goodwin #7 Linzee Stover #8 Lexie Mooney #9 Mackenzie Carpenter #11 Marissa Rode #12 Gina Mankey Head Coach: Bill Simms Asst. Coach: Nicole Redlinger

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Asst. Coach: Asst. Coach

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PIONEERS #13 Brittany Bonnema #14 Shelby Morris #16 Mckenna Lampe #18 Sage Vliet #20 Makenzie Thomas #21 Savannah Pettit #22 Jessica Orndoff #23 Brianna Goodwin #24 Bailey Bennington #28 Haleigh Thomas #48 Madison Renner

Jeremiah Allison h: Eric Bedilion

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Asst. Coach: Jeff Stover Trainer: Juan Lopez

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Lady Pioneers

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in Action!

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Co o l at Sc h o o l

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JUST ONE OF THE BOYS

n many of the speeches that were presented at graduation ceremonies across the county and state earlier this month, recognition was fittingly given to academic and athletic successes. There is, however, a population of students that the speeches don’t quite seem to recognize. And so, for our Cool at School, we wanted to shine a light on special needs graduates. It was while attending my own son’s graduation ceremony that a young man by the name of Brodie Speelman came to my attention. For the purposes of this column, Brodie is symbolic of all students who have to work especially hard to find their way to that graduation stage. Brodie’s mother, Dawn, and teacher, Melissa Christopher, shared some insights about Brodie and the class of 2016 at Carmichaels Area High School. “It never seemed like Brodie was not like any other student. He was truly part of them. He was an equal to them,” Melissa said. “There was no pity, no feeling bad for him. They just accepted and let him be who he was. They would see him in the hall and high five and fist bump him. He was just one of the boys.” Dawn said that was a great relief to her.

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by Tara Kinsell

She had some trepidation when her son was about to enter the seventh grade. “You know how mean kids can be with special needs kids. It was never like that for Brodie. I’ve never seen a kid so popular,” she said. Even so, she was not prepared for the reception her son received as he walked across the graduation stage on June 3 in the Carmichaels High School gymnasium. “I was in complete shock. I saw them all stand up for him and there was not a dry eye in the place. It was amazing. He was never allowed to play sports and he is not going to go to college,” she said. “This was his moment.” Christopher said it was not easy for Brodie to adapt in the beginning of his high school education. Crowds and excessive noise can be overwhelming for him as Brodie has a form of Autism. A tumor causes him to experience random seizures, Dawn added. So, they weren’t sure how Brodie would do with so many people and the stimulus of a graduation ceremony. It turned out he was just fine. He had all of his friends in the Class of 2016 to ensure it. “There was a time when other students didn’t know these kids names or who they were. They were ‘the kids downstairs.’” Chris-

topher said. “They have so much love to give and want to be included like everybody else. They do such a great job here at Carmichaels in integrating them.” She said it restored her faith in humanity, “when it is kind of wavering at times,” how Brodie’s fellow graduates treated him. The stories she proffered as examples helped to restore my own as well. “This kind of caring and understanding and always looking out for him was really exceptional. These kids protect him and take care of him,” Christopher added. “They gave him something but he also gave them something. They learned to accept somebody that’s different. That is a gift that they will take through life with them.” At birth, Dawn was told Brodie would not see his first birthday. Then, she heard he would not walk, or talk or learn. Each time Brodie proved the doctors wrong. “Brodie defied all odds when he walked across that stage for graduation,” Dawn said. “He was in good hands. We were blessed.” On so many levels this seemed especially appropriate for our Cool at School. Congratulations to all of the Brodies in Greene County and elsewhere upon their graduations.

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PICTURE PUZZLE WINNER of 4 WildThings baseball tickets Dominique Fitch of Waynesburg, PA

Last months picture puzzle answer is: CICADA

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I

I Love this P l ace

have never lived in Greensboro. To my knowledge I don’t have any family ties to the town. But, I can honestly say that I feel a certain kinship to our neighbors up the road (from where we live in Carmichaels). Sepia-toned photos from the past are exactly how I envision that Greensboro, sort of a wild west of the east. Imagine if you will, large paddle boats, five dry good stores, a drugstore, two confectionaries, three churches, two schools, a jeweler and gunsmith, two luxury hotels with fireplaces in each room and a grand piano in the lobby of one, a foundry, a livery, four doctors, a tailor, a blacksmith and a furniture store. One can’t forget the pottery trade for which the town is famous around the world. Everything one could need was located right inside the parameters of late 1870s Greensboro. Michael Gresh has lived in Greensboro for most of his life, sans time spent in the military and a stint playing baseball professionally on a farm team of the Atlanta Braves. So, I turned to the ever grinning Mike for the answer as to what it is that sets Greensboro apart. In a word, it is the “river,” or at least that is my summation. For those acquainted with Greensboro of 2016 you know there is a log cabin that is featured prominently in the town. Borough council meetings are held there. It hosts a little lending library attached on the outside. A very large crock comes up from the earth to symbolize the pottery trade that made the town and a flower garden pays homage to the late Betty Longo who ran a sort of five and dime store/confectionary in town for many years. Betty was also a historian who documented the history of Greensboro. As Mike put it, “You could pay your electric bill and a get a milkshake there.” But, getting back to that log cabin, this is where Mike helped me to make the connection of why I romanticize Greensboro of old. Inside that cabin is a plaque dedicated to Mike’s grandparents, John and Anna Gresh. Beneath it is another one, placed their by Mike, to commemorate his father, Andy, who was born in the cabin. You see, it didn’t always sit where it is today. At one time, that cabin was located right along the river bank (at the edge of the parking lot of the old fire hall on Front Street). Mike grew up in it. “My dad’s dad (John) bought it in the early 1900s,” Mike said. “Annie and Kenny Bargerstock

owned it when the flood hit (in 1985).” Annie said it was her daughter, Stacey’s third birthday the day of the flood. There were 15 feet of water in the cabin from the basement up. The 1985 flood is a story for another day. The Army Corps of Engineers purchased the cabin and gave it to the borough. It was one of many homes taken over by them. Mike has his own dreamy vision of his hometown. It focuses on that family cabin, the river and Mon View Park. “You could fish off our front porch. When the water was high they would come up in that fast water. You’d only have to cast out about 20 feet,” Mike said, laughing at his next story. “I remember the one time I wasn’t paying attention. A fish grabbed ahold of my pole and it was gone in the blink of an eye.” The fishing was good and the living was easy back then, according to Mike. There were trees along the bank, gone now, that made it nice and shady. “We had all the shade in the world once you got past noon and you knew you’d catch fish if you went fishing. We used to have fires at night. We’d go through town and find someone who was throwing something out or tearing something down and use that for wood,” Mike said. “When the moon was full the river water was like a giant mirror. It was dead quiet. The serenity was unreal.” When the kids weren’t fishing or hanging out at the river they were at Mon View, swimming, roller skating and playing baseball. There were enough boys for four Little League teams back then, Mike said. There were still enough for four feeder ones for the program. Mike loved baseball and roller skating, excelling in both. He held several titles for skating and to this day helps out at the roller rink, owned by Greene County since 2005. Prior to that the park was a product of the employees of Duquesne Light contributing money to its upkeep. Mike said, like many towns, a loss of jobs changed things. “I will say, I tell everybody this was an awesome place to grow up back then (the 60s and 70s). We’d go to the park and stay all day. There was a ‘real’ concession stand,” he said. “I’d go home and my mom would say, ‘You probably ate junk all day.’ I’d tell her I had tomato and cucumber sandwiches, peanut butter crackers, and coke and she’d tell me I ate better there.” He was delighted in telling how the ladies running the stand brought bread and

GREENSBORO, PA

by Tara Kinsell

Darlene’s Hill Road now and then.

fresh vegetables from their gardens to feed the kids. He fantasizes of living along the river banks again one day. Talking to Mike, you sort of felt like you were there in those days, even if you never were, as he shared names of people who owned businesses and where everyone lived. It gave me still another perspective of Greensboro. Although the town is pretty quiet these days, it has a vitality and magnetic charm still. It has become a mecca of sorts for artists and even us regular folks with an artistic nudge, especially during the popular Art Blast on the Mon Festival held every Labor Day weekend. There are civic-minded folks and community groups working to bring improve-

ment and attention to the town, and activities like a weekly farmers market every Saturday morning in season keep spirits alive. Greensboro remains a place of beauty and appeal for those seeking inspiration from the river, like the potters and a young boy who once saw the river as one big mirror. Who wouldn’t love this place?

Front Street circa 1920’s.

FRONT

BACK

Circa 1875 It was auctioned by crockerfarm in 2013 for $34,500. It goes to show how important this pottery is considered even with multiple cracks and a chip on the handle. It is unknown who James McClure was that received this crock.

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DOWN BY THE RIVERSIDE The Greensboro Baptist Church isn’t visible from the main streets of Greensboro Borough. Although I have been to the town on many occasions, I wasn’t prepared for what I was about to see when I went there to meet with Charles Mallory, a member of its board. Charles happily agreed to open the church for me and share some of its history for Shining the Light. I was already in town and he was still a few minutes away so I beat him there. What I saw was castle-like, as you can see in the photograph accompanying this story. The view from the front of the church is the Monongahela River. A street and the church parking lot are all that separate it from the Mon. If it were closer to it, a moat would fit well with its look, church or not. The gothic styling of the arched entry suits it perfectly. As Charles let me into the sanctuary I was once again awed by the architecture of this hidden gem. The domed ceiling with backlit stained glass panels in the top of the dome was stunning. “The stained glass windows were brought here from Italy,” Charles said. A very large, boldly colored and exquisitely detailed one is dedicated to Mary Ann Hartley Mestrezat, who lived from 18151891. It is the only one with a clear indication of the family responsible for supporting its purchase. Obviously, I quickly fell in love with the work of the architect, who I learned was a local man, James Parreco. James was also responsible, I would find, for multiple other buildings within Greensboro Borough, including the Greensboro Schoolhouse (aka the Monon Center), and the James Parreco House, listed on the National Register. “The Parreco family doesn’t live around here anymore but a group of them still come back here every Labor Day and come to church,” Charles said. Today, the church, dedicated in 1905, draws a crowd of 30-40 plus parishioners on any given Sunday. It is noteworthy to state that the original church started in 1845. James Parreco was commissioned to build the current one after church elders saw his work on the schoolhouse. Pastor Timothy Tanner said he will celebrate

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two years at the church in a few months. In his time as pastor, Tanner has seen the congregation grow from 12 to 15 on a Sunday to where it is now. “The Lord’s been giving me little by little. I’m not really full-time. The church couldn’t afford to hire someone full-time. I am a painter and a pastor,” he said of his other profession. “I love the people in Greensboro. It is amazing how everybody works together there.” Pastor Tanner said he knows he has more work to get done and it will take a lot of hard work to achieve the goals he has set for Greensboro Baptist but he has faith. “I want to see it be standing room only. We went from having no kids attend to now having nine and some teens and young couples,” he added. “We are probably going to start a Bible study group on Wednesday nights. We just put in air conditioning for the first time in 150 years, a new church sign is going up this week, and we fixed the front steps.” Little-by-little things are taking off and he couldn’t be more thrilled, he said. Future plans also include doing more outreach in the community with clothing and food for those in need. “I tell people, ‘It’s a quiet little town. We’re down by the river; just drop in. We can baptize down by the river. We are Baptists. That’s what we do, we baptize,” he said, quite happily, followed by an invitation. “Come on up and see us some Sunday. We are there at 10 am.”

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G ree n e Sce n e of the Past A House of Many Stories While spending the day in Greensboro gathering information for this month’s I Love This Place I had an opportunity to visit with Brenda Martin. Brenda was kind enough to share the story of her home and even allow me to see some of its special features. Although, there is one that not even she has dared to investigate. Brenda’s home does not give away its historical significance from the outside. It is a simple, vinyl-sided house with what one notes is a small addition. If you look closely at the home’s foundation one can tell it is quite old. However, you’d never guess it was once a log cabin believed to have been part of the Underground Railroad. “It was built with those square nails. Sometimes one of them will work loose and you can see them,” Brenda said. Brenda’s house was built in 1859 by Robert Peters. A former slave himself, Robert was said to have been released by a doctor from Virginia. She shares an old article given to her by a previous owner who was a descendent of Robert. It traces the home to tax records that indicate it was assessed to Hamilton and Jones, the most well-known of the pottery companies in Greensboro. Robert’s profession, according to census records of the time, was one who labors at pottery. With Greensboro’s proximity to the Warrior Trail, Dunkard Creek, and the Monongahela River, it was in the vicinity of these pathways known to be used by slaves escaping captivity. Therefore, it isn’t a stretch to believe the stories of the house being part of the Underground Railroad, although there appears to be no specific supporting documentation. It is stories handed down and the components of the house serving to support them that leads one to believe it was indeed part of the railroad. She directs me to a location inside the main living space of her

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residence. “See that paneled area up there? I was told they would hide them in there,” Brenda said, motioning to a long section of paneling above the stairwell leading to the basement. “It is hollow. It looks like it is the right size for a couple of (skinny) people to fit.” The paneling is obviously a later addition to the home’s decor. And, the space is indeed the right size for someone to be able to lie down and hide inside it. Brenda has some remodeling going on and is therefore able to show me The house today. the framework of the original cabin, located inside the walls. She mentions some cupboards that were removed by the previous owners and shows me the original fireplace. It gets most interesting when she tells me about that ‘special feature’ left unchecked. “There is a door in the basement that leads to a room that goes out under the road. I have never been in it. There is an old dresser and

by Tara Kinsell Original Cabin

other stuff blocking it that were there when I moved in,” Brenda said. She has been told by local African American historian and author, William Davison that this room was a place where escaping slaves hid. Although she doesn’t necessarily believe in ghosts and such, she said, she isn’t willing to open the door to find out if they do. The house was listed in the National Register of Historic Places on March 9, 1995 as the Peters-Grahams House. Graham’s for its then owner, Georgia Graham, widow of a descendant of Eliza Graham. Eliza was Robert’s daughter, born in the house in 1860.

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Waynesburg Chamber Scholarship

Students Raise Big Bucks for Cancer Society

(L-R) Steve Gillis, Nicole Zimmel and Kelley Hardie

Waynesburg University’s Colleges Against Cancer Chapter presented the American Cancer Society with a check for nearly $25,000 on May 31.

The funds were raised through the Chapter’s annual Mini Relay for Life held in April, and throughout the 2015-2016 academic year. These monies will help cover the costs of lodging at the American Cancer Society Hope Lodge, connect cancer patients with trained patient navigators, assist with one-on-one peer support and help provide patients with transportation to and from treatments. The funds will also support cancer research.  Kelley Hardie, assistant dean of Student Services, and senior Nicole Zimmel, vice president and former president of the Colleges Against Cancer Chapter, presented the check to American Cancer Society Representative Steve Gillis. Gillis, a 2008 Waynesburg alumnus, was instrumental in the first Mini Relay for Life 10 years ago.   “Monies raised at the Waynesburg University Mini Relay for Life benefit Greene County and American Cancer Society programs,” Kelley said.

The Educational Scholarship Fund Committee of the Waynesburg Area Chamber of Commerce recently presented their 26th annual scholarship in the amount of $1,500 to Lindsey Gilbert of Waynesburg Central High School. In addition to the scholarship, Lindsey was presented a laptop, compliments of PCsquared, and a custom backpack, courtesy of the Greene County United Way. Seventeen year old Lindsey plans to attend California University of Pennsylvania to pursue a degree in Sociology of Deviance this fall. She will enter Cal U as an incoming junior as a result of courses completed on-line and on-campus during her last two years of high school. She is the daughter of Richard and Heather Gilbert of Waynesburg and a 2016 graduate of Waynesburg Central High School where she maintained a 3.44 grade point average. Lindsey and her family were special guests of the Chamber at the May General Membership Meeting of Chamber members where she read her winning essay. This year, thirty-three applications

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for the scholarship were received. The committee had a difficult task of selecting one winner from the qualified field. The Chamber of Commerce thanks all who participated in the process.

Support For Autism Foundation

Carmichaels Scores Third in State Envirothon Envirothon competition. The team had the highest score in the Current Issue station with a 94, second highest Forestry Station score of 91, an Oral Component score of 94.7, and a total score of 522.7 points for the competition, only 25.6 points away from first place. Each team member received a $500 scholarship from the PA Envirothon. For third place, the team was awarded a wooden plaque made from Pennsylvania hardwoods. For the high station score, the team received the Donna Hays Memorial Award plaque along with preserved invasive species specimens and field guides. This year marks the seventh year in a row and the eighth time overall that the team has placed in the top 5 and the eleventh year in a row that the team has placed in the top 10 at the State Envirothon. At the Envirothon, five-member teams participate in a series of field staFrom left, Brady Watters, Blake Conard, Emma Lowry, Kaleb Wilson, tion tests that focus on five topic areas Kevin Willis, team coach, and Ryan Swartz. – soils and land use, aquatic ecology, forestry, wildlife, and environmental ishe 33rd Pennsylvania Envirothon state sues. The 2016 current environmental issue focused competition was held at Susquehanna on Invasive Species. The teams also prepare and University and Camp Mount Luther in deliver oral presentations to panels of judges who May with high school students from 65 evaluate each team on its problem-solving capabilities, oral presentation skills and recommendations Pennsylvania counties participating. The Carmichaels Area High School Envi- to help solve the specific environmental challenge, rothon Team placed third overall at the 2016 State which relates to the current environmental issue.

From left, Jeff McCracken, Chamber President, Lindsey Gilbert, Scholarship Winner

Pictured is Damon Casseday (left), chairman of the Dustin Damon Casseday Autism Foundation, accepting the check from Chuck Trump, Vice President of First Federal of Greene County.

First Federal Savings and Loan Association of Greene County presented the Dustin Damon Casseday Autism Foundation with $125 raised through the sale of chocolates. To mark Autism Awareness Month in April, the Association sold chocolate-covered Oreos featuring puzzle pieces and chocolate lollipops in the shape of puzzle pieces. A puzzle piece is the symbol of autism awareness. The Dustin Damon Casseday Autism Foundation, created by Damon Casseday in honor of his son, will continue to hold fundraisers this year, including a golf outing in August. The foundation provides support and other resources for parents and family members affected by autism.

Waynesburg Graduate Selected for Fellowship Program Bradley Renner, 2001 graduate of Waynesburg Central High School, has been selected for DeVos Institute of Arts Management Fellowship Program. As general manager of the Atlanta Ballet, Bradley will take part in the DeVos Institute’s competitive arts management intensive. The intensive, held in Washington, D.C., is four weeks long each summer for three consecutive years. Bradley and the new class of fellows, led by DeVos Institute executives, consultants and experts from the field, will receive practical and specialized training in arts administration. Bradley is one of 13 arts managers from six countries selected from a field of more than 450 applicants world-wide. Today, graduates of the fellowship program operate and oversee some of the world’s most prestigious arts organizations. “This year’s Fellows were selected in keeping with our mission: to train, support and empower game changers in our field,” said DeVos Institute President Brett Egan in a press release from the organization. “In our opinion, these individuals are amongst the most talented arts managers working

today. We will stand shoulder to shoulder with them in their pursuit to strengthen their organizations and communities.” “I am honored to have been selected as a Fellow for the DeVos Institute of Arts Management,” Bradley said. “I am excited to learn from innovative arts leaders and share this knowledge with my colleagues at Atlanta Ballet to further strengthen the organization.” Bradley is the son of Dewey Renner of Spraggs and the grandson of Laura “Jerry” Renner, also of Spraggs. GreeneScene Magazine •

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IT’S BEEN A YEAR

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t suddenly dawned on me as the fair issue approached that this was the issue I started with last year. So, this being my anniversary with the publication, I decided to share some thoughts. The weather as I write this is beautiful, not so much the last couple of days. I understand many of our neighbors are currently without power. Ours has gone on and off quite a bit and at the moment there is no internet service. So, thank you so much Flenniken Library for having a quiet place with WiFi for me to work from. Thank you too to Bowlby Library that was also quite accommodating when I worked from there one evening recently. If you have not been to the library in some time or, egads, ever, you are missing so much. There is a vast amount of services being offered online and at our libraries. You may be surprised and I highly recommend checking them out. There have been some changes with the GreeneSaver in this year that has gone by. Not the least of which is that we are no longer the GreeneSaver. For those who did not notice on our previous issue, the name of our publication is now, GreeneScene Community Magazine. As co-owner of the GreeneScene’s parent company, Direct Results, Shelly Brown told me, the original intent when she and late business partner, B.J. Quallich, started the GreeneSaver in 2002 was for it to be primarily an advertising piece. However, it quickly began to evolve into much more as local stories and photos began to fill up space. GreeneSaver has become a misnomer, so at long last the name GreeneScene Community Magazine was selected as our new title. That is what we bring to our readers each month, the Greene scene. Drawing on my years as a sports writer, I believed that scene should include sports and introduced the Sports Shorts column.

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By Tara Kinsell

What a year to do it! As our center spread shows, the 2015-16 school year was an exciting time to be a sports fan in Greene County. Pam Blaker, co-owner of Direct Results, and I had the opportunity to attend Class A Softball PIAA Championship Game to watch our own West Greene Pioneers. Although the final outcome wasn’t in our girls’ favor, it was still an accomplishment to be proud of and we congratulate them. In other features, the I Love This Place drove the history buff in me to want to expand it into other columns. I soon realized the GreeneScene of the Past and Shining the Light could also reflect the community chosen for I Love This Place. As often as is possible, that has, and will continue, to be the case. This has afforded me, and in the instance of our Brave story, my daughter, an opportunity to meet some really nice people. I’ve learned a lot about our history; and even wrote about a place on the cusp of no longer existing - the Village of Time. Much thanks to Cornerstone Genealogical Society, the Greene County Historical Society, Brice and Linda Rush, Mary Shine, and everyone who has shared documents and photographs to help me. I can’t forget the late Dr. G. Wayne Smith who indirectly helped me to create a list of places we love that will last for years with his book on the post offices of Greene County. You’d be amazed at how many there were! From that knowledge came a thirst to know more about where they were located and what it was once like there. We have heard many compliments on these glimpses into the past as well as our series on interesting or unique things our neighbors around Greene Collect. This is your magazine. Keep us informed of the good news about your towns and the people who are from them.

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Mountain Craft Days Trip Nathanael Greene CDC is sponsoring a day trip to Mountain Craft Days at Somerset Historic Center on Sat., Sep. 10. Starting at 9 am, the bus will pick up in Waynesburg, then Carmichaels and Uniontown. Cost for the bus is $25 plus $9 festival admission. More than 125 craft booths and a dozen

GreeneScene Community Magazine

outdoor performance sites, all within walking distance of each other, offer visitors a medley of You may have noticed with last month’s demonstrations, music and food. The bus will issue, that your favorite local publication has also make a stop at the 911 Memorial site. FMI: email  shine201027@yahoo.com  or call  724-943- a new name. The GreeneSaver (established in 2002 and locally owned and published by Di4462. rect Results BSP, Inc. in Waynesburg), is now GreeneScene Community Magazine. “The name change is really long overdue,” said editor and co-owner Shelly Brown. “GreeneScene Community Magazine is much more descriptive of the content and purpose of this publication, which spotlights the good news, human interests, community activities, history, charm and beauty of Greene County and surrounding communities,” she said. Don’t worry, only the name has changed - you can still look forward to all your favorite features, pictures, info and fun each month when your GreeneScene Community Magazine is delivered directly to every household and most businesses in and around

Blueberry Workshop Presented

Kay Collins presented the program, “Growing and Taking Care of Blueberries” at the May meeting of the Town and Country Garden Club. Collins explained in detail the focus in planting and growing blueberries from soil prep, planting and care to harvest. Blueberries trouble-shooting

included: bacterial canter, iron chlorosis, and twig blight. Collins and husband are owners of Collins Farm and Butcher Shop in Graysville, farming beef cattle, chickens, and growing vegetables, peaches and blueberries for over 46 years. Members also received blueberry recipes.

Greene County - a circulation of nearly 20,000 with readership over 58,000.

What is it? An ancient, fossilized sea creature? An Aboriginal peace pipe? An alien life form?

Oxford House Scholarship There is a scholarship for eligible applicants to pay the first month’s rent at the Oxford House for men or the Oxford Bird House for women in recovery. Both houses are located in Waynesburg. Additionally, there is now a Friends of Oxford Houses group to help residents of these Oxford houses with jobs, transportation and other issues. Monthly rents at the houses are $400 per single room and $300 per double room. Rent includes

utilities, laundry and commonly used household products. Applications are available online at: http://www.oxfordhouse.org/userfiles/file/doc/ app_mem.pdf. FMI: contact the Bird House for women at 724-802-7186 (currently five vacancies – two single & three double rooms). Contact the Oxford House for men at 724-833-9650 (currently one single room vacancy).

Summer Construction on County Bridge Reconstruction of Greene County Bridge #36 located on Forney Hollow Road in Wayne Township has begun, with a target completion date of Sep. 30, 2016. Replacement of the bridge will cause a traffic detour of 6.7 miles (Forney Hollow Road to Drift Ridge to Strawn Hill Road back to School Road to

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State Route 218. Greene County Bridge #36 was built in 1926 is 40 feet long and currently has a 25-ton weight limit; it spans Roberts Run. The construction contract for the new bridge was awarded to Clearwater Construction from Mercer, PA, for an amount of $955,000 funded by PennDOT. FMI: Greene County Department of Bridges and Grounds at 724-852-5216.

Actually it’s a yam. Yes, a yam; brought to us by Wanda Snyder of Waynesburg, who found it among the goods while working as a volunteer for Produce to People distribution at the Greene County Fairgrounds. Because of its abnormalities, the tumorous looking tuber was culled from the food distribution and Wanda thought it would be fun to share it with our readers. We agree. It also gives us a great opening to remind all you gardeners out there that we love to hear you brag!

Anything you grow - flowers, fruits or veggies – whether it’s big, bold or particularly beautiful, we want to see it! And, obviously, the strange and unusual are welcome too. Send us your pictures, or bring it on in! Thanks to Wanda for sharing, and thank you also for your service, along with your mom, Lena King, who even at the age of 90, also volunteers for Produce to People, a worthy cause in our community.

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Carmichaels Celebrating 250 Years

Historic view of Carmichaels town square, looking down South Market Street.

A planning committee has been formed in preparation of the 250th birthday of the founding of Carmichaels, 1767 – 2017. A group has been meeting every month since February 2015 to plan for a town-wide community celebration to be held from June 29 – July 2, 2017. Officers include Bill Groves; chair, Marianne Gideon, co-chair; Joyce Fortney, secretary; and Lena Davis, treasurer. While still in the planning stages, the 250th birthday will be a four-day long showcase of events and venues encompassing the town and celebrating the town’s history and roots. Highlights being planned include a kick-off dinner, living history reenactors and speakers, historical demonstrations, community food and craft vendors, flower show, live bands playing various styles of music, historical memorabilia collection and exhibits, and early American-themed baseball games featuring his-

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2016 • GreeneScene Magazine

torical matchups of town teams from the turn of the 20th century. In order to offset the costs of the event, the committee is selling shares of stock that can be framed as keepsakes or passed on as a gift for $5 each, along with tee shirts and hats commemorating the event. Contact any of the committee members for information on how and where to purchase shares and apparel. The committee is also seeking photographs of families, property, documents, and memorabilia from ANY TIME PERIOD from residents of the region to be scanned and collected as part of the Carmichaels Area Historical Society historical documentation initiative. Please contact member Shelley Anderson at shelleya29@yahoo.com or 724-319-2060. The committee is also looking for local busi-

nesses, crafters, vendors, and food vendors from Carmichaels and surrounding towns to participate with a booth at the event. Booths can be secured for $25 for one day, $40 for both Saturday and Sunday. Electricity will be available at some venues. People or businesses interested in participating or purchasing fundraising shares or apparel should contact one of the following: Bill Groves at 724-998-5555; Marianne Gideon at 724-998-6178; Joyce Fortney at 724-366-9411; or Lena Davis at 724-998-8381. A Facebook page has been set up to provide the community with ongoing information at facebook.com/Carmichaels250thBirthdayCelebration. The committee meets on the second Monday of each month at the Greene Academy at 6:00 PM.

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From Farm to School and Back

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tudents in the third grade classroom of Shannon Adamson have an opportunity each year to see how various species of birds are hatched, including quails, pheasants, ducks, chickens and geese. “We got to spray mist them,” said Ainslinn Linderman. “It takes 28 days to hatch them,” said Ariana Cropper. “You have to get the temperature right,” said Dillan Fisher. As Adamson encouraged her students to share what they learned they enthusiastically share such ranClockwise from front left, Tyler Mikalik, Ariana Cropper, Ainslinn dom facts. Linderman, Corey Trainor, Daicydawn Horner, Shawn Ingram, They say the humidity and venAndrew Swestyn, Dillan Fisher, Ainsley Popson, Olivia Glendentilation in the incubator has to be ning, Josh Ochkie, Aydan Bale, and Harlie Whipkey. correct. After they have hatched the students tend to feeding and ensuring there is enough water for them to drink. Although the students would move up to “We’ve done it in my classroom for about 9 the fourth grade in the fall, a few of them exor 10 years now. The first year we had quail and pressed an interest in returning when they heard pheasants,” Adamson said. “Next year we are go- about the peacocks. Adamson promised nothing ing to have peacocks.” but said they might be able to stop by and see Student Ainsely Popson’s family raises them them sometime. As for the already hatched birds and volunteered to share some eggs with Adam- in the classroom, they were shipped off to a local son’s next class. Ainsely offers a brief lesson on farm at the end of the school year. the difference between the male and female peacocks. The males have the vibrant blue coloring one thinks of when peacocks are mentioned.

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Spo rt Sh or t s

by Tara Kinsell

Kristin Polosky-Puskas

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apletown graduate, Kristin PoloskyPuskas was inducted into the Washington-Greene County Chapter of the Pennsylvania Sports Hall of Fame on

June 10 at the Doubletree in the Meadowlands for her high school basketball career. Kristin holds the school’s all-time record for points with 1,570, scoring 16.5 points per game, and blocks 364. Kristin brought down 1,020 rebounds, had 235 assists and 387 steals. She set single-season records for blocks with 122, steals with 175, and points at 614. She graduated from Mapletown with a full basketball scholarship to play at Northern Kentucky University. There she continued to make a mark on the basketball court, leading her team to win the 2000 NCAA Division II National Championship with a 32-2 record. In 2002 the Northern Kentucky Norse were in the Elite Eight and ended up as national runner-up in 2003. Kristin played in 129 games for the Norse, scoring 948 points with 501 rebounds and 307 assists. She is fifth in Northern Kentucky history with 105 blocks. Accolades include: Associated Press All-State, Pittsburgh Post Gazette Fab Five, honorable mention All-Great Lakes Valley Conference, four-time academic All Great Lakes Valley Conference, the Margaret Rouse Athlete of Distinction and a player on the Dapper Dan Roundball Classic. Kristin finished her college athletic career as a starter for the Northern Kentucky soccer team.

New 5K Run/Walk Being Held

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here is a new 5K run/walk coming to Greene County on August 13. The Victory 5K will support the Corner Cupboard Food Bank and the Alexa Grace Pester Memorial Scholarship. Race day registration will take place at 7 am for the run/walk and a children’s challenge one-mile run. The event starts from the Waynesburg First Church of the Nazarene, 115 Deerfield Lane, Waynesburg. Alexa is the infant daughter of Debbie and Alex Pester of Sycamore who passed away on the day of her birth, February 10, 2015. The scholarship fund was started by the Pester family to honor the memory of their precious baby girl and to provide opportunities for others that they had hoped for her. The scholarship is an endowed Christian scholarship for higher education. The Corner Cupboard Food Bank was selected as the dual recipient of race proceeds after it was announced at the 2015 Dock to Lock Race that it was facing funding challenges. “We decided to create an event that would benefit both of these causes and help our hurting community,” said race co-directors Debbie Pester and Larry Calvert. Although Debbie and Larry are from different churches, they wanted to offer what they call an “interchurch community effort”. Debbie attends Waynesburg First Church of the Nazarene and Larry attends Bethlehem Baptist Church of Ruff Creek. “Essentially, Debbie and I are acting as liaisons between our two churches. This is two churches, working together to bring Christ to the community through fun, fitness, and fellowship,” Larry said. “We encourage the public to join us. Be a spectator if you’re not participating in the race. Enjoy the music. Let your kids play. While our community faces many challenges, we pray this event provides

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refuge from the pain.” A silent auction, food drive, children’s activities and chicken roast will also be a part of the race day activities. Whole chickens will be available around 11 am for $10 each. The name Victory 5K was chosen for the song, “The Victory,” by Christian rock band, Third Day. Larry said the mission of what he and Debbie are working toward is clear, “to achieve victory in Jesus Christ, our Lord and Savior, victory over the pain of hunger, victory over financial struggles, and victory over hardships.” The plan is for the race to become an annual event with the Alexa Grace Pester Memorial Scholarship always benefitting as one of two charity organizations it will support. As the Corner Cupboard Food Bank hosts its own race, the Race to End Hunger 5K, Larry said they will try to help promote that race during the Victory 5K. It is yet to be determined if the food bank will remain the second organization to benefit, after this year’s race. If its own race takes off and does well then other needs in the community may be addressed by the Victory 5K instead, along with the memorial scholarship. Right now, Larry and Debbie will be happy if their race makes enough in this first outing to cover race expenses and have enough money left over to give to these worthy causes. “This first year is more driven by exposure and introducing the event to the community,” Larry said. “We hesitate to give an exact amount but are hopeful that at least $1,000 can be provided to each of the two causes. While our community faces many challenges, we pray this event provides a refuge from the pain. Together we can achieve victory.” For more information about the Victory 5K contact 724-627-5471 or email thevictory5K@yahoo.com.

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2016

June July GreeneScene 2016  

In this issue we celebrate the Awesome West Greene Girls Softball Team. Check out the support for our local teams! This is also the Fair Gui...

June July GreeneScene 2016  

In this issue we celebrate the Awesome West Greene Girls Softball Team. Check out the support for our local teams! This is also the Fair Gui...

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